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Full text of "The New York Clipper (September 1917)"

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PRICE TEN CENTS 



2 . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5, 1917 



LOU REED 



AND THE 



WRIGHT GIRLS 



-'S» 



Desire to sincerely thank 
members of the United 
Booking Offices for the 
many kindnesses and 
courtesies received dur- 
ing the past season; and 
last, but not least, our 
manager, Jack Curtis, 
of Rose and Curtis. 



I 



BOOKED SOLID FOR THE SEASON 1917-1918 



! 



Copyright, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1SS3. 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 5, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No, Jl 
Price, Ten Cent* 



LOEW, FOX, MOSS HOUSES 
RAISE ADMISS ION PRICES 

Riviera and Audubon Boxes Go to Seventy-Five Cents with 

Corresponding Increases Throughout Rest of 

Theatres and Circuits 



Giving aa their . reason that the cost of 
everything from acts and films to ushers 
and scrub women, has advanced during the 
past year, the management of the Loew, 
Fox A Moss combination theatres and 
many motion picture houses throughout 
the city, last Monday put into effect an 
admission scale of prices which is from 
Are to twenty-fire cents in advance of the 
prices heretofore charged. The advanced 
rates were put into effect without notice. 

The greatest increase was of box seats 
at Fox's Audubon and Riviera theatres, 
where, on Saturdays, Sundays and holi- 
days, the admission will be seventy-five 
cents instead of fifty, aa is the past. 

With the exception of the Bedford and 
Bay Ridge theatres, in Brooklyn, and a 
few of the straight picture houses, all of 
the Fox theatres made a alight increase in 
their admission prices. 

At the Audubon the orchestra seats in 
the evening are now thirty-five cents, in- 
stead of twenty -five, with the same price 
prevailing in the front balcony. Seats 
in the rear of the balcony are now twenty- 
five cents, instead of fifteen. On all other 
days than Saturdays, Sundays and holi- 
days, the price of boxes will be fifty cents. 

The matinees on Saturdays, Sundays and 
holidays will call for the evening scale of 
prices. For the week day matinees the 
first fifteen rows in the orchestra will be 
reserved at twenty cents, instead of fif- 
teen, and the balance of the orchestra will 
be fifteen cents instead of ten. The front 
of the balcony will also be fifteen cents, 
while the rear will be sold at ten. The 
price of boxes at this performance will 
be thirty-five cents instead of twenty-five 
cents. 

At the Riviera, the front of the orches- 
tra will be reserved at fifty cents instead 
of twenty-five, with the rear selling at 
thirty-five instead of twenty-five. The 
front of the balcony will be fifty cents 
also. The rest of the house, which for- 
merly sold at fifteen cents, now brings 
twenty-five cents, with boxes selling at 
seventy-five cents. At the week day 
matinees the orchestra will be twenty-five 
instead of fifteen cents, and the balcony 
is fifteen instead of ten cents, with boxes 
selling at thirty-five instead of twenty- 
five cents. 

At the City Theatre, another Fox house,. 
on Sunday and holidays the orchestra and 
balcony are thirty-five instead of twenty- 
five cents, and the second balcony twenty 
instead of fifteen cents, with boxes selling 
at fifty cents. For the balance of the 
week, the entire orchestra and balcony 
will bring twenty-five cents, the orchestra 
price remaining the same, but the balcony 
being increased ten cents. The second bal- 
cony will be fifteen instead of ten cents, 
and prices for. boxes in the afternoon will 
bring thirty-five cents and in the evening 
fifty cents. 

The Academy of Music, which has a 
straight picture policy on Sunday and holi- 



days, now charges thirty-five instead of 
twenty-five cents for the orchestra and 
balcony, with the two upper balconies sell- 
ing at twenty-five instead of twenty cents. 

On the other nights of the week the 
orchestra is selling for twenty-five cents, 
aa heretofore, with the price of the upper 
part of the house being increased from fif- 
teen to twenty cents. At the matinee, the 
orchestra is advanced from fifteen to 
twenty cents and the upper part of the 
house is fifteen instead of ten cents. 

The New Star Theatre, which plays 
vaudeville and pictures, and is located in 
the east part of Harlem, has also made a 
small increase in its admission prices. On 
Sundays and holidays the entire orchestra 
brings twenty-five cents instead of fifteen 
and twenty-five cents, as in the past, and 
the balcony calls for an increase of five 
cents, changing from fifteen to twenty 
cents. The gallery will remain at ten 
cents. The price of boxes will remain at 
thirty-five cents. 

On week day evenings, the entire or- 
chestra bringB an admission of twenty, 
cents. In the past, the first twelve rows 
sold at twenty-five cents, with the other 
seventeen going at fifteen cents. The en- 
tire balcony is fifteen now instead of ten 
cents and the gallery ten instead of five 
eurtsj. The price of box-seats is advanced 
from twenty-five to thirty cents. 

In the afternoon, the entire orchestra 
brings twenty instead of fifteen cents lor 
the first twelve rows and ten cents for 
the balance. The balcony remains at ten 
cents and the gallery at five cents with 
boxes still selling at twenty-five cents. 

The Crotona Theatre, in the Bronx, 
will get thirty-five cents for the orchestra 
in the evening instead of twenty-five cents 
and thirty cents for the front of the bal- 
cony instead of twenty cents. The bal- 
ance of the balcony is twenty-five instead 
of fifteen cents. The boxes are fifty cents. 
In the afternoon, the orchestra brings 
twenty i nstead of fifteen cents, and the 
first balcony fifteen instead of ten cents. 
The second balcony is ten cents, with 
boxes selling for twenty-five cents. 

The Fox vaudeville houses in Brooklyn 
are charging the same scale of prices. At 
the Nemo Theatre, a picture house located 
• at One Hundred and Tenth Street and 
Broadway, the entire house, in the eve- 
ning, is twenty-five cents now instead of 
fifteen cents and, in the afternoon, fifteen 
instead of ten cents. 

The Loew Circuit have only advanced 
the scale of prices in four of their houses 
up: to date. They are the De Kalb, War- 
wick and Palace in Brooklyn and the Ave- 
nue B Theatre on- the lower East Side. It 
is expected, howevri. that an. increase will 
be made in the balance of the theatres on 
this Circuit Oct. 1.. At these houses, the 
price of boxes is thirty -five instead of 
twenty-five cents, -. the orchestra twenty 
instead of fifteen cents and the balcony 
(Continued on page 5.) 



TEXAS GUINAN IS "BROKE" 
Los Angeles, Cal., Aug. 30. — Texas 
Guinan was summoned before Judge Mon- 
roe in supplementary proceedings here this 
week, to give an account of her assets in 
the matter of satisfying a judgment ob- 
tained against her by the National Adver- 
tising Co. on a stockholders liability. She 
has been here on a motion picture venture 
for the last few weeks and claims she is 
"broke," bnt says she is negotiating with 
a film company here for a contract. The 
Court continued the case until Sept. 21 for 
the evidence- of her mother and the repre- 
sentatives of the film company. 



FRANCIS FAY MUST PAY WIFE 

Francis Fay, having failed to file an 
answer to his wife's complaint in ber 
action to recover $2,500 which she claims 
to have lent him, will now have to pay 
$2,556.31 according to a judgment awarded 
Miss White in the Supreme Court last 
week. House, Grossman and Vorhaus, who 
represent Miss White, after taking an in- 
quest for judgment, immediately filed their 
claim in the office of the County Clerk and 
turned it over to Sheriff Al. Smith for 
execution. 



TAILOR SUES SOCIETY AUTHOR 

. F. L. Dunne and Co., Fifth Avenue 
tailors, obtained a judgment in the Muni- 
cipal Court against Preston Gibson, the 
playwright and society man for $636.29 
last week. They claim that Gibson last 
May obtained clothes from them for this 
amount and failed to pay for them. ' The 
judgment was filed in the County Clerk's 
office last week by A. W. Gray, attorney 
for the plaintiff. 



ALBANY LIKES "BRANDED" 
Albany, N. T., Sept. 3.— "Branded," 
Oliver D. Bailey's new melodrama, de- 
scribed as a drama in heredity, opened to- 
night at Harmanus Bleecker Hall, before 
a large audience. The company included 
Christine Norman, A. H. Van Buren, 
Geoffrey Stein. Blanche Moultcn and Guy 
Hitner. The play was well received. 



SCHWARTZ OPENS NEW HOUSE 

Sol. Schwartz, who is managing the 
Dyckman Street Theatre under its new 
policy, on Monday opened a new house in 
Mt. Vernon. He has taken possession of 
the New Playhouse there which seats 800 
persons and is presenting a feature picture 
program. 



DeCOURVILLE'S RETURN DELAYED 

Albert DeConrville, who left New York 
several weeks ago on the Baltic to return 
to London, has not yet reached home. 
After leaving port, it is reported that the 
boat turned back to Halifax to avoid an 
enemy ship and did not start on her way 
again nntil Tuesday last. 



CONWAY TEARLE IS SUED 

Asserting that Conway Tearle, an actor, 
failed to pay them commissions for en- 
gagements they procured for him, the 
American Play Company obtained a judg- 
ment of $65424 against him in the 
Municipal Court last week. 



INDIANAPOLIS H'G'R. PROMOTED 
IKDIANAPOUB, Aug. 29. — William Show- 
maker, known professionally, as Sydney 
Jerome, is now manager of the Lyric The- 
atre, succeeding Henry K. . Burtss, irho 
has been promoted to the post of general 
representative of the theatrical firm of 
Barton and Olson. 



LOEW LOSES 

LINCOLN SQ. 

THEATRE 

COMPETITOR GRABS LEASE 



Marcus Loew will have to give up the op- 
eration of the Lincoln Square theatre, Oct. 
1, unless he can make arrangements with 
the Cinema Amusements, Inc., for further 
occupancy of the theatre, aa the latter, with- 
out Loew's knowledge, has obtained a lease 
on the theatre for a period of five years 
from that time at an annual rental of $45,- 
000. This lease was made July 11 
last, with Chas. E. Miller, of the Empire 
Square Realty Co., who owns the property, 
and was recorded in the Register's office 
on July 12 last. 

About seven years ago, Loew obtained 
the house from Chas. E. Blaney, who, at 
that time, was operating a stock company 
there. The rent at the time was said to be 
in the neighborhood of $45,000 a year. Af- 
ter running the bouse for a little mora than 
a year Loew is said to have obtained a re- 
duction of $18,000 a year in the rent and 
made a lease for the premises of five yean 
which expires October 1 next. At that time, 
Loew was granted an option for a renewal 
of the lease, providing he exercised it In 
the early part of July. However, it is said 
that be did not take advantage of the option 
at the time it was due and Louis B. 
Schindler and Henna \ Schoenbach, who 
conducts the Grand Opera House, New 
York, the Strand theatre, Hoboken, and are 
ibterested in the Olympic theatre, Brook- 
lyn, got into touch with Miller and had him 
execute a lease for the Lincoln Square to 
him. 

It is ssid that a few days after the date 
when Loew was to exercise his ' option, 
he communicated with Miller and asked him* 
him that they could not do this as the 
premises had already been leased to Schind- 
ler and Schoenbach. Loew was then in a 
quandary and is said to have consulted 
to -prepare a new lease. They informed 
counsel, who informed him that the new 
lease was legal and that the holder of it 
would be entitled to the premises at the 
expiration of the Loew lease. 

It is said that overtures were then made 
to Schindler and Schoenbach from various 
sources for the purchase of the lease. Ac- 
cording to Schoenbach, a certain real estate 
man offered them $50,000 on behalf of an 
unknown client for the lease. But they in- 
formed the agent that they were not de- 
sirous of disposing: of it as they intended 
operating the house in conjunction with the 
Grand Opera House, which is now present- 
ing split-week vaudeville and feature pic- 
tures. 

It is claimed that only recently Loew ex- 
pended more than $5,000 in overhauling and 
redecorating the house, one of the improve- 
ments being the erection of a marquise on 
the Broadway entrance of the house. 

Schoenbach and Schindler are not mem- 
bers of the V. M. P. A., as far as the Grand 
Opera House is concerned and it la said 
that it Is hardly likely that they would be 
accepted with the Lincoln Square- if they 
were to operate it, aa that organisation 
would uphold the cause of Loew, one of its. 
members. It Is likely, however, that the 
case will get into the courts. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5, 1917 



TRUCE IN CINCINNATI STRIKE 

■ Cincinnati, O., Sept 2. — At the open- 
ing of the Grand Opera House tonight, 
with "Dew Drop Inn," it became apparent 
that the musicians have weakened in their 
demands and threats of a strike. Instead 
of being a performance, of an "orchestra- 
less" musical comedy, the orchestra pit was 
just as full and just as noisy as ever. 
Chairman Joseph Sibcy of the committee 
named by the musicians to meet the the- 
atre managers said that the union men bad 
decided upon a week's truce and would 
play pending an agreement. 

The theatre managers, it is said, are 
standing by their refusal to grant a thirty- 
week clause in the new contracts. Com- 
promises on the wage demands have been 
made and it is expected that the musicians 
soon will reduce their demands for the long- 
season contract. 



MORE TROUBLE FOR FAY 

After getting into *beaps of trouble 
through being made a defendant in two 
actions and a plaintiff in another, all of 
which were brought in the Supreme Court, 
Francis A. Fay, the actor, finds that he 
will have to reimburse Sam Golding, who 
was his legal representative in these actions, 
to the extent of $776.41. 

This decision was reached in the Mnni- 
ipal Court last week, when Fay failed 
to defend the suit brought against him by 
Golding to collect money for legal services 
and advice. Horace London, attorney for 
Golding, filed judgment for the above 
amount in the office of the County Clerk 
last week, and bad an execution issued and 
given to Sheriff Al. Smith for service. 

A. E. A. EXTENDS SUIT 
Justice Guy, in the Supreme Court last 
Friday, signed an order allowing the 
Actors' ' Fund to include Jane and .A. T. 
Hoge as defendants in the suit it has 
brought against the Hoge Estate Trustees. 
The' suit is to' restrain them from taking 
possession of:; the. property willed to the 
Actors' Fund by John Hoge located at 
Fifth avenue and Forty-third- Street and 
valued at $500,000. 

After these defendants are served with 
the papers in the cose Ditenhoefer, Fishel 
and Knox,- attorneys for the Fund, will ask 
the Court to appoint a receiver to collect 
the rents of the property until litigation 
institned in Zanesville, Ohio, is settled. 



HARTFORD FAIR OPENS 

Habtfobd, Conn., Sept. 3. — Charter Oak 
Park opened its gates today for the big 
Connecticut Fair, which was largely at- 
tended. The list of free acts presented was 
conceded to be the best ever and included : 
The Flying Moores. the Montrose Troupe 
of acrobats. The Hawaiian Band, Stewart 
and Mercer, Miss Harper, Harry Henry 
and Rube Haskell. The music is furnished 
by two bands. Colt's Armory Band, con- 
ducted by Theodore P. Ford, and the 
Vassar Ladies Band, conducted by Mme. 
Dial. 



BERNHARDT PROGRAM CHANGED 

Mme. Bernhardt has changed her pro- 
gram for the matinees of Thursday, Fri- 
day and Saturday. She : will on those oc- 
casions appear as the wounded soldier in 
"Du Theatre au Champ d'Honneur," in 
response to an insistant demand. Last sea- 
son her patriotic portrayal of the soldier 
thrilled her audiences. 

At the evening performances she will act 
in "Hecube" and "L'Aiglon." 



QUITS ACTING TO SELL AUTOS 

S. Greenblatt has quit the show business 
for the commercial and has associated him- 
self with the Pathfinder Automobile Co. 
For the past five years he has been ap- 
pearing nnder the name of Harry Tick 
Green and, in order to take up his new 
line, had to cancel several engagements for 
this season. 



TRAINER HAS ANIMAL STORE 

Harry Hoile. the old wild animal trainer, 
is still alive. He is running an animal and. 
bird store at 19 New York Avenue, Union 
HID, N. J. 



NEWARK PARK CLOSES 

New ask, N.* J., Sept 3.— Hillside Park 
dosed today a most successful season.. 



RAILROADS ARE 
REFUSING TO 
CARRYSHpWS 

GOVERNMENT USING EQUIPMENT 

Theatrical producers have come face to 
face with a railroad problem regarding the 
hauling of their shows during the past 
week, which is likely, to cost them many 
thousands of dollars. The condition has 
arisen through the Federal government 
commandeering railroads for the next three 
weeks for the transportation of troops to 
the mobilization and cantonment points. 

A number of the roads west of Chicago 
have even refused to accept any contracts 
to haul theatrical companies during that 
period while the Eastern roads have issued 
an ultimatum stating that they will haul 
shows, but that the owners must be willing 
to make sacrifices to the extent of carrying 
a minimum of equipment and utilizing day 
coaches and Pullman cars to their capacity. 
The Federal government has mapped out a 
routine of transportation for all of the 
roads in the country whereby more than a 
million men will be moved to mobilization 
and cantonment points throughout the 
country. 

The situation in the West particularly 
around Chicago, is very serious especially 
with, respect to the giving of baggage cars 
to theatrical troupes. Many of the roads 
are willing to carry the shows in coaches 
and Pullman cars during that period, but 
absolutely refuse to make any promises to 
furnish baggage cars for the transportation 
of scenery and other equipment. The Chi- 
cago, Rock Island and Pacific and the 
Chicago, Milwaukee and St Paul roads, 
have absolutely refused to handle any the- 
atrical business during this period, claim- 
ing that they .have orders to handle about 
80,000 soldiers during that time. . 

Several other Western roads, such as the 
Chicago and Northwestern, Chicago, Bur- 
lington and Quincy and the Santa Fe, are 

taking business contingent upon, govern- 
ment orders. 

The Eastern roads, even though they will 
be heavily taxed, have not refused to issue 
contracts for transportation in this local- 
ity. But all of them have agreed that they 
will not release any of their equipment, 
such as day coaches and baggage cars, for 
any jumps beyond Chicago and St Louis. 

W. B. Lindsay, who handles the the- 
atrical business for the Lehigh Valley Rail- 
road, carrying more than one half the 
theatrical business going out of New York, 
says that his road is making a survey of 
the equipment carried by all shows before 
contracts are issued for transportation. 
The reason for this is so that they can 
figure the minimum number of baggage cars 
necessary to carry a show as. in the past 
some shows have been using four and five 
cars to carry equipment which could be 
easily placed in two or three cars. Linday 
says: 

"We are advising producers to send out 
their shows as light as possible during this 
period, with regard to equipment We also 
tell them that tbey will have to stand a bit 
of discomfort with respect to day coaches, 
for we must insist now that two persons 
occupy each seat in these coaches. There- 
fore, shows which have been accustomed to 
have two cars in the past will have to use 
one now. This condition will prevail, we 
hope, for only a short time, and we crave 
the indulgence and forethought of the the- 
atrical people during that period." 

One of the first producing concerns to 
encounter the Western difficulty was Sel- 
wyn and Company, which tried to obtain 
transportation for "Fair and Warmer" in 
the West. They applied to the Chicago, 
Rock Island and Pacific and the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul for transportation 1 
during the present month. Both of these 
roads flatly refused to make the haul. They 
then approached the Chicago & North- 
western, over whose lines they would be 
compelled to make a detour to reach the 
points of engagement and this road said 
it would accept the contract for the haul 
providing the government, in the meantime, 
did not commandeer their equipment 



INA CLAIRE 

Miss Ina Claire, whose portrait is pub^* 
lisbed on the front cover of this issue of - 
the Clipper, will make her initial appear- 
ance on the dramatic stage under the direc- 
tion of David Belasco this week. 

Miss Claire will be seen in the lead- 
ing part in a new comedy, "Polly with a 
Past," by George Middleton and Guy Bol- 
ton, with which Mr. Belasco will open the 
Belasco Theatre on Thursday night of this 
week. 

Miss Claire's appearance in this play is 
to be looked forward to with unusual inter- 
est she having been identified heretofore 
as a musical comedy star and one of the 
cleverest mimics of the stage. 



ACTRESS EXONERATES HUSBAND 

Los Angeles, . Col., Aug. 30. — Mabel 
Baker, musical comedy actress, has made 
a statement exonerating her husband, 
Claude G. Lewis, of having any part in the 
attack made upon her yesterday morning 
in her room at the New Broadway Hotel. 
After she was attacked she was in a 
delirious state, and said she may have 
mentioned her husband's name, . but had 
not accused him of beating her. Following 
her statement the police arrested Benja- 
min F. Herring, former night clerk at .the 
New Broadway, and he was held pending a 
further investigation of the case. Mrs. 
Lewis is improving and will recover. 



PERFORMERS AID SMOKE FUND 

During the past week, the following per- 
formers appeared at Loew's American 
Theatre and auctioned off gifts for the 
benefit of the Sun's Tobacco Fund : 

Monday, The Dolly Sisters; Tuesday, 
Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle; Wednesday, 
Raymond Hitchcock ; Thursday, Norworth 
and Loraine ; Friday, Will Rogers appeared 
with a bevy of "Follies" beauties to help 
him out. Among the gifts was an em- 
broidered handkerchief from Mrs. Wood- 
row Wilson, which brought $500. 



OPERA HOUSE WANTS SHOWS 

Hutckins, Kan., Aug. 27. — The Opera 
House at Junction City, this State, wants 
musical comedy attractions. Chandler Lee 
and his Ginger Girls played there last 
week to packed houses. Nine-tenths of the 
audiences were soldiers, who were en- 
camped at Fort Riley. The Chandler Lee 
company has been giving special matinee 
performances in all towns where BOldiers 
are encamped for the benefit of the soldiers' 
mess funds. 



MANAGER MARRIES ACTRESS 

Oklahoma Citt, Okla. — Tex Valentine, 
manager of the Quality Maids company, 
and Vida Van Allen, a member of the 
company, were married in this city last 
week. After the ceremony a dinner was 
served at the Lee Huckins Hotel, in which 
members of the company and personal 
friends in the city participated. 



AMERICAN ACT DOING WELL 

London, Eng., Aug. 24. — Pierce and 
Roslyn are playing the London Syndicate 
Tour and will continue with it till Novem- 
ber. They play the Palladium two weeks 
beginning October 1. They expect to spend 
Christmas with their folks in the United 
States, but must return to fill tbeir book- 
ings which run into 1920. 

ACTOR MAKES SPEECH 

Boston, Mass.. Sept. 2. — Donald Mac- 
Donald addressed a meeting held by the 
local anti-saloon league here tonight and 
said he was in favor of temperance to the 
point of prohibition. MacDonald is ap- 
pearing here with the "Have a Heart" Co. 

QUITS ACT OWING TO BREAKDOWN 

Kansas City, Aug. 29. — Mrs. Harlan 
E. Knight, a member of the "Chalk Line" 
act which played Pantages Theatre here 
last week, suffered a nervous breakdown 
and was compelled to return to her home 
in the East 



MARC KLAW RETURNS HOME 

Marc Klaw baa returned tp New -York 
from the far West where he helped organ- 
ize the 'Klaw and Erlanger 'stock, company 

now playing on the Coast. 



INTERNATIONAL 

OPENS ITS 

SEASON 

EIGHTEEN HOUSES NOW RUNNING 



The International Circuit officially in- 
augurated its season last Monday, when 
sixteen houses throughout the country 
opened their doors with its attractions. 

Several of the houses on the circuit this 
year are new and judging by the business 
done at the opening performance have a 
prosperous season ahead of them. Al- 
together there are eighteen houses open on 
the circuit at present the Shubert Theatre, 
Milwaukee, and the Southern Theatre in 
Columbus, having opened last week. 

The attractions and theatres which 
opened Monday were "After Office Hours," 
Lexington, N. Y. ; "Come Back to Erin," 
Emery, Providence; "A Daughter of the 
Sun," National, Chicago ; "Going Straight" 
Imperial, Chicago; "Girl Without a 
Chance" (A), Gayety, Louisville; "Girl 
Without a Chance" (B), Southern, Colum- 
bus; "Katzenjammer Kids," Park, Indian- 
apolis; "Leave It To Me," Strand, 
Hoboken; "A Little Girl in a Big City," 
Majestic. Buffalo; "The Little Girl God 
Forgot," Garden, Kansas City; "The Mil- 
lionaires Son and the Shop Girl," Boyd's, 
Omaha ; "Peg o' My Heart," Poli's, Wash- 
ington ; "Safety First," American, St. 
Louis ; "Step Lively," Majestic Peoria ; 
"The White Slave," Lyceum, Pittsburgh; 
"The Unborn Child" (A), Lyceum, De- 
troit; "Unborn Child" (B), Shubert, Mil- 
waukee, and "Which One Shall I Marry," 
Prospect, Cleveland. 

Tomorrow the Lyceum, Paterson, will 
open with "The Heart of Wetona," and 
the "Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl" 
will move from Omaha to St Joe, Mo., 
for the remainder of the week. 

Next Monday the following houses will 
open : Walnut Philadelphia ; Auditorium, 
Baltimore ; Lumbers, Uticn : Baatable, 
Syracuse, and the Avon, Rochester. 



"RIVIERA GIRL" CO. LEAVES 

The cast of "The Riviera Girl" when it 
opens for a two weeks' engagement in 
Philadelphia, prior to its opening here, left 
today for the Quaker City. The Klaw and 
Erlanger production will have its premiere 
on Sept. 10. Among those who have left 
for Philadelphia to attend the final re- 
hearsals are Wilda Bennett Sam B. 
Hardy, Juliette Day, Carl Gantvoort, J. 
Clarence Harvey, Louis Cassavant, Viola 
Cain, Frank Farrington, and Eugene 
Lockhart 



TERESA SHERIDAN IS MARRIED 

Teresa Cecilia Sheridan, for five years 
secretary to Charles E. Ford, of Ford's 
Opera House, Baltimore, has been married 
to Sergeant Linton Beckley Arnold, of 
Co. I., Fifth Maryland Regiment. Miss 
Sheridan was well known to the theatrical 
men visiting Ford's. 

MAY EXTEND RUN 

Boston, Mass., Sept 3. — "Turn to the 
Right" which opened here last night at 
the Tremont Theatre for a limited engage- 
ment, will probably stay here indefinitely 
because of the exceptional success that at- 
tended its first performance here and the 
flattering press comments. 



COREY OFFERS PRIZE FOR POSTER 

Madison Corey announces that he will 
give a prize of $100 for the best poster 
design submitted to him for use in con- 
nection with his new musical, comedy, "The 
Grass Widow." 



LOUISE DREW IN REVIVAL 
Louise Drew will appear with her father 
this season in the John Drew-Margaret II- 
lington revival of "The Gay Lord Qnex." 



MOTHER OF ACTRESS DIES 

Belfast, Me., Aug. 81. — The mother of 
Goldie Cleveland died suddenly at her home 
here last week. .... 



September 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



OFFER COURSE IN BUSINESS 
A course in business training to fit its 
members for places in the commercial 
world, both in the theatre and outside, has 
been announced by the Stage Women's 
VCnr Relief. This course ^will start early 
this month, under the direction of Mrs. 
Edwin Arden. Enrollments are now being 
made at 366 Fifth$,venue. 

HOUSES RAISE PRICES 

(Continued from page 3.) 

fifteen instead of" ten cents. The prices 
in the afternoon are ten and fifteen cents 
instead of ten cents, as heretofore. 

In the B. S. Moss Circuit of theatres in- 
creases were made in all of the houses but 
the Regent. It is expected that an in- 
crease will go into effect at this house 
Sept. 15. 

The Hamilton Theatre,- which is the 
Moss house on Washington Heights, 
charges thirty-five cents for the orchestra, 
instead of twenty-five cents, with the same 
scale applying to the smoking balcony and 
twenty-five cents for the rear .of the bal- 
cony instead of fifteen cents, for the eve- 
ning performances. 

At the afternoon performance the first 
fifteen rows, which are reserved, bring 
twenty cents instead of fifteen, with the 
remainder of the lower floor and the front 
of the balcony charging fifteen cents in- 
stead of ten. The rear of the balcony will 
be ten cents. The boxes at these perform- 
ances are thirty-five instead of twenty-live 
cents. 

Moss's Jefferson, which is considered op- 
position to the City, has at present only 
raised its prices on Sundays and holidays, 
getting thirty-five cents for the orchestra 
and smoking balcony instead of twenty- 
five as in the past, and twenty-five cents 
for the rear of the balcony, instead of fif- 
teen cents. The price of boxes remains at 
fifty cents. . ■ 

The Prospect, which is the Moss house 
in the Bronx, has made a slight increase 
in prices, but the distribution of rebate 
tickets, which was made last season, has 
been entirely eliminated. In the evening 
tbe orchestra brings thirty-five instead of 
twenty -five cents; the balcony twenty-five 
instead of fifteen cents, and the gallery 
remains at ten cents. The matinee prices 
bring ten and fifteen cents instead of ten 
for the entire house. 

The Flatbush, which is the Moss house 
in Brooklyn, has increased for the evening 
performances the front rows of the or- 
chestra from thirty-five to fifty cents and 
the balance of tbe orchestra brings thirty- 
fire instead of twenty-five cents, with the 
front balcony seats bringing thirty-five in- 
stead of twenty-five cents and the balance 
of the seats selling for twenty-five instead 
of fifteen cents. The price of smoking 
loges remains at fifty cents, but boxes are 
increased from fifty to seventy-five cents. 

The' prices for Saturday matinee are 
thirty-five and fifty cents for the orches- 
tra, instead of twenty-five and thirty-five 
cents, and the front of the balcony brings 
thirty-five instead of twenty-five cents, 
with the rear of the balcony selling at 
twenty-five instead of fifteen cents. The 
daily matinee scale is ten, fifteen and 
twenty-five cents, as heretofore. 

A number of motion picture houses in 
upper Harlem and the Washington Heights 
district have also made a slight increase 
in price. This was decided upon at a 
meeting of the exhibitors in that district, 
held last week. It was agreed to charge 
twenty cents admission for the evening 
performance instead of fifteen cents in the 
better class houses and fifteen cents for 
the matinee instead of ten cents. ' The 
houses which charged ten cents in the past 
are now charging fifteen cents for tbe 
evening performance, and ten cents at the 
afternoon performances instead of five and 
ten cents. - ■ 

It is quite likely, from the high price 
asked for feature films of the better qual- 
ity, that the exhibitors throughout the 
city will be compelled to make an. in- 
crease in their scale of prices. A meeting 
of Bronx, Harlem and. Yorkville exhibitors 
is scheduled for next week to take up the 
proposition 'and agree' on the new scale to 
fee charged' and put into - effect about 
Sept. 15. . . ' i 



V.M.P.A.TOTAKE 

IN BARRED 

HOUSES 

FIVE THEATRES WANT TO JOIN 



At a meeting of the Vaudeville Man- 
agers' Protective Association, scheduled to 
take place this week, the application for 
membership in the organization, of five 
theatres, will be taken up. These houses 
are among those which were considered 
as opposition during the White Rats' 
trouble. 

The houses which have put in their ap- 
plication, with the fee necessary for ad- 
mission, are Fay's Theatre, Providence, 
R. L; Alhambra Theatre, Torrington, 
Conn.; Strand Theatre, Halifax, Nova 
Scotia; Opera House, St. Johns, Nova 
Scotia and Mountain Lake Park Casino, 
Holyoke. It is said that the applications 
of these houses will be acted upon favor- 
ably at the meeting. 

The Providence and the two Nova 
Scotia houses are booked through the M. 
R. Sheedy Vaudeville Agency and the 
other two houses through the Eastern 
Vaudeville Managers Booking Officers. If 
the first three houses are accepted, all of 
the theatres booked through the Sheedy 
office will then be considered acceptable to 
the V. M. P. A., and agents booking in 
the circuits affiliated with the V. M. P. A, 
will again be able to book acts through 
the Sheedy offices for their entire circuit 
of , houses. 



DISSENSION AMONG LIGHTS 
Reports reached' : Broadway during the 
last week that there has been considerable 
dissension in the ranks of the Lights since 
the recent cruise of the organization. It 
is said that a faction of the club was 
very much dissatisfied with the net returns 
from the cruise, claiming that those who 
had it in charge had shown very poor busi>- 
ness judgment in the management of the 
show. 

This faction contended that there was 
a big waBte of money in preparing for the 
cruise. They claim that a number of per- 
sons who rendered their services during 
the cruise lived at the club house for three 
weeks prior to it and there obtained every 
necessity they desired at the expense of 
the organization, as well as being carried 
about during the cruise at the expense of 
the club. 

These so-called agitators, claim that, 
had one performance been given instead 
of the week of shows, the club would have 
fared much better in a financial way, es- 
pecially as far as the net proceeds were 
concerned. About $8,000 was taken in on 
the cruise, but no statement of the net re- 
ceipts has yet been made to the members. 
It is said that, as a result of this feeling, 
one of the men most prominent in the 
preparation of the cruise, as well as its 
presentation, has been promiscuous by his 
absence from the club house for some time, 
time. 

LAFAYETTE TO HAVE NEW HOUSE 

Lafayette, Ind., Aug. 29. — A company 
has been formed to erect a theatre here at 
a cost of $150,000, to be named the Bauer, 
after the Mayor of the city. The eompany 
'is composed of ten of the leading business 
men of the city, each of whom has con- 
tributed $10,000. The theatre will be 
erected at Seventh and Main Streets. It 
will have a seating capacity of 1,400 and 
will bouse dramatic attractions. 



HARRIS SHELVES VEILLER PLAY 

On the advice of Collector of the Port 
Malone, William Harris, Jr., has aban- 
doned the production of "Danger," a melo- 
drama by Bayard Veiller, which depicts a 
Japanese- minister at the head of a band 
of spies who ferret out government secrets 
and' plot with Germans against this 
country. The scenery bad been built and 
the cast' engaged Before Japan became one 
of our allies. -"itO-". . 



SAN CARLO OPERA OPENS 

The San Carlo Opera Co. opened a two 
weeks' engagement at tbe Forty-fourth 
Street Theatre last Monday night, "Aida" 
being tbe bill. Tuesday "Cavalleria Rus- 
ticana" and "I PagliaccL" 

The bills for tbe remainder of the week 
are: "Martha" this afternoon; "Carmen" 
tonight; "Rigoletto" tomorrow night; "La 
Gioconda" Friday; "La Traviata" Satur- 
day matinee and "II Trovatore" Saturday 
night. 

LADY AGNESE TO BRANCH OUT 

Lady Agnese, who presented the Irish 
Colleens in vaudeville last season, intends 
to present a series of Irish playlets this 
season, taking the works of W. B. Yates, 
Lady Gregory and J. I. Walsh as her lead- 
ers. She will present them under the gen- 
eral title of "Tears and Smiles of Ire- 
land." The playlets will each run twelve 
minutes. 



HERMAN SUES PULLMAN CO. 

Because the Pullman Company failed 
to give him the possession of a drawing 
room on a New York Central train for 
which, he alleges, he held a ticket, Martin 
Herman has instituted an action against 
it for $10,000 damages. In place of a 
drawing. room, Herman was offered a berth, 
which he declined. 



SKINNER STARTS REHEARSALS 

Otis Skinner returned last Thursday 
from Colorado, where be has been spend- 
ing his Summer vacation, and immediately 
began rehearsals of his company in 
"Mister Antonio," in which Charles Froh- 
man. Inc., has a long tour booked for him. 
His company will be the same as it was 
last season. 



WIZARDS OF WISELAND OPEN 

Sooth Haven, Mich., Aug. 30. — Wam- 
sher's Wizards of Wiseland Co.. opened 
the season here last Saturday to $700. Tbe 
company numbers thirty-five people, the 
scenery is new and the costumes elaborate. 
Gilbert Fossick is manager and Daurine 
Dodd, secretary. 

DOOLEYS TO SPLIT IS RUMOR 

It is rumored that Ray and Gordon 
Dooley are going to desert vaudeville for. 
pictures after this week's showing at the 
Riverside, and that tbe third member of 
the act, William Dooley, is going to sign 
with the Fred Stone show now in rehearsal 



REN WOLF SKETCH PRODUCED 

"A Lock of Hair," a vaudeville playlet 
by Rennold Wolf, will have its initial pre- 
sentation this week out of town and in a 
week or two will be brought to New York. 
Ann MacDonald and William O'Neill will 
play leading roles. 



CENTURY REVUE CHRISTENED 

This season's Century revue will be 
known as "Dillingham and Ziegfeld's Miss 
1917." Rehearsals have begun and tbe 
premiere has been scheduled for early 
October. 



TO REHEARSE IN BUFFALO 

Alice Nielson and other members of tbe 
"Kitty Darlin" company leave to-morrow 
for Buffalo, N. Y., where final rehearsals 
of the show will be held. 



SHERI HAS NEW REVUE 

Andre Sheri has in rehearsal a girl revue 
of twenty-four people, which will begin an 
engagement at Rockwell Terrace on Sept. 
19. 



"JOHNNY" BEGINS REHEARSALS 

John Cort began rehearsals of "Johnny 
Get Your Gun" last Thursday. Louis 
Bennison is retained for the leading role. 



VAUDE. AGENT IN- AUTO BUSINESS 

Francis M. Smith, formerly a vaudeville 
agent, is now the managing director of the 
Tropical Tires Company, Inc. 



BOOKERS HAVE 

TROUBLE TO 

GET ACTS 



SHORTAGE FELT EVERYWHERE 



BECK ATTENDS ORPHEUM OPENING 
St. Louis, Sept. 3. — Martin Beck came 
here for the opening, of the ne w Orpbeum 
Theatre to-day. 



Unusual difficulty was encountered by 
the Loew, Moss, Sheedy and other vaude- 
ville agencies in obtaining acts for their 
theatres the first half of this week. The 
bookers worked like Trojans all day Sat- 
urday in an effort to line up their bills 
but, late in the evening, were shy several 
acts. Saturday afternoon, the Loew 
bookers needed nineteen acts, while the 
Sheedy office needed seven. The Loew 
bookers managed to get their acta that 
evening, but tbe Sheedy bookers did not 
have their shows lined up until Sunday 
evening. 

The greatest scarcity was among open- 
ing and closing acts. The cause for this 
is that many of this type of act are 
booked for fairs this week and, conse- 
quently, could not be got in touch with. 
Of the neighborhood theatre bills, in the 
environs of Greater New York, iTardly two 
of them bad closing acts on Saturday 
morning. The bookers in all of the offices 
in the city were compelled to get in touch 
with Philadelphia and Boston agencies to 
see if they could not furnish suitable 
turns for closing positions. One of these 
agents, from Philadelphia, managed to 
help out with two, but the rest of the 
acts procured were obtained through the 
efforts of local agents. 

Even acts which had been called "un- 
suitable" by bookers for V. M. P. A. 
houses during the White Rats trouble 
were sought, but most of them had al- 
ready obtained engagements for this week. 

One of the bookers stated on Monday 
that another reason for n general shortage 
of acts was the taking by the army draft 
of a great many actors. He stated that, 
to his knowledge, more Hum fifty acts hnd 
been broken up during the last few weeks 
in this manner. An act which had been 
considered one of tbe stnunchest White 
Rat members was given an offer to play 
an engagement in Cleveland at a salary 
of $100 in excess of their regular price, but 
refused to accept the engagement unless 
a further route were provided. 

Scouts are being dispatched by tbe 
various circuits in the city to all parts 
of the country, in search of new material 
this week. They were instructed that 
any act which apeared in tbe least way 
appealing should be immediately sent to 
New York, and that work would be fur- 
nished. 

On Monday mornings, as a rule, the 
booking offices are infested by acts which 
are eager to fill disappointments. How- 
ever, last Monday but very few acts could 
be seen around the various offices. These 
were mostly acts which had not been 
playing engagements in the past six 
months or more. 

An agent who handles about 100 acts 
on the neighborhood circuits claims that 
a lot of acts are still away in the country, 
and that these people will not work at 
this time of the year unless a route is 
furnished to them at the salary they de- 
mand. These acts have been holding out 
for tV past few months in hopes that 
the li -nkers will be compelled to pay them 
tbr : - price. 

It is expected that the situation will 
be somewhat alleviated, however, with 
the removal of 162 acts from the "unde- 
sirable" list by the V. M. P. A. hist week. 
These acts were considered unsuitable on 
account of their alleged membership or 
activities in the White Rats Actors' 
Union during the recent trouble or 
"strike" of that organization. Pat Casey 
had this matter in charge, and is expected 
to furnish the list of these acts to the 
bookers during tbe present week. 

There are still several acts left on the 
unsuitable list, however, they being what 
are known as the "anarchistic" type dur- 
ing the recent strike. Those whose names 
were taken off the list were persons who 
took no part in the strike agitation. 



SHE NEW YORK jCLJPPJER 



SfptembyL^lgX? 




KEITH TO HAVE 
NEW BRONX 
VAUDEJIOUSE 

TO SUPPLEMENT THE ROYAL 



B. F. Keith interests are to add one mote 
vaudeville bouse to their chain of variety 
theatres in Greater New York. The Bronx 
Theatre, situated at Melrose Avenue and 
One Hundred and Fiftieth Street, will 
inaugurate a vaudeville and picture policy 
under the Keith management, opening on 
the 17th of this month. 

For the past few seasons, the Bronx 
Theatre has been running stock produc- 
tions, bnt the owners figure that vaude- 
ville presents a more lucrative field in the 
Bronx region, and that there is room for 
another vaudeville house there. It is a 
well known fact that Keith's Royal The- 
atre, a block away from the Bronx The- 
atre, was filled to capacity practically 
every night of the winter season, and it 
was necessary, many times, to turn away 
an overflow crowd. Capacity winter 
audiences are also the usual order of 
things at Loew's National Theatre, also 
in this immediate neighborhood. It is, 
therefore, figured that the Bronx Theatre 
can cater to the overflow of the other two 
houses as well as build up a patronage of 
its own. 

Although the opening bill has not been 
announced, it is admitted that the boose 
will play split-week vaudeville, consisting 
of acts of the same quality as those play- 
ing the Greenpoint and Prospect theatres 
in Brooklyn. A feature picture will be 
shown in conjunction with the vaudeville. 

Although the manager of the house has 
not been definitely decided upon, it is in- 
timated that Edward Renten, of the 
United Booking Offices, will assume con- 
trol 

Carpenters and painters are now busy 
remodeling the house, so that when it 
opens all necessary alterations will have 
been made. 



MAKE BOOKING AGREEMENT 

Acta playing the Eighty-first Street The- 
atre under its new policy will not be booked 
at the Colonial or Riverside for six or 
seven months thereafter, according to Ed- 
die Darling, of the United Booking Offices 
This does not mean that the Eighty-first 
Street Theatre is considered as an oppo- 
sition house, but simply that it would be 
bad business policy to book an act at either 
of the Keith houes named soon after it had 
played at Manager Shackman's theatre. 
Darling admits that there is an amicable 
booking understanding between the houses. 



KEITH SECURES WAR FILMS 

Messrs. Keith and Albee announce that 
they have paid $200,000 for exclusive re- 
leases in the houses booked by Che United 
Booking Offices of the film "The Retreat 
of the Germans at the Battle of Arras." 
The contract calls for an aggregate show- 
ing of 5.000 days at the houses controlled 
by the Keith interests and until the con- 
tract is fulfilled the pictures will not be ex- 
hibited in any other theatre in the country. 
The film will be shown complete In three 
episodes. 



SAILORS SEE ALL-STAR BILL . 

An all-star vaudeville bill was presented 
last Friday night on board the U.S.S. Re- 
cruit for the entertainment of members of 
the Navy, officers and men. The bill in- 
cluded: Lew Dockstader, John Cutty. 
Strength Brothers, Lewis and White. 
Frank J. Holland. Bissett and Bestry, 
Thorndike and Barnes, William Sisto, Will- 
iam J. Kelly, Bert Fitegibbon. Sergeant 
Garrison, Barns and Jose, the Musical 
Gormans, and Ryan and Joyce. Bert Levy 
was announcer and Frank Evans acted as 
stage manager. 

SAVOY AND BRENNAN SIGNED 

Although it was reported that Savoy and 
Brennan were to sail, this week, for Lon- 
don and had cancelled their engagement at 
the Fifth Avenue Theatre the first half of 
the week on that account, the fact- remains 
that they have signed a contract with the 
new Dillingham Ziegfeld show at the Cen- 
tury and will appear there when "Miss 
1917" opens. Their place at the Fifth Ave- 
nue was taken by Jack Marley. 

VAUDE MAY GET COMEDY STARS 

Reports are current that two musical 
comedy favorites are about to invade vaude- 
ville. It is said that Clifton Crawford con- 
templates doing a single in the two-a-day 
houses. Cecil Lean and his wife, Cleo 
Mayfield, are the subjects of the other 
minor. 



MOTHER OF CLARA MORRIS DIES 

Titckahoe. N. Y„ Aug. 30. — Mrs. Sarah 
Proctor Morris, mother of Clara Morris, 
died here to-day, at the home of her 
daughter, from paralysis. Mrs. Morris was 
ninety-five years old. 



FIFTH AVE. TO HAVE CARNIVAL 

Proctor's Fifth Avenue will hold its 
"Fall Carnival" next week and will pre- 
sent an augmented bill for the occasion. 



STAGING 20 PEOPLE REVUE 

Julian Alfred is staging a revue en- 
titled, "The Omar Khayyam Revne," with 
twenty people, which will begin an en- 
gagement at the Martinique Hotel on 
Sept. 15. The costumes are being designed 
and made by Andre Sher. 

DANCING DAVEY GETS DIVORCE 
DetbOIT, Aug. 31. — Dancing Davey, 
formerly of the dancing team of Pony 
Moore and Dancing Davey, was granted a 
declare of divorce from his stage partner, 
who in private life was bis wife, in the 
Superior Court here last week. 

STOKER TRANSFERRED TO NAVY 

Floyd W. Stoker, of Stoker and Bier- 
bauer, vaudeville agents, is now an active 
ensign of the United States Navy, to which 
he was recently transferred from the Naval 
Reserves. He is on duty somewhere .across 
the Atlantic Ocean. 



WELLS' THEATRE NEAR READY 

Atlanta, Ga., Sept 3. — Jake Wells's 
new theatre here is rapidly nearing com- 
pletion and will open early in October. Un- 
til the new bouse is ready, Keith vaude- 
ville will be presented at the Grand in ad- 
dition to the regular road attractions. 



AMY SHERWOOD HAS NEW ACT 

Amy Sherwood & Co., are appearing in 
a new musical farce entitled, "Juggling the 
Truth," on the Poli Circuit Supporting 
Miss Sherwood are Pat Rafferty, Fred 
Bnelah, Elsa Lorraine and Norman Lane. 



LOEWS NEWARK HOUSE OPENS 

Loew's Newark Theatre opened for the 
season on Monday with a program of six 
vaudeville acts and feature pictures. The 
house was overhauled and redecorated dur- 
ing the Summer season. 



HELEN LACKAYE HAS NEW ACT 

Helen Lackaye, wife of Manager Harry 
Ridings, of Cohan's Grand Opera House, 
Chicago, has returned to New York to 
begin rehearsals of her new vaudeville 
sketch. 



TOYLAND CIRCUS TRIED OUT 

Racine, Wis., Aug. 28. — Belmont's Toy- 
land Circus, a new act, was tried oat last 
week at the Strand Theatro here. 



B.S. MOSS AFTER 

THE DYCKMAN 

THEATRE 



IS NEGOTIATING FOR HOUSE 



Having decided that he would not build 
a new theatre at Broadway and One 
Hundred and Eighty-first street at the 
present time, B. S. Moss is conducting 
negotiations to obtain an interest in a 
theatre on the upper end of Washington 
Heights. 

For the past week, John J. Keit, a busi- 
ness partner of Mobs in his various the- 
atrical enterprises, has been negotiating 
with John J. Jermon to obtain an interest 
in the Dyckman theatre at Broadway and 
Two Hundred and Seventh street. This 
house was opened last Monday by Jer- 
mon's firm with a vaudeville and motion 
picture policy. 

Moss has been eager to have a theatre 
on the upper end of Manhattan, and had 
plans drawn for a house at One Hundred 
and Eighty-first street, which was to 
have seated 3,000 persons . However, with 
the advance in price of building material 
and the increased cost of labor, he de- 
cided that he would suspend building op- 
erations until prices are normal again. 

Keit has had several meetings with 
Jermon, and it is said that he offered $25,- 
000 on behalf of Mosa for a half-interest 
in the lease of the theatre. A meeting of 
the two men is to take place today, and it 
is expected that negotiations will be 
closed before the end of this week. 

The house at present is being supplied 
with vaudeville by Sam Bernstein, but, 
in the event that Moss becomes interested, 
his booking offices will supply the talent. 
The house plays six acts, with a change of 
bill on Monday and Thursday. 



WARD DANCES BUT DOESNT TALK 

Hugh J. Ward, the Australian showman, 
did not speak at the elubrooms of the Na- 
tional Vaudeville Artists, Inc., last Thurs- 
day night, as scheduled. There was a large 
dance crowd on hand, and Ward states 
that he didn't have the heart to stop the 
dancing, so merely looked over the club 
and contented himself with a few steps. 



U. B. O. SUSPENDS MAX HART 

Max Hart, the well-known vaudeville 
agent, has been suspended from the floor 
of the United Booking Offices for three 
months, owing to a row he had with a per- 
former last Wednesday. Harf s suspension 
followed a complaint registered by the per- 
former through the National Vaudeville 
Artists' Association. 



BREAKING IN NEW ACT 

Elizabeth Mayne has been quietly break- 
ing in an act of song stories out of town. 
Miss Mayne is using exclusive material 
from the pen of Jean Havez, and it is re- 
ported that she may present the songs now 
being used by Cecile Cunningham. 



' U. B. O. SETS MORE OPENINGS 

The United Booking Offices' theatres at 
Cincinnati, Indianapolis and Dayton have 
been scheduled to open on September 16. 
The Louisville house will open one week 
later. 



START TOUR TO COAST 

Racine, Wis., Aug. 29. — 'The Fountain 
of Love," a musical tabloid, began a tour 
to the coast here tinder the management 
of Ackleman and Harris. 



PERFORMING BEARS ARE SOLD 

H. C. Waiteman, through Billy Atwell. 
has sold "Whiteman's Five Performing 
Polar Bears," to Spissel Bros, and Mack, 
who are offering the act this week at the 
Provincial Fair, in Sherbrooke,. Can. 



NEW PRODUCERS INCORPORATE 

Harry Fitzgerald and Solly. Ginsberg 
(Violinsky) incorporated last Friday for 
$5,000 as a vaudeville agency of which they 
are to be the chief directors. They are to 
produce sketches and girl acta. Fitzgerald 
and Ginsberg is the firm name. 



POLl'S, HARTFORD, OPENS 

Habtfobd, Conn., Sept. 3. — Poll's The- 
atre here, opened the season to-day with 
four shows, the first being given at 1.40 
p. m. "The Naughty Princess," a tab mu- 
sical comedy and motion pictures were the 
offerings. 



TURN VAUDE SKETCH INTO PLAY 

The vaudeville musical comedy, "The 
Bride Shop," is being made into a three- 
act musical comedy and will be produced 
by John Cort. Silvio Hein has been en- 
gaged to write the music for the produc- 
tion. 



HOUSE TO OPEN LATE 

Oakland, Cat, Sept L — The Orpheum 
is now in the hands of decorators, and 
will not reopen till about the first week in 
October with its usual high class vaude- 
ville shows. 



"TRY-OUTS" OPEN OCT 3 

Vaudeville "try-outs" at the National 
Theatre, in The Bronx, will be resumed 
Wednesday, October 3. Ten acts are to 
be presented at each of these performances, 
in addition to the regular bill. 



OSBORN STAGING ACT 

Nat Osborn is staging a big act of ten 
people, headed by Jack Sidney, to play 
the United Time. He also wrote the music 
for the act Charlie Howard is responsible 
for the book. 



TWO ACTS SIGNED FOR SHOW 

The Picolo Midgets and the Three Hoy 
Sisters have signed to appear with the 
Fred Stone show. They were booked by 
Rose and Curtis. 



ADLER FEATURE OF NEW ACT 

"Money Talks" is the title .of a new five 
person act in which Hyman Adler is to be 
featured by Joseph Hart The act is be- 
ing written by George V. Hobart. 



NEWSPAPER MAN IS MANAGER 

Kansas City, Sept 1.— -Floyd B. Scott, 
for twelve years a member of the staff of 
the Star, has resigned to become assistant 
manager of the Orpbeum Theatre here. 



MACART WRITES A DRAMA 

Wm. H. Macart, the vaudeville actor and 
author has completed a drama entitled "The 
Man Down Town." It is in a prologue 
and three acts. 



JIMMY BRITT IS BOOKED 
James Edward Britt, the monologist and 
former champion pugilist has been booked 
on a ten weeks' vaudeville tour, opening 
in Atlanta, Ga., on September 17. 



HAVE NEW ACT 

AI Pinard and Alice Dudley will be 
seen in a new act this season entitled 
"Don't Weaken." 



SHARP & BERNARD HAVE ACT 

Sharp and Bernard are presenting Vera 
Burt and the Five Virginia. Steppers in 
vaudeville. 



Scptctobtr 1; S/'Y0I7 



X HE^ NEW YORK CLIPPER 




PALACE 



After the pictures, Everest's Monkey Hip- 
podrome started the show proper and vent 
through its usual routine, as shown at this 
bouse many times. The monkey drummer 
is still the chief laugh procurer of this act 

Bennie and Woods are new comers at 
this house and, in the number two spot, 
suffered on account of their nonchalant air 
and manner of going through their act. The 
piano player seems exceedingly affected and, 
while his playing is nothing out of the or- 
dinary, he tried to embellish it with super- 
fluous pieces of business. The violinist is 
a good rag time player but the act as a 
whole startled nobody and departed very 
quietly. 

Amelia Stone and Axmand Kalisz, in the 
next spot, offered a singing skit entitled 
"Ma'mzelle Caprice," which was written by 
Edgar Allan Wolf. The same story, or 
plot, has been employed before by the au- 
thor in an act shown for bnt one week at 
the Alhambra, about three years ago. .The 
accidental loss of a key to a room, during 
tie search for which a dashing prima donna 
meets a supposedly debonair juvenile, fur- 
nishes the. groundwork for a great deal of 
unintelligible singing by Kalisz, and sev- 
eral pretty poses and top notes by Miss 
Stone. The act was slightly handicapped 
by the lights not working at the right time, 

Joe Laurie and Aileen Bronson proved 
their value at this show, following Stone 
and Kalisz. The little couple, with their 
"hick" nonsense, won one- of the big bits 
of the show with their chatter.' 
' 'Lucille Cavanaugh, Ted Doner and Paul 
Frawley are in their second week with their 
new act. At this performance, it was no- 
ticed that Frawley is getting too dramatic 
in his gestures while singing, and that Do- 
ner's dancing is the big hit of the act, not 
detracting from Miss Cavanaugh, .who has 
a great deal to do and does it well. A cor- 
net, with the mate attached, also was heard 
in the orchestra this week, it being an ad- 
dition to Cfae act. 

Joe Smith, Charley Dale, Harry Good- 
win and Irving Kaufman constitute the 
quartette, working under the name of the 
Avon Comedy Four, and scored the laugh- 
ing hit of the show with a highly humorous 
skit entitled "The Hungarian Rhapsody," 
in which the kitchen of a restaurant is 
shown. The boys worked smoothly and 
fast and besides putting over a big. hit as 
laugh getters, also won the honor of fur- 
nishing more real barmonius melody to the 
show than any other act. Their singing 
was a treat, especially several songs in 
which they had special arrangements of 
counter melodies and one number in par- 
ticular, caught on quickly on account of its 
beautiful lyrics and melody. The act took 
a great many bows at the finish, which is 
a skit in a doctor's office. 

Adelaide and Hughes, with their new of- 
fering followed, and were accorded a big 
reception. They scored all the way. The 
act is reviewed under New Acts. 

Walter C. Kelly, with an Atlantic City 
tan, stepped out and started his monologue 
with a baseball story which was not ex- 
actly in keeping with his regular routine. 
His second yarn, about a wake, was in bad 
taste and could well be eliminated. How- 
ever, he then settled down to his regular 
routine of darkey stories and the trials and 
tribulations of the prisoners brought be-" 
fore a white judge in a court in Virginia. 
He scored a great many laughs and, at the 
finish, won a big hand, . . . ... ■. • 

The Five Kitamuras are now featuring 
Koman and Tommy Kitamura in the act 
and closed the -show with one of -the pretti- 
est risely and. novelty acts seen in some 
time. The boys work fast and seem to en- 
joy their work so much that the departing 
audience remained standing at the back of 
the house to watch the very finishing stunt 
of these clever Japs. 

The show ran smoothly throughout and 
showed a great deal of class, with the Lau- 
rie and Bronson "hick" act sandwiched in 
between Stone and Kalisz and the dazzling 
affair of Lucille Cavanaugh and Co. , , 

S. L. H. 




RIVERSIDE 

With Belle Baker, the Ponzillo Sisters, 
Gilbert and Friedland, Henry Marshall and 
the Ford Sisters, and Maurice Burkhart 
on the bill there is singing a-plenty at the 
Riverside this week. 

Vera Sabina opened the bill and pre- 
sented a number of well executed dances. 
Miss Sabina is a graceful performer and 
wears a number of attractive gowns. She 
is ably assisted by Maurice Spitzer. 

Maurice Burkhart followed with "The 
Thief," a cleverly constructed monologue 
which gives him an opportunity to intro- 
duce some new songs. He was in good 
voice and was well received. 

The Ford Sisters and Henry Marshall 
stopped the show completely and scored 
so strongly that the placing of the act in 
a position further down on the bill would 
doubtless be advisable. The Ford Sisters, 
in strikingly attractive costumes, with a 
complete change for each number, are do- 
ing the best dancing of their career. Their 
numbers are so well executed and ar- 
ranged, building up to the best which 
coming at the very end carries the act 
over to a rousing finish. 

While the girls are changing their cos- 
tumes Marshall plays the piano and sings 
a number of his own compositions in a 
way which won him much applause. Al- 
ways a fine pianist, he has evidently been 
giving much attention to his voice, which 
has improved wonderfully and he renders 
all bis selections in a most artistic man- 
ner. Is its present shape the act is strong 
enough to hold a feature spot on any bill. 

The laughing hit of the bill was fur- 
nished by the Three Doolcys, who have 
collected a lot of nonsense which they pre- 
sent in a manner which will create 
laughter anywhere. Billed as "Some 
Original Dooley Nonsense" and con- 
structed solely with the idea of amusing 
it succeeds admirably. The offering will 
be further reviewed under "New Acta." 

Carmela and Rosa Ponzillo, operatic so- 
pranos, closed the first part of the bill 
with a repertoire of classical selections 
and for an encore gave an exceptionally 
fine rendition of "Swaunee River." The 
girls have well trained voices of excellent 
quality and sing with fine musical intelli- 
gence. Barring a slight tendency to stray 
from the pitch occasionally, their singing 
was all that could be desired. 

Bert Levy opened intermission and his 
artistic drawings of great men, past and 
present, won him much applause. 

Wolfe Gilbert and Anatol Friedland had 
things all their own way and if their 
repertoire of poular song hits had been 
larger could have remained on almost in- 
definitely. They sang and played all their 
new songs, then the old ones and only 
were allowed to leave when they an- 
nounced that their entire list of compo- 
sitions had been rendered. 
■ Lee Kohlmar and Co. have in "The Two 
Sweethearts" a one act playlet of much 
merit. The story of Jake Michaels, a poor 
man who after saving for years in order 
that he may marry, is willing to sacrifice 
his own future in order that his sister may 
have money for a dowry is clearly and 
convincingly told. A good strain of 
comedy runs through the piece, which 
ranks well with any of vaudeville's 
sketches. The work of Mr. Kohlmar, Will 
Fox, Georgette Du Parque and Josephine 
Bummuller was excellent. 

Belle Baker closed the show and despite 
the lateness of the hour and the fact that 
almost every act ahead was a singing one, 
scored one of the biggest hits ever regis- 
tered at this house.. Miss Baker has for 
. the new season selected a particularly 
fine repertoire of songs which, rendered in 
her charming manner, is a guarantee of a 
smashing hit on any bill. W. V. 



ORPHEUM 

Judging from the crowded attendance 
at Monday's matinee, Brooklynites were 
glad to see the Orpheum re-opened 

The show was started off by the Kana- 
zawa Brothers who presented a snappy 
equilibriatic act. 

Corbett, Shepard and Donovan have 
made several changes in their routine and 
went over nicely. The turn would be 
considerably improved if the tallest mem- 
ber of the trio could cultivate more stage 
assurance and be made to put more snap 
and understanding into his work. 

Fred and Adele Astaire worked hard 
and received deserved applause. The 
opening of the act was very effective. All 
of the songs were rendered in an individ- 
ual way, which makes the act stand out 
and the dancing was very well done. 

Lester Crawford and Helen Broderick 
have an exceptionally good line of patter, 
most of which sounded original. How- 
ever, the "kiss in the taxi" gag is being 
used by many acts. The girl, in putting 
• over the gag-points, does so in a very 
innocent way, which helps matters great- 
Winston's Water Lions and Diving 
Nymphs can only be reviewed in superla- 
tive terms, for there is no act of Ub kind 
that can equal it on the vaudeville stage 
to-day. The stunts that the water lions 
do are nothing short of marvelous, so well 
are they trained. Great credit is coming 
to Winston for the way he has taught 
these seals to perform, and greater credit 
is coming to him for the showmanlike 
way in which he "sells" his act to the 
audience. The Misses Gray and Glaze, 
who give a swimming and diving exhibi- 
tion, do all their work adeptly and are so 
expert in their line that even they, alone, 
could put the act over successfully. 
Vaudeville needs more turns on the order 
of Winston's Seals, both because such an 
act lends color to the bill and because 
there is something really good to show. 

After intermission Madame CMIson- 
Ohrman rendered a number of high class 
vocal selections in a way that pleased and 
.received a warm hand from those in the 
house who enjoy highclass offerings. The 
pianist, whose name does not appear on 
the program, accompanied the songstress 
well and deserves some sort of recogni- 
tion. 

The audience seemed to enjoy Hassard 
Short and Company drinking Maurice 
Hennequin's cocktail, "The Ruby Ray," 
but it is questionable just how suitable 
this act is to vaudeville. The piece goes 
over because it is well acted, but the fact 
remains that it deals with a subject which 
is obnoxious to many persons in the audi- 
ence. It is regrettable that this com- 
petent cast wastes its talent in an exposi- 
tion of how to get drunk when they would 
be bo much more appreciated in the right 
kind of a vehicle. 

A big hand was tendered to Gus Van 
and Joe Schenck upon their entrance, and 
they proceeded to earn it. They sang a 
repertoire of popular numbers which were 
well received, ranging all the way from 
a War ballad to a comedy song. At the 
end of their act, the applause kept up for 
several minutes, continuing even after the 
piano had been hauled off and the cards 
had been put up for the next act. 

Jack C. McLallen_and May Carson pre- 
sent a first class skating act, which is 
put on in a most attractive way. The 
table dance of McLallen's always proves 
a big applause winner and Monday after- 
noon was no exception. The neck spin at 
the . end of the act is a good closer, bnt 
we were rather surprised to hear McLellan 
announce that he "was trying it for the 
first time. 1 ' • H. G. 



ALHAMBRA 

The new season at the Alhambra was 
ushered in with a rather long bill that 
pleased the Harlem patrons on Monday 
night. * 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wilde occupied the 
first spot and introduced some animated 
shadowgraph,, Wilde making the sllhou- 
ettes from the shadows cast by his hands 

r^n.t.T.T 8 - H f ■"*■ 80me remarkable 
results the monkey and the jockey being 

P" t, ™ lari y fcWd. His patter g weak 

SSL. paInustr y M»» have been bodily 

Noan's'ar" " ^'^ 8h ° W * Ten on 

did line of blackface crossfire and put it 

Uuehs" g< ^n Sb K P t. K Was S 00 " Ior ^r 
laughs. The hokum music in the act 

leaves considerable to be desired; but 

£ f -"U* ,8 ' 1 Plea8cd a* -udience. * 

_ine ^Inree Chums presented "A Pew 

Moments at the Club," with music Vnd 

lyrics by John S. Black. The vehicle an*. 

gests an old act of Will Oakland's! and 

offering "*K ^ h ° ha ^ 8cen the 0a kland 
mZ? e ' it plece 8uffers °y comparison. 
However, these three boys prove to S 
fairly good entertainers Snd thlfr sonss 

tercsting and colorlesB introduction. 
3^ 2*L£ *«7 modest in his billing 
which reads "Very Little of Nothing," f f 
E?! f , d0e f "Very Much of Everything" 

%*££ A Ju'P mm bit ' which 5 the kind 
of stuff that vaudeville needs more of 
comes too early in the act. The paws' 
shop episode is very well done and rom- 
pleteiy demonstrates Delfs versatility 

R.™°w g the ?*£ half of **• W» wis 
ham Mann and Company in "The Ques- 
tion which took more than thirty-five 
minutes to present. This crazy-quilted 
farce by Aaron Hoffman shows the author 
at his best and has enough brilliant lines 
and laughs to carry along four or five or- 
d.nary playlets. However, the offering is 
certainly too long as it stands, and its 
success to vaudeville would be enhanced 
if it could be cut to a shorter running 
time, for brevity is the soul of wit— par- 
ticularly in variety houses. The acting in 
the playlet is excellent, and Sam Mann, 
playing the role of "Reason," an escaped 
inmate of a lunatic asylum, gives a por- 
trayal that is perfect. *^ 

Daisy Jean is a versatile musician and 
entertained, in turn, on the violin, 'cello, 
piano and harp. She also rendered sev- 
eral vocal selections. What Miss Jean 

* •'/ 8nfficient personality: at any 
rate, if she possesses personality, she 
does not exert it. . We believe that this 
glaring fault could be rectified by a little 
application on Mias Jean's part, by a smile 
now and then and by the elimination of 
a manner which seems to say, "Now that 
my song is finished, I must get to the 
next thing in my routine, which is the 
harp." 

There is too much mechanism in the 
routine and too little showmanship. It 
was only in the last number that Miss 
Jean showed animation and came out of 
her shell, so to speak, and the success that 
attended this number only bears out our 
contention. 

Homer Dickinson and Oracle Deagon 
found it a very easy matter to obtain 
laughs and applause with their material. 
Miss Deagon, as an eight-year-old, rang 
up the hit of the evening and deserved to 
go over big. Since last seen by this re- 
viewer the pair has considerably improved 
the routine of the act. 

Arnaut Brothers keep on using their 
material despite the fact that practically 
every steady theatre goer has seen their 
offering not once but several times. To 
those who have not seen it before, it is 
very entertaining and a bii» laugh-getter. 

Emily Francis Hooper and Herbert Mar- 
bury do entirely too much singing, con- 
sidering the fact that they know little 
'about putting over song numbers. Their 
dances were executed quite- well. H. G. 



8 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5, 1917 




AMERICAN 

Capacity business at this house, in the 
theatre and on the roof, was in evidence 
on Monday night and both audiences put 
the stamp of approval on the bill pre- 
sented. 

Pero and Wilson, in "Bits of Vaudeville" 
drew a good share of approval for their 
work (see New Acts). 

Miller, Packer and Selz, two men and 
a woman, offered a comedy talking, sing- 
ing and dancing act and found favor. They 
open with a trio, the woman dressed as a 
man. After the song, they run into a lit- 
tle comedy patter. Then, the smaller of 
the men sings and this is followed by a 
clog by the woman, dressed in a nifty cos- 
tume consisting of black tights and a 
close fitting jacket. The taller of the 
men then renders a comedy song and the 
woman, in a long dress, follows with a 
vocal number. They finish with a trio. 
The men are clever comedians, the, woman 
is attractive, and sings and dances well. 
As a trio, their voices blend well. 

The CeUi Opera Company; two men and 
two women, rendered several ballads and 
operatic selections, and received much 
hearty applause. The women begin with 
a duet. The quartette then renders the 
march song from "Faust" and follows it 
with another operatic number. The tenor 
then sings a solo and then the four ren- 
ders another song from an opera. From 
this, they go into the Toreador's song 
from "Carmen." They finish with "Just a 
Song at Twilight," with solo work by the 
contralto, and the chorus by the quartette. 
The four sing well together, except for a 
tendency of the soprano to sing her high 
notes with to much power at the close of 
each number. 

Ward and Lum, in a singing and talking 
act, were so well liked that they were 
forced to respond to an encore. (See New 
Acts.) 

"The Phun Phiends," presented by Jack 
"Kalian and Murry Harris and a chorus of 
six girls, lived pretty well up to its title. 
A special set represents a drug store with 
a soda water fountain and a candy coun- 
ter. The act opens with a song by one of 
the men, assisted by the chorus. Some 
comedy talk by the men follows, at the 
finish of which they go into a song and 
dance, with chorus. Another single man 
song with chorus is followed by two of 
the girls doing a neat song and dance. 
They finish with a number by the entire 
company. 

The act is well put together. The ma- 
terial is of the sure fire brand. Hallan 
and Harris are capable comedians. The 
girls do good chorus work. They make 
four changes of pretty costumes. 
' . Nada Kesser, who bills herself as "The 
Belgian Nightingale/' sang four numbers, 
one of which was rendered in Italian. She 
finished with a yodeL Miss Kesser pos- 
sesses a double register voice- of fair qual- 
ity which she uses to good advantage win- 
ning her hearty approval. 

•Well! Well! Well!" was presented by 
a very clever pair of performers, man and 
woman, whose names do not appear on 
the program. It is bright, travesty melo- 
drama, in which the man is called upon 
to play four characters, including the hus- 
band, the lover, a policeman and an am- 
bulance surgeon. The woman plays the 
wife. While the skit is a capital comedy 
vehicle, with less capable performers it 
would amount to little and it is a pity 
that these two are, by the absence of their 
names from the billing, prevented from 
getting the full reward for their good 
work. 

Tom and Stacia Moore, in their talking 
And singing act, scored a hit. Most of 
the singing is done by the man, who 
renders a dream song while his partner 
makes four changes of costume to repre- 
sent the dream characters he sings about. 
They are great favorites at this house. 
i Kennedy and Nelson, in an ou t-of-the 
ordinary tumbling and acrobatic act dosed 
the bill and won plenty of hearty applause 
for their work. B. W. 



ROYAL 

A holiday crowd brought a turn away 
audience to the theatre, and the show, 
while slow in the first part, picked up 
strong in the second half, closing big. 

After the pictorial the show proper 
started with Harry and Kitty Sutton and 
Company in their offering entitled "Love's 
Perfume" from the pen of James Madison. 
It was more than cordially received. 

The act has a special setting, a great 
line of comedy chatter and several well 
worked up comedy situations. Harry Sut- 
ton has shown exceedingly good taste in 
fixing up the act and deserves the credit 
due him for the enthusiastic reception it 
received. Kitty Sutton offered her acro- 
batic dance and the act did exceptionally 
well in the opening part. 

John Dunsmore offered a routine of 
songs and several Scotch stories which 
came in for mild approval. Dunsmore, 
dressed in a sack suit, starts bis act with 
a topical number and then gives his bass 
voice an opportunity with a selection from 
"Robin Hood." Next came several stories 
and then a Scotch song. He closed by 
reciting several toasts which stamped the 
act as an old timer. The thirteen minutes 
were but mildly enjoyed. 

Arthur Sullivan and Mercedes Clark 
offered a classic in slang and punch situa- 
tions entitled "A Drawing From Life" 
which went great. The many snappy lines* 
and corking good comedy in the act was 
well enjoyed. 

Walter Weems, moved down to the 
fourth position after the matinee, is more 
fully reviewed under New Acts. 

Bert La Mont's Montana Five closed the 
first half with their splendid arrangement 
of comedy and singing. The act breathed 
a distinct atmosphere of the far West on 
account of its scenic investiture, mode of 
dress and manner of delivery of the ma- 
terial. The young woman in the act did 
nicely with a yodel number and the 
boys worked hard and sang well, bring- 
ing the act about six bows at the finish. 

George McKay and Ottie Ardine with 
their new act "All In Fun" were a sensa- 
tion. The act has four special Bettings 
and is speedily routined as to songs, 
dances and chatter. McKay had things 
going just the way he wants them and 
his several ad lib remarks during the run- 
ning of the act came in for big laughs, 
while Miss Ardine'B dancing and ward- 
robe brought many indications of ap- 
proval from the crowded theatre. The 
dancing of both is worthy of special com- 
mendation and more than passing notice 
should be given to the new chatter and 
comedy. McKay and Ardine are sure fire 
here, as elsewhere. 

Joe Morris and Florence Campbell were 
moved from the fourth position, after the 
Monday matinee, to the next to closing 
spot, with a comedy skit called "The Avi- 
Ate-IIer" from the pen of Joe Browning. 
It is more fully reviewed under New Acts. 
The "Futuristic Bevue" closed the show 
with a brilliant array of talent. Countess 
de Leonardi was featured in the program 
and well deserved it. The eight singing 
assistants showed great vocal prowess 
and their voices blended well. A medley 
of operatic arias came in for big applause 
and the violin solos and general playing 
by Countess de Leonardi showed that she - 
is an artiste who has devoted much time 
in the study of violin playing. The har- 
mony and general arrangement of melo- 
dies was nicely worked out and the act 
scored a decided hit in the closing spot 
on account of its actual merit and the 
decided flash it added to the bill. 

A Keystone comedy entitled "Thirst" 
closed the show. • S. L. H. 



DYCKMAN 

The Dyckman Theatre opened under its 
new management for the season hist 
Sunday afternoon, with a fairly well filled 
house. 

This is one of the outlying houses which 
could be made an ideal place to try out 
new material. 

The present booking arrangement could 
be more than mildly censured, although, for 
the poor quality of the program. How- 
ever,. it was understood that the acts were 
procured hastily from Miner's Bronx Thea- 
tre, where, a Sunday concert was booked 
by Sam Bernstein. 

The show started with a Universal 
Weekly which was followed by Billie and 
Mae Cunningham, who did not seem to 
be able . to get started. This act is re- 
viewed under New Acts. 

Earl and Bartlett offering the same rou- 
tine of chatter they have used for some 
time, amused a few, but treaded on dan- 
gerous ground with their Irish-English 
war talk. The couple sit on two gold 
chairs at a table in one and go through 
their routine of gags for nine minutes. 

The Two Cantons, formerly of the 
Equili Brothers, opened in one, went into 
full stage and returned to one, doing a 
fairly, good routine of acrobatic tricks. 
The first five minutes of the ten minutes 
employed by the act are used only to 
stall into their tricks without getting 
a ripple of laughter for any of the pan- 
tomimic comedy. 

A Keystone picture followed and then 
came Fields and Halliday, who were the 
only ones to raise any real enthusiasm. 
They are doing the same soldier act Joe 
Fields has been identified with for years, 
and, although handicapped by the neglect 
of the property man to shoot the revolver 
off at certain cues, they scored the hit of 
the bill. 

Gerald Griffin sang five songs and is 
reviewed under New Acts. 

Sullivan, Wells and Martin closed the 
show portion with a sketch that has seen 
its best time in burlesque. An old plot, 
which gives one of the men a chance to 
assume female garb and a lot of uncalled 
for business, marred any results the act 
could have gained. The "feet on the hose" 
gag and the pie business at the finish, 
means that this act confesses it is not 
a good one. 

The show was closed with a Triangle 
picture called "The Hater of Man." 

Sol Schwartz is the house manager; 
Robert Carpel is assistant manager and 
Dick Baumgarten is stage manager. What 
the house needs for the neighborhood is 
good clean shows that start on time. 

S. L. H. 



DANDY HAS NEW ACT 

Ned Dandy has in preparation a musical 
comedy travesty, entitled, "Higher, 
Higher !" in which Nora Allen is being fea- 
tured. The act will have four principals 
and a chorus of eight girls. It will be pre- 
sented on the TJ. B. O. circuit the latter 
part of this month. 



BECOMES TWO-A-DAY HOUSE 

Newark. N. J., Aug. 31. — Proctor's Pal- 
ace saw the inauguration of a new policy 
last week whefW.it changed from a continu- 
ous to a two-a-day house, the 4.30 show 
being eliminated. Mabel Eerra and Rigo 
headed the bill for the first half, while Sam 
Mann was featured the last half. 



OPERA SINGER TO TRY VAUDE 

Edith Helena, recently with the Aborn 
Opera Company, will be seen in vaudeville 
soon in a singing act written by Bide Dud- 
ley and John Godfrey. The act will not 

be operatic. 



PIELSON AND GOLDIE RE-UNITE 
Gilbert' Pielson and Jack Goldie, after a 
separation of one year, have reunited and 
will do a comedy, singing and talking act 
written by Joe Browning, opening at the 
Globe Theatre, Philadelphia, next Monday. 
The act is being bandied by Jack" Lander. 



DILLONS RETURN TO TWO-A-DAY 

Bobbie and Billie Dillon will shortly re- 
turn to the two-aiday in an elaborate song 
and dance offering entitled "A Vaudeville 
Surprise. • 



FIFTH AVENUE 

A house filled to its seating capacity 
with a goodly number of standees was 
the condition of business here at the first 
Labor Day performance. 

Stevens and Falk, two women, opened 
the bill with a singing and dancing act. 
It is presented in a full stage setting, rep- 
resenting a Western border scene. Stevens 
and Falk first appear in Tndian costume, 
one as a young chief, who sings a number, 
and the other as a maiden, who dances. 
Two more songB and two dances follow. 
They each make two changes of costume. 

The Edwards Brothers, with their bur- 
lesque acrobatic act, were well liked. They 
open in one and go to full stage. They 
start with some magic tricks and then go 
into their fake acrobatics, doing all man- 
ner of impossible balancing feats, which 
are made possible by the topmounter being 
attached to a wire hung from the flies. 
They won many laughs. 

"Peacock Alley," a tabloid comedy 
drama, presented with a company of eight, 
four men and four women, scored a suc- 
cess. The story is that of a New York 
clubman who has a friend whose wife has 
gone to the metropolis to elope. The 
Scene is laid in a hotel known as "Pea- 
cock Alley," and to this place the runaway 
wife comes. The clubman has the woman 
"paged," which results in his meeting a 
charming widow, who, on being charged by 
the clubman with being "the" woman he 
is looking for, does not disabuse him. The 
wife finally appears, and is followed by 
the husband and a reconciliation is effect- 
ed. The clubman and widow find that they 
love each other and all ends happily. 

With a good idea to start with the au- 
thor has worked it out well. The lines 
are bright and bring forth many a good 
laugh. • Vivian Blackburn and Elwood F. 
Bostwick, who are featured, play, the 
widow and the clubman, respectively, and 
do excellent work. The supporting com- 
pany, down to the young man- who does 
the bell hop, is made up of capable players. 

Mabel Burke, the favorite illustrated 
song singer of this house, returned after 
several weeks* vacation and received a 
hearty welcome. 

Roy Cummings and Hazel Shelley, In 
their little skit "One Afternoon," scored 
the comedy hit of the bill. They open 
with comedy patter, a sort of summer 
flirtation affair. Cummings follows with 
a song, his partner dances, then comes 
more talk, and they finish with a dance. 
Qimmings is a crackerjack eccentric co- 
median, a dancer, a tumbler, sings well, in 
fact, is an all-round performer of marked 
ability. He makes some remarkable falls 
and gets plenty of laughs. The man and 
girl work well together, both in their songs 
and in their patter, and seem to understand 
the value of injecting plenty of speed into 
their work. Hazel Shelly is a clever per- 
former, an excellent dancer and a good foil 
for her partner. 

Maryon Vadie and Ota Gygi, in a toe 
dancing and violin act, were well liked. 
Miss Vadie is pretty and graceful and re- 
ceived a full meed of approval for her 
three dances. Gygi played three solos and 
also played for his partner's dancing. He 
is a good violinist. They were assisted by 
a pianist. 

Ford and Goodrich in a skit called "You 
Can't Believe Them," waa another act of 
the summer flirtation order, which was 
well liked. Their act is made up of sing- 
ing, talking and dancing. 

Jack Marley is a rapid-fire monologist, 
with a "punch" in almost every line. He 
puts his material over to the best advan- 
tage and gets laughs. 

Johnny Clark and company, two men 
and a woman, closed the bill. They have 
a special set in three (boxed scene) which 
represents a restaurant. Clark is the 
main performer, and his work consists of 
tumbling. His chief feat is a back fall 
from the top of tables four feet high to 
a fifth one and then to the stage. He.was 
rewarded with.applause. E. W. 



September 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




ADELAIDE AND HUGHES 

Theatre — Palace. 
Style — Dance production. 
Time — Thirty minute*. 
Setting — Special. 

Offering a stupendous dance production 
for two people, Adelaide and John J. 
Hughes are the terpsichorean treat of the 
season at the Palace Theatre, where they 
will appear for several weeks to come, 
judging by their reception. 

They open with a special introduction 
number, revealing some gorgeous ward- 
robe and dandy lyrics telling what they 
are going to offer. They then go into a 
dainty modern dance number, presenting 
it as only they know how to. A toy 
soldier and Dresden doll dance is next 
and proved to be a beautiful piece of 
special dancing and pantomimic business 
which went over splendidly. After that 
number they offered a novel dance dressed 
as Paul and Virginia in "The Tempest," 
in which the barefoot steps were splen- 
didly shown and worked out. 

Edwards Devis, directing the orchestra 
in the pit, next offered a classic piano 
* solo, which finished with a jazz arrange- 
ment of music in which an exceedingly 
good saxophone player and a cornetist 
with a mute on the instrument, helped at 
the finish. 

Next, Adelaide offered her toe dancing 
specialty, in which she excels, starting 
from a lattice work pedestal and con- 
cluding to thunderous applause. Hughes 
next offered as a solo dance, a quaint 
arrangement of Indian steps, appropriate- 
ly dressed and also gathered for himself 
many laurels. 

As a concluding number they offered a' 
Chinese fantasy which was prettily 
staged, beautifully dressed and excellently 
danced. 

In the special setting the act got out 
of the usual rut of things by showing 
special masks in front of the tormentors 
and a new black cyclorama drop' with 
banging flowers. The wardrobe, music, 
dancing and general classy air of the 
Adelaide and Hughes production proved 
it to be a welcome addition to present day 
vaudeville. It is a big hit and should be 
everywhere. S. L H. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued on Pace It) 



DOROTHY REGEL & CO. 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 
Style— Playlet. 
Time— Twenty-one minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

The title of this playlet is "Playing 
the Game." It is replete with surprises, 
runs along original lines, possesses a cap- 
able cast and gets plenty of laughs. All 
of which makes it welcome to vaudeville. 
Dorothy Regel is featured in the offering 
and the supporting cast consists of three 
men. 

The plot centres around a waitress 
from Child's, who is not content with her 
eight dollars per and has made no bones 
about telling her friends that she wants 
to be a crook. Three men take it upon 
themselves to grant her this desire and 
initiate her into the ways of "crookery." 
Part of the initiation consists in looting 
a haunted house, and, between the ghosts 
and the police, the poor girl wishes her- 
self back at Child's again. Thereupon, 
the men show her that the whole thing 
has been a ruse to cure her of her crooked 
desires. 

The -playlet has two scenes. The first 
is in one, the drop representing Madison 
Square. The other scene uses the full 
stage and represents a room in the 
haunted house. The "spook" effects in 
the latter are cleverly worked out. 

The very end of the playlet is a little 
weak, and, if, in the surprise ending, the 
girl could come back at the three men 
with some sort of counter surprise, the 
result would be better. 

But, even as it stands, the turn is a 
corker. H. G. 



THE THREE DOOLEYS 

Theatre — Riverside. 
Style — Singing and dancing. 
Time — Twenty-five minutes. 
Setting — Special 

Ray, Gordon and William J. Dooley 
have assembled the best parts of the old 
act of Ray and Gordon Dooley and added 
some new material making an offering 
which makes no pretense of being any- 
thing but sheer nonsense. 

The act opens as a military scene, 
with one of the men as sentinel He is 
armed with a rifle and also carries, at 
his side, a clanking sword which con- 
- tinually trips him. The other Dooley, 
dressed as a captain, with Miss Dooley 
in the garb of a nurse, attempts to pass 
and some good comedy dialogue follows 
over the pass word. At the conclusion 
of this the curtain drops and the act 
finishes in one where a clever comedy 
duet is sung by the men, one of them in 
female attire. They do some particularly 
clever comedy falls also, the best of which 
results from an argument between the 
two when the woman leaps and plants 
both feet on the other's chest. 

The act closes with a burlesque cabaret 
scene in which one of the men plays a 
toy piano, while the other attempts the 
violin. Miss Dooley does some good 
dancing in this portion of the act. W. V. 



WALTER WEEMS 

Theatre — Royal. 

Time — Twenty minutes.. 

Style — Blackface comedian. 

Setting— Otto in one. 

Stepping out in one, dressed in a light 
sack suit, Walter Wcems started off with 
a routine of things in general about Au- 
stralia, sharks, women, love and hash. 
While his talk might be entertaining, it 
certainly missed fire at this performance 
at the Royal. 

The material is very badly delivered 
and undoubtedly would have earned bet- 
ter rewards if bandied differently. 

Weems reads a scenario of a supposed 
motion picture plot in which he interpo- 
lates the services of the orchestra. This 
has been done by Fred Duprez. 

He closes the act by rendering a jazz 
selection on a horn and then a short se- 
lection from "Katinka," which let him off 
easily. If Weems wants to remain in big 
company he should improve his style of 
delivery and chop out the dead wood in 
his material. S. L. H. 



MORRIS AND CAMPBELL 

Theatre — Royal. 

Style — Comedy skit. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — Special drop in one. 

In front of a drop depicting an avia- 
tion field and a hangar in the distance, 
Joe Morris and Florence Campbell offer 
a new line of chatter written by Joe 
Browning, which was pie laughing hit 
of the show. 

Morris is a comedian of the "boob" 
style who wins laughs galore by the splen- 
did feeding of Miss Campbell. As a 
straight woman, working opposite a clever 
comedian, she proved that she is a dia- 
mond in the rough and knows vaudeville 
thoroughly. Morris does several dance 
steps and falls, which show him to be a 
coming comedian in the two-a-day field. 
His work as a plant, in a box, brought 
down the house with laughs. The act is 
a fast running affair, built mainly for 
comedy and a chance for Miss Campbell 
to show her voice in two popular numbers 
which she put over very well. The skat- 
ing steps Morris employed were a revela- 
tion. S. L.H. 



BILLIE & MAE CUNNINGHAM 

Theatre — Dyckman. 
Style — Singing and dancing. 
Time— Fourteen minutes. 
Setting-T-/» one. 

Opening the house in the opening spot, 
the Cunninghams did not receive a single 
laugh throughout the fourteen minutes 
they occupied the stage, although they 
used every gag they could think of, from 
"keeping-milk-in-the-cow" down to "show- 
the-dog-where-his-papa-lived." 

The act opens with the woman, dressed 
" in a silk coat, long out of style, singing 
a song, which is interrupted by a "nut" 
comedian dressed eccentrically to make his 
partner laugh. The routine of chatter 
starts with a "love" rose scene and fin- 
ishes nowhere. 

The man then does a few dance steps 
in fairly good style and the woman at- 
tempts to sing, only to find herself way 
off key. Both are attempting to be 
comedians of the "nut" variety and. 
thereby, spoil each other's laughs. If 
- there is any talent in the act it can only 
be discovered after some real material is 
used. The act deserves to be known only 
as a small time offering. S. L H. 



NICK VERGA 

Theatre — Proctor's 23d Street. 

Style — Talking and singing. 

Time — Twelve minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Versa styles himself as "The News- 
boy Caruso," and, to a degree, is entitled 
to this line of billing, as he has a rich 
and resonant tenor voice. 

He opens off stage, singing an oper- 
atic aria and then appears on stage de- 
livering a character monologue with ref- 
erence to his family. Following this, he. 
renders a popular ballad, after which 
he again delivers a little talk about his 
"girl." He concludes his turn with his 
conception of Caruso singing an aria 
from Marta. A. U. 



RYAN AND RYAN 

Theatre — Proctor's Fifty-eighth Street. 
Style — Dancing. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting — In ttco. 

Ryan and Ryan, a man and a girl, 
start their routine with a song and dance, 
and then go into an Irish clog. The girl 
then re-enters in Scotch attire and does 
a Scotch dance. They then introduce the 
feature of the act. In Scotch attire, the 
pair wear odd looking shoes, that look 
like skis, but are nothing more than long 
scantlings. In these they clog and do 
some very effective work. 

The act is a novel dancing turn and, if 
the pair would improve their appearance 
at the opening of the act, the turn 
would go nicely on any bill. H. G. 



JOHN STONE 

Theatre— Proctor's Twenty-third Street. 
Style— Jumping. 
Time — Nine minutes. 

Setting— Full stage. 

John Stone makes a rather unique en- 
trance, emerging from a barrel on the 
stage. He does some effective jumping 
in and ont of barrels and ends with what 
he calls his. "world famous head dive." 
This would Be rather difficult to describe, 
but it is both hazardous and flashy, and 
closes the act very successfully. 

If .Stone would dance around the stage 
less while preparing for his various 
stunts, he would enhance the value of his 
act. He is capable in his line of work. 

H. G. 



GRAY AND FRANCIS 

Theatre— Proctor's Twenty-third Street. 
Style — Alan and girl. 
Time— Seventeen minute*. 
Setting — In one. 

Roger Gray is a comedian who lacks 
singing voice and grace and depends 
upon his clumsiness and a good natured 
personality to get him over. May Francis 
is a little soubrette, presenting a strik- 
ing contrast to tall Mr. Gray. 

But this man and girl team does not 
seem to pull together well, neither seem- 
ing, to get into the whole spirit of . the 
other's work. Either might be clever with 
a different partner; but, as a team, the 
act drags considerably except near the 
end. Gray is the stronger half of the 
act, and whatever success it enjoys is 
earned through his comedy. At times, 
the girl might as well be doing a single, 
so little attention does she pay to the 
work of the man at her side. 

The pair open with a song duet, after 
which Gray sings a number. There is 
then a little talk, including the war-be- 
ing-over-a-six- weeks' gag, which is being 
used by every Tom, Dick and Harry in 
vaudeville. She renders a ballad, after 
which they go into a song and dance, and, 
at this point the act picks up. A bur- 
lesque on vaudeville follows, and con- 
cludes the routine. 

' pray seems better suited for musical 
comedy than for vaudeville, while Miss 
Francis needs to show more animation 
and interest in her work. H. G. 



E. E. CL1VE AND CO. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Bouse. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Eleven minutes. 

Setting— Parlor. 

Lord Cecil Windemere does not be- 
lieve in divorce and yet bis married life 
is not a happy one. He, therefore, de- 
cides to make' it easier for Her Ladyship 
by committing suicide, but finds that he 
does not possess sufficient nerve to do so. 
A burglar enters the house and levels 
a revolver at Windermere, who asks him 
to shoot. The burglar thinks, him crazy 
and refuses to do bis bidding. Lady 
Windermere, entering, sees her husband 

. braving the thug and his revolver, 
thinks her husband a hero, and all ends 
happily. 

The idea of the playlet is good, bat 
the offering would be better appreciated 
with an American hero in place of an. 
exaggerated type of Englishman who 
continually says "Silly ass," and "Are 
you there?" Although we may be allied 
in a common cause with England, we 
cannot bring ourselves to laugh at the 
English humor in this act, for there is 
entirely too much of the London type 

' of joke. J. G. 



ELIZABETH PRICE AND CO. 

Theatre — Proctor's Fifty-eighth Street. 
Style — Piccaninnies. 
Time — Twelve minutes. 
Setting — Full stage. 

Elizabeth Price is supported by five 
piccaninnies, two boys and three girls. 

She sings a Chinese number, with the 
piccaninnies acting as a chorus. One of 
the boys . then does some fancy stepping. 
Miss Price and the girls render a Dixie 
number. A- popular number is then 
rendered by one of the boys, the others 
joining in from the wings, although the 
latter can - hardly be heard. They all 
finish with a free-for-all fancy stepping 
ensemble. Miss Price beating time with 
her hands. 

Miss Price is not strong enough to 
head the act. She does not know how to 
put over her songs and is weak on per- 
sonality. Her piccaninnies are fairly 
clever, but not sufficiently so to take the 
act further than small time. Even there 
the act would need a good deal of bolster- 
ing up to really make good. H. G. ' 



10 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5. \9\7 

"^ I ' ' '■ "' Tft *£?•. *7"-V 




"THE M AS QUERAD E RS" 
SCORES SUCCESS 

AT THE LYRIC 



•THE — JBMAMM "—A play 

la a prologue aad three seta, by John 

' Hooter Booth. Jfcsnded upon Kat&er- 

tna Cadi T LuibUm 'b novel. Presented 

" atandar nlant, September 8. at tbe 

Iffrle. 

CAST. 

John OiUcote. at F..1 8 „ Batca Poat 

Jobs Loder J 

Brock Loola Calvert 

Bobby BIcaalnstoD. O eiij Cornell 

afarle.......... Lorlta Stone 

Sre Qdleot* ...... . Trials La-wtoo 

Petty Forsyth* Georgia Mai Foreman 

Allitan H. B. Flttjl&twn 

Herbert Fralde Clarence HandjaWe 

Mr. Lately Ian Robertson 

Lady TJI ""» Astnrpp Florence Malooe 

Robalna Bohr Gordon 

Lady Bramfell OUee- Temple 

Lady Sarah Frald* Gertrude Linton 

Captain GaUatry.. James Moore 

Lord Braaaf ell.'. - . -.William Podmore 

Greening.. ......... .Raymond Martin 

Doctor Edward Ungcr 

...By Himself • 



In dramatizing; Katharine CecQ Thurs- 
ton's story "The Masouerader," John 
Booth Hunter baa made many changes, 
moat of them for better. The time of 
action has been brought np to date and 
the plot centers about English political 
life just before Germany invaded Belgium. 

The plot while dramatic verge* upon tbe 
Improbable as the possibility ot there being 
two men in the entire world so alike that 
they coold exchange places without even 
their closest friends and relations discover- 
ing; it seems rather remote. It requires 
quite a stretch of the imagination to be- 
lieve that upon a short half hour's notice 
John Iioder, Canadian, could step into the 
political and social life of John Chilcote. 
member of parliament, master the war 
questions to the extent of making a speech 
in parliament and then take his place in 
the home without even his wife discovering 
the deception. 

That the play, however, was convincing 
to a degree was dne to its remarkable 
presentation. There was not a doll or 
dragging moment, never was the interest 
allowed to'lag for an instant and the sus- 
pense was sustained to the fall of the final 
curtain. The burden of the performance is 
carried by Mr. Post, who in the dual role 
of John Chllcote, M. P., and John Loder, 
is doing quite the best work of his entire 
career. His rapid transitions from the 
brilliant Loder to the drug crazed Chilcote 
were accomplished with an ease and rapid- 
ity which was well, night bewildering. 

The play is presented in a prologue and 
three acts, beginning with the accidental 
meeting in a London fog of -John Chilcote, 
M. P.. and John Loder. A lighted match 
reveals the fact that they are so alike in 
appearance, voice and manner, that they 
can not be told apart, and Chilcote, a vic- 
tim of the drug habit evolves the idea that 
they can temporarily exchange places. 

He plans that he can finish np his drug 
debauch while Loder takes., his place in 
parliament. Unwillingly Loder accepts, hnt 
the drug fiend instead of returning to his 
home and work sinks deeper and deeper 
into the habit's clutches snd dies from an 
overdose of morphine. 

While all the big honors of the play fell 
to Post, his cast was most capable. Par- 
ticular mention should be made of Louis 
Calvert; Chflcote'a servant, and Thais 
Lawton, who was seen to excellent ad- 
vantage. 

Others in tbe cast were Georgia Mai 
Eursman, Florence Malone, Ruby Gordon 
and Clarence Hafldyside. The stay of 
The Masqueradera at the Lyric will doubt- 
less be a long one. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAT. 
World— ZTo* no dragging moment, . 
Herald — Qug Bate* Pott win* in Anal role. 
Sun — Guy Bate* Pott scores. 
Tribune — Jfo doubt of ploy** success. 
Times — An effective play. 
American — Really fascinating. 



OPENING DATES AHEAD 

New York City. 

"Polly With a Past" — Belasco — Sept 8. 

"The Pawn"— Fulton— Sept 8. 

"Rambler Rose" — Empire — Sept 10. 

"The Landlady"— Yorkville— Sept 12. 

"Lombard! Ltd."— Morosco— Sept 17. 

"Misalliance"— Broadhnrst— Sept 17. 

"The Family Exit"— Comedy— Sept 18. 
Out of Tows. 

"Kitty Darlin' "— Buffalo, N. Y.— Sept 6. 

"Scrap of Paper"— Atlantic City, N. J. 
—Sept 10. 

"Odds and Ends of 1817" — Stamford, 
Conn. — Sept 15. 



"THIS WAY OUT' 
NEW CRAVEN COMEDY 
MILDLY AMUSING 



"COUNTRY COUSIN" 
MAKES ITS BOW 

TO BROADWAY 



"THB COUNTKT COCHIN." — A 
comedy la four acta, by Booth Tark- 
lnrton sad Julian Street. Presented 
Monday erenlnx. September 3. at the 
Gaiety Theatre. 

CAST. 

Mrs. Howitt Jolla Stuart 

Eleanor Howitt *****~n Coakley 

Sam Williams Donald Gallaher 

Nancy Price 4texandra Carlisle 

Geo. Tewkaberry Reynolds, 3d. 

Rogene O'Brien 

Stanley Howitt Arthur Forrest 

Athalle Walnwrtsbt Lontae PraaatnC 

Mra. Jane Kinney Eleanor Gordon 

Cyril Kinney Donald foster 

, Hand Howitt Ones KUlston 

Arcnie Gore diaries afackay 

Prultt Otorjo Wright, Jr. 

................ .Albert Tarernler 



"The Country Cousin" is a production of 
George C. Tyler, in association with Klaw 
and Erlanger, and reminds one somewhat 
of other plays in which Tarkdngton has had 
a hand. In other words, it has a familiar 
Tarkdngton twang. 

The piece deals principally with Eleanor 
Howitt a girl of eighteen, who has out- 
grown her native Ohio village. She has 
inherited about a half million dollars, when 
her father, divorced and rewedded to a 
cheap and frivolous woman, appears on the 
scene to take her East Tbe second act 
discloses Eleanor in the scenes of sin to 
which her father has brought her. Acts 
two, three and four show a bouse party in 
action in an Italian villa near New York 
City. 

To this place of iniquity comes Nancy 
Price, a country cousin, who farms out in 
Ohio. She is insulted fay every one,. but 
manages to more than hold her own and 
even win Eleanor back in the end. with 
the aid of an overdrawn snob whom she 
has converted to common sense before the 
final curtain. 

Tarkington and Street are thoroughly 
familiar with people from Ohio, and, in 
spots, this work is charming, but the char- 
acters which form the smart set in this 
play are so utterly bad that they might 
be denizens of the lower world. At any 
rate the contrast between them and the 
simple folk would make capital characters 
for real old time melodrama where the 
'rOIain" pursues the heroine but they mar 
the 'delightful comedy atmosphere which is 
born in simple surroundings. 

Alexandra Carlisle as the country cousin 
scored an individual triumph. . She in- 
vested the role of Nancy with her own 
pleasing personality and made her a most 
charming personage. She imitated the 
Middle West dialect with breezy, fresh 
style that gave her an added charm. 

Eugene O'Brien lent distinction and force 
to the character of Reynolds. 

Donald Gallaher did good work as Sam 
Williams, an ambitious youth of the Middle 
West 

Of the others, Grace EHiston and Arthur 
Forrest were probably the best 

The production was adequately staged. 
WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 
Sun — Alexandra Cartels win* pergonal tri- 
umph. 
Tribnne — Delightful in tpott. 
Times — Delightful in tpott. 



•THIS WAX OOT."— A comedy In 
a prologue and three acts, by Frank 
Craven; founded on a story by Oc- 
taTtoa Boy Cohen and J. U. Gleay, aa 
pnbllahed In Manaey'a ataaastna Pres- 
ented Thursday night, Axuroat SO, at 
the George M. Cohan Theatre. 
CAST. 


Walter Simmons. 








Bell Bar 




George Williams 
Charles Merriwell 


Mra. John Caldw< 






. .MUUcent Brass 


Mande Lererldge 







Frank Craven's delightful comedy, "Too 
Many Cooks," which was one of the dra- 
matic successes of two years ago, had at 
least an original and plausible story, and 
treated in Mr. Craven's attractive man- 
ner was filled with charm. For the basis 
of hia latest play Mr. Craven has selected 
a story by Octavius Roy Cohen and J. U. 
Giesy, thin and weak and larking in all 
the qualities which made "Too Many 
Cooks* 1 a success. 

There are many clever and mirth-pro- 
Tokinj? lines in the new play, and 'what- 
ever popularity the play achieves will be 
dne to them rather than the plot and 
situations provided by the story. 

"This Way Oat" begins with a prologue 
which tells of two young men living in a 
small town hotel. One of the men is 
about to get married and a discussion arises 
as to the advisability of telling a wife 
about one's "past" Joe Franklin, played 
by Mr. Craven, strongly advises against it, 
but bis friend believes that the only way 
to insure happiness is to have no secrets 
from his wife. 

After the marriage Joe, who is a prac- 
tical joker, reads an advertisement in a 
matrimonial paper, and out of curiosity 
answers it, but instead of signing his own 
names uses that of hia married friend. 

The recipient of his note does not wait 
to answer, but cornea on in person, and 
what follows after her arrival supplies the 
comedy of the piece. 

Joe, envying the happiness of his mar- 
ried friend, has become engaged, and the 
arrival of the answer to the letter on the 
eve of the announcement of his engage- 
ment further complicates matters. Just 
as the affairs of all seem hopelessly en- 
tangled the hotel clerk falls in love with 
the matrimonially inclined young lady and 
the situation is saved. 

Grace Goodall was the lady who adver- 
tised for a husband, and scored the real 
hit of the piece. Mr. Craven was excep- 
tionally good, while Jed Prouty, as the 
hotel clerk, and Charles Trowbridge, the 
young man who believed in revealing his 
"past" to his wife, made the most of their 
respective rales. * 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY: 

Tribune — Mag win fair thare of attention. 

Sua, — Amusing farce. 

Herald — Light, pleating farce comedy. 

Time&— Ha* bright moment*. 

World — Strained bit of humorous writing. 

American — A quiet farce. 



,-. "JONES" IS REVIVED 

"What Happened ' to Jones." George 
Broadhursf s twenty-year-old ' farce, was 
revived last Friday' evening at the Forty- 
Eighth Street Theatre by the author, with 
Hale Hamilton, John Daly Murphy, 
Charles Harbury, James Spottsw ood, Al- 
phonse Ethier, Thomas P. Gunn, William 
H. Gregory, Marie Wain Wright, Marti a 
Harris, Leila Frost, Margaret Ferguson, 
Viola' Leach and Josie' Sadler in the cast 
The piece, despite its age, was well 
received. 



BERNHARDT OPENS SEASON 

After a long and severe illness, Mme. 
Sarah Bernhardt returned to the stage on 
Saturday night at the Knickerbocker 
Theatre, where she was seen in a new 
one-act play and the trial scene from 
"The Merchant of Venice." 

■The Star of the Night" a war inspired 
play by Henri Cain and L. Guerinon, while 
rather weak as good plays go served its 
purpose to the extent of giving Mme. Bern- 
hardt opportunity to display her great art 

"LEAVE IT TO JANE" 
AT THE LONGACRE 

WINS SUCCESS 



"LEAVE IT TO JANE/'— a mnrfcal 
comedy based on "Tbe College 
Widow," by George Ade. Book and 
lyrics by Got Bolton and P. J. Wode- 
hotise; music by Jerome Kern. Pre*- 
ented Tuesday night. An?. 28, at tbe 
Laocaere. 

CAST. 








...Catherine Mack 


Peter Wltberepoon, A. 


. -Annette Herbert 

M.. Ph. D. 
Frederick Graham 


Hiram Bolton, D. D., I 


.Georgia O'Bamey 
-L. D. 

Will C. Orimana 
.Robert G. Pitkin 




Harold ("Bab") Hicks 





"The College Widow," George Ade's suc- 
cessful comedy of over ten years ago is 
the basis of Guy Bolton and P. G. Wode- 
house's musical comedy "Leave It To 
Jane," which is the second musical produc- 
tion to score a success this season. 

To the brilliant lyrics supplied by Mr. 
Wodehouse Jerome D. Kern has written a 
score which is really delightful, and while 
there is no single number which stands out 
prominently from the rest as is often tbe 
case in musical productions, the entire 
score is melodious to a degree and written 
in a musicianly manner. 

Tbe plot of the piece follows closely that 
of Mr. Ade's clever piece and the introduc- 
tion of the bright lyrics and Mr. Kern's 
melodies make of it even a better theatrical 
production than in its previous form. 

Edith Hallor, scored a success in the 
title role of Jane, the college widow who 
flirts with a football star to win him away 
from a rival college. She is successful and 
hia playing upon . the team wins the big 
game for her college. After the game is 
over he learns that her only interest in 
him was to keep him away from a rival 
university and as he prepares to leave for 
home confronts her. She admits that while 
her interest in him was at first due to his 
fame as a football player, it had changed 
to real love and affection and so all ends 
happily. s j. 

Ann Orr was a pleasing feature of the 
entertainment and Olin Howland scored . a 
genuine hit in the role . of "Bub" Hicks 
who in -one short .term waa transformed 
from a. rube of -the greenest variety to the 
college sport. . 

" A review of the piece, would not be com- 
plete without mention of Arline Chase, a 
dainty young miss, whose charm and grace 
in a neat dance with Oscar Shaw won her 
numerous recalls. The balance of the cast 
was adequate. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAY. 

World— Bern's melodies tinkle agreeably. 
Herald — Started tamely but -got better and 

'■ better. 
Times — Gag and tasteful musical letting. 
Sun— A sad "College Widow." 
Tribune — Jerome'* melody it sprightly. 
American — Festively youthful > 



JsasJTW 



SeptegJ>fi£5; 1917 



THEr NEW YORK CLIPPER 



11 




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Th« Cloth cast n obtai»st> wboiuaii aits 



sstail. at our ag ent s. Daw's Steamship Agency, 
' Oiaring Cross Boadl Londort. 

; Brentano's News Depot. 37 

Avenue de lOpera, Paris, France; Manila, P. L; 



17 Green Street, 

W. C. England: Brentano's News T)epot, 37 
Avenue de 1 Opera, Paris, France; Manila, P. L; 
Gordon ft Gotch, 123 Pitt: Manila Book and 
Stationery Co., 128 Escorts Street, Sydney, 
N. S. W„ Australia. 



A TIMELY WARNING 

A recent review in the San Francisco 
Chronicle of a well-known dancing act 
should Bound a warning to all performers 
to be extremely cautious in their allusions 
to the war and to the flag if they wish the 
respect and approval of their audience. 

This review is one of the first of many 
stronger ones that will follow unless cer- 
tain performers are brought to realize that 
Old Glory is not a subject to be made light 
of and that the war is not a joke. The 
American theatre-goer will quickly resent 
any facetious remarks directed at the war 
or at the cause for which a million Ameri- 
cans will give their life's blood, if neces- 
sary, and the performer would do well to 
avoid the subject altogether, rather than to 
take the chance of committing a breach. 

The newspaper review which we allude 
to, reads partly as follows: 

"The trio profers a dancing act full of 
rapid changes and excellent dances. Per- 
haps the criticism may be captious, but 
the writer of these lines believes that the 
sooner vaudeville players of eligible mili- 
tary age discover that this war is not a 
svbject for levity, the better we win be 
pleased and the more patriotism we will 
show. The spectacle of a soldier in uni- 
form dancing with two naked limbed ladies 
parading otherwise as Red Cross nurses 
and bandaging up an imaginary wound on 
the wrist does not appeal to good taste 
just now." 

The war is yet young so far as America 
is concerned, but, as the days go by, senti- 
ments like the one expressed above will 
become more and more general. It will be 
the history of England's early days in the 
war repeating itself. English audiences 
did not enjoy seeing men of eligible mili- 
tary age performing on the stage when men 
were needed at the front, and flippant allu- 
sions to the war by these performers waa 
not tolerated. The sentiment became so 
widespread that young English actors fonnd 
it extremely difficult to obtain bookings, 
if they could obtain them at all. 

If, therefore, the American performer 
realizes on which aide his bread is bat- 
tered, he will refrain from alluding to the 
nation's troubles in any way except with 
the utmost respect. 

Credit is due to the patriotism of Victor 
Morley who, evidently, has realised the 
trend of the times and has done his duty 
at a considerable personal sacrifice. Al- 
though big playlet, ?A Regular Army 
Man," had a substantial booking of some 
thirty or forty weeks ahead, Morley, of his 
own accord, has discarded the act rather 
than make light of the life of a soldier, 
as was necessary in his offering. 



Answers to Queries 

E. P. D.— (1) You are right. The 
"House of Glass" was written by Max 
Marcin. (2) We do not know. 

• • • 

S. P. — We do not keep the addresses of 
performers. - Chamberlain Brown may be 
able to tell you. 

a a a 

A. J. — (1) Tea, David Belasco produced 
"The Boomerang." (2) Write David Be- 
lasco, Belasco Theatre, New York. 

• a • • 

J. J. — (1) B wins. 'They have been to- 
gether for more- than twenty years. (2) 
Sam and Kitty are -the original Mortons. 
(3) James C. is no relation, as far as we 
can ascertain. 



J. E. — (1) The American Academy of 
Dramatic Art, the Alveine School, or the 
Washington Square School, are three good 
ones. (2) We have no way of knowing 
from your letter. 

• • • 

B. B. — Yon are right The London Bra 
is four years older. (2) About twenty 
years. 

» • » 

H. S. — For any information regarding 
Oscar Hammerstein, write Arthur Ham- 
merstein, Tilden Building. 

• • • 

R. W. — The play of "Eben Holden" was 
dramatized from the novel of the same 
name and was first presented with E. M. 
Holland in the title role. 

• • • 

C. T. — A wins. Maude Fulton, the 
actress-author, was formerly of the team 
of Bock and Fulton. 



DENIES MARRIAGE TO CARR 

Editor New York Clipper : 

I see by last week's Cltpfeh an an- 
nouncement of my marriage to one 
"Eddie Carr." WU1 yon kindly deny 
this, as I do not know Mr. Carr and 
there is no foundation to the story. I 
do not care to have my name involved 
in any such a ridiculous rumor. 
Sincerely, 
Constance Farber, 
(Of Farber Girls.) 
Rye Gate, Rye, N. Y., 
Sept 3. 



ANNIE ABBOTT NOT "CANNED" 

Editor New York Clipper, Heu> York 

City. 

Dear Sir — I wish to deny the truthful- 
ness of an article in a recent issue of a 
theatrical weekly. 

I have been in retirement for several 
years; spending my Summers here and 
my Winters at my Florida home. 

I have not given a performance since I 
closed on the United time in 1914, and 
have not been in Chicago in three or four 
years. I do not like to see managers im- 
posed upon in this manner, and it might 
be some protection to those disposed to 
employ such im posters to know t hat my 
act has been handled by Mr. Alf Wilton 
for many years, and could not be secured 
through any other source. 

I have many good friends in the pro- 
fession who would be greatly pained to 
think I had been "canned," and the pub- 
lication of this win relieve them. 

Thanking you for the favor, I remain, 

Yours sincerely, ANNIE ABBOTT. 

No. 40 Anderson Street, New Bochelie, 
N. Y., August 25, 1917. 



25 YEARS AGO 

H. J. Conor was with "A Trip to 

Chinatown." 

E. W. Chipman and the Arion Quin- 
tet were with Arlington's Minstrels. 

Sam Collins played "Oreppo" in the 
"Black Crook" revival at the Academy of 
Music, New York. 

The New Gerry Society law went into 
effect in New York. It pat the question 
as to whether a child could appear up to 
the Mayor, instead of having Mr. Gerry 
decide the question. 

"My Sweetheart's the Man in the Moon" 
was published by Frank Harding. 



3* 



•*s 



R I A L T 6 



"m^m 




TjT L.E$ 



ANGLING 

Margaret is Anglin* for Daly's Theatre. 



ALMOST A POKD JOKE 
- Ford and Goodrich auto ran well to- 
gether. 



AT LAST! 

There is one place where every one 
prefers the dosing spot Ifs in the army. 

HER PRICE 

E. D. Price is in advance of "Here 
Comes the Bride." In other words, he 
leads the bridal procession. 



MAYBE KISCHNEFF WILL BE NEXT 
Since the song writers have forsaken 
Hawaii, they don't seem to be able to 
find any other place to write about 



WHO'LL BOOK "EM? 

According to the dailies, Senators La 
Follette and Stone would make a good 
team of Dutch comedians. 



THANK YOU, MR MICHAELS! 

We note that Joe Michaels has a supply 
of cigars on hand again. Left hand upper 
drawer of his desk, friends! 



IT'S BEING DONE 

Who ever heard of a stockhouse playing 
vaudeville? If you haven't, go up to the 
Eighty-first Street Theatre. 



REEL STUFF 

Harry Steinfeld, tbe theatrical lawyer, 
says that he likes Eva Tanguay's voice 
better since she is in pictures. 



WHAT'S IN A NAME? 

According to the critics, "This Way 
Out" may have to follow, its own direc- 
tions. 



A STICKER 

Song writers, awake! Isn't it time for 
a song about Camouflage? But what are 
yon going to find to rhyme with it? 



TOO DIS-MANTLED 

Since Barns Mantle doesn't like "Mary's 
Ankle," May Tully had better get a longer 
dress for Mary. 



TO ARMS! TO ARMS1 

If General Bell is right when he says 
that a singing man is a fighting man, make 
room in the first trench for the Shnbert 
chorus boys. 

A PERTINENT QUESTION 

Aren't the drinks on Nick Hanley? 
We're still reading about the war on 
page one of the dailies. 



NEW EXPERIMENT 

Herbert Brenon is going to start a pro- 
duction on "Empty Pockets." First time a 
big producer started a film on anything 
less than $10,000. 



SEAL ADVICE 

If yon are an actor 

And don't want to go to war, 
Get into a khaki suit 

And join tbe recruiting corps. 



COUPLING CARRS 

A brakeman would have been the best 
fitted fellow to have united Constance 
Faber and Eddie Carr in marriage, for he 
is accustomed to car coupling. 



THE FOLLY OF IT 

Walter Catlett and S. Jay Kauffman had 
a short fisticuff, and now Catlett has with- 
drawn from the Follies. We suppose he 
has decided that his follies are over. 



WE FERVENTLY HOPE SO 

Harry Monntford has taken the stomp 
for the Red Cross, for which he is to be 
commended. But lefs hope be is more 
successful for the Red Cross than be waa 
for the Rabs. 



BATTLER'S .REVIEWS OF SHDWS 
"Daybreak" — Goodnight. . 
"Mary's Ankle"— Some class. I • 
"The Knife"— Cutting tragedy. 
"Tie Lassoo" — Boped for $2. 
"This Way Out"— WhieS way? 

PUT THIS IN YOUR ACT 

We've made up a gag. If you want your 
act to flop, just try this: " 

Patient— Why de- you look so blue? 

Dentist — Ifs my business to look down 
in the month. 



A JOKE ON CHESTERFIELD 

When we saw Henry Chesterfield leave 
the N. V. A club rooms to go out and eat 
it reminded us of an old chestnut story: 
A man went into a restaurant and asked 
for the proprietor. "He just stepped out 
for lunch, sir!" answered the waiter. 



FITTING NAMES 

Granville English has been accepted for 
the draft army. So has Stuart Fran*. Is 
there a performer whose' last name Is 
American, so that we can complete the 
triumvirate? Johnny Tuerk has also been 
accepted. Hell have to change his name. 

CONTRADICTIONS 
Harry Singer never won any prises for 

singing. 

Charles Seamon has never been to sea. 

Harry Green is rather wise. 

Haaxard Short is quite tall. - 
' Louis Stone has a warm heart 
. Nellie Nichols is not a jitney. 



FAMILIAR HEADLINES: 

Dolly Sisters at Palace. 

Eddie Foy Must Have Permit 

Bolton, Wodehouse and Kern Write 
Play. 

Film Company Fails. 

Record Season Last Year. 

Next Year Will be Record Season. 



A HAIR RAISING INCIDENT 

Tis a secret ! Bernard Granville had a 
little moustache which be intended to' ex- 
hibit to the patrons of the Bushwick The- 
atre last, week, but he "didn't feel just 
right" with it on. So, at the eleventh 
hour, be called his trusty Gillette into 
play. 



ON BROADWAY'S B0R5D WALK 

Jim Toney, looking lonesome at an N. 
V. A. dance. 

Sam Abrams greeting old friends. 

Blossom Seeley receiving congratulations 
—on her act! 

Billy Gibson talking to three girls at the 
same time. 



A BIT 0' FREE VERSE 

You have eyes like Anna Held i 

Yon have a figure like Annette Keller- 



Tour voice la like Ethel Barrymore's ! 

Arms like Ruth St Denis! 

Curls like Mary Pickford! 

But oh, love, can you make up beds? 

Can you cook? 

Can yon do housework? 

HEARD ON THE RIALTO 

"On Monday we start thirty-two weeks 
of two-a-day." 

"They can keep their pictures. Give me 
stock every time." 

"Isn't Harry Weber a handsome fel- 
low r 

"We're going to cut out that gag 
everybody's using it" 



WEEK'S MOST STARTLING NEWS: 

Tbe Enterprise of East Jordan, Mich., 
informs us : 

"Mr. Adams, while one of the best 
hearted men in existence, finds his time 
fully taken up with hi* duties at the 
Fnraace and Chemical plant, and just had 
to give up the Temple Theatre, which waa 
a side line. No one can make as good a 
success of any side line aa be can of a 
main posh in which be concentra te s his 
energies." 



-12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5, 1917 




FIFTH AVENUE 

STOCK OPENS 

SEASON 

MAKES FAVORABLE BEGINNING 



The Fifth Avenue Theatre Stock Com- 
pany last week opened it's season under 
favorable auspices with Owen Davis' three- 
act comedy, "Mile-a-Minute Kendall." as 
the offering. The house was packed to the 
doors by an audience that was so deter- 
mined to give .the company a most hearty 
welcome that every member of the organ- 
ization, old and new, was given a recep- 
tion. ■ - 

• Of course, Edmund Abbey, Edward Davis 
and W. O. Mac Walters, favorites of last 
season's company, were singled out for 
siieeial demonstrations and the ovations ac- 
corded them must have warmed the cockles 
of their hearts. 

Stage Director Harry Home was of- 
ficial speechmaker and, in this capacity 
Introduced the various members of the 
company. At the close, the audience took 
them all, old favorites and newcomers alike, 
to its heart. 

The performance was excellent. Mae 
Melvin, the new leading lady, essayed the 
role of Joan Evans in a manner that won 
her instant favor. 

Edmund Abbey gave a capital portrayal 
of Jim Evans, W. O. MacWatters did 
forceful work in the title role . and Ed- 
ward Davis was fully equal to the require- 
ments of the role of Judge Weeks. 

Caroline Morrison gave a good perform- 
ance of Amelia, and Aubrey Bosworth did 
well as Eddie Semper. Edna Preston, 
Opal Essent, Edward Van, William Short, 
William Davidge and Eleanor Bennett all 
aided in making the opening a success. 

With the start fully up to the high 
Standard set by last season's company, 
there is every reason to expect that the 
same level will be continued. 

The same high grade of plays have been 
booked for this season, and from time to 
time will be seen some of the most recent 
releases of Broadway successes. 

There" wlli be the usual ten weekly per- 
formances, six nights and four matinees. 
The prices will remain the same. 

Stage Director Harry Home, after see- 
ing the season successfully launched, left 
last Wednesday to take charge of another 
house, an'd was succeeded by Aubrey 
Xoyes. 

"Mile-a-Minute Kendall" was continued 
during last week. " This week "Rich Man, 
Poor Many-will be the attraction. 



STOCK. REX URNS TO JERSEY CITY 

Jersey Cut, «ept 3U — The Academy 
of Music returned to-night to its former 
poliey -of .dTamatic stock, under the direc- 
tion of Jay Packard, who was associated 
with the. successful. stock company at this 
house two seasons ago. Packard has se- 
cured an excellent., comffllny, . wMch in- 
cludes several of the members who were 
former favorites here, including Edward 
MacMillan, James .Marr and Bessie Shel- 
don. Hazel Corinne is leading lady, and 
Gus Forbes leading man, with Dan Mal- 
loy doing the comedy roles. Claude Mil- 
ler is stage director. Ther.opening bill, 
"The Woman Who PaidJ* will be held 
over for next week, with a special Labor 
Day matinee. The regular matinees will 
be given" every day except Mondays and 
Fridays. 



LEAVE GORDON TO JOIN BUBB 

Blue Hill. Neb., Aug. 26. — Louise 
Buckley and Lenore De Larsh have left 
the Gordon Players to join George H. 
Bubb's "Ikey and Abey" company, to 
play ingenues and soubrettes. David 
Rivers also left the same show to join 
Mr. Bubb. 



WILKES PLAYERS OPEN SEASON 

Sait Lake City, Sept. 2. — The Wilkes 
Players opened their season to-night with 
"Common Clay." The company includes: 
Nana Bryant, Claire Sinclair, Mae Thome, 
Ralph Kloninger, Ernest Van Pelt, 
Ancyn T. McNulty, Frederick Moore, Cliff 
Thompson, Frank Bonner, George Barnes, 
and Huron L. Blyden, stage director. 
Ancyn T. McNulty is writing a play which 
Manager Wilkes will produce here this sea- 
son. Nana Bryant, Claire Sinclair, 
Ancyn T. McNulty, Cliff Thompson and 
Huron L. Blyden have been under the 
management of Tom Wilkes since the open- 
ing of his first stock house, which was in 
Salt Lake City three years ago. 



GIVE WATCH TO MANAGER CALVIN 

Wilkesbarre, Pa., Sept 3. — The Poll 
Players, headed by Director Harry E. 
McKee, presented Manager John J. Galvin 
a gold watch and chain as a parting token 
of appreciation of his many kindnesses. 
The company closing to-night included : 
Grace Huff, Nan Bernard, May B. Hurst, 
Marie Hodgkins. Alma Rutherford, Ed- 
ward Everett . Horton. Frank G. Bond, 
Arthur Buchannon, Rexford Burnett, Dan 
Davis, Jack McKee, Jack Roche and Karle 
O. Amend. 



LIBERTY PLAYERS OPEN SEPT. 3 

' San Diego, Cal., Aug. 30. — The Liberty 
Players, under the direction of Mrs. 
Dorothy Millias, will open an engagement 
at the Strand next Monday. "Under 
Cover" will be the opening attraction, with 
a change of bill weekly. Ray D. Clifton is 
stage director. The company consists of 
twelve players, headed by Winnifred 
Greenwood. 



TULANE OPENS STOCK SEASON 

New Orleans, La., Sept. 2. — The 
Comic Opera Players opened the new sea- 
son to-night at the Tulane Theatre. Their 
first offering is "The Firefly," and the fol- 
lowing cast is employed: Florence Weber, 
Frank Moulan, Alice Hills, Christie Mac- 
Donald, George Bognes, Matt Hanley, 
Norma Brown and Eulalie Young. 



BRIDGEPORT HAS MUSIC STOCK 

Bridgeport, Conn., Aug. 31. — Under the 
management of Poli & Isham, the Lyric 
Theatre, bousing the first musical stock 
company Bridgeport has ever had, will open 
on Labor Day. The prospect looks very 
bright, the management believing that 
Bridgeport is ripe for musical stock at this 
time. 



WITHDRAWS PLAY FROM STOCK 

Columbus, Ohio, Aug. 29. — The title of 
A. G. Delamater's new play is "Almost a 
Mother" and not "Nearly a Mother," as 
previously announced. The play will not be 
given in stock, bnt will have its first pro- 
duction on the road, with a speical cast, 
and go to New York later. 



BROADWAY TO SEE "THE PIRATE" 

Milwaukee, Wis., Aug. 31. — r Ludwig 
Fulda's fantastical comedy "The Pirate," 
which was produced last week at the Pabst 
Theatre by Wallis Clark, has received 
much favorable notice from the critics and 
will be given an early New York City pro- 
duction. 



BROCKTON MAY SEE NEW PLAY 

Brockton, Mass., Sept. 1. — "The 
Hornefs Nest," a dramatization by 
George Brinton Beal, of Mrs. Woodrow 
Wilson's novel, is being considered for 
production by Manager Warren O'Hara, of 
the Hathaway Players. 

CLARK REJOINS "IBBETSON" CO. 

Milwaukee, Wis.. Aug. 3L — Wallis 
Clark, who has been heading the Summer 
stock at the Pabst Theatre, here, leaves for 
New Xork to open at the Republic Theatre, 
next week in "Peter Ibbetson," in which 
he appeared last season. 



HARRY HORNE 

OPENS CO. IN 

PATERSON 

ASSUMES CHARGE OF EMPIRE 



Paterson, N. J., Sept. 1. — The Empire 
Theatre opened the season here to-night in 
a blaze of glory, with a new company and 
new management. "The House of Glass" 
was the offering, and it is the consensus of 
opinion that the performance was one of 
the best ever given in this city. 

HarryHorne is the new manager and 
stage director, 7 a fact which assures the 
theatregoing public of Paterson of the 
best in the amusement line. 

Society turned out in full force for "the 
opening, and the members of the company ' 
were made to feel that they were among 
friends. There were the usual first-night 
speeches, floral tributes and congratulations 
all around. 

In selecting his plays for the season. 
Director Home has aimed to secure the 
best that has ever been presented in stock 
in this city. In fact, for the most part, 
the plays he will present are from among 
those which have heretofore only been 
given by traveling companies. "The 
House of Glass" will be retained this week 

The management will cater to the best 
class of patrons and, already, the reser- 
vations for seats for the . season are big. 
The top price of seats will continue to be 
$1, and there will be eleven performances 
a week, six nights and a matinee every 
day bnt Monday. 

The roster of the company is: Ernia, 
Edith Gray ; Erwin, Ruth Le Claire, Edith 
Bowers, Jack Doty, John Whitman, Frank 
Base, Victor Fletcher, Forrest Orr, Harry 
Fischer and Lester Howard. 



WILKES ENTERS B'WAY FIELD 
Seattle, Wash., Aug. 29.— The Pacific 
Theatre Corporation, whose activities have 
heretofore been confined to operating stock 
theatres in Seattle and Salt Lake City, 
will invade the field of Eastern producing 
managers within the next month. 

The first offering of the new concern will 
be a play called "Broken Threads," a 
comedy drama in prologue and three acts 
by 'William Ernest Wilkes. The play was' 
presented in Seattle during the Summer 
and its local success was so pronounced 
that it was voted a worthy contender for 
Eastern honors. The managing director of 
the new concern is Lodewick Vroom, who 
has taken a suite of offices in the Fulton 
Theatre building and will begin assembling 
a cast for the play. 



STAR PLAYERS BEGIN TOUR 

SoMEBvnxE, Mass., Aug. 28. — The Star 
Players, which will play the principal 
New England cities this season, opened 
here last week in a musical comedy written 
by Mathew Ott, and entitled "Seven Hours 
from New York." This week the company 
is playing "Oh, Johnnie." The roster of 
the company includes: John Dugan, Jack 
Fairbanks, Richard Barry, Ruth Fielding, 
Florence; Major. Jeanette Darling, Billie J. 
Morrisey and a chorus. 



K & E STOCK STARTS SEASON 

San Francisco, Aug. 29. — The first 
stock company of Klaw and Erlanger gave 
its initial performance last night at the 
Columbia Theatre, presenting the Atwell- 
Marcin three-act play "Here Comes the 
Bride," which is being simultaneously pro- 
duced in Boston. The company, which in-, 
eludes Bertha Mann, Harrison Ford, 
Suzanne Morgan and other popular play- 
ers, acquitted itself with credit Marc 
Klaw, who arranged for the production has 
made Ms departure for the East, now that 
things are running satisfactorily. 

POLI PLAYERS END SEASON 

Wilkesbabbe, Pa., Sept. 3. — The Poli 
Players closed to-night a fourteen weeks* 
stay, which has been the most successful 
season Poli has ever had in this city. 



LEAVES STOCK FOR VAUDE. 

Emily Smiley, who has been appearing in 
dramatic stock during the past season, will 
return to vaudeville with her dramatic 
sketch, "Her Great Chance." 



PLAYERS JOIN CHASE-LISTER CO. 

Hablah, la., Aug. 2T. — Jack Haggerty, 
Louise Gordon and Jack Haggerty, Jr., 
joined the Chase-Lister Company here for 
the season. 



. TULSA OPENED LABOR DAY 

Tulsa, Okla., Sept 3. — The stock com- 
pany at the Grand Theatre, here, opened 
the season tonight with "Alias Jimmy 
Valentine." The production is elaborate 
and a credit to Director Harry F. Vickery 
and scenic artist James Johnson. During 
the summer, - the house was redecorated 
and re-carpeted and presents a bright ap- 
pearance. The company includes Ella 
Kramer, Laura Love, Mary Enos, Capitola 
Crumley, W&it Brandon, Keith Ritchie, 
Tom McElhany, Clayton Sinclair, James 
Johnson, Harry Hoxworth, Harry Vickery, 
and Cliff Hastings. L. K. Powell is man- 
ager. 

EMERSON PLAYERS OPEN SEASON 

Lowell, Mass., Sept 3. — The Emerson 
Players opened tonight their third season 
at the Opera Honse, with "Shirley Kaye" 
as the bilL The company includes- Ken- 
dall Weston, manager and director: Ray 
Walling, Robert Laurence, J. Ellis Kirk- 
bam, Jerome Kennedy, Chas. Crymble, 
Albert Berg, stage manager; Winnifred 
Wellington, Mary Morris, Emma De Weale, 
Gladys McLeod, William Bevins is scenic 
artist. "Hit-the-Trail Holliday" is next 
week's bill. 



ELBERT-GETCHELL STOCK OPENS 

Des Moines, la., Aug. 28.— The Elbert 
and Getehell Stock Company opened their 
regular season here last week. The com- 
pany includes: Alice Clements, Selma 
Jackson, Grace Young, Flo Murray, 
Agnes Everett, Turner Ford, Van B. Bur- 
rell, J. A. Young, W. J. Mack and Jack 
Matthews. 



STOCK THEATRE SOLD 

Lynn, Mass., Aug. 29. — The Auditorium 
Theatre, this city, which has been operated 
as a stock bouse, was sold this week to 
Attorney Charles Leighton, representing a 
Boston theatrical syndicate, for $15,750. 
The sale resulted from a first mortgage of 
$15,000 held by the Lynn Savings bank. 



SOMERVTLLE PLAYERS OPEN 

Somebvtlle, Mass., Sept 3. — The Som- 
erville Theatre Players opened their regular 
season here, to-day with a special matinee 
presenting "Mile a Minute Kendall." The 
house has been thoroughly overhauled arid 
presents a bright appearance. 



LEVY OPENS SEASON 

Jack Levy opened his season with the 
Dreamland Burlesquers at Lansford, Pa., 
on Labor Day, instead of Boonton, N. J. 
The show is booked on one nighters through 
Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and Michigan. 



JOINS ST. PAUL STOCK 

. St. Paul, Minn., Sept 3. — Richard La 
Salle has replaced Victor Browne here as 
leading man of the Shubert Stock Co. 

JOIN WESSELMAN-WOOD PLAYERS 

Ebxckson, Neb., Aug. 27. — Leland Mc- 
Neese. Jack White and Dora Woodruff 
have joined the Wesselman-Wood Flayers 
here. 



September 5; 1917 



THE NEW YO*K CLIPPER 



13 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




FOR ADVERTISING 

RATES 
Phone Randolph 5423 



W.V.M.A.MINOR 

CIRCUIT GETS 

STARTED 

OPENED AT MINOT. AUG. 29 



Plans for the putting into operation of 
tbe new minor or second circuit of the 
Western Vaudeville Managers' Association 
were considerably advanced during the 
last week. Routes were laid ont and the 
first show opened at Minot, North Dakota, 
August 29. 

The Kellie-Borns Theatrical Booking 
Association, of Seattle, will have charge of 
the booking of the new circuit which will, 
when it is completed, cover more than 
fifty towns of the West and Northwest 
and give more than thirty weeks* booking 
time. 

The Kellie-Burns interests will send out 
road' shows, each show featuring four 
vaudeville acts. These shows will play 
split weeks, and will follow each other 
around the circuit. The show that opened 
in Minot on tbe 29th will reach San 
Francisco about November 1. 

All of the shows will start from Chi- 
cago and there, with contracts from Mort 
H. Singer, will play some of the Western 
Vaudeville Managers' Association time, 
after which they will play Minnesota and 
Wisconsin through the Paul Goudron of- 
fices. They will then jump to Minot, to 
begin their tour of the new circuit, which 
will take them through North Dakota, 
Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, 
British Columbia, California, Nevada, 
Utah, Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska. 

After playing the Kellie-Burns' time, tbe 
acts will be taken up by Bert Christie, at 
Sale Lake City. Christie, in turn, win 
route them to Denver. At Denver they will 
be booked by the Charlie Jacobs' office as 
far east as Alliance, Nebraska. 

From Alliance they will continue east- 
ward on the Western Vaudeville Man- 
agers' Circuit again and, on this circuit, 
will play their way back to Chicago. 

Under this arrangement, acts will be 
enabled to make an entire loop from Chi- 
cago to the Coast and back to Chicago. 

Edward H. Kellie, one of the heads of 
the new circuit, is now busily engaged in 
a tour of the West, engaging theatres for 
his acts. He was in San Francisco last 
week, and, while there, completed arrange- 
ments for tbe Alhambra and Garrick the- 
atres. 

Bert E. Levy, who, for many years, was 
manager of the juvenile Bostonians, has 
been made manager of the Grand Theatre, 
at Minot. 



GIRL REVUE OUT 

Owing to the fact that the "girl revue," 
running as a permanent attraction at the 
Avenue Theatre, of which Louis Wein- 
berg is manager, was not to the liking 
of the W. V. M. A., which formerly 
booked the house, Manager Weinberg has 
discontinued it and last week found the 
usual five-act bill of vaudeville at the 
Avenue. 



"OH, SO HAPPY" CLOSES 

The "Oh, So Happy" company, playing 
at Powers' Theatre, cut snort its run 
there Saturday night, though announced 
to run until Sept. 8. 

It moved to New York, where it opened 
Monday under the name of "Good Night, 
PauL" 



SIGNS WITH "FOLUES" 

Charlotte Whiting, who appeared with 
the three weeks girl revue at the Avenue 
Theatre, joined the Garden Follies at 
White City last week. Raymond Midgley 
produced acts. 



STARTS NOVELTY GAME 

T. F. Graham, of the Giant Safety 
Coaster at Forrest Park, staged a new 
and novel game on the grounds of the 
park last Thursday afternoon, consisting 
of two teams of three men each, armed 
with water hose. The men played force 
streams of water on a huge football, the 
idea being to "water it" past tbe opposing 
side. It served great amusement for both 
player and spectator, and will likely hold 
forth as a permanent attraction for the 
rest of the park's season. 



DU VRIES TO SUE B. & O. 

Sam Du "Vries, the local vaudeville 
agent, will file suit against the B. & O. 
Railroad to recover a loss of five weeks' 
bookings of a diving act, at the rate of 
$200 a week. 

Following the closing of the Berlo 
Sisters' tank act at Indianapolis, several 
weeks ago, Du Vries' stage manager had 
the tank and equipment for the act shipped 
via the B. & O. road to Chicago. The 
equipment got lost somewhere, and it took 
five weeks to find it. 



POWERS TO HAVE NEW ONE 

"Mister Antonio," with Otis Skinner, 
will begin bis engagement at Power's The- 
atre September 10, surplanting tbe present 
attraction, "Oh, So Happy." The Skinner 
company will flaunt Joseph Brennan, 
Eleanor Woodruff, Robert Harrison, 
Frances Landy and Agnes Marc also in 
its cast. The Herz company has gone to 
New York. 



"CANARY COTTAGE ,, FOR OLYMPIC 

Following a five weeks' engagement of 
the new "Parlor, Bedroom and Bath," at 
the Olympic Theatre, Oliver Morosco's 
"Canary Cottage," with Trixie Friganzi, 
Herbert Corthrell, Dorothy Webb and 
Charlie Buggies heading the cast, will 
open there September 30. 



PALACE VAUDE. REOPENS 

With the closing of the "Show of 
Wonders," after a long Summer run, the 
Palace Music Hall regained its vaudeville 
stride last week without losing a day. 
Emily Ann Wellman, Nellie V. Nichols and 
Rooney and Bent headed tbe programme. 



ORR'S MUSICAL SHOW OPENS 

Harvey D. Orr's new musical comedy, 
"There She Goes," opened the official sea- 
son of the Bell Opera House at Benton 
Harbor, Mich., August 26. and with the 
Senior Drr and his son, Harold, in the 
comedy roles, scored big. 



MABEL VANN GRANTED DIVORCE 

Mabel Vann, who last starred with Fiske 
O'Hara, was granted a divorce in Min- 
neapolis recently from her husband, Ro- 
maine Fielding, and has resumed her 
maiden name, Mabel Van Valkenburg. 



HAS NEW MANAGEMENT 

The Moulin Rouge Garden is now under 
the management of Albert H. Rey, who 
formerly managed the States Restaurant. 
Nicholas Boilla is staging a new revue 
there. 



REICHARDT SISTERS SIGNED 

The Reichardt Sisters (Reinie and 
Florence) have signed to appear in Charlie 
Boyer*s new act which went into rehearsals 
in New York this week. 



RAHN & HAMILTON IN REVUE 

Paul Rabn and Gail Hamilton head the 
new revue that went on in Merrie Garden 
in the Planters Hotel last week. 



MABEL FLORENCE RETIRES 

Mabel Florence has retired from the 
show business and is now living in Peoria, 
TJL 



RAVINIA SINGERS CLOSE 
The Ravinia Park singers concluded their 
Summer engagement of opera Labor Day. 



HODKINS TOUR 

LIKES "PAN" 

SHOWS 



STRONG BILLS FIND FAVOR 



The southwest addition to the Pantages 
Circuit, better known under the designa- 
tion of the Hodkins tour, is now playing 
Pantagea shows, and the new brand of 
variety material has found favor. 

The first road show to make the tour 
is composed of Capt. Sorcho, Bevan and 
Flint, Stoddard and Hines, Queenie Dune- 
din and Edith Haney. 

The second show has the "Beauty Or- 
chard" as its feature, the company being 
composed of Frank Sinclaire, Cliff Dixon, 
Catherine Creed, Babe Dunbar, Ada Clark, 
Helen Crewe, Grace Wallace and Margaret 
Clancy. The rest of the show includes 
Minnie Allen and Company, Harlan Knight 
and Company, Olson and Johnson and 
Alexadria. 

The third show, which opened Sept. 2, 
has "The Hong Kong Girls," William 
Schilling and Company, Will and May 
Rogers, Willie Hale and Brothers, and Bil- 
ly Small. "The Hong Kong" act, pre- 
sented by Hilliam, Brown and Magin- 
etti, includes Tom Brown, Rodney Hilliam, 
William Maginetti, Eleanor Robinson, 
George Widney, Ruth Jensen, Herbert 
Duffey, Clifford Van Dyke, Nell Gates, 
Margaret Clinton, Alice Edwards and 
Clara Moon. 



DAVIS HEADS STROLLERS' CLUB 

Will J. Davis Is now acting president 
of the Strollers' club. Robert Sherman 
resigned at a recent meeting and Davis, 
being first vice president is advanced to 
the place of honor. Several meetings 
have been held recently with the Idea of 
continuing that organization or forming 
a new one. 



"THE OLD COUNTRY" CASTED 

Dion Caltbrop's new play. "The Old 
Country," will contain the following cast: 
Jane Houston, Maud Milton, Katherine 
Brook, Cecilia Radcliffe, H. A. Tonge. 
Edwin Cushman, James Galloway, Robert 
Forsyth, Hallet Thompson and others. 



CASTLE CAN'T RESIGN 

L. Andrew Castle's resignation as 
Chicago representative of the Actors' 
Equity Association, was not accepted 
last week, the council ruling that he 
could represent the organization at Cauip 
Grant at Rockford just as well as he 
did when traveling on the road. 



DOROTHY WILLIAMS RETURNS 

After several weeks' engagement as 
prima donna of the Kenny Musical Stock 
Company at the Orpheum, Louisville, 
Dorothy Williams has returned to Chicago 
and is shaping up a new single for the 
varieties. 



CHRISTY GOES TO NEW YORK 

Wayne Christy, local agent, left this 
city for New York Monday to do business 
at his metropolitan address in the Palace 
Theatre building. 



TABLOID STARTS SEASON 

Boyle Woolfolk's "The Merry-Go- 
Round," a tabloid, fashioned after the 
big revues, opened recently at East 
Chicago. 



CAT ALAN O TO PLAY U. S. TIME 

Henry Catalano, a vaudevillian, will 
go into training at Rockford, TJL, for 
Uncle Sam next week. 



McKOWEN MAY BE MAJOR 

James B. McKowen, head of the agency 
of that name in the Western Vaudeville 
Managers' Association, and who is a mem- 
ber of the Second Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Camp, at Ft. Sheridan, is reported to 
be in line for promotion to the rank of 
Major. 

McKowen was at one time a member 
of the Clipper Quartette in vaudeville. 
Jess Freeman is in charge of the local 
McKowen office. 



"GOODBYE BOYS" OPENS 

"Goodbye Boys," a musical farce, had 
its premiere at the Princess Theatre Sat- 
urday night. It is a musical version of 
"Billy," a three-act farce which was 
popular a few years ago. 

In the cast are Edgar Atchison-Ely, 
Natalie Alt, Eddie Garvle, Dolly Castles, 
Edward Basse, Beth Franklyn, John Al- 
lison, Maude Allison and the dancing 
team, Handers & Millls. 



EDWARDS MANAGING INDIANA 

With the opening of the Indiana The- 
atre, Saturday, Sept. 1, with its regular 
vaudeville and picture policy, George Ed- 
wards was found managing the house. 
Three six-act bills per week are being 
booked by Walter Downie, who just re- 
turned from a rest at West Baden. 



FRIEDENWALD'S TAB OPENS 

Norman Friedenwald's tabloid, "My 
Honolulu Girl," opened its season at 
Muncie, Intl., Monday. The company in- 
cludes a Hawaiian troupe, Alice Berry, 
Rose Stevens, Ned Melroy, Frank Wil- 
liams, Con Daly, Enid Rodriguez and a 
chorus of eight. 

APOLLO CHANGES HANDS 

The Apollo Theatre has changed hands 
and is now owned by a man named Engel, 
owner of the Columbia Theatre at In- 
diana Harbor. It is running five acts and 
feature pictures, managed and booked by 
Mile. Sidoni. 



TWO MORE HOUSES OPEN 

The Erie and Virginia theatres, both 
playing vaudeville and pictures, opened 
for another season last week, the former 
under the management of F. C. Menzing 
and the latter tinder W. E. Heaney's 
direction. 



WILSON HAS NEW FACES 

Two new faces seen in the box office 
of the Wilson Avenue Theatre, when the 
house began its regular vaudeville season 
Thursday night oP last week, were those 

of Jack Lawrie and Dawson Hastings. 

FORM NEW QUARTETTE 

• A newly organized quartette, composed 
of Messrs. Kelly, De Lucas, Johnson and 
La Barr, began working as the Golden 
Gate Four at the Banner Theatre Sunday. 



LEDERER MANAGING PASTIME 

Sam Lederer, formerly manager of the 
Olympic Theatre for several seasons, is 
now managing the Pastime, a motion pic- 
ture and vaudeville house in the Loop. • 



ORGANIZES A QUI N T E TTE 

Hazel Kirke will shortly be seen in a 
new act called "The Hazel Kirke Quint- 
ette," under the direction of Dwight 
Pepple. 



HAYMARKET STOCK OPENS 

The Haymarket Theatre, for many sea- 
sons a favorite burlesque stock house, 
opened Aug. 31 with a Yiddish stock com- 
pany. 



KENOSHA HOUSE OPENS 

Booked by the W. V. M. A. Office, the 
Virginia Theatre, at Kenosha, Wis., 
opened its season last week. ■ ' 



14 



f HE NEW TOVLK ■ CLIPPER 



Septembac; £,-. 1917 




PROFESSIONAL MEN 

NOW PUT TO TEST 



Elimination of Payment Syitem la De- 
monstrating the Actual Worth of 
Publisher*' Outside Repre- 



Siaee the publishers of popular music 
decided to put an end to the paying- of 
singers to introduce songs in the theatres 
- the professional managers of the big 
houses have suddenly found themselves in 
the position of having to demonstrate 
their actual worth to their employers. 

As long as the payment system con- 
tinued, with other things equal, the pro- 
fessional manager with the strongest fi- 
nancial backing accomplished most in the 

way of having his publications featured in 

the theatres. As there was no check- be- 
tween publishers to determine just how 
many singers received money, the amount 
of work of the professional manager 
was comparatively easy. If he could 
not get action on the song's merits he 
simply had to resort to the check book 
which generally obtained the desired re- 
sult. 

With the loss of the financial argument, 
however, the professional man who had lost 
the enthusiasm so necessary in this work, 
suddenly found his lot a bard one and the 
experiences that one or two of these man- 
agers are having at present are far from 
pleasant. The young, hustling friend- 
making professional man has adapted him- 
self to the new conditions and is placing 
his songs almost as readily as in the past 
but some of the older ones are finding it 
almost impossible to get one of their songs 
in the repertoire of a big time artist. 

The professional manager that is unable 
to place his employer's songs with the 
headline singers is of little value, and with 
the theatrical season now in full swing, 
there are some anxious faces at the weekly 
conferences held in some of the big pub- 
lishing offices. 



NEW SONG HIT HEARD 

Gilbert and Friedland have again pro- 
vided the profession with a success. This 
time it is "Set Aside Your Tears," an ap- 
pealing song which has a prominent place 
in their own act now appearing at the 
Riverside Theatre in New York. "Set 
Aside Tour Tears" has made an unusual 
impression upon the audiences at the va- 
rious houses in which these two young 
writers have appeared commencing at Hen- 
derson's and the Palace a few weeks ago. 
It is just the sort of song that appears to 
catch on best at this time. It contains 
neither gun-fire nor recruiting appeals but 
has a highly useful little message- just the 
same, set to a beautiful melody. It was 
written by L. Wolfe Gilbert. Malvin 
Franklin and Anatol Friedland. Jos. W. 
Stern & Go. are the publishers of the num- 
ber. 



PHIL KORNHEISER EXPLAINS 

Phil. . Kornheiser, professional manager 
of the Leo Feist house, says the non-pay- 
ment system has had little effect upon 
the Feist catalogue. 

During the past few weeks a greater 
number of singing acts have used the Feist 
publications than ever before, and in con- 
sequence the professional quarters, over 
which Mr. Kornheiser has charge, are 
crowded to the doors with singers. 

"All one needs in these days," said 
Phil, "is the songs and the ability to hustle 
and put 'em over. We have both." 

REISNER SIGNS FOR SEASON 

0. Francis Reisner, writer of "Good- 
Bye Broadway, Hello France," has signed 
with tbe "Watch Tour Step" company, 
and will this season be seen in the part 
formerly played by Harry Fox. 



BELLE BAKER SINGS NEW SONG 
Another big Jos. W. Stern & Co. hit is 
the late novelty creation "Some day Some- 
body's Gonna Get Yon." This song is one 
of the features of Gilbert and Friedland's 
performance in vaudeville. It happens 
that the number is also being used by 
Belle Baker and that she and Gilbert and 
Friedland both played the same bill at 
Morrison's Rockaway last week. Miss 
Baker consented to stop using the number 
just for that one week but expressed her- 
self as being very much disappointed that 
she was unable to use it at that house. 
She felt; however, that it was absolutely 
essential to the act of the writers and 
therefore gave in to them. 

It is being used by many other headline 
acta with a great deal of success, which it 
richly merits inasmuch as it seems to be 
a sure hit with any audience anywhere. 



NAN HALPERIN HAS NOVELTY 
Jos. W. Stem & Co. nave a very suc- 
cessful number in "Oh, Yon Wonderful 
Girls," the work of Wm. B. Friedlander, 
whose reputation as a writer of excellent 
material is constantly on the increase. This 
number is being featured by Miss Nan Hal- 
perin, America's favorite singing charac- 
teriste (all of whose numbers are written 
by Mr. Friedlander), by Ray Raymond in 
Ziegfeld's Midnight Frolics and in the pre- 
tentious vaudeville production 'The Four 
Husbands." It is also employed by many 
other excellent acts. 



MORRIS GETS A TELEGRAM 

Jones and Sylvester, who played the 
Empress Theatre. St Louis, last week, in- 
troduced the new Joe Morris song, "We're 
Going Over," and immediately after the 
first performance sent the following tele- 
gram to the Morris company. 

"Congratulations to you, Sterling and 
Lang, we have used many songs, but never 
gang anything that was such a hit with 
the audience as 'We're Going Over.' It 
was a sensation at the Monday matinee." 



VON TILZER SONG WINS PRIZE 

In the recent New York Herald prize 
song contest, in which nearly 5,000 manu- 
scripts were submitted, the novelty march- 
ing song, "I Don't Know Where I'm Go- 
ing But I'm On My Way" was awarded 
one of the principal prizes. This number, 
although but a few weeks old is being fea- 
tured in all the leading vaudeville booses 
as well as in the big army training camps. 



QUICK SUCCESS FOR NOVELTY 

The new novelty number "China We 

Owe a Lot to You," has scored one of 

. the quickest successes on record and is 

being sung' by scores of the best known 

acts. 

Among the leading vaudeville singers 
using this number are, Brice and King, the 
Avon Comedy Four, Florence Rayfield, 
Bailey and Cowan and others. 



GUS EDWARDS HAS NEW REVUE 

Gns Edwards is in Chicago, where his 
new revue was produced on Monday night. 
After getting this one under way Mr. Ed- 
wards intends to give up cabaret work en- 
tirely and will devote his entire attention 
to his music publishing business, which un- 
der the direction of Max Silver is making 
much progress. 



BANDS PLAY MORRIS SONG 

"America, Here's My Boy," the Joe Mor- 
ris song hit, was played by nearly every 
band in the big military parade in New 
York last week. This song, the first of 
the many war numbers, still retains its 
popularity. 



HITCHCOCK & GOETZ TO PRODUCE 

Raymond Hitchcock and E. Ray Goetz, 
encouraged by the success of Hitchy- 
Koo, their first production, have decided 
to continue as a theatrical' firm' for the 
staging of other musical shows. 



BALL HAS BIG BALLAD HIT 

"All The World Will Be Jealous of 
Me," Ernest R. Ball's latest ballad suc- 
cess, seems destined to rival in popularity 
any of his previous successes. This song 
has been growing in popularity at such a 
rapid rate that it has become- one of the 
biggest sellers in the entire catalogue of 
M. Witmark & Sons. Scores of profes- 
sional singers using it predict that it will 
surpass in sales any of the great song hits 
written by Mr. Ball during his long career 
of song writing. 

D. A. ESROM HAS A NEW ONE 

Just to show her hand has not lost its 
cunning since writing "Bobbin' Up and 
Down," "Uncle Joe and His Old Banjo," 
"Another Rag," "Whistling Jim," and var- 
ious other songs, D. A Esrom has, in 
collaboration with Teddy Morse, turned 
out as catchy and timely a song, appro- 
priate either for war, peace, college or 
any other purpose, as has been, heard 
this season. Its title is "Somebody's Boy," 
and although but a week old is in big de- 
mand. 



BERLIN'S NEW BALLAD FEATURED 

Cook and Stevens, one of vaudeville's 
clever teams, opened their season this week 
playing the United time. With new talk 
and songs they have improved their offer- 
ing wonderfully and believe that this year 
will be their banner one. As their fea- 
ture song they are singing Irving Berlin's 
new ballad "The Road That Leads to 
Dove." 



BRATTON HAS A NEW HIT 

John W. Bratton, who quit writing 
songs several years ago to become a the- 
atrical manager, is back in the music field 
again with a clever song entitled "Then 
I'll Come back To You." The new song 
is being received with such enthusiasm in 
the profession that it is already being 
recognized as one of the big successes of 
the season and John is being congratulated 
on all sides for Ms "come back." 



EDWARDS SENDS WARNING 

Gus Edwards has sent a notice to music 
publishers stating that .he has purchased 
all rights, title and interest in a song 
by Billy Gaston entitled "What Will Be- 
come of Your Little. Doll Girl?" and that 
any infringement of the copyright will be 
prosecuted. 

PIANTADOSI ON THE ROAD 

George M. Piantadoai of the Al Pianta- 
dosi publishing concern, left yesterday on 
a three weeks' business trip for the firm 
through the New England and New York 
territory. He expects to be away for 
about four weeks. 



HARRIS JAZZ SONG SCORING 

Charles K. Harris expects "Scratchin' 
the Gravel" to be the rag-jazz sensation 
of the season. The piece is now being 
taken up by the cabarets and is proving 
popular both as a dance and vocal number. 

STERN JOINS AUTHORS' SOCIETY 

The American Society of Authors, Com- 
posers and Publishers has sent out a no- 
tice- to ■ the effect that the publications of 
Jos. W. Stern A Co. have been added to 
its catalogue and the unlicensed public per- 
formance for profit of any of the Stern 
numbers is an infringement of the copy- 
right law. 



WILLIAM JEROME'S MOTHER DEAD 

Mrs. Mary .Donnellon Flannery, mother 
of William Jerome,, died on Friday at her 
home in Goshen, N. Y, of acute indiges- 
tion.' She'wu 78 years of age.- - 



SHARPS AND FLATS 

By TEDDY MORSE 



An unconscious clash of publishers took 
place on upper Fifth Avenue, where a 
banner was stretched across the street 
reading, "Goodbye, Good Luck, God Bless 
You." As one band got directly under it, 
they struck up "Where Do We 'Go from 
Here." 



Now, try this chorus on your E flat 
cymbal. It's a pretty thing: 
Nelly was a lady, she was; 
Last night she died, she did; 
Toll the bell for lubly Nell. 
My dark Virginia bride, she was. 



N. W. Ayer and Son are one of the 

largest advertising agencies in the world, 
and "their motto is "Keeping everlastingly 
at if brings success." Even granting that's 
true, there's one chap been writing songs 
for endless years and hasn't had a hit yet 
What can his slogan be? - - * 



Louis Weslyn meets every one with a 
smile these days, for he is the lyrical 
perpetrator of "Send Me Away With a 
Smile," which is some song. And accord- 
ing to Louis, and others, 'tis selling in large 
and juicy quantities. Like a few other 
capable rhymesters in the game of song, 
Louis Weslyn is deserving of hits a-plenty. 



Uncle Sam went to war. Thursday, 
August 30, 1917, when 40,000 men 
marched down Fifth Avenue, New York, 
cheered and applauded, wept and sighed 
over by nearly two million people. There 
were more opportunities for song titles 
than any song writer will get in a cen- 
tury. Here's what the bands played : 
"Goodbye, Good Luck, God Bless You," 
"Where Do We Go from Here?" "Good- 
bye, Broadway, Hello France," "Me and 
My Gal," "Stars and Stripes Forever," 
"Hot Time in. the Old Town To-night," 
"Dixie" and "The Star-Spangled Banner." 



College men are supposed to be fairly 
well balanced, and at least more sensible 
than the average human, who has not had 
the advantage of a soft college education. 
Now, list awhile to one of their songs and 
you'll understand why Wool worth handles 
only hits. 

At number three Old England Square, 
Mark well, what I do say; 
At number three Old England Square, 
My Nancy, doesn't she live there? 
111 go no more a-roving with yon, fair 

maid. 

Chorus. 
A-rov-ing, a-rov-ing, since roving has been 

my rn-i-in , ■ 
I'll go no more a-roving with you, fair 

maid. 



Andrew Mack, the famous kitchen me- 
chanic's delight, is starring this season in 
a new. Irish play. Lilting a song as only 
he can, the evergreen Andrew win surely 
have a big year. Remember his beautiful 
"Story of the Rose" and other splendid 
songs? 



There - was an Emperor in China said 
to his mistress, an olive-dyed lady of 
Peking, "I shall love you till the great 
wall crumbles and be washed away by 
.rains, till the stars turn grey with age, 
and the mountains that girdle the kingdom 
march like giants into the sea." And he 
believed it. 

Ere the moon was new again,, he was 
dancing the cancan played by an Oriental 
jazz band in the Imperial Palace at 
Peking with a lissome flower girl, who 
had come with a basket Of blossoms from 
the village of Chang-Nan. • (From the 
Book of Fools by John McClure in Smart 
Set) ; ■ 



September?^- 1SW7 



THE:NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




QUIZ BURLESQUE 

HEADS IN 

SUIT 

HYDE AND BEHMAN PRESS ACTION 



Interrogations were filed yesterday in 
the office of the Clerk of the United States 
District Court, for the directors and of- 
ficers of the Columbia and American Bur- 
lesque Association, in the suit brought 
against them by Hyde and Behman to re- 
strain the presentation of burlesque at- 
tractions in the Empire Theatre, Chicago, 
•ad the Victoria Theatre, Pittsburgh. 
These interrogations will be forwarded 
by the clerk of the court to the solicitors 
who represent" the burlesque companies, and 
answers by them must be made to the court 
twenty-one days after the filing of the 
questions. 

The questions to be asked the directors 
of the circuits will refer to the formation 
of the American Circuit, the disposition 
of the stock of this organization ; the ques- 
tion of management and control of shows 
on this circuit by officers and directors of 
the Columbia and any working agreement 
that may exist between the two circuits 
for. their mutual benefit. 
: The directors of the American- are to be 
asked what relation their circuit bears to 
the Columbia, and whether or not any of 
them represent officers and directors of the 
Columbia. 

: After these interrogations are returned 
to the court house, Grossman and Vor- 
haus, solicitors for Hyde and Behman, will 
apply to the Court for an injunction re- 
straining the defendant corporations from 
presenting burlesque attractions from the 
American Circuit in either of the theatres 
until the issues are finally decided In court 
of equity. 



SEEK MISSING CARPENTER 

It became known last week that, for 
some time, the Sheldon Amusement Com- 
pany has been endeavoring to locate Bill 
Bailey, whom they engaged in July as 
carpenter, but who disappeared a short 
time afterward taking with him, they say, 
several hundred dollars which he had 
drawn for the purchase of material with 
which to construct props. They also state 
that he drew some salary in advance. 



THEATRE CORPORATION FORMED 

Trkhton, N. J., Sept 4.— The United 
Cinema Theatre Co., Inc., a Delaware cor- 
poration, has been chartered here to buy, 
lease, build and operate motion picture 
houses from an office to be located in 
Hackensack. The concern is capitalized at 
$1,000,000, and $5,000 win be devoted to 
commencing the business. 



j GIVE PARTY FOR O'SHEA 
A theatre party was . given to Capt. 
Daniel O'Shea, of the Home Defense 
League, by a number of business men of 
Brooklyn at the Empire Theatre last Tues- 
day night, the "Spiegel Revue" being the 
attraction at the house. Fully two thou- 
sand persons attended the performance, at 
which a gold watch was presented to Capt. 
O'Shea. v.:, ... 



JOIN "MAIDS OF AMERICA" 

PBOvminaB,.B. L, Sept S. — Calvert 
Shane and Blsland opened with the 
"Maids of America" here to-day. They 
replaced the "World's Comedy Four." 
They were with the show last season. 



BEDIM SHOW PRAISED 

Washington, D. C, Aug. 31. — Jean 
Bedini and his "Puss Pubs'* Company met 
with big success this week at the Gayety. 
In a review one of the daily papers said : 

"One of the most pleasing features of 
the show is the cast of leading feminine 
characters, all of whom are exceptionally 
pretty and can dance and sing. The 
comedy end of the performance is upheld 
in an admirable manner, judging from the 
applause received by Bob Harmon, Bobby 
Clark and Paul McCullougb. The 
comedienne contingent is headed by Helen 
Xiorayne, Ella Golden and Marie Sabbott 
The house was in a continuous roar of 
laughter. An attractively costumed and 
well trained chorus adds to the entertain- 
ment." 



PRINCESS DOVEER SIGNED 
Princess Doveer has signed a three-year 
contract with the Sheldon Amusement 
Company for their "Some Babies" com- 
pany. - . ••■-.- -.- •- si: 



LOUISVILLE WANTS BURLESQUE 

Louisville, Ky., Aug. 28. — The manage- 
ment of the Buckingham Theatre, Louis- 
ville, Ky., is seeking to book bnrlesqne at- 
tractions, similar to those playing the 
Columbia Circuit for the season. From 
forty to sixty thousand soldiers will be 
quartered in the city, which, at present 
has no house playing burlesque. 



CENSORS START SEPT. 10 

The Censor Committee of the American 
Burlesque Association will start on its 
tour of censoring the shows of its circuit- 
September 10. They will first look over 
the shows around New York before start- 
ing on the road. The houses of the cir- 
cuit will also be inspected at the rome 
time. 



"SPIEGEL REVUE" LOSES TWO 

Princess Luba Meroff, prima donna, and 
Sarins Malin, ingenue, of the "Spiegel 
Revue," closed with the show at the Em- 
pire, Brooklyn, last Saturday night They 
were replaced by May Clinton, a new 
comer to burlesque, and Emma Cook. 



MAE HOLDEN IS MARRIED 

Portland, Me., Aug. 31. — Mr. and Mrs. 
Joe Haggerty arrived here on a wedding 
trip today. They were married in Brook- 
lyn, Aug. 29. • Mrs. Haggerty, before her 
marriage, was Mae Holden, well known 
soubrette in burlesque. 



SAUNDERS HEADS LEGIT. SHOW 

Arthur Saunders left New York last 
Saturday to do advance work for "The 
Heart of Wetona." He opens in Pater- 
son, N. J. Saunders managed "Blutch" 
Cooper's "Globe Trotters" last season. 



ADELAIDE MADDEN ENGAGED 

Adelaide Madden, who was with Ghaa. 
Bakers "Tempters," on the American Cir- 
cuit last season, is again in the employ of 
Baker, being with his "Speedway Girls" 
company on the same circuit. 



McKEEFREY AND POST HONORED 

A farewell banquet was tendered to 
Howard McKeefrey and Emanuel Post at 
the Bits, in Brooklyn, last Wednesday 
night The boys have been called in the 
first draft of the National Army. 



CARLTON REPLACES LEWIS 

Lew Lewis closed with Hughy Bernards' 
"Americans" at the Gayety, Brooklyn, last 
Saturday night Billy Carlton opened in 
Yonkera, Monday, in the part 



HARRY STEPPE EXEMPTED 

Harry Steppe has been declared exempt 
, by the Exemption Board at Newark. 
Steppe ia the sole support of his mother 
and crippled brother. 



DRAFT HAS HIT 

BURLESQUE 

LIGHTLY 

COMPANIES RETAIN OLD FACES 



Burlesque has suffered very little 
through Uncle Sam's endeavors to fill the 
ranks of the new national army by selec- 
tive draft. Hardly more than two per 
cent of the men carried with the shows 
have found themselves subject te the 
call after appearing before the exemption 
board and making their exemption claims. 

Even though, for the past few seasons, 
more than one-half of the m« carried 
with the shows have been way under the 
draft age, performers in burlesque have 
been very fortunate with respect to having 
to answer the call to the colors as com- 
pared with men employed in other 
branches of the theatrical business. 

After the numbers were drawn in Wash- 
ington and the burlesque people learned 
of their standing on the list, a great 
many of them began to worry. A large 
number of them consulted specialists who, 
after making thorough physical exami- 
nations, found that they had some physical 
trouble or other which would debar them 
from serving. These physicians gave the 
men affidavits which were submitted to 
the boards, and after the men were ex- 
amined the statement of the specialists 
were verified. A great numbor of the ex- 
emptions allowed comedians were on ac- 
count of flat feet and defective vision. 

Then, it was found that most of those 
who were apparently physically fit for 
service had other causes of exemption that 
were quickly allowed by the local boards 
when presented, the most important being 
dependency of parents for support. From 
inquiries at the various boards it was 
learned that more than one half of those 
who were exempted oh account of depend- 
ents had parents to support. Others again 
had a wife and children dependent on 
them as well as numerous other relatives 
which quickly brought the local boards to 
the determination that these men should be 
excused from service for the present 

With these claims made by the actors 
in this branch of the business but very 
few f am il i a r faces are missing from the 
complement of the shows travelling on 
both circuits this season. 



A. M. BRUGGERMAN MAR RIED 

Married during the past week, A. M. 
Bruggerman, owner and manager of the 
Empire Theatre, Hoboken, left last Mon- 
day for a ten-day honeymoon at Columbia, 
S. C. At the end of that time, he and his 
bride, who ia a young Belgian woman 
driven to this country when her country 
was overrun by the Germans, will establish 
a home In Hoboken. 



SCRIBNER GUEST OF FAIR 

Bbookfield, Pa., Aug. 30.— Sam A. 
Scribner, general manager of the Columbia 
Amusement Company, is spending a week 
at his old home in this city. He ia also 
a guest of honor at the Annual Country 
Fair now being held here. Mr. Scribner 
will return to New York after Labor Day. 



WOLF JOINS HURTIG SHOW 

Baltimore, Md., Aug. 30.— Henry 
Wolf is now ahead of Joe Hurtig'B 
"Hello America," starring here this 
week. B. M. Garfield, former agent, 
closed at the People's, last Saturday 
night 



GIRLS QUIT MARION SHOW 

Habtfobd, Conn., Sept. 2. — Claiming 
that Dave Marion, owner of Dave Marion's 
Own Show, which played the Grand The- 
atre here last week violated his contract 
with her, by deducting the cost of ward- 
robe and paying half salary for the first 
week's engagement, Mabelle Parker has 
left the show and placed the matter in the 
hands of a ' local attorney. Miss Parker 
returned to New York. On the same train 
with her were Marie Vannick, Ruth Brady, 
Elita Chester and Emma Orner, who are 
said to have quit the show for the tame 
reason. 



ZELLA RUSSELL HAS FELON 

Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 30. — Zella 
Russell, co-star of the Burlesque Revue, 
will not be able to offer her piano 
specialty for a few weeks, having Just 
undergone an operation for a felon on 
her finger. She will be out of the show 
for the balance of her Philadelphia engage- 
ment. 



LESLIE BUYS FARM 

Walter Leslie, manager of the Casino. 
Philadelphia, has bought a forty acre farm, 
at May's Landing, N. J., on which he has 
five thousand chickens and many acres of 
vegetables. There is a twelve-room house 
and garage on the property, and he will 
make week-end journeys there during the 
Winter. 



ABBOTT BUYS CAR 
Philadelphia, Pa., Sept 1. — Frank 
Abbott manager of the Peoples Thea- 
tre, which plays the Columbia attrac- 
tions In the Kensington section of this 
city, has bought a new Oakland ear. 



WILL LEAVE FOR CAMP 

Teddy Rayne, assistant electrician, and 
Thomas Dooly, chief usher of the Colum- 
bia Theatre, leave for their camp, at Yap- 
hank, next week. 



OPP TO WRITE SCENARIOS 

Joe Opp, of the "Bon Tons," cloned con- 
tracts last week while in New York to 
write two five-reel scenarios for two well 
known motion picture stars. 



EDNA ZUCA TAKE NOTICE 

An important letter is in the CUnrXft 
Post Office for Edna Zuca. 



COLUMBIA CONCERTS SUNDAY 

The Colombia will start its e 
next Sunday. 



BURLESQUE NOTES 



Billy Harms, of the Empire Theatre, 
Hoboken, is giving away a very good pencil 
for advertising purposes. Harms wants it 
known that he will send some to any agent 
or manager who writes him. 

Kid Kennedy, of Yonkera, dropped into 
the Union Square one afternoon last week 
and caught Frank Mackey doing a boxing 
bit. He was so impressed with Maekey'a 
work that he sent him a pair of pneumatic 
boxing gloves. 



Dolly Webb, who is prima donna of the 
"Darlings of Paris" company this season, 
is doing nicely. Miss Webb has been with 
the "Mischief Makers' the past three 
seasons. 



Boriaaqoe News Continued on Pages 29 and 31 



Joe Lyons Is doing a classy bit of 
straight this season with the "Darlings of 
Paris" company. 

Mae Earle la doing some great soubre t t e 
work with Charlie Taylor's "Darlings of 
Paris" , company. 



16- 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5. 1917 



We announce our program of fully 

protected material for 

Season of 1918 



J^ A saucy little miss in a "Lucile" gown 
In vaudeville rhanced to stray — 
Where she met at youth from Swagger-town 
Who proposed in a princely fray. 

/} He made love to the itrains of a dreamy wal tx. 

But could not win her hand. 
£ Then they sailed away and he sang his lay. 

To this same little miss in ToylancL 

D Now the Storm King above had witnessed the lore 
Of these two little vaudeville lovers; 

Like "Virginia and Paul" he started a i quail, 
And left them oat there without rubbers. 

Etc "° w """>« holds sway and they drift away, 
To scenes of idealisation; 
Unlike fables of old, when the story's all told. 
You have our latest Dance Creation. 

(We thank You) 



Adelaide and Hughes 



THIS WEEK 

(SEPT.3) 



Palace Theatre, New York. Indef . 



ROSALIND 
COGHLAN 



AND COMPANY 



in 



A SURE-FIRE COMEDY 



"Our Little Bride" 



This Week, (Sept. 3) 



B.T. 




s 




Direction— EVELYN BLANCHARD 



f»3»»»*B^» 



-"■"•■a" 



September 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17- 



M 



ADAME ESTELLE BEAUGRAND is 
resting: a f her camp at Lake Ta conic 



Barney McDonald is building the scenery 
for "Odds and Ends of 1817." 

John Wilstach goes in advance of Willie 
Collier in "Nothing but the Truth." 

Albert L. Miller, prominent in motion 
pictures, has joined the U. S. Navy. 

Charles Brown will be business manager 
for Leo Ditrichstein in his new play. 

Carl Helm is at the camp at Pitts- 
burgh, training to be an army officer. 

Ed Long, house manager of the Lyric 
Theatre, is the father of a fourth baby. 

Harry Fox has arranged with William 
B. Friedlander to write a new act for him. 

Kathleen Clifford was given a reception 
in Los Angeles on her return to vaudeville. 

Harry Alfredo was booked for one day 
last week at the Strand Theatre, Racine, 
Wis. 

Leo Carrillo returned from Chicago last 
week and began rehearsals for "Lombardi 
Ltd." 



Dave Power has signed as business man- 
ager of Thomas E. Shea in "Common 
Clay." 

Richard B. Taut will again be manager 
of the Grand Theatre, Atlanta, Ga., this 
season. 



Victor Morley has been engaged to act 
one of the comedy roles in "The Grass 
Widow." 



Frank Gruber has succeeded E. L Adams 
as manager of the Temple Theatre, at East 
Jordan, Mich. 



ABOUT YOU! AND; YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



Ralph Stoat, managing editor of the 
Kansas City Stor, is in the city, the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln A. Wagenhals. 



E. J. Carpenter, who has been manag- 
ing Vailsburg Park, has returned to New 
York to engage in active show producing. 

Ted Shapiro, who was accompanist for 
Lydia Barry, is now acting in a similar 
capacity for Wellington Cross in his new 
act. 



Zulieka, the hypnotist, who recently re- 
turned from abroad, expects shortly to 
obtain a route from the U. B. O. for her 
act. 



James O'Neill will celebrate the fiftieth 
anniversary of his stage debut on Oct. 10. 
Incidentally O'Neill is seventy-one years 
of age. 

Edward L. George will present "The 
Family Exit," a farce comedy by Law- 
rence Lagner, Sept 18 at the Comedy 
Theatre. 

John Coleman, formerly of the Two 
Colemans, is filling in the summer months 
singing in a picture house in East Liver- 
pool, Ohio. 

Grace Fisher, late prima donna with the 
■ "Show of Wonders" in Chicago, is in New 
York preparing to return to vaudeville in 
a new act. 



Claude Fleming has enlisted in the Brit- 
ish Army and will sail shortly for his 
home country. 

Charles E. Blaney has retired from the 
theatrical business and is now a real 
estate operator. 

Arthur "Cane" Levy will do the press 
work for Edward B. Perkin's production 
of "The Red Clock." 



Mav Hart last Saturday subscribed 
51,800 for the purchase of a motor truck 
for the 71st Regiment. 

Jack Middleton has signed with Acker- 
man & Harris for their musical tabloid, 
'The Fountain of Love." 

Arthur Briliant has been engaged as as- 
sistant to G. Horace Mortimer in the Or- 
pheum Press department. 

Frankie Kelsey, formerly of the Three 
Kelsey Sisters, has joined "The Fountain 
of Love," musical tabloid. 



Gus Salzer has been engaged as musical 
director for Madison Corey's new musical 
play "The Grass Widow." 

William F. Moran is now chief advertis- 
ing man and head doorkeeper at the Ma- 
jestic Theatre, Jersey City. 



Adolpb Bolm has been engaged by the 
Metropolitan Opera Company to stage the 
opera pantomime "Le Coq d'Or" to be pro- 
duced during the coming season. 

Oscar Neal, stage carpenter at the Cer- 
amic Theatre, East Liverpool, Ohio, has 
returned home, after spending a pleasant 
two weeks "down on the farm." 

Cecelia Wright is leading woman with 
Henry W. Savage's "Have a Heart" com- 
pany which opened its road season last 
Thursday at Asbury Park, N.' J. 

Harold Conway, a magazine and news- 
paper feature writer, has been engaged to 
assist Murdoek Pemberton in the press 
department of the Hippodrome. 

Russell T. Dobson, proprietor of the 
Rae Theatre, in Ann Arbor, his wife and 
Russell 3rd are spending a two weeks' va- 
cation touring the Great Lakes. 

Walter Moore, of Lithograph fame, pre- 
sented Rita Vincent McTergue, a writer, 
with a check for $1,000 when she married 
his brother, Robert C, last week. 

Robert Vivian, the English actor, was 
the recipient of a send-off dinner last 
Thursday night at Shanley's, given him by 
Walter Pulitzer and a number of friends. 



Will Elliott, of the International Cir- 
cuit, has quit the road to accept the man- 
agement of the Washington Theatre, De- 
troit, Mich. 

F. J. Carroll will manage the New 
Strand Theatre at Lowell, Mass., which 
will be ready for its opening the middle 
of September. 

Eddie Goodwin, assistant treasurer of 
the Eighty-first Street Theatre, left last 
Monday for a two-week vacation at Dela- 
ware Water Gap. 

Harrold Crane, for the past two sea- 
sons with the "Blue Paradise" company, 
joined the Boston production of "Oh! Boy" 
Monday afternoon. 

Jane Cowl has lost a diamond and plati- 
num crown pin and will reward the finder 
if he will return the jewel to the Harris 
Theatre box office. 



Charles Purcell, who plays a leading 
role in "Maytime" at the Shubert Theatre, 
has purchased a house in the Flatbush 
section of Brooklyn. 



Cissy Hines was granted a divorce from 
Palmer Hines in Baltimore last week and 
given custody of their child. 

Leon Friedman has started on bis 
eleventh annual pilgrimage in the inter- 
ests of the "Ziegfeld Follies." 

Paul McAllister has been made a cap- 
tain of the New' York militia and will help 
train the recruits at Yaphank. 

Bert Farmer, former treasurer of the 
Varieties Theatre at Terre Haute, In<L, 
and now located at Port Arthur, Out., 
where he has charge of a chain of vaude- 
ville houses, is visiting relatives at Terre 
Haute. 



Adrian o Ariani and Carl Edouarde-are 
busily engaged selecting musicians for the 
new Strand Symphony Orchestra. 

Thomas F. Moran and-W. Fitzgerald are 
assistant advertising men and doorkeepers 
at the Majestic Theatre, Jersey City. 

"Kid" Beebee, the ticket speculator, who 
joined the army, is now in a machine gun 
company in charge of a Lewis gun, and 
expects to soon be in France. 

Emily Ann Wellman waa given a rousing 
reception when she appeared at the open- 
ing of the new Orpheum Theatre, in St. 
Louis, Monday, that city being her home 
town. 



Thomas Sheehan, better known as the 
"lobby superintendent" at the Palace 
Theatre, left last Saturday for a ten days' 
vacation trip to Canada. 

Benj. B. Vernon has forsaken the mo- 
tion picture field this season to appear 
t with Thos. E. Shea in "Common Clay" on 
'the International Cireuit. 



Mark Fuller has been seen "barking" 
for "A Trip to Melodia," at Luna Park, 
and is trying to draw the crowds into the 
concession with his funny gesticulations. 

A. Robins, "The Walking Music Store," 
has again rejoined" the cast of Arthur 
Hammerstein's musical play "Katinka," 
which opened at Atlantic City last week. 

William B. Parker, for many years af- 
filiated with the Columbia, a picture house 
of East Liverpool, Ohio, has resigned his 
position. He will probably go on the road. 

Leon Kelmar, of the Casino Theatre, 
Narragansett Pier, R. I., announces his 
engagement to Hannah Coleman of that 
place. They will be married next month. 



Karl Lang has quit the show business to 
accept employment with the Morse Air- 
craft Company at Ithaca, N. Y., where 
aircraft for the government is being 
made. 



Robert C. Benchley, who was formerly 
a magazine writer and a member of the 
Tribune?* staff, succeeds Dave Dallace as 
general press representative for William A. 
Brady. 



Val Roche, secretary to Dorothy Hirsch, 
manager of the Morning Telegraph vaude- 
ville department, has bid good-bye to 
Broadway and joined the naval marines at 
Tarry town. 



Frances Boeder, a sixteen year-old girl, 
has been selected by R. H. Burnside as 
general understudy and alternate prima 
donna at the Hippodrome. 



Marie Nordstrom who has been ill for a 
fortnight, returned to the cast of "The 
Passing Show of 1917," at the Winter 
Garden last Saturday night. 



Helen Westley has decided to remain 
with "The Lassoo" in preference to accept- 
ing a new contract offered her by the 
Washington Square Players. 

Ralph W. Hawley, editor of the Morn- 
ing Tribune of East Liverpool, Ohio, and 
formerly affiliated with Frank Mackey, 
of the opera house, in Salem, has resigned 
his position to accept a position as State 
editor of the Youngstown Telegram. 



Brock Pemberton, dramatic writer of 
the New York Timet, will leave that posi- 
tion on Sept. IS to take charge of the 
publicity department for the Arthur Hop- 
kins attractions. 



Frank Mackey, formerly manager of Ed. 
L. Moore's Salem house, and last heard of 
in Elwood, Ind., would please friends in 
East Liverpool, Ohio, by letting them hear 
where he is. 



James Bonnelli and Steve Price have dis- 
solved partnership, Bonnelli purchasing 
the Price interest in the Greater New 
York Minstrels, which they have operated 
for several years. 



Margaret Wyeherly is playing Phila- 
delphia for the first time in her career, her 
opening there in "The 13th Chair" Mon- 
day, being the first time she ever enacted 
a part in that city. 

Nat Kamern is not going to leave aa 
leader of the Royal Theatre Orchestra 
after all. He adjusted his affairs in Cleve- 
land last week so that he can remain in 
New York indefinitely. 



Eddie Cline, treasurer of the Eighty- 
first Street Theatre, has returned from 
a four-week vacation and announces that 
he will be in the box-office of that theatre 
during the coming season. 

Ernie Williams., of the Loew booking 
forces, returned last week from a two- 
week motor trip through New York and 
Pennsylvania. He was accompanied by 
Mrs. Williams and their daughter. 

Maude Fulton began her road tour in 
"The Brat" at the Broad Street Theatre, 
Newark, on Monday. After a four-week 
tour over the' subway Circuit the play 
will be taken to Philadelphia for a run. 

William Colombo, for the past two sea- 
sons violinist at the Diamond picture 
house, East Liverpool, Ohio, has resigned 
his position and accepted a vacancy in the 
Tenth Regimental Band at Youngstown. 

Nat M. Wills gave a clown's party at 
. his home at Woodcliff, N. J., but Sunday, 
his guests being from the ranks of the 
"Cheer Up" company at the Hippodrome. 
Among those present were Fred Walton, 
the Bud Snyder Trio, Tozart and Dippy 
Diers. 



Jack Hart, formerly employed as a bill- 
poster with the Cook Brothers Shows, is 
at present assisting William Bridge, bill- 
poster of the Ceramic Theatre, East Liv- 
erpool, Ohio. 

Gertrude Vanderbilt, the dancer, wishes 
it known that she is not the Miss Van- 
derbilt who was recently married in Eng- 
land to Lance Corporal Locquell, of the 
Canadian army. 



Claire Rochester assisted Traffic Police- 
man Patrick Walsh in his chase after an 
automobile speeder one night last week on 
Fifth Avenue, driving her ear at the rate 
of thirty-five miles an hour. The speeder 
eluded arrest, but the policeman captured 
his car and took it to the West Thirtieth 
Street police station. 



Allen Doone was the guest of honor last 
Friday at a luncheon given in Providence, 
R. I., by the Lieutenant Governor of the 
State, Emery J. San SoueL Prominent 
among the guests were: Mayor Joseph H. 
Gainer, Postmaster Edward F. Carroll, 
Henry J. Sayres and James C. Garrison. 

Don Barclay has returned to the cast of 
the Ziegfeld "Follies," replacing Walter 
Catlett in the cast. In addition to Oat- 
lett's part, he will present "The Stone 
Age" scene which was used at the Cen- 
tury last season by Sam Bernard, Harry 
Kelly and Marie Dressier. The scene was 
rewritten for Barclay, who will have Eddie 
Cantor and Fanny Brice as aides in pre- 
senting it. . " 

Johnny Dooley, of "The Passing Show 
. of 1917," at the Winter Garden, organized 
the entertainment for the O. 8. Aviation 
Corps Training Station at Mineola last 
Sunday. Among those who appeared were : 
Charles (Chic) Sale, John T. Murray, Mil- 
ler and Mack, Singer, Allen and Heigley, 
in their paint scene; front The Passing 
Show," Kerr and Westonj Yvette Rngel 
and the cartoonists Walter Hoban, Tom 
McNamara and Harry Hershfield. 



18 



THE.JJ2W YORK £.L1?PE«t 



S^oml»r:5;i917- 



^^» 









FOUR 



In Their Own Version of 



"A Hungarian 




V 



• It 



CAST 

THE PROPRIETOR. . . . CHARLES DALE 

SAM V HARRY GOODWIN 

MORRIS . . IRVING KAUFMAN 

THE CHEF JOE SMITH 

AT 

B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE 

For Two Weeks 
STARTING SEPTEMBER 3 

Booked Solid for the Season 
1917-18 

Direction • - MAX HART 



Metropolitan Debut 
|ROY 



1 




AND 



HAZEL 




In A New Act Entitled S|| 

"ONE AIM ANOTHER" 



DIRECTION— THOS. J. fITZPATRICK 



At Proctor's Fifth 

Avenue Theatre 

NOW 



-■» • -# 



r ., ■ -. .. 



Sef>\«H**fc3i-191^ : 



TH1 NEW YORK CO 



19 



. THE SHADOWMEN --m •-; 

Tt*alre-^Proc«or*» 58th Street. *- 

StyltP— Shadow acting. 

timff^-Twonty minutes. 

Setting— Special. . 

The moving picture curtain is lowered 
in this act and a stereopticon slide in- 
forms the audience that the shadowmen 
are William Penny, A. Penny and A. 
Kennedy. It further states that the 
shadowmen will be seen in four epi- 
sodes, announcing the first as "A Few 
Minutes- in Fojiama Park." 
' The curtain then rises on a full stage, 
in the back of which is a semi-trans- 
parent curtain, on which is painted a 
Japanese scene, with a volcano in action 
seen in the distance. Except for a faint 
pink light thrown on the curtain, the 
stage is dark. In front of the curtain 
the three men work, their figures sil- 
houetted against the background. The 
men represent different Japanese char- 
acters and try to give an idea of life 
as it is in a Japanese park. 

The next episode depicts the story of 
the Miracle of Gizeh, for which a faint 
blue light is thrown on the curtain 
while the trio go through the action of 
the story. 

The third episode shows the Hong 
Kong Theatre and laundry, for which 
a yellow light is used, while the men 
portray the roles of three Hong Kong 
Chinamen, who run a laundry by day 
and a theatre by night. 

The fourth episode is a patriotic spec- 
tacle. In front of a red, white and 
blue flag, can be seen the Statue of 
Liberty. One one side is an American 
soldier, on the other a sailor. They wig- 
wag to each other, and what they are 
supposed to signal is "America First," 
the letters of these words appearing 
one by one on the back curtain as the 
wig-wagging progresses. 

That the act is a novel one cannot 
be disputed. Plus its novelty, it is 
highly artistic, even to the stereopti- 
con slides. The first episode would be 
improved by being considerably short- 
ened, for the action is rather uninter- 
esting, and' the running time of this 
part of the act could easily be cut down 
to half. ^^ 

The novelty of jBIFact should carry 
it over succesaf uBj^especially in the 
better grade of vsSKviile houses. 

h. a. 



TRENNELL TRIO 

Theatre— Proctor** 125th Street. 
Style — EquMbrittic novelty. 
Time— Ten minutes. 
Setting— Full stage. 

Two men and a woman constitute this 
turn. Their work is very novel, with 
the understander and the woman doing: 
the major pert ion of the stunts. The 
other man, who is the comic of the act, 
performs simple feats, depending on 
comedy to put over his share of the 
work. His efforts, however, are of the 
conventional type of acts of this kind 
and poorly done. 

The comedy of the act should be 
greatly curtailed and speed injected into 
the working end of the act instead. 
Several difficult feats are performed by 
the woman, working with the under- 
stander, and, if one or two more of a 
similar style were added to the routine 
in the place of comedy, the act would 
be a very acceptable one for the opening 
position in the three-a-day houses. 

A.U. 



TEDDY AND MAY 

JJeatre— Proctor's 58th Street. 
styte—Equilibristic. 
Time— Bight minutes. - 
Setting— Fan ttage. 

The girl renders a vocal solo while 
the man . juggles and balances himself. 
They then do a number of stunts with 
a large rubber ball, after which the main 
executes several equfllhrlstic stunts. 

The. girl has a pleasing singing voice 
and might do well to sing more. The 
•touts performed in the act are of 
mediocre quality. "~77" ■"$- -B.-Cfc-v; 



■ i 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 

(Continued from page) 9) 



•THE BOHEMIAN GIRL" 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Home. 
Styles — Tabloid operetta. 
Time — Ticenty-five minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

"The Bohemian Girl," as here pre- 
sented, is a capsulated version of the 
famous old operetta of the same title. 
There are thirteen in the company, in- 
clusive of the chorus. The company also 
carries its own orchestra leader. The 
scene represents a gypsy camp and is 
both realistic and artistic. 

All of the well known arias of the 
bigger operetta are introduced in this 
offering, and are fairly well sung. The 
gypsy chief and Arleen's father have 
exceptionally good voices, while the rest 
of the company sing passably well. 

Not so much can be said for the act- 
ing which -is moat amateurish and al- 
most spoils the effect of the good sing- 
ing. Happily, there are but few speak- 
ing lines. In the case of Arleen, not 
. only does she act poorly and speak her 
lines with an unpardonable Teutonic ac- 
cent, but she has little or no stage ap- 
pearance. The gypsy queen also acts 
very poorly and speaks her lines stiffly. 

The chorus girls are, for the most 
part, pretty, and work bard. 

The idea of the offering is excellent 
and, if more care had been given to the 
casting, the act could have made a Sash 
anywhere. However, as things stand, 
its booking possibilities seem limited to 
small time. H. G. 



DONEGAN AND CURTIS 

Theatre— Proctor'* 58th Street. 

Style — Singing and dancing. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — One and two. 

Under the management of Gertrude 
Vanderbilt and George M. Moore, 
Donegan and Curtis are appearing in 
the act which was presented in vaude- 
ville by the former team. Donegan. 
who appeared very much . to disadvan- 
tage in an act with Pam Lawrence, re- 
cently, has stepped into an offering 
which it might be said, was constructed 
for him. 

The couple open in one, singing a 
novelty number, after which they exe- 
cute a neat dance. They then offer u 
minstrel song, after which the curtain 

' rises to two and they present a tra- 
vesty on a minstrel show. That is fol- 
lowed by dancing. 

Donegan then sings a character song, 
after which he does the eccentric inebri- 
ate dance which he did with the Law- 
rence act. A fashion song is then of- 
fered by Miss Curtis, with patter inter- 
polated between the verses. This num- 
ber is unique and very entertaining. 

There is plenty of pep and ginger to 
the turn throughout, it speeding along 
as fast as it did when presented by Van- 
derbilt and Moore. A. U. 



McKAY, HARRIS AND CO. 

Theatre— Proctor's Ttccnty-third Street. 

Style— Dancing. 

Time— Twelve minutes. 

Setting,— Special. 

Working in their own cyclorama 
drop, McKay and Harris, a man and a 

" girl, start off with a fancy waltz dance. 
A woman pianist plays their accom- 
paniment. The pianist, left alone, 
sings an Irish number. She follows 
this with a popular chorus, the other 
girl, in the wings, singing with her. 
Both seem to be carrying a "second" in 

. the first chorus, so, naturally, the effect 
is bad. The second chorus was better 
done. But it appeared as if this num- 
ber bad not been properly rehearsed. 
. The man then does spme fancy step- 
ping. A whirlwind dance, done very 
. poorly, .closed the act. 

This is a dancing act considerably be- 
low standard. If it be heading toward 
big time it is due for a breakdown. On 

. the smaller circuits it will get by. _,„ 
; w -.l , ,-i->. ,,.. «■ >•> ■ — i Hr ».• — 



DREW AND WALLACE 

Theatre — Royal. 
Style — Man and girl skit. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

The scene represents the interior of a 
drug store. 

The man is the drug clerk. The girl is 
the customer. There . is considerable 
cross fire between the pair, after which 
the girl orders a drink which the man 
mixes for her. She sings a popular 
number and follows it with a dance. He 
returns, and, after several minutes more 
of cross fire, they conclude their rou- 
tine with a duet number and dance. 

Although the act itself is of a rather 
old style, the pair speed it along con- 
siderably and make a nifty offering out 
of a vehicle which might fall in other 
hands. Some of the gags are not as 
new as they might be, and it would be 
advisable for the pair to go over the of- 
fering and weed out a few chestnuts. 

The man has an original style of 
comedy and puts his lines and comedy 
over for all they are worth. The girl 
does her share of the work most ac- 
ceptably. All in all, the turn should 
please any audience. H. G. 

"THE DEPARTMENT STORE" 

Theatre — Proctor's Fifty-eighth Street. 

Style — Comedy sketch. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

The setting of this act, which is 
presented by Fred Ardath, represents the 
interior of a small department store. 

There are five characters in the act: 
the owner of the store, his bride, a negro 
cook, an errand boy and a traveling sales- 
woman. 

The plot is secondary, only being nsed 
to furnish a chance for slapstick comedy 
and laughs. There are plenty of both, 
and the piece, therefore, fulfills its 
mission. 

All of the parts are well taken, the 
owner of the store having the corned; 
lead, although the rest contribute plenty 
of fun. The offering is well worked out, 
the action is fast and there is no doubt 
as to the fact that "The Department 
Store" is a surefire laugh-getter. H. G. 



MAZIE EVANS & CO. 

Theatre — Proctor's 58th Street. 
Style — Singing comedienne. 
Time — Vine minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Marie Evans sings, accompanied by 
two banjoists. 

She announces that her songs are 
such as you might hear if you visited a 
cabaret, and, to one unacquainted with 
the routine of such entertainments, her 
rendition of numbers would have a 
tendency to make them fight shy of such 
places. Miss Evans 1 chief idea seeau to 
be to make a lot of noise, and what she 
lacks in singing voice and stage appear- 
ance, she makes up in that direction. 

Her first number is an Irish novelty 
song, which is followed by a negro Jazz 
song. The boys then render a banjo 
medley of popular songs. Miss Evans 
finishes with a rag number. H. G. 



CHALLIS AND LAMBERT 

Theatre — American. 
Style — Singing and piano novelty. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting— Jn one. 

The ■ young woman in this act is a 
capital character singing comedienne, 
depending entirely upon her mannerisms 
to get her material over, as she is en- 
tirely devoid of a singing voice. The 
man acts as accompanist and plays a 
solo number to give her a chance to 
make a change of costume. The woman 
has a_. routine of . four numbers which 
can be. said to have been as judiciously 
chosen.' 

This"-, act should be a very popular 
. one in feature spots on small time bills, . 



ADELAIDE FRENCH AND CO. , 

Theatre— Proctor's 125f» Street. 
Style — Dramatic sketch. ■ 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting — Full stage. 

Miss French has a vaudeville vehicle 
which presents a story of a woman who, 
being sued for divorce, appeals to her 
husband's lawyer to withdraw the suit 
claiming that the evidence used against 
her is of the frame-up variety. To ac- 
complish her end, she goes to the home 
of the lawyer, forces ber way in and 
awaits bis arrival in his bedroom. When 
he discovers her he orders her ont, but 
she refuses to go. He then tells her 
to go into the library. This she re- 
fuses also, saying she. will discuss the 
matter right there and then. He then 
tells her that he does not want to be 
found alone in his room with a woman, 
especially should his wife or any of the 
servants enter. 

The woman then says that was how 
she was compromised by a man who 
was in love with ber. She says she will 
do the same and starts to disrobe and 
take down her hair. 

A maid knocks at the door and de- 
mands admittance. The man is greatly 
excited and tells her to get ont. She re- 
fuses. The maid insists that he let ber 
into the room. He tells her he is sick and 
can't. The woman then shows him bow 
easy it is to get caught. He agrees 
with her and tells her that if she gets 
ont, he will withdraw the cue. 

Miss French's work is very good, but 
that of the man is rather amateurish. 

A. TJ. 



GEORGALAS TRIO > 

Theatre — Proctor's Ttcenty-third Street. 

Style — Novelty shooting. 

Time — Ten minutes. ;. 

Setting — Fun stage special. 

A novelty shooting act which is a real 
novelty is the offering of the Georgalaa, 
Trio, comprised of two men and a woman. 
As is the case in all similar act! the 
work is done by one person. This man is 
very adept with the rifle and pistol and 
executes many difficult shots and feats. 
Probably the most difficult one Is shooting 
at a target on stage from the back of 1 
the theatre with a revolver and rifle, and 
hitting them at the same time. He also- 
shoots at six targets from the back of 
the house hitting them in successive 
order. This bit is similar to the one 
done by General Pisano. His feat of 
shooting the dress off the woman is not 
new, bnt always interests, holding an, 
audience spellbound. The finish of the 
act is most sensational, for he joggles a. 
cone about five feet in length and six. 
inches in diameter and it explodes while- 
he is handling it. The discharge la as- 
loud as the report of a cannon. 

This act is one which will easily find', 
its way into the two-a-day houses where 
it will be able to hold down, the closing - 
spot. A. TJ. 

JACK AND CORA WILLIAMS- 

Theatre— Proctor's TvKnty-thW4 Street. 

Style — Song, dance and acrobatic. 

Time — Eleven minutes. 

Setting — One and full ttage. 

A very unique and pleasing turn- 
which was assembled for speed and 
maintains it throughout, making the act 
one which can always occupy a feature - 
or closing spot in any of the "better elass 
small time houses, is offered by this 
couple. 

The pair open in one, with a popular 
song, after which a yodeling number 
is presented by the man. The act then 
goes into full stage with the couple doing 
an acrobatic dance for an entrance. The 
woman Is then raised into the air, swing- 
ing by ber teeth and discarding her 
wardrobe in a manner similar to "Dainty 
Marie- 
There is one comedy bit in the act, . 
however, which should be eliminated. . 
That is the stage hand who is nsed in 
one feat staggering off as though he were ■ 
dazed by his experience in being swung 
around. This haziness is not necessary 
and detracts considerably from that 

. finesse and neatness of the offering. 

«-— ' ■ ■'-■ - .to: 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5, 1917 



jfe* 



f& il 



A BROADSIDE 
FROM BROADWAY 

The top-notch hit of hundreds of "top liners." A 
Hit because it just can't help being one ! 

GOOD-BYE 
BROADWAY, 

HELLO FRANCE 

Words by C. FRANCIS REISNER and BENNY DAVIS 
Music by BOXY BASKETTE 

The "cheer up" farewell song- adopted by our "Ubtrtr 
Lads" wbo are DOW M somcwhora In Frince" aa w 
aS M S0nia ports" and "lomewhere in the 

THE SONG THAT 
"STIRS 'EM UP"! 



THAT 

SMASHING 

BIG HIT! 

A marvelous lyrical inspiration with 
a melody that's just strong enough 
to fit the "hit spot" in your act! 

MOTHER 
DIXIE AND YOU 

Words and Music By HOWARD JOHNSON 
and JOS. H. SANTLEY 

A "rag" ballad wonderful for singles, while quar- 
tettes, trios and duos are simply raring 
about AL Doyle's special Obli- 
gate arrangement of 



"'YOU 



V CANT CO 
/ WRONG 

WITH:', 



THESE ME 

* "QUICK ACTION" 
DAYS, SO CO TO IT BOYS r 

THROW NO STONES 
IN THE WELL THAT 
GIVES YOU WATER 

By ARTHUR FIELDS and THEODORE MORSE 

This sons i* a Knockout, especially when 
used with "Good-Bye Broadway, Hello France." . 



SONG 




THIS SMASHING 
B16 HIT! 



HERE 
IT IS BOYS! 

That comedy "gang" song. 

The "punch" is where you 

want it Whether in the Armory, 

the field or the theatre, it's a furore, 

whenever it is sung! 

WHERE 

DO WE GO 

FROM HERE ? 

Words by HOWARD JOHNSON 
Music by PERCY WENRICH 

Straight, Comic and War Choruses 



A SENSATIONAL NOVELTY 



_ _ YOU SET 5 EM COMING 

'3SW.44I2ST. M^jSrT, 



*&*% 



•niinr^jjj j 



o.o- H * 



P^HTA , Ll Ne,SC0 



rasa* 1 



September 5, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 




EIGHTY-FIRST ST. 

(Last Half) 

After the News Pictorial, the vaudeville 
bp was opened by the Three Larneda, 
billed as Comedy Cyclists. Although their 
comedy registered little, if at all, their 
cycling stunts were well done and their 
work appreciated. 

Halsey Mohr and Gladys Moffatt re- 
turn to vaudeville with their old act, "A 
Day With a Composer." The turn is 
rather novel and is nicely put over. 

i E very time this reviewer sees Mattie 
Keene's "Sunshine," there has been a 
cbange in cast. When, originally, Heron 
played the role of Chick Welch, that 
characterization left nothing to be de- 
sired. The next man who essayed the role 
was not nearly as strong as his predeces- 
sor, although passable. P. J. Conroy, who 
now plays the part, does it with so little 
color or realism that he spoils the whole 
effect of the playlet. 

Harry Steppe and Jimmy Cooper found 
the audience in good humor after the pa- 
rade picture and proceeded to more than 
make good. In fact, they stopped the 
show and were forced to respond with an- 
other bow after the lights were up for 
the next act. In view of this reception, It 
may seem captious to criticise these boys, 
bat, nevertheless, the fact remains that 
their success would have been even greater 
had they taken the pains to study their 
audience and mould their routine accord- 
ingly. There is no doubt that the dialogue 
at the beginning of their act went over 
with far greater effect than the parodies 
.that followed. The popular numbers also 
went over better than the parodies. In 
other words, a high class audience does 
not relish parodies, and the applause at 
the end of the act waa tendered for the 
popular numbers and the dialogue. 

'Jewell's Manikins were presented in 
"Circus Day in Toyland," and met with 
more success than usual, although the 
water spectacle at the end of the act was 
poorly presented and killed the hopes of 
warm applause at ffhe end of the act. 
The manikins performed nicely, but, at 
best, the' act is ■ slow. 

A Keystone Comedy closed the show. 

h. a. 



TWENTY-THIRD ST. 

(Last Half) 

The bill was started by John Stone, who 
performs some hazardous jumping feats. 
The turn will be reviewed under "New 
Acts." 

Dresser and Wilson, who will also be 
reviewed under "New Acts," presented a 
dancing act in the second spot. 

Martini and Maximillian amused the 
audience with their novel magic act. 
The "Patsy" is very funny and scores 
laughs easily. The goldfish trick is well 
done, and is certainly mystifying. 

Roger Gray and May Francis pre- 
sented a torn which will be reviewed under 
"New Acts." 

Webb and Romaine get some effective 
harmony in blending the guitar and violin, 
and the ballad singer received a tremen- 
dous ovation at Thursday's matinee. The 
violin soloist played the "Melody in F" 
only fairly well. The ballad singer would 
improve the effect of his second ballad if 
he would discard his guitar for that num- 
ber, for he does not use the instrument 
during its rendition. 

Mack and Williams presented an 
original stepping act, the man being an 
exceptionally proficient dancer. _ Their 
opening is both original and effective. The 
man's character dances are very good and 
his baseball specialty is most entertaining. 
The girl sings her "kid" number well, but 
could improve her appearance by wearing 
skin colored tights under her abort dress 

and socks. 

The Monarch Comedy Four received 
many laughs as a result of their slapstick 
comedy, the tragedian being responsible 
for the greater part of them. Their songs 
were well liked and they registered the 
hit of the bill, although much of their 
stuff is borrowed from other quartette 
turns and their success would be enhanced 
by employing a more original idea. 

The Littlejohna, a juggling turn, will 
be reviewed under "New Acts." This act 
closed the show. H. G. 



HAMILTON 

(Last Half) 

An exceptionally well arranged vaude- 
ville bill, with Manager W. R. Meyers 
presenting the pictures of the troops 
making their "getaway," two hours after 
the end of tbe parade, held the attention of 
the audience in this house. 

Two new acts were on the bill. One, 
the opening turn. Capes and Snow, a 
novel singing and dancing act,- and the 
other, Watson and Clark, in the third po- 
sition, will-be reviewed in the "New Acts" 
department. 

Sylvester, the talkative trickster, was 
in the second spot. His work is on the 
style of "Van Hoven," and Merlin, is well 
rendered, and his talk is of the rapid-fire 
personality kind which quickly impresses 
an audience. 

Jessie Hayward and Company, who ap- 
peared -in the comedy sketch "The Trick- 
ster," unloaded an abundance of "slang" 
and • "fly" conversation, which pleased the 
audience immensely. . * 

Billie Martelle, female delineator, has a 
very classy act, beautifully costumed, and 
presents his singing numbers in an un- 
usually pleasing manner. He, however, 
makes one mistake at the end of tbe turn 
which works greatly to his detriment. 
That is in revealing his identity immedi- 
ately' after concluding his number and 
before taking a single bow. Should he 
take two or three bows and keep the audi- 
ence mystified before revealing himself, he 
will find that be 'will make a much better 
impression. 

Louise and Mitchell, a hand balancing 
and equilibristic turn, were in the closing 
spot and made a very creditable impres- 
sion. * A. TJ. 



WARWICK 

(Last Half) 

It was an almost capacity, house that 
ushered in the last half of last week, and 
the bill presented was received with marks 
of approval. 

Alice De Garmo opened the bill with 
her trapeze act, and won much hearty 
applause during the course of her per- 
formance. She starts working in a full 
length dress and does a number of clever 
stunts on the swinging trapeze. She then 
does a teeth suspension act, of long dura- 
tion, and, before its finish, she takes off 
her outer clothing and is disclosed in 
cream colored blouse and knickerbockers. 
For a finish, she gets a crooked elbow 
hold of the trapeze bar and makes a re- 
markable number of revolutions: 

Janet, of France, a chanteuse, sang 
four songs, two in French and two in 
English. The latter included an imita- 
tion of an American girl singing a popular 
song. When she makes ber first appear- 
ance she sings with the orchestra and, 
approaching a stage box, addresses a 
man who finally cornea on stage and be- 
comes her accompanist. His name does 
not appear on the announcement cards, 
which is unjust to him, for he is not only 
a capable pianist, but an entertainer, his 
little bit of ventriloqnial work getting a 
big band. The non-appearance of his 
name in connection with the act is par- 
ticularly noticeable. 

Sampson and Douglas, man and woman, 
open with talk, give a couple of songs, and 
more talk, and finish with a dance. They 
are not very, long on singing, bnt are 
capital on low comedy stuff and get their 
material over in great shape. They scored 
a big hit 

The Five Melody Maids, entertained with 
piano, 'cello and violin, as well as with 
song, and were well received. 

The parade of the soldier boys, which 
occurred but a few hours before, was 
shown in films. E. W. 




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THE AN ICO 

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Phon. 1114 Circle 

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Complete for Housekeeping. All Large, Light Rooms 

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PLAYS 



FOR STOCK, REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN TBS WORLD. Books lor ham* 
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SAMUEL FRENCH, a West Sfta Su New York 



MUSIC HOSPITAL 

V'c bind nnd repair shrrt music, parts and books, so that the leaves, open .flat and 

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SITX^ALTY- — Hinjgrd covers fvi oV< hcsYratioixi. Call or write for ir«-e M>ni|»1e. 

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ROSE & CURTIS 

e-a stern Kcfn* 



BEEHLER & JACOBS 
Western Rapt. 



eJOHISJ GEIGER 



And His Talking Violin 

'" BOOKED SOLID 



Tbe Terpeickorean Artist* Supreme 

STAFFORD $ IVY 

In Various Mods* of Classical Dancing. Direction Sol linger. 



DENNY 1VI ULLEN 

k THE NEW JANITOR TU Riot of E«e*r Bui 



ST. REGIS RESTAURANT 

ItS WEST «7TrI STREET. NEW YORK (OPPOSITE PALACE STAGE DOOR) 



22 



NEW Y^RK CLiP#KR 



. September' 5. 1917 



•.« 



SAM HEARN 



WITH HIS 



FIDDLE AND BOW 



\S - . . \- :- ■i9< 



■ 

■: i 



Direction 



Booked Solid U. B. O. 



LEWIS & GORDON 



At B. F. Keith's Royal Theatre, This Week, September 3 



Metropolitan Debut of 



IMOI 



MORRIS M CAMPBELL 



In a New Act by JOE BROWNING* Entitled 



DIRECTION 

STOKER' AND BIERBOWIER 



*' THE A VJ- ATF.-HF.R " Moved from the Fourth Position to Next ( 



Nora and Sidney Kellogg 

**Xlie IVIusic Room" 

Direction SAMUEL BAERWITZ 



DOLLY 



GREYand BYRON 

Praeentmc "A Girl'. W*i*h," by Harry L. Newto. 

DIRECTION TOM JONES 



al SHAW & LEE »am KENNETH GRATTAN & CO. 



hllwl 



hVi 



k THE END OF A PERFECT DAY" 



Pi VAUDEVILLE 



>NNI! 



DINKINS, EVERETT & CO. *?£-£ ' 



Septej»b(«;5, ; 1^7 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 




la iirdar to avoid mUtelroo and to maore tfae prompt dalhrary <X the letters ail its lasts! 
as tab lb*, a POSTAL CARD moat ha saat ragnaatau us to forward foot bttar. It mul 
a* atfaad with year ruD. aaroa and the address to which tha letter b to ha sent, and the 
Uaa af linseiaaa Insiuassl br tha aandar should ha mentioned. 

itfaa tha data (or number) el tha CUPPER in which tha letters east far 



GENTLEMEN 



Haas, Daniel 
Ana, fee 
Amrr. BffiJe 
Anderson. Clrie 
Anal!. Wm. 
Ames, Bobart . 
Bond, Pan! *~ 

attlfaCB, afr*HlHl D. 

Bart 



AUtborpe, UU 
Arnold. Harriett 
Inatnof, Helen 
Bah. Qlutrt 
Botzner. Mia. A. 
Beeebey, En 
Blondel). Llbby 
CUrt. Rachel IL 
Clayton, LndMt 
Chase. Lawt 



Bneber, Herbert 

j. c. 

Bertelsen. A. D. 
BsnntU, J. U 
Clue. Wm. H. 
Chester. Bud 
Dafley. Jas. E. 
Dec. Bar 



Elliott, e. r. 

Elliott, uu a 

Floystrop, Neel J. 
Fsnmn. Ted 
Gerard Btoex Co. 
Hiatus, Howard 
Himy, Jack 
Harris a Lyman 



EUaood. Paul E. Harris. Joe 



De Moot. EKlyn 
De Armond. 



Earle, Jolla 
Earle. Helen 
Fen, Alma 
Flynn, Joste 
Gibson. Erelyn 
Gordon, Grass 
Clorer. Edna 



Edmk, aba. L. 

Haymaker. Jess 
Homer. En 
Klnpley, Anna 
Kolrlaea, Eleanore 
Kane, Ed 
LaTtoder, Ida 
LlniDey, Frances 
Lueey. Hay 
La Too. Babe 



Jennlnta, 8. B, 
Knlfht, T. ArJjsr 
Slot. Thos. 1. 
Pearl. Harry 
Lur/s. r ^**1"tT 
Lawrence, Bert A 

YlTlan 

Leahy, Chaa. 
Hurry, Thee. 



Learttt, Jeaoeua 

W. 
Meara. Mrs. Joe 

Morettt Bliurt 
Meany. John 
autttaon. Ilia 
Mack. Nellie 
Morgan, Hilda 
Newton. Haitle 
tCNein. Sadie 



UeKddon. Banr 
Marroc, Jam. 
Morrla. Walter 
Paul. 0. M. 
PoUock, Sam M. 
Riley, fee. 
Bran, Frank W. 
Roprs A Brock- 



Phelusa. Una 
Richardson, Anns 
Bio, Violet 
Beld. Vlnlnla V. 
KeTBolds. Mia 0. 
Ridge. H. B.. 

slue 
Israeli, Helen T. 
Robeson. Erbs 
SHrer. Erelyn 



Shaw. Jaa. T. 

Saaae. Chaa. L. 
Spaim. Byron 
Tuner, Chaa. B. 
Taflan, M. 
Tennyson, Wm. 
Williams, Qrt9 
Warren. Frrcc 
Weat, Henry 



Smith. Ansa H. 
Swensoo, Hn. Al 
Taker. Eleanore 
Thnjpp, Florence 
Trent, Don P.. 

Mrs. 
Willis. Hay 
Weston. Ethel 
Wool/, Ksthryn 

N. 



SPIEGEL OPENS NEWARK THEATRE 
Newark, N. J., Sept L — Max Spiegel 
informally opened Newark's new $1,000,000 
photoplay theatre tonight to an invited 
audience which included Mayor Raymond 
and his official family. The bouse, which 
is called the Newark Theatre, opens to the 
public tomorrow night. 



ROSENBERG GETS 14TH ST. HOUSE 
Walter Rosenberg has signed a five-year 
lease for the Fourteenth Street Theatre, 
situated at Fourteenth Street and Sixth 
Avenue. The house will undergo a 
thorough renovation and will open about 
October 1 with high class photo plays. 



CAMDEN HOUSE CHANGES POLICY 

Camden, N. J., Sept. 3. — The Broadway 
Theatre, which has for some time been ran 
as a vaudeville house, opened today with 
"Soildars Brinkley Girls." The boose is 
under the direction of G. H. Kellner. 



BOB GRAITS DAUGHTER DIES 

Motjut Vernon, N. T., Aug. 30. — Jea- 
nette A. Grau, daughter of the late Robert 
Gran, died at her home here to-night. She 
was a student of the New Rochelle Col- 
lege, preparatory to entering on a theatrical 
career. 



PLAYERS ENGAGED THIS WEEK 



Helen Eley for the 'Tassing Show of 

a»17." 



Alice and Edna Nash by Edward B. 
Perkins for "The Red Clock." 



Laura Tintle ba. John Cort for "The 
Verdict." — * 



Violet Kemble Cooper, by John D. Wil- 
liams, for "The Gay Lord Quex." 



Cecil Kern for "The Lasso," replacing 
Eleanor Gordon. 



Miss Alice Johns by the Shoberts for 
"Peter Ibbetson." 



Edwin Holland, by Robert Hilliard for 
"A Scrap of Paper." 



Dorothy Klewar, by Dillingham and 
Ziegfeld, for Century Theatre Revue. 

Frederick Hand and Vida Reed, by Rob- 
ert Hilliard, for "The Scrap of Paper." 

Marion Danes by Dillingham and Zieg- 
feld for "Miss 1917," at the Century 

Theatre. 



F. A. Gleason, by George Arlis, for 
"Alexander Hamilton." 



Madeline Delmar, by Cohan and Harris, 
for "The Judge of Jalamea." 



W. Cooper Cliffe, Arthur Lewis, Henry 
Duffy, Francis Bentzen, Alexander Onslow, 
Allen Thomas, Evelyn Varden, Mildred 
Collins and Alice Belmore by Daniel Froh- 
man for "Seven Days' Leave." 



DEATHS OF THE WEEK 



] 



MORRIS MORRISON, who was probably 
the greatest exponent of Shakespearean roles 
on the Yiddish stage, died on Aug. 28 at his 
home in Brooklyn. He was the first actor 
to introduce Shakespeare to the Yiddish 
Theatre. Morrison was first brought to this 
country by Helnrich Conreld for his Irving 
Place Theatre company. This was after his 
fame in Europe was secure. He was a 
favorite ot Czar Nicholas of Russia and was 
frequently summoned to appear before the 
Boyal Court He also appeared before the 
late Emperor Franz Josef of Austria and 
the German Emperor. The funeral took place 
on Thursday under the auspices of the He- 
brew Actors' Club, of 108 Second Ave. Rev- 
erend Joseph Rosenblatt read the services, 
assisted by the combined choruses of the 
Jewish theatres of this city. Morrison's last 
public appearance was made on June 5 in the 
title role of "Othello" at the Thomashefsky 
Theatre. Interment was made last Thursday 
in Washington Cemetery. Brooklyn, and was 
attended by a large number of friends of the 
deceased, among whom were : Jacob P. Adler, 
David Kessler. Boris Thomashefsxy. Joseph 
BarendesB, Peter Schmnckley and a commit- 
tee from the Hebrew Actors' Union. 



Worth. Tex. He was born Nov. 6. 1843 in 
New Orleans, served in the Confederate 
Army In the Civil War and entered Uie the- 
atrical business In the '80s. In 1888 he 
opened the Greenwall Opera House in Fort 
Worth and with his brother, Henry, estab- 
lished the Greenwall Circuit through the 
South. He recently took charge of the Savoy 
Theatre in Fort Worth and intended to open 
it this fall. He was a prominent Elk. Mr. 
Greenwall Is survived by one son and a 
daughter. 



PHILIP W. GREENWALL., one of the 
best known theatrical managers in the South, 
died suddenly Aug. 27 at his home In Fort 



JOHN HENRY COOKE, a veteran show- 
man, died last week in England. He was 
born in ' New York more than eighty years 
ago, but went to England as a boy. In 1865 
he returned to America and was connected 
with Lent's Circus and later with John H. 
Murray's. In 1876 he went to Scotland, 
where he toured with his own shows, play- 
ing some of the principal cities for long en- 
gagements. He was the uncle of George 
Ernest Cooke. 

■MIMMIE" THOMPSON, the old-time 
comedian, and producer of Sam T. Jack pro- 
ductions, for several seasons in the '80s. died 
at Kankakee, 111., Aug. 22, and was burled 
from his sister's home In Chicago on the 
25th. He was 'sixty -Tour years old. 




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McXESSON & 

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MaDufacturlns Chemists Established 1833 

•1 Fulton Street Nsw York 




ROBBLNS 



Broadway 4t 47th St. 
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NEW ZIEGFELD MIDNIGHT FROLIC 

Starts 1 1 .10. 



ELTINGE 



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Sat. at 2.10. 

A H. WOODfl praaasts 



BUSINESS BEFORE PLEASURE 

A saw ostnady by Keatafm disss aad Jalas 

Sekart Goodman, with BABJTET HOtXAXS 

aad AXXXAXBBB OABJL 



LYCEUM 



THEATXX, Wast 
St., * B'way., 
Evas. S.15, Mats Than, ft Bat. at a. II. 

First presentation here of a taedera 

comedy entitled 

THE LASSO 

By VICTOR KATES, Co-Anther ef "The 
Boomerajur." 

1 an£Fsra>^f*aae Theotr*. B'way ft tSrd St. 
rnHAN phone Bryant 392. Era. at 8.18. 
V-VTAS-fall M1U WelJ 1IKl g,, i)A 

| J. FXED ZnaCERMAN presents 

THIS WAY OUT 

A new comedy by IXAXX OBATXV, 



Jack Housh 

Kathryn LaVelle 

ia 

WHEN THE WORM TURNS 

Wee tern Rsrrreeaatatrr. WAYNE CHRISTY 
Eaatarm Bewrsaaa talis* PETE MACK 



Who's that First N. V. A. WletawT Mil 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liharty St, I A. H. b U P. M. 

aasd at aaaahaasht with Bliajsrs 

It MINUTES OF THE HOUR 

From W. adSt 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Conaolt P. W. HEROY. E. P., Agaat 

144B BROADWAY. NEW YORK 




Central Fibre Wardrobe 

45 x a a ■ 

$35.00 

IS a a a Z*K 

$40.00 

Equal to the' 

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trunk and guar- 
anteed. 

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FACTOrY 
simons a co. 

TW Ards St. 
FhHa. 




44 



atari te alas H — sU i sas atari la as" 
a* HanateaKBt 

TAtlffl 

DILLDrfflAM 



CHEER UP 

AT THE 



"GXtaTEST 

S UCCESS 

KYEB K50WN" 

Stand by 

B. H. B11SBIDE 



MAnMBX 
Enry Day 



HIPPODROME 

! Seats 6 Wasta Ataal 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

M each til H 14 tach. 

S inch. II 14 a inch. 

M each. nutlet hash. 

42 huh 






WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th SL. N.Y. 4 W. 22d St, H.T. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mall Orders Filled Same Day R ec e ived 

R Deposit Required 



"The Theatrical 
Route" 

Comfortable steamers leave New 
York, Pier 32, N. R, foot Caaal 
St 6.00 P.M., West 132d SL 6J0 
P.M. daily, including Sunday; also 
Sunday morning at 9.30 for Al- 
bany, Troy and the Nortk. 

avMatJ memey 

Travtl in comfort' 

HUDSON WISAJIOH COMPANY 



Wigs, Toupees. Grease Paint, Be. 

Send (or Price List 
C SHTNDHELM, MB Wast 4H* U-.H. Y. 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5, 1917 



FE, FI, FO, FUM! 

IF YOUR ACT IS WEAK, WE CAN HELP YO U SOME 

For months and months we have been working in our "song orchards" and have raised a prize collection of "peaches," real, 

luscious fruit. We are prepared to offer to the profession— 

"SOME SWEET DAY" 

PRIZE PEACH No. 1— RIPE AND READY— A really "real novelty song," and 

"THE MISSOURI WALTZ" 

No. 2 — Get your "Dan Webster" out. Under "wonderful" write "Missouri Waltz" — another— 

"ALL I NEED IS JUST A GIRL LIKE YOU 

No. 3 — "Man Broke Two Fingers Applauding." Act wires — mor 

iiAiiuniyn -rur iinnrn nr i nwr " 



Words and Music by TONY JACKSON, ED ROSE 
and ABE OLMAN 



By SHANNON and 
LOGAN 



> > By A. ADDISON BURKHARDT 

and ABE OLMAN 



By ABE OLMAN, RAY WALKER 
and RAY SHERWOOD 



CLIMBING THE LADDER OF LOVE 

No. 4 — Looks like a "Pippin"— A "Gibraltar" Ballad— then 

"SHE NEVER KISSED ANYTHING ELSE EXCEPT THE BLARNEYSTONE" 

No. 5— By OLMAN, HART and HAYS.— A little "Irish Peach"— The one you've been searching for. 

Orchards: FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER, Inc. 



NEW YORK, 146 W. 45th Street 
MAURICE RITTER, Manager 



CHICAGO, Grand Opera House Bldg. 
TOM PAYTON, Manager 



SAN FRANCISCO, Pantages Theatre Bldg. 
EDDIE MAGILL, Manager 



FOOT LIGHT 



America's Representative 
Dancers 

ADELAIDE 

and 

HUGHES 



HARRY 



WARD 



JOB 



VAN 

in "OFF KEY" 

CLAUDE AND GORDON 
BOSTOCK 



EMMA .. 
STEPHENS 



Direction 
HARRY FITZGERALD 



LA 

BERGERE 

Art in Porcelain 
and Marble 

Direction 

FRANK DONNELLY 

NORMAN JEFFERIBS 



SYLVESTER 

AND 

VANCE 

in a skit by WiUari Mack 

DIR. PETE HACK 



BERT 
BAKER&CO. 

in 

* 'Prevarication ' ' 

Dir. HARRY FITZGERALD 



NAN 
HALPERIN 



Management 
E. F. Albit 



ROBERT 

DO RE 

Direction Ed. B. Perkins 
1482 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



FLORENCE 

RAYFIELD 

In Vaudeville 



Dir. LOUIS PINCUS 



F A V O R I T; 



BILLY 
B.VAN 

<§> 

Management 
KLAW & ERLANGER 



CHAS. McCARRON 

presents 

BETTY 
BOND 

In Five Flights of Mnsicnt 

Comedy. Coptnred By 

Arthur Klein. 



THE 

FAYNES 

THE ARTISTS WITH A 
SUPREME OFFERING 

Dir. JACK FLYNN 



CHARLIE 
HOWARD 


ELIZABETH 

M. 

MURRAY 


Management 
Max Hart 


Dir. AIJ. T. Wilton 




EDYTHE 
& EDDIE 
ADAIR 

m 
"At the Shoe Shop" 

STOKES & BIBRBAUBR. 


WtLLIAU 

H ALLEN 

ems! 

ETHEL 

HUNTER 

Direction— Pete Mack 



WALTER 

DE LEON 

and 
.MARY 

DAVIES 

'Behind The Front' 

DIR. MAX HART 



SOPHIE 
TUCKER 

and her 5 Kings of 

Syncopation 
M'g"t Max Hart 



FREDWEBER&CO. 



Ventriloquial Novelty 
At the Stage Door 

Direction LEW LESLIE 



September 5; 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



U. B. O. . 

NEW YORK. 

Palace— Adelaide and Hughes— Lucille Cavanagb" 
and Co. — Avon Comedy Four — Boolta and Lew 
Hears — Frank Crumnrit — Bernard Granville. 
.Three to 811. i 

Alhambrn— Bert Leslie Co.— Jack LaVler— 
Backoff ft Girlie — Nellie Allen— Kanaiawa Japa— ' 
Crawford ft Broderick — Ellnore ft Williams — Van 
& Scbenck — Evelyn ft Dolly. 

Riverside — McLellan ft Caraos — Brltt Wood 1 — Im- 
perial Sextette — Four Mortons— Brice ft King — 
Belle Baker — Four Nlghtona — lime. Cbllaon Ohr- 
man. 

Royal— Winston's Water Lions — Diamond 4 
Brennxti — Cafta Bros. — Bernard ft Scarth. 

Slat street — De Witt, Bum and Torrance — 
Roberta and Riviera — Hassard. Short ft Co. — 
Sbattack and O'Nell — Bailey and Cowan. 

Orpheus — Rae Ellnore Ball — Lee Kohlmar Co. — 
Benny ft Woods — Al ft F. Steadman — Breen 
Family— Sylvia Loyal Co. — Bert Fitxglbbon. 

Buanwlek— Dickinson A Deagon — Gilbert 4 Fried- 
land— Futuristic Review — Alex. O'Nell A Saxton — 
Geo. ft Lilly Garden — Duffy & Ingles — Lawloo — 
Mr. ft Mrs. Wilde— Lydia Barry. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Loew (First Half) — The Skatellea. (Second 
Half) — Warren 4 Templeton. 

ATLANTA, GA. 
Forsytha (First Half) — Bnrna 4 Lynn — Water 
Lillles. (Second Half)— Melody Garden— Billy 
Kinkald. 

BUFFALO, N. Y. 
Shea'a — Howard's Ponies — Misses Campbell — 
Dancing Girl of Delhi— John P. Wade ft Co. — 
Three Hlckey Bros. — Asaki & Girlie — Harry Fox 
ft Co. 

BALTTMOBE, MD. 
Maryland— Lobse ft Sterling — Nolan & Nolan — 
Bert Levy. 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 
Lyric (First Half) — Melody Garden— Billy Kin- 
kald. (Second Half) — Burns ft Lynn — Water 
Lllliea. 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Keith's— Walter C. Kelly — Adair ft Adelphl — 
Donovan ft Lee— Kolman ft Brown — "Makers of 
History" — Elsie Williams Co. — French ft Eie — 
Not. Clintons. 

CHARLESTON, 8. C. 
Academy (First Half) — Finn ft Finn — Eadie ft 
Ramsden- (Second Half) — Plstel ft Cnshng — 
Harry La Vail ft Sister. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 
Keith's— Fox ft Ingrabam — Sallle Fisher— Ethel 
Hopkins — Slg Frana ft Co. — Three Equlllia — Foster 
Ball ft Co. 

COT.TJatBIA. 8. 0. 

Loew (First Half)— Plstel & Cuaulng— Harry 
La Vail ft Slater. (Second Half)— Finn ft Finn— 
Eadte ft Ramsden. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO. 
Keith's — Adeline Frances — Jas. J. Morton— 
Cbas." F. Semon — Jack ft Foras — Bostock'a Biding 
School — Gaylord ft Lancton — Stan Stanley •Trio — 
Leavitt & Lockwood. 

CHATT A2J00 G A. TENN. 
Keith's (Second Half)— Ziegler Twins ft Ken. 5 
— OrbaEsany'a Birds. 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Temple — Camilla'a Birds — Walter Brower — Mack 
ft Earl — McConnell ft Simpson — Marguerite Farrell 
— Albertlna Baacb & Ball— "Memories" — Regal ft 
Bender. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. , 
Empress — "The Cure" — Rooney ft Bent — "Dream 
Fantasy" — Gallettl'a Monkeya. 

HAMILTON, CANADA. 
Temple — Mullen ft Coogan — Joyce, West ft 
Senna— Little Lord Roberts— Will Oakland Co. 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 
Keith's (First Half) — Gaston Palmer. (Second 
Half) — Edwin George. 

XNOXVTLLE, TENN. 
Bijou (First Half)— Ziegler Twins ft Ken. S — 
OTbaasany'a Birds. 

MACON, GA. 
Keith's . i First Half) — Warren ft Templeton. 
(Second Half (—The Skatelles. 

MONTGOMERY, ALA. 
Keith's — The Crelgbtona — Tiny, Joe ft Mldgle — 
Mystic Bird— Cole. Russell ft Davis. (Second 
Half) — Gallerini ft Son— Harry ft Etta Conley — 
Ward ft Useless. 

MONTREAL, CANADA. 
Orpheum — Herman ft Shirley — Alex. McFadden 
— Seabury ft Shaw — Ashley ft Altaian. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. .. . 

Princess (First Half)— Emmet Welch's Min- 
strels—Mystic Bird. 

NORFOLK, VA. 
Norfolk (First Half) — Saxton ft Farrell— Frank 
Stafford. (Second Half)— Dan Burke ft GlrUe— ; 
Hunting ft Frances. 

NEW ORLEANS. LA. 
Loew (First Half) — Gallerini ft" Son— Harry 
ft Etta Conley — Ward ft Useless. (Second Half) 
—The Crelghtona — Tiny Joe ft Mldgle — Mystic 
Bird — Cole, Russell & Davis. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 
DiTis— Dooley ft Salee — Renee Florigny — Doree'a 
Celebrities— Hill ft Sylvany. 

PROVIDENCE. 
Keith'e— Paul Dickey ft Co. — Anita Gonld— Swor 
ft Arey— Browning ft Denny — The Volunteered — 
Plplfax & Pnnlo — Jos. E. Bernard ft Co. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
Keith's — Morgan Dancera — Jack Alfred ft Co. — 
Harry Green ft Co. — Cecil Cunningham — Ed. ft Lew 
Miller — Arnold A Taylor — Wheeler. Dolan ft F. — 
La Sylphe — Bert Swor. 

ROANOKE, VA. 

Roanoke (Firat Half)— Swan Bros.— J; -W. 

F.arasen. . . . . 



VMUBEVILEM MMMS 



RICHMOND, VA. 
Richmond (First Half) — Dan Burke ft Girls- 
Hunting ft Frances. (Second Halt) — Saxton 4 
Farrell — Frank Stafford Co. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 
Temple — G. AluaV Boudegger — The Gaudamldts — 
Lyons ft Yoeco — Kennedy ft Burt — Jeasle Bueley 
ft Co. — Weadlck'a Stampede. 

SAVANNAH, GA. 
Savannah (First Half) — Edwin George. (Second 
Half) — Gaaton ft Palmer. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 
Keith'e— Whitfield ft Ireland— Alfred Bergen— 
Four Husbands — McCormack ft Wallace — Darta ft 
Rlalto— Felix ft Dawson Girls. 

''•" TORONTO. CANADA. 

Shea's-^Lvdell ft Hlgglna — Grew. Pates ft Co. — 
Barry Girls — Conrad & Conrad— Four Readings — 
Five_Mexettl»— Bauh ft Briscoe. 

; » WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Keith's — Sam Mann ft Co. — Annie Sutter — Three 
Chums — Dolly Sisters — Collies A Hart — The Ran- 
dalla. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Garrick — Boyarr Co.- — Fred Kornan. 

YOUNGSTOWN. "OHIO. 

Keith'e — LeRoy. Talma./ft Bosco — "Cranberries" 

— Dave Roth — Mae Curtis — Hanlon 'ft Clifton — 

Bnrna ft Frabito — McBae ft Clegg. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Majeetio — Howard ft Clark Revue — Alan Brooks 
ft Co. — Oould — Williams ft Wolfna — Senor Westony 
— Bowman Bros. — Rena Parker — Hubert Dyer ft 
Co. 

Palace — Nat C. Goodwin — Conroy ft Le Maire — 
N. ft S. Konna — Geo. Kelly ft Co. — Marmein Sis- 
ters — Lockett ft Brown — Ed Morton — Montambo ft 
Wells. 

CALGARY, CANADA. 

Orpheum — Marck'a Jungle Players — Norwood ft 
Hall — Diamond ft Granddaughter — "The Nlgbt 
Boat" — Mang ft Soyder — Chaa. Howard ft Co. — 

Frankie Heath. 

DENVER, COLO. 

Orpheum — Katherlne Clifford— Else Ruegger — 
"Vacuum Cleaners" — Ray Snow— Hufford ft Chain 

— Three Jabn. "Hit the Troll." 
DULUTH. MINN. 
- Orpheum — FJddte Foy ft Family — Kltoer. Hawks- 
ley ft McClay — Gonne ft Alberts — Libouati — Saun- 
der'a Birds — Fern Richelieu ft Fern. 
DES MOINES. LA. 
Orpheum — Jean Adair ft Co. — Medlln. Watts ft 
Townes — Callste Conant — Delro — "Act Beautiful" 
—Juggling Nelson — McCarty & Faye. 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Orpheum — Julia Arthur — Santos 4 Hayes — 
Marie Stoddard — Long ft Ward — Vera Berliner — 
Orville Stamn — Hugh Herbert ft Co. 
L08 ANGELES. CAL. 
Orpheum — Louise Dresser — Win. Gaxton ft Co. — 
Chaa. Olcott— Beatrice Morrell Sextette — Rita 
Roland— Edwin House; — Harry Glrard ft Co. — Lew 
Brice 4 Ban Twins. 

LINCOLN, NEB. 
Orpheum — "Rubcville" — Johnston ft Harty— 
Patricola ft Myers — De Leon ft Davles — Three 
Vagrants — Lottie Horner — "Motorboatlng." 
MEMPHIS. TENN. 
Orpheum — Emily Ann Wellman ft Co. — David 
Saplrsteln— Bert Baker ft Co. — Harold Dokane ft 
Co. — Haager ft Goodwin — Nevina ft Erwood — Rath 

Bros. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
Orpheum — Nan Halperln — Mack A Walker — 
"Corner Store" — Beaumont ft Arnold — "Five of 
Clubs" — Phina ft Co. — Ferry. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Orpheum — "Submarine F 7" — Georgia EarJe ft 
Co.— -Gould ft Lewis — Brown ft Spencer — The Flem- 
ings — Hughes Musical Trio — Mllo. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Orpheum — "For Pity's Sake" — Edwin Arden ft 
Co. — Berate ft Baker — Maria Lo ft Co. — Welser ft 
Reeser— Holt ft Roaedale — La Zler & Worth. 
OMAHA, NEB. 
Orpheum — Randall ft Myers — Hermlne Shone ft 
Co.- Clifford ft Wills — Asabt Troupe — Bensee ft 
Baird — Fern Richelieu ft Fern — Harry CarrolL 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 
Orpheum — Stella Mayhew ft Co. — Arthur Havel 
ft Co. — Gallagher ft Martin — Nina Payne A Co. — 
Betty Bond — Roland Travers — Avellng ft Lloyd. 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Orpheum — "America First" — Chung Hwa Four — 
Norton A Nicholson — Hamilton ft Barnes — Ben 
Decly A Co. — El Cleve ft O'Connor — Bert Melrose. 
BAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Orpheum — Elsie Janla — Three Bobs— Joe Towle 
— Eva Taylor ft Co; — Spencer ft Williams — Loven- 
berg Sis. ft Co. — Leona "La Mar — Kathryn Murray. 
ST. LOUIE, XO. 
Orpheum — Donald Brian ft Co. — Alexander Kids 
— -McMahon. Dimond A Chap — Bernard ft Janls — 
Willie Weston — Rae Samuels. 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 
Orpheum — Geo. Edwards Bandbox Revue— 
"Prosperity" — Wm. Ebbs ft Co.— Jordan Girls — 
Frank Hartley — Santly ft Norton— Al. Herman. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

NEW YOR K CIT V . 

American" (Firat Half) — Oakes ft" De Lore — 
Sells A Norman — The Blockers— Jenka A Allen — 



"Neglect" — Peggy Brooks — Lloyd ft Whltebonse— 
Geo. M. Rosener. (Last Half) — Alanine Trio — 
Manning ft Hall — Geo. M. Roacner— Krescott — 
Mary Donoghue — Lotts ft Lotts— Exposition Jubilee 
Four. 

• Boulevard (First Half)— The Hennluga— Har- 
mony Trio — Lew Wilson. (Last Half)— Oakea ft 
De Lure — Florence Bayfield — Howard, Chase & Co. 
— Lender Bros. 

Avenue B (First Half)— Dunn Sistera— Clarence 
Wilbur — Barbara Thatcher ft Co. — Sampson ft 
Douglas. (Last Half)— Mack ft Lee — Belle Rut- 
land — Two Carltooe. 

Greeley Square (Firat Half) — PIquo — Ryan ft 
Rlggs — Camllle Person! ft Co.— Greater City Four 
—La Petite Cabaret. (Laat Half) — The Hennlngs 
— Panla Reeves — Taylor ft Howard — "Do Your 
Bit" — Hndler-Steln-Pbllllps — Teehow's Cats. 

Delanoey Street (First Half) — Ream 4 Butter 
— Nada Keser — Techow'e Cata — Harry & Myrtle 
Gilbert— Henry E. Dlxey, Jr.— Lander Bros. — 
Helen Jacklay. (Laat Half) — Pero ft Wilson — 
Bursa ft Foras — La Petite Cabaret — Ryan ft 
Rigga — Harold Selman ft Co. — Frank Fan-on. 

Lincoln Square (Firat Half) — Carl Rlfner — 
Chains ft Lambert — Willard, Hutchinson ft Co. — 
Dunham-Hdwarda Trio — Dawson, Lannlgan, Covert. 
(Laat Half)— The Zanarros— Jenka ft Allen — 
Camllle Person! 4 Co. — Greater City Four — Mor- 
ley ft Jaaa Band. 

National (First Half)— Pero ft Wilson— Panla 
Reeves — Leonard ft Ward — Howard. Chase ft Co. 
— Delmore ft Angel. (Laat Half) — Musical Chrya* 
ties — Leonard ft Dempsey — Gordon, Eldrld ft Co. — 
Burk ft Harris — Pequo. 

Orpheum (First Half) — Henry Cllve — Harold. 
Selman Co. — Hudler, Stein, Phillips — Ralph Boyle 
ft Co. (Laat Half) — Hern ft Rutter— Xarln Keser 
— Budd 4 Nellie Hetn — Henry E. Dlxey. Jr. — 
Weston 4 Hale — The Glockera. 

Seventh Avenue (First Half) — Wllbnr ft Dolls- 
Miller, Packer. Selz — Adele Oswald— Gordon, 
Elder ft Co. — West ft Hale — Gardner's Manlaca. 
(Last Half) — Challia ft Lambert— Willard Hutch- 
inson — Henry Cllve. 

BROOKLYN. 

Bijou (First Half) — Manning ft Hall — Burns' ft 
Foron — Lotta ft Lotts — Bud ft Nellie Helm — Aerial 
Bartletts. (Last Half) — Breakaway Barlowa — 

Adele .Oswald — Lloyd & Whitehousc — The Leigh- 
tons — Dawson. Lanlgan. Covert. 

DeKalb (First Half)— Musical Cbrratlos— Alex- 
ander ft Fields— Florence Rayflelrt— Freseott — 
Frank Farron — Eskimo & Seals. (Last Halt) — 
Wilbur ft Dolls— Miller. Packer. SeU — Valyda ft 
Nuts — "Well. Well. Well"— Eddie Foyer— Helen 
Jackley. 

Warwick (First Half)— Mack ft Lee — Leonla 
Slmon6on — Bruno Cramer Trio. (Last Half) — 
Barbara Thatcher Co. — reggy Brooks. 

Fulton (First Half) — Breakaway Barlows — 
Valyda ft Nuts — "Do Your Bit" — Burke ft Harris. 
(Last Half) — White ft White — Harmony Trio- 
Leonard 4 Ward — "Neglect" — Eskimo 4 Peals. 

Palace (First Half) — Two Cantons — Betty Bon- 
nell. (Laat Half) — Carl ft Francis — Leonla 
Slmonaon — Clarer.ce Wilbur. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Hippodrome — Kennedy & Kramer — .Tesaon & 
Jesson — Freriiks 4 Palmer — Arcadia Trio — Alice 
Hamilton — "Bachelor Dinner," 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Orpheum (First Half) — Dolce Sisters— Townsond. 
Wilbur ft Co. — Daniels & Conrad — Geo. Armstrong 
— Rose ft Ellis. (last Half )— Mllloy. Keonch ft 
Co. — Jim Reynolds — Phuopblends — Crawford. 
Smith 4 Martell— Mills 4 Camp. 

St. James (First Half)— Jewltt ft Pendleton— 
Ward ft Pryor — Mabel Page ft Co.— Cooper ft Cox 
—College Quintette. (Lnat Half)— White Steppers 
— Smith ft Troy — Weber ft Wilson. 
FALL RIVER, MASS. 

Bijou (First Half)— Will ft Kemp— Jim Rey- 
nolds— Mllloy. Keouph ft Co.— Crawford. Smith ft. 
Msrtell — PlmnphlemlK. (last Half)— Hose ft Ellis 
— Dolce Sisters — Tnwnycnil. Wilbur & Co. — Geo- 
Armstrong — Daniels ft Conrad. 

NEW ROCHELLE. N. Y. 

Loew's (First Half)— Nora ft Sid Kellogg— 
Belle Rutland — Hands. Roberts ft Co. (Last Half) 
— Stanley Burns— Betty Bunnell. 

PROVIDENCE. B. I. 

Emery (First Half)— White Steppers— Smith ft 
Troy — Weber ft. Wilson. (Last Half) — Ward ft 
Pryor— Mabel Paige — College Quintette— Cooper ft 
Cox — Jewltt 4 Pendleton. 

TORONTO, CAN. 

Tonga Street — Corner ft Odette — Kammerer ft 
Hnwtand — Sbrapndl Dodgers — Lee & Bennett — 
Morris Golden — Rlunos. 

PANTACES' CIRCUIT 

BUTTE. MONT. 
Pantasea (Five Days) — Jeasle ft Dolly Miller — 
The Cromwella — Brady ft Maboney — "Saint and 
Sinner" — "Bon Voyage." 

CALGARY, CAN. 
Pantasea — Goldberg ft Wayn<! — Von Cello— Mer- 
cedes— Cook ft Lorenx— Four Holloways — Julia 
Curtla. 

DENVER. COLO. 
PanUeea — Gillespie Girls — Ed Bloodell ft Co. — 
Miller ft Lyle— Gerrard's Monks. 

EDMONTON, CAN. 
Pontages — Claudia Coleman— Six Piano Girls — 
Willard — Claude Younger — "Dream -of- the ilrlen" 
—Willard. 

GREAT FALLS. MONT. 
Fantaa-es — Four Earla — Tom Edwards ft Co. — 
Sllber ft North— Alleen Stanley— "Count aod the 
Staid." 



KANSAS CITY. MO. 
Pantasea— Ed F. Reynard— Thri e S\ uiphi.ny 
Maids — "Magailne Girls" — Dorothy Vaughn— Mile. 
Blanca — Alberto. 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
Pantasea — Holmes 4 Le Vere — "A Breath of 
Old Virginia"— Morris ft Allen— "The Movie 
Glrla"— Rondaa Trio. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Pantasea — Morris and Beasley — Ash and Shaw 

Six Sercnudcrs— Rlgolettu Brothera — Larson and 
Wilson. 

OGDEN, UTAH. 
Pantasea (Three Dnya)— Will Morris— "Oh. Mr. 
Detective" — Stuart — "Woman Propoaee" — Green. 
McHendry ft Deane. 

OAKLAND, CAL. 
Pantagea — The 1-amptnis— Smith ft McGuIre — 
Joe Roberts — "The Mimic World" — Abrama ft 
Jobna. 

PORTLAND. ORE. 
Pantases — Claire & Atwood— Venetian Gypsies 
— Frank Morrell— Edna Keeley Co.— Dixon ft 
O'Connor. 

SPOKANE. WASH. 
Pantasea— Three Mori Bros.— Five Sully*— 
Norino Coffey — Winter Garden Revue — Willie 
Solar. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Pantasea— Kane ft Herman— Neleon ft Nelson— 
"Birth of a Roae"— Ahearn Troupe— Godfrey ft 
Henderson — Gulllanl Trio. 

„, SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH. ,_„.- 

Pantasea— Howard Klbel ft Herbert — "Miss 

Hamlet" — Leila Shaw 4 Co. — Klote ft N'asb. ... < 

SEATTLE, WASH. '. ■, 

Pantasea— Dumltrescu Dunham Troupe — Lane ft 

Harper— "A Friendly Call"— Nell McKlnley — "Oh-. 

You Devil." 

SAN DIEGO, CAL. 
Pantasea — Julian Hall — The Gaacolgnes — 
"Women"— "Wanted, a Wife" — Lucy I.ucler Trio. 

TACOMA. WASH. 
Pantasea— Bert Wheeler-Johnny Small ft Sla- 
ters — Owen McGlveney — Al Wonlman — "Oh! Doc- 
tor." 

VICTORIA. CAN. 
Pantasea— Four Roses— Octavla Handworth ft 
Co. — Swor ft MrCormlck — Harry Breen — "Little 
Mlsa Up to Date." 

VANCOUVER. CAN. 
Pantasea— "Girl from Starland"— Chester Gat- 
her — DeMlcbelle Bros. — "Everyman'e Slater" 

"Misa America." 

WINNIPEG, CAN. 
Pantasea— Parsons and Irwin — Lord and Fuller 
— "Flreade Reverie"— Wilson's Riding Lion— Wil- 
son Brothers. 

BAY CITY. MICH. 
Bijou (First Half) — Booth ft Leandrr— Burns ft 
Lynn — Jno. A. Sparks ft Co. — Fay. Two Cooleya 
ft Fay— La Graclosa. (Last Half )— Harry Ster- 
ling — Ed 4 Irene Lowry — Wolf ft Stewart — Byal 
ft Early— Long Tack Sam ft Co. 

BATTLE CREEK. MICH. 
Battle Creek splits with Kalamazoo. 

CALUMET, MICH. 
Crown (First Half)— Tudor ft Stanton. (I-ast 
Half)— Everts ft Boyle. 

FLINT, MICH. 
New Palace (First Half)— All Girl Revue. 
(Ijist naif)— Curtis Canines— Armstrong ft Straus 
—"Honor Thy Children"— Al. Shayne— l-ona's 
Hawaflans, 

FORT WAYNE, IND. 
Palace (First Half)— Karltnn ft Kllfford— Mon- 
trose ft Allen — Gils Knltnan— Six Colonial Belles 

Holloday ft Wlllette — "Honor Thy Children." 
(Last Half) — Bernard 4 Merrltt — Geaaet ft Mer- 
lin — Palais Royal Revue — Alexander Bros, ft 
Evelyn — Geo. Morton — Three Types. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
Opera Rouse (Full Week) — Vanity Fair. 
Lyrio— De Boars Sistera— Daisy llarcourt — 
Smart Shop — Howard ft White — Murphy ft Barry. 
JACKSON. MICH. 
Orpheum (First Half)— Hart ft KervlUe — Geo. 
Schindler— Jesslyn ft Merlin— Anderson ft Guinea. 
(Last Half! — Geo. ft Mae Le Fevre — Six Colonial 
Belles — Al Sbayue — ^Herbert Gcrmatne Trio. 
KALAMAZOO. MICH. 
Majestic (First Half) — Dan Abearn— Rome ft 
Wager — Ore ft Ilagen— Cooper ft Robinson — "1917 
Winter Garden Revue." (Last Half)— The See- 
uachs — Ed ft Jack Smith — McConnell ft Simpson 

Co. — Robhe 4 Nelson — SI* Musical Noaaea. 
LA tJ STUM, MICH. 

Lyric (First naif)— Millard 4 Harper. (Last 
Half)— Fields ft La AuVlla. 

LOGANSPORT. IND. 

Colonial (First Half) — Claire Hanson ft Four. 
(Last Half)— May ft Kllduff. 

LANSING. MICH. 
Bijou (First Half)— Splits with Flint. 

MUSKEGON. MICH. 
Regent (First Half) — Bernard 4 Merrltt — Haw- 
ley ft Bellaire — Creat Howard— Doe O'Nell — Alex- 
ander Bros, ft Evelyn. (Last Half) — "Merry Go 
Round." 

MARION, END. 
Lyric (First Half)— May ft Klldutf— Altboff 
Sistera. (Last Half )— Mildred Hayward— "Camp 
In Rockies." 

RICHMOND. END. 
Murray (Last Half) — Claire Hanson ft Four — 
AltholT Sisters— I. mis ft L< opold— Prince Kur Ml— 
Gallando. 

BAULT BTE. MARIE. CANADA. 
Orpheum (Firat Half)— Morrison ft Clifton. 
(Last Half)— Carsetta ft Rydell. 
800. MICH. 
Star (First Half) — Carsetta ft Rydell. (Last 
Half) — Morrison 4 Clifton. 

{Continued on page 34.) . 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



~{3? 2 



" iiffUllltf T ^17 



SAM HARRIS CO. 



v*»* 



■•ri'i >i .'- 3 



"His Night Out" 



Working 



In Vaudeville 



NICK VERGA 



la VaadariUo 



The Young Caruso 



Direction JACK LEWIS 



JIMMY 



BILLY 



PLUNKETT and ROMAINE 

2 BOSTON BEANS— CHIPS OF THE OLD BLOCK 

In Dainty E ccentr ic Soars, Dancaa ud SmOn 
WATCH THEM GROW. 



HOOPER & BURKHART 



NA/E - 

Nw Act Soo n " At the Fas Ou^" by John P. MuIjtbw (F ully Copyrighted) 
Direction IRVING COOPER 



FRANK E. 



Hi 



JANE 

.IN/I 



In a Comedy Talking Act, Entitled "LOVE" 
By LEA D. FREEMAN. IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOBBY HENSHAW 

The Human Ukulele 

A REAL NOVELTY BOOKED SOLID Dir., HARRY SHEA 



O'ROURKE -d JORDAN 

Irish Songs 



Irish Wit 



12 Minutes in One 



CARBONI and MORAN 

Sinking Harmony and ln« Big Hawaiian Guslar Player. Direction, PAT. CASEY 

IRENE LATOUR and ZAZA 

D erection Jai J. Armstrong In VaudeTule 

Xtic MARTIANS 

SSesM araaic 



E rarytain, a aw and orifnuU, Ckaractar, 

Coatortioa I— Sjpslss\ 
DIRECTION MAX OBERNDORF 

™-~ WINTER & HANLEY ™~ 

U "ON THE CORNER" Siajin., Talkia., 



AND 



B1 VAUDEVILLE 



WM. 



JESSON & JESSON 



VAUDEVILLE 



MARK LEVY 



N a d a K cscr 

The Belgian Nightingale 

Playtnf tha 1 umm Circuit Olractioa Teen Joaas 




FLYING MIS SILE EXPERTS 

^nTTEJoMERaNIT THk<3WDG 



SolU 

U. B. O — HG 



— FRANCETTI SISTERS '«- 

Playin» Lo«w ana Fax Tim* Bookad by Mandal and Rom 

MARGUERITE CALVERT 



THE DANCING VIOLINIST 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



THE HENNINGS 



REFINED COMEDY 
NOVELTY OFFERING 

Direct!** Cha«. Fitrpa trick 



EARL M. PINGREE & CO. 



la "M IS3 THANKSGIVING" 



Dfa^ctUa Itda- A X 



Irene 

Of Original Carbrey Brother*. 



Douglas 



Diractioo, Irrin, M. 



ZIEGLER SISTERS 



AND THEIR KENTUCKY FIVE 



PAUL DURAND 



lew CARLE & INEZ dolly 

Something ia One. Oat of tk* Ordinary. Dir. Sam 



THREE TIVOLI GIRLS 

Taa Miantea af Haraaaay ia Vauaarilla 



II 



SYLVESTER 



J J The "Nut" Magician 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

MEMBER N.V. A. 



MAUDE IP \J N INI "SUVT 

Laay An lmru Qua— Bonypart. Diractio a Mark Laay. 



LOUISE MAYO 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

CLAYTON CONRAD 

CRAYON CONCEPTIONS Dir action CHAS. WILSHIN 



Of STUDIES OF LIFE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TANEAN BROS. 



PLAYING U B O TIME 

September 6-7-8 .Poll's, Waterbury 

September 10-11-12 .. Auditorium, Norwich, Conn. 



5., 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



V. 



Routes Muit Reach Tfiiii Office. Not Later 
Th»n Saturday . g- 

DRAMAT1C AMD MUSICAL k 

Bernhardt, Sarah — Knickerbocker, Sent. 8-15. 

"Business Before Pleasure" — Eltlnge Theatre, 
lndet 

"Cheer Dp" — Hippodrome, lndef. 

■'Canary Cottage'' (OUTer Moroico, mgr.) — 
Park Square, Boston, lndef. 

"Daybreak" — Harris Tl.eatre, lndef. 

"Dew Drep Inn" — mim»i« Chicago, lndef. 

"Dollar* and Sense" — Princess, Chicago, ln- 
def. 

"Everywoman" Co. — Bijou Theatre, Bangor, 
Me., Sept. J; Jefferson Theatre, Portland, 
Me., 3-4 ; Colonial Theatre, Laconla, N. H„ 
5; New Park Theatre, Manchester, N. H, 
8 : Opera House, Lawrence, .Mais., 8 ; Bos- 
ton, Maw., 10-29. 

"Experience Co- Indianapolis, Ind, 10-15. 

"Ere* of Youth 51 — Marine Elliott's Theatre, 
lndef. 

"Friend Martha" (Edw. Peplee, mgT.) — Ply- 
moath, Boston, lndef. 

"Fair and Warmer" (Selwyn A Co, mgrs.) — 
Park St., Boston, lndef. 

"Flame, The" — Schenectady, Sept. 1: To- 
ronto, Oat- 3-8 ; London, Oat., 10-11 ; 
Hamilton, Ont,, 12-18. 

"Freckles" — Western (Broadway Amusement 
Co.'s), Clark, 8. D., Sept. 8: Ash ton, 10; 
Aberdeen, 11; EUendale, N. D., 12; Edge- 
ley, 13; Lisbon, 14; Oakes, 15; Cogswell, 
17; Webster, 18; Lemmon, 22; Bowman, 
25; Iemay, Mont., 26. 

"Freckles" — Northern (Broadway Amusement 
Co.'s), Grafton, N. D„ Sept. 8; Hoople, 10; 
Glib j, 11 ; Park Elver. 12 ; Milton, IS ; 
Langdon, 15; Inkster, 17; Tonkin, 18; 
Lawton, 20 ; Sarles, 22 ; Mnnlch, 26 ; Rock- 
lake, 27 ; Cando, 29. 

"Good for Nothing Husband" (Bobt. Sher- 
man, mgr.) — Eastern Co., Wallston, 6; 
Jackson, 6 ; Irontown, 7 ; Huntington, W. 
Va., 8 ; Galllpolis, Ohio, 10 ; Pomeroy, Ohio, 
11; Parkersburg, W Va., 12. 

"Good Night, Paul" — Hudson Theatre, lndef. 

"Good for Nothing Husband" (West)— Ster- 
ling, Sept. 5; Galena, 8; Maquoket, la., 7; 
Washington, 8; West Point, Iowa, 0; Bur- 
ton, 10 : What Cheer, 11: Maxengo, 12. 

"Have a Heart" — Eastern Co., Savoy Theatre, 
Aabury Park, N. J., Sept. 1; Academy of 
Mnslc, Scran ton,. Pa., 3; Stratton Theatre, 
Mlddletown, N. Y., 4 ; Armory. Blngham- 
ton. N. Y.. 5 ; Harmanus Bleecker Hall, Al- 
bany, N. Y.. 8-8; Empire Theatre, Syracuse, 
N. Y, 10-15 ; Lyric Theatre, Allentown, Pa., • 
17-22 ; Trent Theatre, Trenton, N. J., 24-29. 

"Have a Heart" (H. W. Savage, mgr.) — Co- 
lonial, Boston, Sept. 15. 

"His Little Widows — Shubert, Boston, lndef. 

"Here Comes the Bride" — Hollls, Boston,, ln- 
def. 

"Hltchj-Koo" (Hitchcock A Goetz. mgrs.) — 
Liberty. New York, lndef. . 

"Henpecked Henry" (CaskeU & MacVltty, Inc., 
Merle H. Norton, gen'l mgr.)— Owosso, 
Mich., Sept. 6 ; Coldwater, 7; Morencl, 8; 
Pontlae, 10 ; Tecumseh, 11 ; Mt. Pleasant, 
13-14 : Alma, 15 ; -le+pena, 17 ; Cheboygan, 
18; Boo, 10: SoOf-Ontarlo, 20; Sudbury, 
21; Cobalt, 22; North. Bay, 24; Orlllla, 25; 
Midland. 28 : BarrteVTT ; HamUton, 28-29. 

Ikey fc Abbey Co. — (Western — Mgmt Geo. H. 
Bubb.)— McCook, Neb., 80; Elwood, Neb., 
Aug.. 31 ; Minden, Neb., Sept. 1 ; Kearney, 
3: Lexington, 4; Corard, 5; Gothenberg, 6; 
Hershey, 7: Sterling, Colo., 8. 

"Inner Man, The" — Cort N. Y, indef. 

"Knife. The"— Cort Theatre, Sept 1 : Stand- 
ard (N. Y.), 3; Boof Opera House, week 
Sep. 10 ; Majestic Theatre, Brooklyn, week 
Sep. 17 ; Bhnber, Brooklyn, week Sep. 24 ; 
Boston, lndef. 

"LB8S00, The" — Lyceum Theatre, lndef. 

"Love-O-Mlke" — Casino, Aug. 27, lndef. 

"Leave It to Jane" — Longacre Theatre, indef. 

"Maytlme" (The Shubert's mgmt.) — Shubert 
Theatre, lndef. 

"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 
mgr.) — Playhouse, New York, lndef. 

"Mary's Ankle" (A. H. WoodB, mgr.) — BUon, 
N. Y., lndef. 

Masquerader, The (B, W. Tully) — Lyric, N. 
' Y.. lndef. 

"Million Dollar Doll, The" (Western, Norton 
4 Bunnell. Inc., owners) — Eau Claire, Wis., 
Sept. 7 : Stillwater. Minn., 8 ; Brainerd, 9 ; 
Bibbing, 10 ; Virginia, 11 ; Cloquet, 12 ; 
Crookston, 14 ; Grand Forks, N. D., 15 ; 
Winnipeg, Man., 17-22; Beglna, Sask, 24- 
29; Saskatoon, 27-29. 

"Nothing Bat the Truth" (Max Elgman) — 
Syracuse. N. Y, Sept. 6-7-8: Sandusky, O., 
10 : Ft. Wayne, 11 ; South Bend, 12. 

"Oh Boy" — Wilbur, Boston, indef. 

"Oh Boy" — La Salle, Chicago, indef. 

"Oh Boy" — Princess, New York, indef. 

"Pals First" — Illinois, Chicago, lndef. 

"Parlor, Bedroom and Bath" — Olympic, Chi- 
cago, lndef. 

"Passing Show of 1917"— Winter Garden, 
New York, indef. 

Peter Ibbcttson — Republic. New York, lndef. 

Pom-Pom with Mitzl Hajos (H. W. Savage) 
—Opera House. Newport B, I., Sept, 10; 
Middlesex Theatre, Mlddletown, Conn., 11 ; 
Park Theatre,- Bridgeport, Conn, 12 ; Shu- 
bert Theatre, New Haven, Conn, 13: Re- 
gent Theatre, Norwalk, Conn, 14; Lyceum 
Theatre, New London, Conn., 16. 

"Rambler Rose" (Chas. Frohman, mgr.) — At- 
lantic City, Aog. 28-Sept. 1: Washington, 
D. C, S-8 : Empire Theatre, New York City, 
lndef. 

Skinner, Otis (Chas. Frohman, mgr.) — Syra- 
cuse, N. Y, Sept. 7-8; Powers, Chicago, in- 
def. 

San Carlo — Grand Opera Co, 44th St, Sept. 
3-15. 

"This Way Out" — Geo. M. Cohan's Theatre, 
lndef. 

"Tailor Made Man" — Cohan & Harris, lndef. 

"The 13th Chair" — Pulton Theatre. New 
York, UH Sept, 8. 



ROUTE LIST 



"Turn to the Right" (Smith ft Golden, mgrs.) 
— Gaiety. New York, lndef, ' 

"Turn to the Bight" (Smith & Golden ( mgrs.) 
— Grand, Chicago, lndef, 

"Upstairs and Down" — Cort, Chicago, lndef. 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin" (Wm. Kibble, mgr.) — 
Jamestown, N. Y, Sept. 5; Corry, Pa, 6; 
Warren, 7 ; Olean, N. Y, 8 ; Emporium, Pa, 
9; Du Boise. 10; Bellefoutaln 11 ; Lewis- 
town, 12; Huntington, IS; Tyrone, 14; 

Altoona, 15. — • 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin" Co. ( Browning- Ander- 
son-Lewis) — Freemansburg, Sept. 6; Glen- 
don, 6; Nazareth, Pa, 7; Wlndcap. 8; 
Bangor, 10; East Bangor, 11; Portland, 
12; Stroosburg, 18; Milford, 14: Hawley. 
15; Honesdale, 17: Forest City, 18: Oak- 
land, 19; Lanesboro, 20; Hallstead. 21; 
Montrose, 22 ; Wy aloslog, 24 ; Towanda, 
25. 

"Very Idea, The" (Messrs. Shubert, mgrs.) — 
New York City, lndef. 

"Wanderer, The" — Manhattan Opera House, 
last two weeks. 

Wilson. Al H. (8. B. Ellis)— Heading, Pa, 
Sept. 3 : Harrlsburg, Pa, 4 ; Lewistown, 
Pa, 5: Houtzdale, Feu, 6; Du Bols, Pa, 7; 
Bradford, Pa, 8. 



"What Happened to Jones" — §«th St Thea- 
tre, indef. 

"You're In Love" — Garrick, Chicago, lndef. 

"Zlegfeld Follies" — New Amsterdam, New 
York, last two weeks. 

STOCK 

Auditorium Players— Maiden. Man., lndef. 

Alcazar Players — San Francisco, lndef. 

Albee Stock (Chas. Lovenberg, mgr.) — Provi- 
dence, H. I, lndef. 

Austin, Mildred, Musical Comedy (Star) — 
Louisville, Ky., lndef. 

Angell Stock (Joe Angell, mgr.) — Park, Pitts- 
burgh, lndef. 

Baker Stock Co. — Portland, Ore, lndef. 

Bouetelle, Jesse, Stock Co. — Buffalo, N. X, 
lndef 

Bennett Richard, Stock — San Francisco, ln- 
def. 

Bryant Marguerite, Players — Altoona, Pa, 
indef, 

Buhler, Richard. Players (A. G. Delamater, 
mgr.)— Columbus, O, indef. 

Bishop Players — Oakland, Cat, indef. 

Boyer, Nancy, Stock — Detroit Mich., lndef. 

Baldwin, Walter, Stock — Duluth, Minn, lndef. 

Blaine's, James, PlayerB — Saskatoon, Can, 
lndef. 

Cooper Baird Co. — Zanesvllle, Ohio, lndef. 

Colonial Stock, Cleveland, O, indef. 

Crown Theatre Stock Co. (E. W. Rowland. 
Sr.) — Chicago, lndef. 

Comstock, F. Roy, Stock Co. — Cleveland, O, 
Indef. 

Cornell-Price Players — Wauseon, O, lndef.; 
Alma, Mich, 3-8; Allegan, Mich, 10-15. 

Dwlght, Albert Players (G. A. Martin, mgr.) 
K. and K. Opera House, Pittsburgh, Pa, 
lndef. 

Dale, Kathryn Co. (Krug) — Omaha, Neb, ln- 
def. 

Dainty, Bessie, Play en — (I. B. Earie, mgr.) 
— Dallas, Tex, lndef. 

Denham Players — Denver, indef. 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sharps- 
burg, Pa, lndef. 

Emerson Players — Lowell, Mass, lndef. 

Elltcb Stock Co. (Elitch Gardens) — Denver, 
Col, lndef. 

Felber * Shea Stock— Akron, O, lndef. 

Fifth Ave. Stock (Harry Home, mgr.) — 
Fifth Ave, Brooklyn, lndef. 

Ftanklyn. Maurice, Stock Co. — Worcester, 
Mass, lndef. 

Garrick Theatre Stock Co. — Garrick, Detroit, 
Mich, lndef. 

Garden City Stock Co.— Kansas City, Mo, 
indef- «_. 

Glass, Joseph D, Stock Co. — Denver, Colo, 
indef. ■ 

Gordlnler Bros. Stock — Ft Dodge, la, Indet 

Grand Theatre Stock Co.— Tulsa, Okla, lndef. 

Home, Col. F. P, 8tock — Youngstown, O, in- 
def. 

Incomparable Grand Stock Co. — Tulsa, Okla, 
indef. 

Jewett Henry, Playere — Copley, Boston, In- 
def. 

Keith Stock — Portland, Me, lndef. 

Kenyon Stock Co. (Forry L. Brott, mgr.) — 
Kenyon, Pittsburgh, lndef. 

Knickerbocker Players— Syracuse, N. Y, ln- 
def. 

Kyle Stock Co. (Barber & Howland, mgrs.) — 
Lansing, Mich, lndef. 

Lexington Park Players — Lexington Park, 
Boston, lndef. _ 

Lakeside Mas. Comedy Co. — Denver, Colo, 
lndef. . 

Lando. Albert, Stock Co. — FItchburg, Mass, 
indef 

Lawrence, DeL, Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Liberty Stock Co. — Strand, San Diego, CaL, 
lndef. 

Lawrence Players — Celeron Park, Jamestown, 
N. Y, lndef. 

Ueb, Harris, Stock Co. — Wilson, Chicago, in- 
Lyric" Light Opera Co.— Providence, B- I, 
lndef. 

Lone-Jane Players (Carl P. HaUaway, mgr.) 
— Warburton, Yonkers, lndef. 

Liberty Players — Norumbega Park, Auburn- 
dale, Mass., indef. 

MacLean, Pauline, Stock (W. W. Richards, 
mgr.) — Samuel's Theatre, Jamestown, N. 
Y, indef. 

Modern Players — Pabst Milwaukee, Wis., In- 
def. » 

Marcus Musical Stock Co. — New Bedford, 
Mass., lndef. 



Morocco Stock — Los Angeles, lndef. 

Manhattan Players — Rochester, N. Y, lndef. 

Miller, Henry, Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Opera Players — Hartford, Conn, lndef, 

Orpheum Players (Geo. Ebey, mgr.) — Oak- 
land, Cat, lndef. 

Oliver, Otis, Players — Lincoln, Neb, lndef. 

Orpheum Players (Clark Brown, mgr.) — 
Montreal, Can, lndef. 

Packard, Jay, Stock Co. — Newark, N. J, ln- 
def. 

Poll Stock Co.— Springfield, Mass, lndef. 

People's Stock Co. — Oklahoma City. Okla, ln- 
def. 

Perry, Tex, Players — Zanesrllle, O, lndef. 

Poll Stock Co. — Wilkes-Barre, Pa, indef. 

Poll Players — Worcester, Mass, lndef. 

Poll Stock Co. — Waterbury, Conn, lndef. 

Powell, Halton, Stock Co.— Lansing, Mich, 

Price, Stanley, Players — Grand Rapids, Mich., 

Robins, Edward, Stock — Toronto, Can, lndef. 
Shubert Players — Milwaukee, Wis, lndef. 
Shubert Stock — St. Paul, Minn, lndef. 
Somervllle Theatre Players — Somervllle, 

Mass, lndef. 
St. Clair, Winifred, Stock (Earl Slpe, mgr.) 

— Trenton, N. J, indef. 
Spooner, Cecil, Stock — Grand Opera House, 

Brooklyn, lndef. 
Toler, Sydney, 8tock — Portland, Me, lndef. 
Temple Stock — Hamilton, Can, Indef. 
Van Dyke & Baton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.) — 

Joplin, Mo, lndef. 
Vees, Albert. Stock — Wheeling. W. Va, lndef. 
Wigwam Stock Co. — Wigwam, Ban Francisco, 

lndef. 
Williams, Ed, Stock— Elkhart, Ind, lndef. 
Williams, Ed, Stock — Qulncy, III, lndef. 
Walker, Stuart, Players — Indianapolis, lndef. 
Wilkes' Players — Seattle, Wash, Indef. 
Wallace, Chester, Players — Wllllamsport, Pa, 

indef. 
Yale Stock Co. — River Park, Concord, N. H, 

lndef. 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT 

Attractions for the week of September 3. 

"After Office Hours" — New York (Lexington). 
"Come Back to Erin" — Providence, B. I. 
"Daughter of tbe Sun" — Chicago (National). 
"Going Straight" — Chicago (Imperial). 
"Girl Without a Chance" — A, Louisville, Ky. 
"Girl Without a Chance" — B, Columbus, 0. 
"Heart of Wetona" — Paterson, N. J, Bept. 6- 

7-8. 
"Katzenjammer Kids" — Indianapolis, Ind. 
"Leave It to Me" — Hoboken, N. J. 
"Little Girl In a Big City"— Buffalo. N. Y. 
"Little Girl God Forgot^— Kansas City. Mo. 
"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl" — 

Omaha. Sept. 2-3-4-5: St Joe, 6-7-8. 
"Peg O' My Heart" — Washington, D. C. 
"Safety First" — St Louis, Mo. 
"Step Lively" — Peoria. 111., Sent. 2-3-4-3. 
"The White Slave" — Pittsburgh. Pa. 
"Unborn Child" — (A) — Detroit. Mich. 
"Unborn Child" — (B) — Milwaukee. Wis. 
"Which One Shall I Marry 7" — Cleveland. O. 

BURLESQUE 

Columbia Wheel 

Al Beeves — Peoples. Philadelphia, 3-8; Pal- 
ace, Baltimore, 10-15. 

Ben Welch— Star. Cleveland. 3-8: Empire. 
Toledo. O, 10-15. 

Best Show In Town — Star and Garter, Chi- 
cago. 3-8 : Bercbell. Des Moines, 10-11 ; 
Gaiety. Omaha. 15-21. 

Bowervs — Casino, Philadelphia, 3-8; Miner's, 
Bronx. N. Y„ 10-15. 

Barlesoue Revue — H. A S„ New York, 8-8; 
Empire, Brooklyn, 10-15. 

Burlesque Wonder Show — Empire. Brooklyn, 
S-8: Park. Bridgeport Ct. 13-15. 

Bon Tons — C'ssIdo, Brooklyn. 3-8 : Empire, 
Newark. 10-15. 

Behman Shows— Gaiety, Detroit, 3-8: Gaiety, 
Toronto, Ont, 10-15. 

Broadway Frolics — Paterson, 8-8; Majestic, 
Jersey City. N. J, 10-15. 

Bostonlans — Omaha, Sept. 1-7: Gaiety, Kan- 
sas City. 10-15. 

Follies of the Day — Lemberg, Utlca. 8-8 ; 
Gaiety. Montreal. Can, 10-15. 

Golden Crooks — Olympic. Cincinnati, 3-8: 
Columbia, Chicago, 10-15. 

Hello America — Palace. Baltimore. 3-8 ; Gai- 
ety. Washington. D. C, 10-15. 

Harry Hastings — Empire, Albany, 3-8; Ca- 
sino. Boston, 10-15. 

HID. Hip, Hoorah — Gaiety. Kansas City. 3-8; 
Galetv. St. Louis, 10-15. 

Howe, Sam— Gayety, Buffalo, 8-8; Corinthian, 
Rochester. N. Y, 10-15. 

Irwin's Big Show — Columbia, New York, 8-8 ; 
Casino. Brooklyn, 10-15. 

Liberty Girls — Gayety. Montreal. 3-8 : Em- 
pire. Albany, N. Y.. 10-15. 

Majesties — Cohan's, Pougbkeepsle. 8-8; Hnr- 
tig 4 Seamon's, New York, 10-15. 

Merry Rounders — Grand. Hartford, Ct, 8-8 ; 
Jacques. Waterbury, Ct. 10-15. 

Million $ Dolls — Layoff, 3-8: Paterson, 10-15. 

Mollle Williams — Gayety, Boston, 3-8 ; Colum- 
bia, New York, 10-15. 

Marions, Dave — Jacques, Waterbury, Ct. 3-8; 
Cohan's, Newburg. N. Y, 10-12; Cohan's, 
Poughkeepsle, 13-15. 

Maids of America — Colonial, Providence, 8-8; 
Gaiety, Boston, 10-15. 

Oh Girl — Gaiety, St. Louis. 3-8; Star and 
Garter, Chicago, 10-15. 

Puss Puss — Gaiety, Pittsburgh, 3-8; Star, 
Cleveland, 10-1B. 

Roseland Girls — Miner's, Bronx, New York, 
3-8: layoff, 10-15; Orpheum, Paterson. 
17-22, 



^p*.$s&ti?&15* ,t ^ °~ **' °^» 

^o'uj&r'fesnrA CMc * , °- lu - •*• 

Star and Garter— Corfathlan. Rochester, N. 
Y„ 3-8: Beatable. sJScus*. nTy?!*!? 
_ Lemberg, Ctica. 13-15. 

8 ^ UJ ^aTs„fT«sr5. Ne,, * rt - M; ■»■ 

80 HartfoTc7$& 5\ ^^ M ' ° nM<t ' 
^^ SfSR-rPA'et/- Washington. 8-8; Gal- 
10-15. 



ta £^!^^.feH. c ..J«««y City. M : 



ety. Pittsburgh. 

am Bldman — Ml, ci , 

Peoples, Philadelphia, lO-loT" 

^uf^o? N-Y* 7 iS:ioT ofonto ' M: °™- 

^§? e £yri? n Day?on M ^?To!$S. D,W - ™* 

Watson's Beef Trust— Berchell, Dea Moines, 

Iowa. 8-4 ; Gaiety, Omaha, Neb, 10-157^ 

AMERICAN WHEEL 

American— Hudson, Schenectady, 8-8; HcJ- 
yoke, Mass, 10-12; Springfield. lS-li 

Arm 6" *? d ."•▼I GUIs— Grand, Akron, O, 
6-8; Empire, Cleveland, 10-1?. * 

%o r HM5 ,8ar " F * U "' 6 " 8: G,rdea ' ■=*• 

Auto jBlrls— Empire. Chicago. S-8; Majestic. 

fo?5 y ° e ' : M * Je "k IndiSpoSi: 

B Tr?nt5n. B N e ."j'ri P 8!lf ^^^ " ! Q ™"* 
^e^^w^ee^lO.^ """^ M = «^ 

CI « Bn .. w ioT5r I * TO * M: *•■— ■ 

Darlings of Paris — Gayety, Phils,, S-8; Ma- 
jestic, Scranton, 10-15. *"""" wm * "■ 

Follies of Pleasure — Empire, Cleveland, S-8: 
Erie. Pa, 10-11; Ashtabula, O, 12 : 
Youngstown, 13-18. 

F orty Thieves— Star, St Paul. S-8; Duluth 
9; Century Kansas City, 17-22. ^ 

^nn fflL^0 V .i e 5 toria - »«*«-*. «: 

J 1 sTvoy%^t a o'oT fe TS.^' ° nt " *■*■ 

Girls from Follies—Howard, Boston, 8-8: 

18-Ts. ' Ma ™" 10 " 1Z: ^orcttti. 

Glrhi from Joy land — Gayety. Brooklyn, 8-8; 

JSfiS?"?). ^ onkere ' ™ *•• 10-12; SchV 
nectsdy, 18-15. 

™? G ,V rU— &y' c ^ , J ^, • Columbus, 8-8 ; Court 
cTfTMlS' v «- 10-12; ffrand," Akro^ 

Innocent Maids— Trocadero. Pblla, 8-8 : 

^ ?l-i5 em ' 10: E " ton ' 1J : WlfieV 
Jolly Girls— Century, Kansas City, 8-8: 

Standard. St Louis, 10.15. 
Ui Lifters— Garden, Buffalo. 3-8: Star. 

Toronto, Can, 10-16. 
La ^ y . B "ccaneers— Gayety, Milwaukee, 8-8; 

Gaiety. Minneapolis. 10-15. 
Mlsehler Makers— Gaiety, Baltimore. S-8: 

Trocadero, Phlla, 10-lK "■"»»■ »"». 

MUltary Maids— Cadillac, Detroit 8-8; Gal- 

ety, Chicago, 10-15. 
Monte Carlo Girls — Grand. Trenton, N. J„ 

6-8: Gaiety. Baltimore. 10-15. * 

Mlle-a Minute Girls— Standard, St Louis. 8-8 : 

Englewood, Chicago, 10-16. "■ ' 

Orientals — Worcester, Worcester. Mass . 8-8 • 

Olympic, New York. 10-15. * 

Pacemakers— Majestic, Indianapolis, 8-8 : 

open, 10-15 ; Lyceum. Columbus. 17-22 
Pa £ White's— 8avoy. Hamilton, Ont. 8-8: 

Cadillac, Detroit 10-13. 
Parisian FIlrtn — Open, 3-8; Century. Kan- 
sas City, 10-15. 
Review of 1918 — Englewood, Chicago. 8-8: 

Empire, Chicago, 10-16. 
Record Breakers — Empire, Hoboken. 8-8 : 

Star, Brooklyn, 10-15. 
Social Follies — Wilkes-Barre, 5-8: Empire, 

Hoboken, 10-15. 
Some Babies — Star, Brooklyn. 8-8 ; Gaiety, 

Brooklyn, 10-15. 
September Morning Glories — Holyoke and 

Springfield, Mass, 3-8 ; Howard, Boston, 

10-15. • 

Speedway Girls — Majestic, Scranton, Pa, 8-8 : 

Bingham ton . N. Y, 10-11 ; Oswego, 12 ; 

Niagara Falls. 13-15. 
Tempters — Olympic. New York. 3-8 : Gayety, 

Philadelphia, 10-15. 
Whlrly Glrly Girls — Gayety. Minneapolis, 8-8 ; 

Star, St Paul. 10-15. 

PENN CIRCUIT. 
Monday — Newcastle, Pa. 
Tuesday — Johnstown, Pa. 
Wednesday — Altoona, Pa. 
Thursday — Harrlsburg, Ph. 
Friday— York, Pa. 
Saturday — Beading, Pa. 

MINSTRELS 

Carter's. Suzann, Black & White — Birming- 
ham, Ala, Aug. 27-8ept 1; Chattanooga. 
Tenn., 4-16. 

Coburn's, 3. A. — Urbang, O, lndef. 

Field's, Al. G, Greater Minstrels — Frankfort, 
Ky, 6 ; Lexington, 7-8 ; Chattanooga, Tenn, 
10-11; KnoxvIUe, 12-18; Asbevllle, N. C, 
14-16. 

Hav-A-Laf Co. (J. M. Clinton, mgr.) — Ft 
Wayne, Ind, lndet 

Htmtington's, F. C, Minstrels — Pulaski, 5; 
Marion, 6 : Bristol, Tenn, 7 ; Johnson City, 
8 ; KnoxvIUe, 9-10-11. 

Musical Walker's Lady Minstrels — Paramount, 
Winston-Salem, N. C, week Sept 8. 

"Red Rose" (Chas. Pounds, mgr.) — Newark, 
N. J, Sept. S-8. 

Vogel's, John W.— Buckeye Lake, Mlllersport 
O, lndef. . 

(Continued on page 84.) 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5, 1917 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 




<^^»»»<^»^»»<^^»»»»»»»»»»»»»»<n»»»»»» » »»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»»o.»»»»»»o»^»»»o» » »»»»»»060»»» 



■e-o-6-vs-:^ 



That Little Fire Fly 

FLOSSIE EVERETTE 

Burlesque Revue 



GLADYS SEARS 




AS 



FLORENCE, TANNER 

Th. Girt With the Golden Vole-, Wttfc ath C mlmy Maids Dfaectton Bosom and Richards 

JULIETTE BELMONT 

"Juliette," Gyp.y Violinist — Ingenue 



Direction, JACOBS and JERMON 



2STH CENTURY MAIDS 



CHARLIE N. V. A. QUINN 



ROEHM * RICHARDS 



ECCENTRIC 



skating DAN MURPHY 



Direction. JACOBS end JERMON 



WITH BURLESQUE REVIEW 



JENIMI 

Soubrette 



"SMILING" NELLIE WATSON 

Ingenue Soubrette 
WITH DAVE MARION'S OWN SHOW-A REAL SHOW 



BLACK FACE ORIGINAL. Foatarod with "Beet Show fa Town" 

HERMAN GIBSON 

Singing end Dancing Juvenile, with Hurtig end Seemon's "Bowery Burlesquere" 

JIM PEARL 

Eccentric Comedian and Dancer. Doing Irish in Army end Nary Girls. 

KITTIE GLASCO 

Ingenue of "Hello America" 

Doffie CLIFFORD and GALLAGHER Daisy 



Specialty 



With Watson's Orientals 



NEW TO BURLESQUE 



PRIMA DONNA, GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES 



DAINTY BONNIE LLOYD 

SOUBRETTE— GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES Direction, ROEHM eV RICHARDS 

STEPHEN PAUL 

STILL SMILING. STRAIGHT, WITH INNOCENT MAIDS 



BEAU BRUMMEL 



WITH SPORTING WIDOWS 



COMEDIAN 




SPORTING 
WIDOWS 



SAMMY 

Hebrew Slide end Laugh 



With Aviators 



KATE PULLMAN 



WtUOFIREMIMS' 



mOL 



WITH ROSE SYDELVS LONDON BELLES 



First Season in Barlason 



Prime Donna. Harry Hastings' Bis; Show 



MAE SHERIDAN 



PRIMA DONNA 



MoIUo William *' Own Show 



Teresa V. Adams 

Prima Donna with Hurtig and Seemon's "Whh-iie Girlie GirU" 

LUCILLE AMES 

Ingenue — Soubrette. Getting Along Nicely With 
JACK REID'S RECORD BREAKERS— SEASON OF 1917-18 



SPEED SPEED— SPEED 



SPORTING WIDOWS 



TEDDY DUPONT 

The Girl with Pleasing Personality with SOCIAL MAIDS. 

GLADYS PARKER 

BOSTON1AN NUT WITH $1,000,000 DOLLS 

HARRY MAN DEL 

Straight with Million Dollar Dolls — 2nd Season Direction Jacobs and Jermon 

THE BLUE 
SINGER 

HIP-HIP HOORAY GIRLS 



ETHEL RAY 



SOUBRETTE 



CHARLIE NEIL 



DOING IRISH 



AVIATORS 



VIVIEN SOMERVILLE 



INGENUE 



HUGHY BERNARD'S AMERICANS 




IDA NICOLAI 

CHARACTERS SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 

Has the Most Remarkable Voice Ever 
Heard in Burlesque. Now Playing with 

HARRY HASTINGS' BIG SHOW 

IRENE CHESLEIGH grgg 

DORIS CLAIRE 

SOUBRETTE, WATSON'S ORIENTALS. 

MAE DIX 

SOUBRETTE WITH BILLY WATSON'S BURLESQUE WONDER SHOW 

TEDDY RUSSELL 

The Only Woman Producer in Burlesque Management Stro use and Franklin 

PRIMROSE SEMON 



The American Girl 



Featured with "Hello America" 



Maud 



In a 



With Hurtig A Seamen's "Hello 



September 5, 1917 



T HE J*EW YORK C L I FP E R 



29 



W A NT E 

Burlesque Bookings 

For season 1917-18 of same c|iH.,oi 
Burlesque shows as are boo1cetf"By the" 
Columbia Amusement Company over its 
circuit. No stock burlesque wanted. 
Exceptional opportunity {or bis; profits 
on account of U. S. Army cantonment 
at Louisville where 40 to 60 thousand 
soldiers will be quartered. 

BUCKINGHAM THEATRE 

Louisville - Kentucky 



JEAN BEDINI'S 



ENTERPRISES: 



"Puss-Puss" 
"Forty Thieves" 



I 


rreaistiMe 


I\^l arveloui 


R 


adiant 


Ej ntertaining 


hi 


ntrancing 


A gile 


IM 


atural 


H. dined 


E 


verlaating 


^V musing 




"SPORTING WIDOWS" 



WM. F. (Billy HARMS 

EMPIRE THEATRE, 
, Hobeken, N. J. 

(Mrmbtr of T. B. C) 



YEA BO! 



bo uaa> talking-- Evan the wall 
known critics say: "You can't get any 
better Comedy Material than that which 

THE NEW No. 2 

McN ALL Y'S BULLETIN 

Everything N.w, DHght and Orlgtaal 

PRICE 91.00 

HoNALLT'B BULLETIN NO. I contains 

17 BOBEAHINO M0M0LOOUE8. 
10 OH.KAT ACTS FOE TWO MALES. 
I ROAH1HO ACTS FOX MALE A*D FZ- 



II BUHF.-FIKK PAEODIEB. 

A COMEDY SKETCH. Entitled "ANXIOUS 
TO OBT RICH." 

« MINSTREL FIRHT-PABTB. rutting wltb a 
screaming Finale. 

A TABLOID COMEDY AND BVBXESQint; 
also nundreils of Crvaa-Flra (lags and 
Joke*. Remember the price of ile- 
N ALLY'S nm.LBTIN No. 2 1. only ONI 
DOLLAR per copy, with money-back guar- 
aDtoe. 

WM. MrNALIY. 81 fc\ USIb Si.. New York 



FREE! 



MELODIES WRITTEN 
To the Beat Poems 

SONG WRITERSI 

Why pay $10 or $20 to have a melody 
written to your poem when I write it free 
and give you 50% of royalties? 

■ MORRIS SLOSBURG 
1420 Gtn Ave. Lo« Aaojelea. Cal. 



PARODIES !!S $1.00 

Great Parodies on the following Biff Hits: From 

Hers to Shanghai, Huckleberry Finn, Indiana, If 
Ton Ever Get Lonely, For Ho and My Gal, Oh, 
Johnny, Ota, Poor Butterfly, In the Sweet Lonr Aro, 
Perfect Day, Joan of Arc, Goodbyo, Broadway, 
Hello, Franoe, Hawaiian Butterfly. Remit by 
money order. Add reus GLEN BNELGROVE, 2718 
Florence Avr„ Cbioaco, HI. 

PLAYS, SKETCHES WRITTEN 

Tanni for a 



ACTS 



E. L. CAMME. PlayvrUat 
Eaat LtvwrawaL Ohm. 

MARY E. P. THAYER 

Vaudeville Author. 2190 Broad' St., Providence, 
K. I. Terms, References and Guarantee for 
stamp. For personal interview apply by mail. 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued /mm.jiojir ]7.) 



rilGH 



SIM WllXIAMS^ 

GRADE SHOW 
FOR THIS SEASON 




Not alone has Sim Williamg thai best 
show of his career this season^ but he also 
has one that will compare fav'. 
any production on either bui 
cuit, and that is far better: ti 
The comedy, production, princip; 
and scenery are on * par -with5iS 
The ahow was a big success at the Star 
last week, and ran ' very' smoothly last 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Of the seven scenes offered in "The Girl 
from Joyland," the Roof Garden, Undersea, 
interior of Captain Kidd's boat and a 
Japanese island were very unusual and 
attractive. 

Billy Gilbert and Bobby Barker share 
the comedy honors. Gilbert, in his peculiar 
"Dutch" make-up and quiet manner of 
working, proves himself a capable come- 
dian, while Barker, as a red-headed Irish- 
man, working with plenty of speed, is 
equally as funny. 

Dan Diehl reminds one of Richard 
Carle at times, particularly in his eccentric 
work and dancing during the action of the 
roof garden scene. As a Japanese, his 
work was clean and well done. 

George Brewer is a good singing and 
dancing "straight." He has a fine voice 
and puts his numbers over. He also 
knows how to wear clothes. 

Zaida Barker, small and shapely, with an 
abundance of personality and a sweet voice, 
handles the prima donna role. Miss 
Barker has some pretty gowns and looks 
well in tights. Her numbers were all 
nicely rendered. 

Beulah Kennedy has developed into a 
clever soubrette. She is a pretty, shapely 
blonde, who has a nifty way of putting 
over numbers. She, too, is endowed with a 
richness of personality that is most pleas- 
ing. 

While Ida Nicalai is not on the stage 
much, she makes up for lost time when 
she Is. Doing a comedy character part 
which many would not care to do, Miss 
Nicalai proves herself a comedienne of no 
mean ability. Her odd costumes are ex- 
tremely funny. Her only number, near the 
close of the show, goes big. 

Doris de Loris, in a specialty, presents 
a classy Oriental dance in a most graceful 
and convincing manner. Her arm and 
hand movements are artistic and not a bit 
suggestive. 

Williams has a good looking lot of 
chorus girls who can dance and sing. In 
fact, he could pick several at any time 
should a principal be taken ill and not be 
able to go on. The ponies are a lively 
lot of steppers, especially the end ones. 

The costumes of the principals and 
chorus are pretty and have been well se- 
lected. Brower and Miss Kennedy offer a 
neat modern dance. A song by Barker and 
Miss Kennedy went well. 

A number offered by Miss Kennedy, 
with the girls in statue tights, posing as 
nymphs, is daintily arranged in a pretty 
set, opening with a transparent drop. This 
scene loses its full value through lack of 
electrical effects. It would be a wonderful 
scene with a proper lighting scheme. The 
burlesque opera bit by Barker, Brower 
and Miss Barker is a big laugh. 

In the drinking scene, Gilbert is very 
funny, but he should cut out the "wagon" 
when the bell rings, aa every show with a 
bell does tbe same thing. Miss Barker 
works this scene up well with Gilbert. 

Many amuBing situations are found in 
the Capt Kidd boat scene. The come- 
dians, in trying to locate tbe treasure in a 
cabinet of a darkened ship with only a 
candle light are funny. A skeleton 
(Diehl) appears and puts the lights oat. 
During tbe twenty odd minutes this scene 
is on, it is one laugh after another. It is 
different than anything in burlesque. 

The show is one that the Censor Com- 
mittee can speak well of. To Bobby 
Barker and Billy Gilbert tbe credit falls 
for the production and book. They de- 
serve a lot, for they have put over a great 
entertainment. 

(Burlesque continued on page 31.) 



ee»ooooeoo»j»ie»ooooooiHr«>o^ 



STARS OF BURLESQUE 

♦eeeeeeeeeeeiHieeeeeeeeeeaeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeei 





Bertram! 

Principal Comedian September Morning Glories 



BILLIE DAVIES 



PRIMA DONNA 



INNOCENT-MAIDS 



A. REVELATION I1M BURLESQUE 

1VI ATT KOLB 

Principal Featured Comedian and Pioducer 
"DARLINGS OF PARIS'* AMERICAN WHEEL 



Glad to be featured with the greatest ibow on the American Burleaque Circuit, SIM WILLIAMS 

Girle from Joyland. featured; aa 



SCI 



J I 



illy Oilbert 



CHAS. REILLY 

SINGING COMEDIAN 

EMMA KOHLER 

The Prima Donna of Voice, Form and Claea 
BON-TONS CO. Season 1117-11 



Well— TOM ROBINSON 

la back with ue once more. Dotng Irian with Girle from the Felllee 

SID GOLD 

2nd Sanson with Ben Walsh. Bigger Hit Than Ever. Vaudeville tint Season. 

G E O. L E O IM 

HAIR-LIP COMIC— SEASON W17-ltU WITH FRED IRWIN'S MAJESTICS. FRED IRWIN 
AND SAM LEWIS DID IT. 

FLORENCE ROTHER 



PRIMA DONNA 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 



GEO. 

Notorious Sensational 



MARTIN 

With September Morning Glories 



GEORGE BROWER 



DOING A NEW STRAIGHT 



SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 



BEULAH KENNEDY 



SOUBRETTE 



SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 



DAN DEIHL 

THE RICHARD CARLE OF BURLESQUE Sim Wuliama' Ch-la From Joyland 

ALXIE IVIASOIM 



PRIMA DONNA 



HUGH Y BERNARD'S AMERICANS 



PERCIE JUDAH 

American Beauty of Burlesque Prima Donna "Soma Babies" Still Leading aa Usual 
Produce and JaL# IM. MM. II M-J MM k-F PRIMA 



SIM WILLIAMS' "GIRLS FROM JOYLAND" 



DONNA 



30 



itfiit'- n¥w york clipper 



anbeT d 3.i$tf 



UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 

ADDRESSING 8. K. HO DC DON, 

. . liiHm Maaaaar «f tka UNITED 

OFFICES 

1. F. Kekh'» Palace Theatre Building 

NEW YORK CITY 



DOLLY & CALAM E 

NIft>r Little Pair 

In 1— ■ I and Dj— . - ,-~ Bookadty Beuit. Royal Always Woridnc 



EDITH HOCKERSON 



ELEONORE KOBUSCH 



FIVE MELODY MAIDS 



EVA BASCH 



BESSIE PECK 
N.V.A. 



FRANCES FISKE 



HARVEY ^ ASHTON 



Crazy Movements 



Direction Law Leslie 



LAIDLAW 



In Vaudeville 



Direction HUGHES and SMITH 



NEW ACT IN PREPARATION, WATCH FOR IT 



JACK 



EDNA 



HAMMERER and HOWLAND 

All we do l» Stnzinx, Dxncin*. TrnnhHay, tall a frw Gags, Eta, Etc, Etc. 

WATCH FOR! OUR NEW ACT 



THE 



2 WHITE STEPPERS-2 



LOEW CIRCUIT 



DIRECTION, CHAS. FITZPATRICK 




m "\':' a ;-■•;■.- ; , ,• t/ 



i} 



_ A . IN MUSIC ? 

Direction PAT CASEY and WM. MORRIS 




WILLIAM WAHLE 

MANAGER, OLYMPIC THEATRE, BROOKLYN. N. Y. 



Songs, NoTalrjr Pan e s* B ookad SolkL 



DtMstiM SAMUEL BAERWTTZ 



I 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Do-action, ROSE A CURTIS 



THE 3 ORIGINAL REGALS 



U "THE VILLAGE BLACKSMITH SHOP." 



DsMctfoa, LOU EDELMAN 



MAXINE 



THE ONLY BLACKFACE VENTRILO- 
QUIST. Thla act Is eopyrlflhtad In Ka m. 
tlraty. also In the Restricted Material 
Dapta. of all theatrical Journals. 



Mr. ..- mim 

BERT and LOTTIE WALTON 

CRETONNE DUO - Direction PAT CASEY 

NAT. SHACK and CHARLOTTE WORTH 

BONGS AND DANCES. Diraction HARRY FITZGERALD 

BONIGER AND LESTER 



la Vaudeville 



Comedy. SI dhI no and Violin 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



GERTRUDE ROSALIE 

TWO DOLCE SISTERS 

SoawwbsM am laafjssssi 

SHERWIN & PREVOST 

ADDRESS N. V. A SINGING AND DANCING AND TALKING 



ATLANTIS and FISH 

SPECTACULAR NOVELTY ARTISTS 

Taa O-ir Act w lu Kfcaa, Cars at Naw Yark CU nsir. 

■ ■ ■ill : ■ " 

IS MINUTES OF MERRIMENT 

PELTIER and VALERIC* 

■ DIRECTION ABE THALHEIMER. PUTNAM BLDO. 

TASMANIAN TRIO 

Versatile Entertainers and Arabian Tumbler. 

WALTER SOMA 

MA1MTHEY& B ARAB AIM 

fast t» Walla Away taa Tlssa VK VAUDEVILLE 

BRUCE and FORSTER 



A NOVELTY IN ONE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



LA EMIVIA & CO. 

NOVELTY EQUILIBRISTS W VAUDEVILLE 

BURNS & JOSE 

Booked U. B. O. — Diraction. Bernard Burke 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



SAIVI. «J. HARRIS 



THE JOYFUL SONGOLOGIST 



DDL. MARK LEVY 




THAT WmaTLDia GIRL 



"BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER" 



September, 5, 1917 



TH£ NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 





AS DRAFT ARMY'S 

FIRST UNIT MEETS 



"It's a Long Way to Berlin," is 
Chorusfof Quota From Local 

f: Board? 170, "but We'll [Get 
There, by Heck!", 



MAYOR TELLS MEN CITY 
WILL BE PROUD OF THEM 



Deputy Attorney- General Conk- 
ling, Brig. Gen.\Hoyle and 
Other Speakers Offer Their 
Congratulations to the Gath- 
ering. 

It's a lo-o-ng way to Berlin — but 
WE'LL get there." 

The words, uplifted by the voices of 
singing men, came smashing in untrained 
chorus from Hollywood Hall, No. 41 West 
One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Street, 
about 9:30 o'clock last night. 

"It's a lo-o-ng way to Berlin — and I'M 
on MY way. By Heelc! By Heck!" 

But the words and the song and the 
spirit carried a deeper meaning than the 
word symbols can, for the singers were the 
first certified members of the new Na- 
tional Army ever gathered as a unit — 
142 of the 1SS men" who form the signed, 
sealed and delivered quota of Local Board 
No. 170, with headquarters in the Harlem 
Board of Commerce at No. 200 Lenox 
Avenue. 

Vanguard of New Army. 

The 142 — the eleven missing men either 
were working or were out of town — had 
lust heard Mayor Mltchel tell them of the 
honor that was theirs as a part of the van- 
guard of the army of democracy. 

They had heard Brig. Gen. Ell D. Hoyle, 
In command of the Department of the East, 
close a stirring and soldierly talk with the 
words: 

"If we had to fight to-day with the whole 
world' In arms against us. you couldn't 
shake my conviction that we would win. 
There never has been in history better 
fighting men than we Americans are, and 
we are bound to win." 

They had heard Deputy Attorney Gen- 
eral Roscoe S: Conkllng in charge of the 
draft say: 

"This meeting to-night will be heralded 
further than any of you realize. You have 
begun the celebration of a brand new 
American idea." 

"A Wonderful Party." 

And now.' after cheering Mayor Mltchel 
and Mr. Conkllng, and after becoming seml- 
dellroua with enthusiasm over white haired, 
blue eyed, ruddy faced Gen. Hoyle with his 
sweeping white mustache, they had heard 
the' recruiting squad of the Seventy-first 

Regiment sing the chorus of "It's a Long 
Way to Berlin, But 'We'll Get There." And 
they were Just Joining in. * 

As Irwin Kurtz, Chairman of Board No. 
170, said, "It was a wonderful party." 

(Reprinted from the N. Y. World, Auput 29) 



.Leo Feist, Inc., has secured the publica- 
tion rights of "It's a Lonjr Way to Berlin" n 
and announce? that it will be Immediately 
published.— (Adv.) 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(.Continued front page* 15 and 29.) 

IRWIN'S NEW SHOW 
IS THE BEST SINCE HIS 
FAMOUS 'TvlAJESTICS" 

Fred Irwin's Big Show, this week at 
the Columbia, is his best offering since the 
Majesties of nine years ago, which was con- 
ceded to be some show. 

"Bill" is the title of the book. It is 
in two acts of twelve scenes, six In each 
part, staged and written by Leo Mc- 
Donald with lyrics and music by Paul 
Cunningham and McDonald. Both of 
these young men deserve no end of 
credit for their endeavors, aa they have 
given Fred Irwin a crackerjack book 
and pretty, catchy music. 

There are fifteen principals with the 
Bhow. nearly double the number carried 
by any otber burlesque attraction. The 
scenery is bright in color, and artis- 
ticly designed and painted. 

The book tells a story of Shakespeare 
as he was and how it is thought he would 
be if be were alive and on Broadway to- 
day. Billy Wainwright gives a good im- 
personation of the famous bard. He has 
many witty lines. 

Hilda Bertin is an excellent performer. 
She delivers her lines distinctly and can 
put numbers over splendidly. Her spec- 
ialty with Wainwright went very big. 

Leo Hayes and Sam Bachen divide the 
comedy honors. Hayes, in his eccentric 
make-up and clothes, looked funny. 
Bachen does several comedy characters. 
His "King Cole" is a clever black face 
role and his "German" is clean and well 
done. 

Harry Burns handles- his several char- 
acter roleB nicely getting the most out of 
his "rube" and "Hebrew." 

Harry Howe is an exceptionally clever 
dancer. He also does a good black face 
as well as several other parts. 

Virginia Irwin is a pretty ingenue who 
has a sweet voice and a pleasing person- 
ality. Her "Bogy Man" number with the 
chorus was nicely rendered. She wears 
some pretty gowns, also. 

Adolf Anderson is another young 
woman who has looks and can sing. All 
her numbers are offered with vim and 
feeling. 

Helen Andrews is a lively soubrette, 
'putting her numbers over with a snap, and 
punch that make her a favorite. 

Grace Kstelle, a shapely blonde, offers 
two songs in a manner that wins friends. 

Marie Beaiigard and Margaret Shane 
handle their 'respective roles with ease 
and render their numbers nicely. 

Blanche Parquette ,was assigned one 
number Monday afternoon. 

The chorus handle their numbers well 
and look nicely in the numerous changes 
of bright and pretty costumes. 

The drinking scene, with Hayes, Bachen 
and Miss Beaugard, is well worked up 
and a funny bit. 

Samaroff and Sonia offer a novelty to 
burlesque in a dandy specialty of Rus- 
sian dances and a trick dog act. Samaroff 
does some good tumbling with one of the 
dogs. 

King and King, a man and woman in a 
specialty, do some fine hand balancing 
and tumbling. 

The Court Room scene, all done in rag- 
time, is a funny piece of business. The 
Exemption Board is another scene with 
many laughs. 

The show is out of the ordinary, is 
free from suggestiveness, and will be a 
big money getter. 

The cast, as it is, is too big for any 
burlesque show to carry and could be re- 
duced without hurting the performance. 

OVERWORK KILLED DRAMATIST 

London, Eng., Sept 1. — At an lnauest 
held Into the death of Captain Basil 
Hood, the .dramatist, ■ who was found 
dead in his chambers on August 11th, 
Dr. Hood, a brother of the deceased, said 
that overwork, on the writings of 
Shakespeare, concerning which he be- 
ttered he bad discovered secret mes- 
sages, was responsible- for the captain's 
death. ' 



.... HOLYOKE HOUSE OPENS. ..... 

Holtokx, Mans., Aug. 3L — The Holyoke 
Theatre, under the management of Fred 
Sarr, opened last Monday for the season. 
This year the house will play attractions * 
of the American Burlesque Circuit on 
Monday and Tuesday, road shows on 
Wednesday and vaudeville from Thursday 
to Sunday, inclusive. The vaudeville shows 
will be supplied by Thos. A. Kirby. 



ROSIE DAVIS MARRIED 

Rosie Davis, a member of Al Reeves 

.Beauty Show, was. married Aug. 23 to W. 

*' A- Gronnlng at thevjClty Hall. Paterson, 

N. J. The bridegroom is a civil engineer 

of Auburn^N, .T., : , ^ . ,■-■, . • . 

The bride will remain with the show 
until, the end of the season. A wedding 
trip will then be made to England, the 
former home of the bride. 



TOM CO YNE 

Back Home at th. Star Theatre, BrooklyV All Tata Wash, with "Some Babies" 
SOME SHOW , ,, EVERYTHING NEW 



When Playing the Peoples Theatre, Philadelphia, 
STOP DIIPVI r«V'C lBU.14E,Cumb«rl«nd3lre»t 

AT JL> KJ \^, JsN.L»Hi I ! O Hsdf Block from Theatre 

He* and Cold Water m Every Room European and Amarteaa 



MEYERS and SELTZER. Proprietor. Where all Show People meet. 

ZEISSE'S HOTEL fe-9f*»q*ii5M - 

PHILADELPHIA L 



Music Every Evening. 
Pay Us a Visit. 



ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 

F s s ia ilf tae) New »■>■■« 

JOS. T. WEHMAN. Preertetar. 

Northwest Corner 14th ok Chestnut St*., St. Louis, Mo. 

Thaa trical Hostelry, Cafe and Cabaret 
Ualem Help (MamW N. V. A. Mtl Btrrlaaq*. Club) Bait Bat cm th* 



THERE'S A'REASON 
When Plnylno PhPaOelphia Slop att 

THE MARGARET M a&J3MLH&SS BR 



| STARS OF BURLESQUE 



JAC 



WOODS SISTERS 

With AL REEVES BEAUTY SHOW 



OLGA 



MAYBELLE GIBSON 

LEADS. 

WITH AL. REEVES' BEAUTY SHOW 



WESTON— SYMONDS 



JOE 

MAIDS F AMERICA 



ALFARRETTA 
SECOND SEASON 



MIDGIE MILLER 

AND THE 

chuck Callahan^Brothers^E" 

Featured with 'Spiegel Revue 



Singing — Dancing — Straight 



"Darlings of Paris" 



"TINY" DORIS De LORIS 

Mitey Dancer a SIm Williams "Girls from JoyUnd" 



1VIAE 

Ragtime Whistling Jim Girl 



With Chaa, Taylor'. "Darling, of Paris" 




Prim* Donna 



"Darling*, of Paris" 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5, 1917 



HELEN MORETTI 

in a Novelty Singing Special ty 

Now on Loew Circuit Direction — MandaO & Rom 



MARY DONOGHUE 

Sparkling (Single) Songstress 

Playing Loew Circuit — Thank* to Mandel and Rosa 



ED. F. REYNARD 



BIANCA 



la a Series ml 
I Pa 



MLLB. BIANCA Presents 
ED. F. 

REYNARD 



The Vaaliai»|lllll i 

la -BEFORE THE COURT.' 



Minnie f Bnd "> Harrison 

"The Girl From Dixie" 

Direction Rom etc Curtis In Vaudeville Mgr. Max Window 



FREDERICK* SIMS 



Of SONGLAND 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



m ROBB - ROBERTSON «n 



In Tbeir Original Offering, "Back to Schooldays" 

Direction of Thalhehnor A. Sofmnald 



In Vaudeville 



FREDRIKS AND PALMER 
Loew Circuit Now 

AHItlCAN ENGLISH 

unnnunvi ixrauuiTArra 

LOUIS P1NCUS WILLIE EDELSTEN 



KENNEDY and KRAMER 

In DANCING IXEIVIS 

Featuring MAUDE KRAMER (Ever See Her Dance?) Dir. CHAS. FITZPATRICK 



TOM 



NADA 



KAY & BELLE 



A Vaudeville Confection 



JOE 



MARGARET 



COOPER & LACEY 



Singing and Dancing 



In Vaudeville 



song writers p :; ^:;;\ T ,^:^r^^o^»: 

"PERFORMERS RQBT. H. B.RENNbTmM Broadway, N. Y, 



JIM 



BLANCHE 



Mclaughlin & evans 



''Courtship on the Bowery" 

Comedy, Singing, Talking and Dancing in Vaudeville. 



N. V. A. 



LEW 

SECOND COMEDIAN 



HUGHY BERNARD'S AMERICANS 



Tenney 



The vaudeville writer of vaudeville'* beat acts, (ketches and mono- 
logues. If yon owe yourself a good act, better 1st ma write it for 
yon now. 

ALLEN SPENCER TENNEY, 1493 Broadway, Now York. 



I_l 



AFTER 
SEPT. 8th 



DOUGLAS HOPE-FLORENCE MADEIRA 

Juveniles, Light Comedy. Leads. Joint only. Address, Frostburg, Maryland. 



W A NTED 



BY RECOGNIZED MUSICAL COMEDY COMPANY 

(Booked solid till next June.) Toe dancing trio; lady musical act and buck 
dancing sister team. All must do light work in chorus. State all and positively 
send photos, which will be returned. Address ROY BEVERLY, Butler Theatre, 
Butler, Pa. 



AMINA 

The Spanish Violinist 

Booked Solid Playing Loew Tune Management F. Walden Thank Yon! 



A. T I., I B E R T Y 

ED. IVf ILLS and FLORA SHE Y 

COMEDIAN INGENUE 

Strong specialties— Single and Double. Wardrobe, Experience, Reliability. Address- 68 Fountain 
Ave., Dayton, Ohio. 



K ENSINGTON'S POPULAR THEATRICAL HOUSE 

MOTHER MATHERSON 



1932 E. Cumberland St., Philadelphia 



Around the Corner {rem Peoples Theatre 



HILLMAN'S STOCK COMPANY 

Wanta A 1 Light Comedian and General Business Man, also Character Woman, both 
young, good looking; experience and ability, with feature specialties, single and double: 
change for week. Write full particular*. Join on wire. F. P. HILLMAN, Franklin, Nebr 



WANTED 

Organized three-night or week stand Rep. 
Show, to put under complete canvas theatre 
outfit to play South. State full particulars as 
to rep. and company. Address' CANVAS THE- 
ATRE, care Clipper. 

WANTED 

Rep. People in all lines (quick study), also 
Vaudeville Acts that have two or more spe- 
cialties. (Give full description of acts). All 
give age, height, weight, lowest salary first 
letter, join on wire. Week stands. BEN TOY, 
Gen. DeL, Penn Yen. N. Y„ Sept. S-S- 

UflUTCn Rev. people with specialties, piano 
«#lls I LU player and trap drummer, also stage 
manager with 3 good comedy bins. Hake tt low, 
you pay your own hotel. Belmont Bros., M Federal 
St., Providence, R. I. 



CLYDE PHIUJPS 

Offer, That Beautiful Act 

MABEL 

NAYNOIVS 
BIRDS 

Etctt person wbo sws 
UUi let on your program 

U m Self Attnrtlser. Why! 
Became it Is the greatest 
troupe of [w funning: birds 
tn the world. It surprises 
Lhtm and creates talk. Iff 
a dra-laj card. Try It 
and be coorloeed. 

Permanent addrwa 188 1Mb St., Brooklyn. N. Y. 




D A D T N F D lAf A N T P LTI w » tn - small capital for interest in organization of a 
■^ «■%■*. ■ iweejlw. «MI« ■ tk. Ia# week stand Musical Comedy attraction (changing 
daily), or will arrange for a Rep.-Musical Tab. Show (week stands) by a "Comedian-producer" 
with top-notch musical comedy scripts. Will also consider stock proposition. E. HART, 374 
West IHth Street, New York. 

THEjGRAHAM STOCK CO. WANTS QUICK 

Ingenue 'capable of doing some leads. Gen. Bus. man to double piano and play Deagon unafoo. 
Other useful people write. Those doing specialties given preference. Long season; salary sure. 
Address FRANK N. GRAHAM STOCK CO, Sept 6-7-8, Grand Forge, N. Y.; Sept. 10-11-12; 
Prattsville. N. Y. . 



"BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER" 



September 5, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 




EXPOSITIONS 

FOR 1918 

PLANNED 

TWO SHOWS TO BE HELD 



Two big motion picture expositions have 
been scheduled for 1918. This was decided 
at a joint meeting of the committee rep- 
resenting the National Association of the 
Motion Picture Industry, and the Motion 
Picture Exhibitors' League of America, 
held last week at the Hotel Ast or. 

The first exposition will be held here 
daring February. The other will be taged 
in Boston at the time of the annual con- 
vention of the National Exhibitor's League, 
beginning on July 14. 

It has been two years since the motion 
picture industry has held an exposition in 
New York, and it is predicted that the 
proposed exposition will have the endorse- 
ment of every big producing and dis- 
tributing corporation, as well as the sup- 
ply and equipment companies. 

Both expositions will be promoted and 
managed under the direction of a joint 
committee. This committee will probably 
be appointed within a couple of weeks, 
and then preliminary arrangements will 
be started' for the New York convention. 
A building and a manager will be selected 
at an early date, it is reported. 

The National Association of the Motion 
Picture Industry was represented at the 
meeting by President William A. Brady, 
ex -officio; Arthur S. Friend, J. E. Brula- 
tour, William L. Sherrill, J. A. Berst, Gab- 
riel L. Hess and J. H. Hnllberg. The Na- 
tional Motion Picture Exhibitors' League 
was represented byi Xee A Ochs, presi- 
dent, ex-officio; Ernest H. Horatmann, 
Alfred S. Black, J,.H. OTJonnell, Eugene 
M. Clark and Frank-Eager. 

FEATURE CORPORATION SUED 

JT. Young, a furniture dealer of the 
Bronx, failed to receive payment from the 
Eminent Features Corp. for the use of fur- 
niture in film productions made by them 
and instituted a suit in the Municipal 
Court against them obtaining a verdict for 
$305.80 last week. The judgment was 
recorded in the office of the County Clerk 
of Bronx County by B. H. Levy, attorney 
for Young. 



FOX PRESS AGENTS CHANGE 

A B. Bernd will retnrn to the Fox 
publicity bureau at Los Angeles this week 
where he and Stuart Acheson will handle 
Fox publicity on the Coast. Abe L. Selig, 
who has been doing the Theda Bara public- 
ity at .the Coast studios, will retnrn from 
there this week. 



FOX MUST PAY JUDGMENT 

Justice Erlanger, in the Supreme Court 
last week, refused to set aside the judgment 
granted T. R. Hart, by a jury last May, 
against the Wm. Fox Film Corp. As a 
result a judgment for $2,910.17 has been 
Bled in the Coonty Clerk's office by Hart's 
attorney. 

The suit was started when Fox, using 
a film version of "La Tosca," failed to pay 
$2,500 to Hart for its use, according to an 
alleged agreement. Fox's defense was that 
Hart had no right to the title and therefore 
was not entitled to any compensation for 
its use on the film. Justice Erlanger, bow- 
ever, in a long opinion upheld the verdict 
of the jury in favor of Hart. 



RAVER RESIGNS PRESIDENCY 

Harry R. Raver tendered his resignation 
as president of Art Dramas, Inc., to the 
Board of Directors last week. His succes- 
sor has, as yet, not been chosen. A. F. 
Beck, general manager of the Art Dramas, 
states that the resignation of Raver will 
have no effect upon the present business 
methods of the organization. Other busi- 
ness interests were given as the cause of 
Raver's resignation. . .' 



MUST PAY FOR LOST FILM 

The Prudential Delivery Corp. will have 
to pay the Exclusive Features, Inc., $115.23 
for the loss of a case of film entrusted to 
them by the latter for delivery. The film 
is said to have been lost in transit. At the 
'time the film .was lost, the defendant gave 
the feature concern a note for $100 to. 
cover the cost of the lost film. It came 
back protested. The action in the 
Municipal Court was then begun. 



ATTORNEYS SUE FILM CO. 
Strauss, Reich and Boer, attorneys, ob- 
tained a judgment last week in the Munic- 
ipal Court, against the Big Three Amuse- 
ment Co. for $532 for professional services 
rendered. The principal stockholders of 
this corporation are Fleishman and Gold- 
reyer, who operated three theatres under 
the head of the defendant corporation. 



WALTER SANFORD BACK 

Walter Sanford. head of the Fox public- 
ity department, returned from a trip 
through the West last Saturday and re- 
lieved Hamilton Thompson of the "reins" 
of the department. On Monday, Thompson 
left the publicity department for the ex- 
ecutive department to become one of the 
aides to General Manager W. R, Sheehan. 



800 INVITES FOR BRENON FILM 

Herbert Brenon has issued eight hundred 
invitations for the initial presentation of 
"The Fall of the Romanoffs," to be given 
at the Ritz Carlton Hotel tomorrow 
evening. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY, 

Director-General. 

WORLD-PICTURES 

present 

CARLYLE BLACK WELL 
JUNE ELVIDGE 

With ARTHUR ASHLEY 

"The Marriage Market" 

Story by Clay Mantley 
Directed by Arthur Alhley , " 



'.„•*«■- . 



—^ 



SMITH WOULD 

OUST MAJOR 

FUNKHOUSER 

STARTS ACTION IN CHICAGO 



WILL DISTRIBUTE U. S. FILMS 

The Universal Film Manufacturing Co. 
has signed a contract with the United 
States Department of Agriculture to dis- 
tribute all motion pictures showing the 
activities and work of that department dur- 
ing the coming year. Many of these pic- 
tures have already been made, the Uni- 
versal cameraman working in conjunction 
with the Government officials on the pro- 
position. They are to be released every 
two weeks in serial form, beginning next 
month. 



Chicago, 111., Sept. 4. — Claiming that 
Major M. L. C. Funkhouser, second deputy 
superintendent of the Police of Chicago, 
has absolutely no legal right to censor 
moving pictures, Albert E. Smith, presi- 
dent of Greater Vitagrapb, has started an 
action which, if successful, will put the 
Chicago censor out of business. 

Major Funkhouser's refusal to issue a 
permit for the showing of "Within the 
Law" unless a number of eliminations are 
made in the picture is said to have 
aroused Smith's ire to the point of start- 
ing legal action. 

Through his attorney, Lewis F. Jacob- 
son, Smith has filed a petition for man- 
damus and questions Funkhouser's legal 
right to censor. 

Before starting suit, on Thursday last, 
the Greater Yitagraph Company held a 
private showing. of "Within the Law" at 
the Studebaker Theatre in Chicago. More 
than 1,200 of the most prominent resident* 
of Chicago attended the showing, and af- 
ter it the great majority declared that 
"Within the Law" was a splendid picture. 



NEXT FAIRBANKS FILM PICKED 
"The Man from Painted Post," which is 
the film version of Jackson Gregory's 
magazine story, "Silver Slippers," is the 
latest Douglas Fnirbank's starring vehicle 
and will be released on the Artcraft pro- 
gram in October. It will probably have its 
initial New York presentation at the Hialto 
Theatre. 



ELSIE FERGUSON AT RIALTO 

Elsie Ferguson, in her initial screen 
presentation "Barbery Sheep," is the at- 
traction at the Rialto Theatre this week. 
A special musical program has been ar- 
ranged by Musical Director Hugo Reisen- 
feld. for the occasion. 



MARY PICKFORD AT STRAND 
Mary Pickford, in "Rebecca of Snnny- 
brook Farm," is the attraction at the 
Strand Theatre, this week. It is a screen 
adaptation of the play by Kate Douglas 
Wiggin and Clmrlotte Thompson. 




34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 5; 1917 

_. . _ ■ r— ■ > ■- --. ■ - 



ITALIAN FILM 

TEMPTS MANY 

SCALPERS 

PLAYS TO $2 TOP PRICE 



A moving picture production, playing 
to a legitimate scale of prices — $2.00 top — 
and then attracting such crowds that large 
numbers willingly paid scalpers, who 
plied their trade on all sides of the thea- 
tre, paying substantial premiums in order 
to gain admittance, has been the unusual 
spectacle provided by the official Italian 
war pictures, "The Italian Battlefront," 
which have just terminated a successful 
engagement at the Forty-fourth Street 
Theatre, New York. It is said that bat 
one other film attraction was ever the ob- 
ject of such activity upon the part of the 
pasteboard hawkers, and that in that, the 
practice was encouraged by the promoters 
of the production. 

In the instance of "The Italian Battle- 
front," however, the management went 
to unusual lengths to protect its patrons, 
both in cutting off the supply of the cou- 
pons, and in curtailing the presence of the 
scalpers in the vicinity of the theatre. 

To accomplish the latter purpose, they 
adopted the rather unique Idea of sta- 
tioning a mas with megaphone In front 
of the theatre, who, at frequent inter- 
vals, announced that only tickets purchased 
at the box office would be honored. 

This expediency was employed out of a 
sincere endeavor to keep the prices at 
their proper levels, particularly in view of 
the patriotic character of the production. 

The incident, however, is of more than 
passing interest and significance at this 
time, by reason of the announcement of 
several of the large moving picture thea- 
tre owners of the contemplation, or in- 
auguration of higher scales of prices. 

The continued maintenance of a legiti- 
mate scale by "The Italian Battlefront," 
would seem to Indicate that whatever the 
experience of moving picture exhibitors of 
the past, the public today will not only 
pay the regular theatrical admission for a 
special moving picture production of de- 
cided appeal, but give bonuses in addi- 
tion, if necessary. 

RIOT OVER SUNDAY SHOW 

Dkwbt, Okla., Aog. 2T. — A Sunday the- 
atre crowd interfered with the arrest of 
L. A. Ramsey, manager of the moving pic- 
ture theatre here, last night, when County 
Attorney A. O. Harrison and Deputy 
Sheriff A. E. Dnnlap stopped the show. 
The arrest of Ramsey was ordered by the 
county attorney on a charge of operating 
his show on Sunday, bnt there is no ordi- 
nance forbidding Sunday theatres in Dewey 
and such a demonstration occurred that 
Harrison called for police protection. The 
chief of police refused assistance, explain- 
ing It was "not his affair." It was the 
second clash within a week between county 
authorities and Dewey cidsens over Sunday 
amusements. 



ROMAINE FIELDING DIVORCED 

Minneapolis, Minn., Aug. SO. — Mabel 
Vann has been granted a divorce from 
Romaine Fielding, the popular screen actor. 
By the terms of the decree Mrs. Fielding 
is restored the use of her maiden name 
Van Valbenburg. She has been appearing 
until recently with Fiak O'Hara, bnt at 
present is living in retirement with her 
brother in Minneapolis. 



"NARROW TRAIL" NEARLY READY 

"The Narrow Trail," the first of the 
William S. Hart pictures under the direc- 
tion of Tims. H. Ince to be released on 
the Artcraft program, is near completion 
at the* Lasky studios in Hollywood, CaL 
The film will be released on the October 
program. 



-"■ NEW SLACKER FILM SHOWN 

Washington, Aug. 30. — "The ■' Mali 
Without a Country," a new multiple photo- 
play, was shown tonight for the first time, 
being presented in the National Sylvan 
Theatre, at the base of the Washington 
Monument. The picture, which was made 
by the Thanhooser Film Co., is offered by 
the Jewel Productions for a nation-wide 
patriotic campaign and aimed particularly 
at the army draft shirker. Permission to 
use the Sylvan Theatre had heretofore 
been refused by the Government authorities, 
but a permit was granted tonight for the 
holding there of a patriotic rally under the 
auspices of the Bureau of Commercial 
Economics of the Department of Public 
Instruction. The picture will be shown 
throughout the country as a warning to 
slackers. 



NEW NESBIT FILM STARTED 

Evelyn Nesbk, ' her son, Russell Thaw, 
and tarty other players, have gone to the 
Adirofldacks to make a photoplay entitled 
"The""Greater Love'*' under "the direction of 
Julius Steger. 



U. S. AGENTS HOLD FILM SINGER 

Ettore Parmegiani, a female imper- 
sonator and singer in motion picture the- 
atres, was arraigned last Wednesday before 
United States Commissioner S. M. Hitch- 
cock on the charge of having violated the 
Federal White Slavery law. In the com- 
plaint, made by Special Agent Pignioolo, 
of the Department of Justice, Parmegiani 
is accused of having taken Caterina Maz- 
zio, eighteen yean of age, from this city 
to Philadelphia, on July 15 last. When 
arraigned Parmegiani waived examination 
and waa held in $2,500 bail for the Grand 
Jury. 



CUMMINGS ENTERING VAUDEVILLE 

Irving Cummings, who has long been a 
popular screen actor, has temporarily for- 
saken the silent drama for vaudeville, and 
signed a contract with B. S. Moss last 
week to tour the Moss Circuit, opening at 1 
the Hamilton Theatre the first three days 
of the week beginning Monday, September 
10, in a sketch entitled "Breaking Out of 
the Movies." - 



NEW WARREN FILM NEARLY READY 

Edward Warren gave a private showing 
of his newest film production last Friday 
for the benefit of directors and cameramen. 
Warren will personally do the cutting and 
editing and expects to have the picture 
ready for a trade showing within two 
weeks. The picture is as yet unnamed. 

KELLERMANN ACTS FOR CHARITY 

Bab- Harbor, Me., Sept. 2. — Annette 
Kellermann, who is here with the William 
Fox Company making "Queen of the Sea," 
gave an exhibition of diving and swimming 
for charity at the Bar Harbor Swimming 
Clnb last week. About $6,000 was raised. 



VANDIVERT BACK IN NEW YORK 

R. M. Vandivert, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of the Peter Pan Film Cor- 
poration, has just returned from * trip 
covering the distribution centres of the 
country. 



FAMOUS PLAYERS GET CHAUTARD 

Emile Chautard has been engaged by the 
Famous Players-Lasky Corporation to 
direct Lina Cavalier! in her first picture 
for the Paramount Program. 



CINCINNATI 

Frank Bernhardt, Coney iBiand mu- 
sician, suddenly finds himself a "musical 
inventor." A little article in the Clipper 
regarding his "wind-ukelele" has brought 
scores of inquiries, one from . the leading 
musical instrument company in the 
country. 



Ed. Kelly, stage manager ; Ed. Nichol- 
son, property man, and Cliff Redmond, elec- 
trician, will again be the big noises back 
stage at the Lyric when the season opens 
September 9th with "Nothing But the 
Truth." 



Lily and Howard Hafford, brother and 
sister, Cincinnati singers, have made their 
■ professional debut in a Gus Edwards com- 
pany, which soon wfll start on the Keith 

time. ' .«.* "* .- ..'*..* • V 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(Continued from Paaa 25) 



W. V. M. A. CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, rjx. 

Windsor (First Bait) — Johnny Singer 4 Dancing 
DoUa — Earl & Stmahlne — Lottie Williams A Co. — 
Tabor & Green — Aiard Broa. (Last Half) — 
Johnson & Well* — Milton tc Laiar — The Brads. 

Arenas — Cheng & Moej — Geo. MacFadden — 
Dorothy Bays & Co. — Vine & Temple — Vernon 
Five. (Last Balf) — Barber A Jackson— BIJon 
Minstrel Misses — Madison A Winchester — Azard 
Broa. 

Xadaia — Karl Emmy's Peta — Bay & Emma Dean 
—Lincoln, U. S. A. (Laat Balf) — Ernette Asorla 
ft Co.— Earl ft Sunshine— Lottie Williams ft Co.— 
Vine ft Temple. 

WUsoa — Connt Peronne — Hilton A Laxar — The 
Brads. (Laat Balf) — Bay ft Emma Dean— Tor- 
cat'i Novelty. 

ASKLAJTD, WIS. 
Royal (Friday and Saturday— Last Hair)— The 
Shorts— The Blllyera— The Aldeana. 



COMPANY ROUTES 

(Continued from Page ZT) 



Paul Hlllman, treasurer of the Lyric 
Theatre,' is spending his vacation at ' Lee 
Chenaur, Mich: His new assistant; YV.-M. 
Unrig, is In the box office. 



ALTON, ILL. 
Hippodrome — Lnckle ft Yoot— Bspe ft Dotton. 
(Laat Half) — Sector — Fonr American Beauties. 
BZLOXT, WIS. 
Hew Wilson (Last Half)— Arthur Valll ft Go, — 
Cleveland ft Dowry — Bong & Dance Berne. 
BILLINGS, MONT. 
Babcook (First Balf)— Swain's Pets— Three 
Dixie Girls— Little Caruso ft Co. (Last Half} — 
Willie Smith— Daris tc Kitty— 8am Harris— 
Charles Wilson. 

BUTTE, M0HT. 
People's (First Balf)— Matilda A Oornoa— 
Bnghes Sisters — Etdredge, Barlow ft Eldredge — 
Sam K. Otto — Blen* ft Murray — Nola'a Dogs. 
(Laat Half)— The Salesman and the Model— Prince 
ft Crest — Fries ft Adair — Tom Llndsey's Lady 
Bugs— Wells ft Rose — Three Metrics. 
CANTON, ILL. 
Princess (Laat Balf)— Kllppel Bros. — Moran 
Sisters — Janls ft West— The H.iiHns '. 
COUNCIL BLUFFS, IA. 
Hloholas (9-10)— Foster. Walker ft Hurley. 
(11-12)— Chaa. ft Madeline Dunbar. (18-14-1S)— 
Bay Brae* ft Fay— Wilfrid Do Bola. 
CZDAB RAPIDS. IA. 
Hajestla — Kremka Broa. — Eastman Sisters— 
"Southern Serenade" — Demarest ft Collette — Olga 
Mlahka Co. (Laat Half)— Better Bros.— Chong ft 
Moey — Vernon Fire— The Veterans. 

EAST ST. LOUTS, XXX. 
Erbers — Paul Patching ft Co. — Floyd, Mack ft 
MaybeUa— Weber. Back ft Fraaar. (Laat Balf)— 
Countess Verona — Willing ft Jordan— Fisher, 
Lucky ft Gordon — Page. Back ft Mack. 
FOND STf LAO, WIS. 
Idas (First Balf)— The Serenaders. (Laat Half) 
— Panl Keul— Ingalla ft Dufflrld. 

FORT SOTJOXC XA- 

Priaoaaa (First Half) — The Wonder Dog — Rae 

Bruce ft Fay — Ires, Leahy ft Pamaworth — Mndga. 

Morton Trio. (Last Half)— Carl ft Incs— "What 

Krery Man Needs" — Jose Mills — Arlsato Troupe. 

OSEAT FALLS, MOST. 

Pslsca — "The Salesman and the Model" — Prince 
& Crest— Frlck ft Adair— Tom Llndsey's Lady 
Bogs— Wells ft Bose — Three Melrlaa. (Last 
Balf)— Van Zorn ft Ammer — Two Orandoa — 
Krsns ft La Salle — J. Edmund Dsrls — Lyceum 
Fonr. 

IOWA CITY. IA. 

Eaglart (Last Balf) — Haley ft Haley — 
Hawaiian Serenaders — Rosalie Asher— CasUng 

Campbells. 

KENOSHA, WIS. 

Virginian (First Half)— 4 Marks Bros.— Corley 
ft Welch— Mary Evans. (Laat Half)— Mile. Lin- 
garde— Malumby ft Musette — Alleman ft Nevlns — 
Cappa Family — HaUlday ft WUlatte. 

LINCOLN, JTEBE. 

Orphsum- (First Half) — La Toy Broa. — Bodway 
ft EdwardSjM£orgin A Orsy— Hopkins ft Aitell 
—The Plying Tenos. 

Lyric- (First Hslf)— Hall ft Guilds— Morris ft 
Allen. (Laat Half) — Herron ft Arnsmau — Chief 
Little Elk ft Co. 

LEWIBTOWN, MONT. 

Judith (First Balf) — Van Born ft Ammer — Two 
.Orandoa — Krans ft La Salle — J. Edmund Davis 
— Lyceum Four. (Last Balf) — Willie Smith — 
Daris ft Kitty — Sam Harris— Charles Wilson. 

MASON CITY, IA. 
Regent (First Balf) — La Toy Broa. — Kawana 
Bros. — Haley ft Haley— Four Musical Lands. 
(Last Half) — Ogden ft Benson — Chaa. ft Made- 
line Dunbar — Aerial Bartletta. 

NORTH YAKIMA, WASH. 

Empire— Sunday and Monday — (First!- Half)— 
Millie Du Bola' Pets — Stewart ft Earl — Two Pear- 
sons — Marie Dufonr — Eboer ft Reusch — Blanche 
Alfred ft Co. Friday and Saturday — Frank Wil- 
bur ft Co. — Keeler ft Belmont — Two Specks — 
Princeton Five — Austin ft Bailey — "Girl in the 
Moon." * - 

OMAHA, WEBB, 

Empress (First Halt) — Carl ft Incs — "What 
Every Man Needs" — June MUls— Fred ft Albert. 
(Last Half) — Snperbe'e Vision — Carter ft Waters 
— Morris ft Allen— Fonr Musical Lands. 

, OSHKOSH, WIS. 
Majestic (First Half)— Paul KelU— Ingalla ft 
Duffleld. (Last Half) — The Serenaders — Monarch 

Dancing Fonr. 

OASXsVND, CAL. 

.Hippodrome (First Half) — Poakay ft . White— . 
Hobson ft Beatty — Tom Brown's Blackface Re- 
rbesMerktt JAfcmiMinfcJhfaastfp ft CktTrOJrq •ST6V- , 
warns. (Last Half)— WoTgast ft Girlie— Strains ft 
Wsrfleld— Harry Dixon — Gibson Girls — Christie ft 

Grlfflu — Herbert ft Dare. 



CIRCUS AND WILD WEST 

Barnes, Al. G. — Watonga, Okla., Sept. 5; 
Anardarko, Okla., 6; Waurlka, Okla., 7: 
Bowie, Tex., 8; Fort Worth, Tex., 10; 
Dallas, Tex., 11 ; alexia, Tex.. 12; Nava- 
sota, Tex., 13 ; Bresham, Tex., 14 ; Houston, 
Tex., 16. 

HaKenbcck- Wallace — Lincoln, Neb., Sept. 8-7; 
Atchison, San., 8. 

La Tena's — Parsons, W. Va., Sept. 8 ; Keyser, 
W. Va., 4 ; Hancock, Md., S ; Westminster, 
Md., 6; MlddUetown, Del., 7; Chestertown, 
Del., 8. 

Singling Broa. — San Joae, Sept. 4; Stockton, 
6 ; Fresno, 6 ; Vlsalla, 7 ; Bakersfleld, 8. 

Sun Bros.' Circus — Corning;, Ark., Sept. 6; 
Walnut Bldge, 7 ; Searcy, 8 ; Heber Springs, 
9. 

Shlpp ft Feltua — En route through. South 
America. Permanent address, Klvadavla 
885, Buenos Aires. 

Wlllard, Jess, ft Buffalo BUI Show — Indian- 
apolis, Ind., Sept. 3 ; Tipton, 4 ; Frankfort, 
; Marlon, 6 ; Richmond, 7 ; Buahville, 8. - 

TABLOIDS 

Amlck's, Jack, Pennant Winners — Folly, Okla- 
homa City, Okla., lndef. 

American Musical Revue (Oscar Green, mar.) 
— Worcester, Mass., week Sept. 3 ; Lcomln- 
lstcr, Mass., week Sept. 10; Fltchburg, 
Mass., week Sept; 17. ■ 

"Liberty Maids" (Jack Hipper, mgr.) — Liberty 
Theatre, Wirt, Okla., Sept. 8-8. . 

La Monte ft Vernon Co. — Savoy, Dulotb, 
Minn., lndef. 

McLeod's, Arthur, Isle of- Bosee— Augusta, 
Kan., Sept. 8-8. . . 

"Northland Beauties" (James Arnold, mgr.) 
— Annlston, Ala.,- till Sept. 8, 

"Palm Beach Girls" (Bob Schafer, mgr.) — 
Tent, Macon, Ga., lndef. .... 

"Submarine Girls" (Meraereau Bros.) — Lena- 
non, Pa., Aug. 27-8ept. 10. ■ . 

Tucker's, L*a, Reno Girls — Lyric, Hopewell, 
Va, lndef. • . ___ "■ 

Zarrow's American Girls— Hippodrome Thea- - 
tre. Marietta. O.. Sept. 3-8 : Colombia Thea- 
tre. Ashland. Ky.. 10-10. __ 

Zarrow's Zlg Zag Town Glrla (Jack Kuuuar, 
mgr,)— Palace, Clarksburg, W. , Va., Sept 
S-8 ; Grand Grafton, W. Va., 10-18. 



AT LIBERTY 

KATHLEEN HALL 

Characters 
702 N. Main St. Lima, Ohio 



THEATRICAL SUPPLIES 

Tights, Wigs, Supporters, . 
Hosiery ■ - 
Send for Price List 
JOS. H. MASSE Y 

IIS No. 8th St, Near Arch St, PhOa, Pa, 



WANTED 

FOR 

G1FFORD- YOUNG CO. 

Playing Rep. through Wise, Minn., 111. and 

Mich. Prop, man to do bits and one or two 
Bpocln ltle,. State e 'ery thin g first letter. 
PXATTEVUXE, WIS.. WEEK OF SEPT. 9. 



MADGE EDISON STOCK CO. 

Can place Experienced. Competent Repertoire 
People (with specialties preferred). Juvenile 
Man to play some characters. All around 
Comedian.. Character Mars. General Business 
Man to handle props. Character Woman. Gen- 
eral Business Woman, and a Live Agent. 
Week stands. State all with lowest .salary. 
FOREMAN AND MORTON, Mars ., Hotel 
Pontine Hd St. and Broadway, New York City. 



Rite Frum fiethil, Mane, By Heck! 
LOOK! MANAGERS LOOK! 

The Greatest Portrayer uf The Yankee. 
Now Livin 

Alvin RUBE Green 

Be was one .of the special features with the 
Barnnm A Bailey Snows at Madison Square 
Garden. N. Y. C. at the opening of the 
191T season. Mr. John Blagllng, the Beal Vet- 
eran Clrcna Manager, .ed Mr. Oreen Is the 
beat Baal Babe be ever see— naif sed! This 
week, Bept. j. ^ Phfla., Pa.; Byberry Pair, 
Tpatta . .— Pa. j. .F air— afsn aaei s ~ write. — PaB^aad > 
"mntef~c^aon^OpenT^»;~Bla«U» "write. " 
Bams addraaa, MS Tkird St,, Bo. Boston, Mass. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




New Victoria Hotel 

IN NEW YORK AT broadway and 

1*1 ili-TT IVIW LONG ACRE SQUARE 

145 to 155 West 47th Street 

Th* Very Heart of Nw Y«V 
ABSOLUTELY FIREPROOF 
350 ROOMS ■ 250 PRIVATE BATHS 

Every Modern Camnfanrt European Plan EicluatvsJy 

ABE MIERS, Manager of Cafe Drop in at any tints 

Single room», hot and cold water SI.09 

Single roomi, private bath (LSI ud op 

Suite, parlor, bedroom and bath U and up 

Suite, parlor, 2 ba dr ooma and bath a IS and up 

The Best 50c. Dinner in New York 

C. A. HOLLINGSWORTH N«w York City 



/ VSEB BY TM " I 
PROFESSION 
OVER SO YEARS - 



Send for 1917 Catalogue 

C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 

678 N. HlIlM St.. Cklesso 

210 W. 44th St. Mr* York 



Theatrical Profession 

ATTENTION 



If ron an bothered .with Boor Blok Stomach, 
Heartburn, Distrou After Eating. Belohing of 
Wind, Big Head In the rooming or other 
stomach tronhles, 1 want too to hare a 
ample of Frleet'e Indigestion Powder. Bent 
tree to any addreae. Dealers carry the 2Sc. 
and fl.00 alsee, but I want yon to try It Bret 
at my exponee. 

H, K. PME8T, Fb. O., Bangor Xa. 




TIGHTS 

Cotton TtgMa. way seed qoaiitj. 



a pair f LOO. 



. II. IS a pair. 
».^ruv1 TUriU. hrarr tfUH. 

88.00 a pair. Iarparted allk 
platted Uinta. In brlgBt Bed and 



pal/ rtUkolia* 



only |s. so a 
Tights la 



all 



anion, IS. SO a par/. Bessy TS 
par Btat lnprrtad suk Ulhu. 
in brirM Bed ear/, ivdaead frost 
IS. 00 to 11.00 a pair, 
sleets mora to mateb 
am price aa Uinta. Orders 
nlled proiapUj. Otppw Catalog 
to application. 



free on appli 

BERNARD MANDL 
110-IU w. HADIB0N BT. OHIOAOO, ELL. 

SCENERY 

Theatre* and production* 
VaaurlfrTillr, Acta Snipped 

HURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO! 

«tt (th Ave . bat. 2*-VHh SU. 
T.l. Had. Bq.. 4AB8 Tom Creamer. MgT. 



Phone Bryant 12S1 



GLOBE THEATRICAL 
TRANSFER 

Long-and-Short-Hnuling, Motor- 
Truck Sen-vice 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

MOLES AND WARTS. HOW TO GET 
RID OF THEM; ASK PROF. BRUECK, 
11 WEST 34TH 8T., N. Y. 



ATTENTION We bay and cell FLAYS, 
"I ICnilVII SONGS, all kinds of good spe- 
cial material. afoalc composing and arranging. 
». J. PLAT-KU8IO BUREAU, S79I Broadway. 
•Ti Y, "" 



TIGHTS 

Silk Opera Hose and Stockings 

ABB OUR BPBOIATJTlaV 

QUALITY PBJ0ES the lOWBI 

Gold and Silver Brooadae, 
Tbaatrloel Jewelry. Sou 
Gold aad raver Triu 
Wiga, Beards aad all Oooda 
Catalogue* and Bamplea noon unassl 

When asking (Or Catalogue, plaaaa mention 
what goods are wanted. 

SIEGM AN & WEIL 

■■ W. O ar, nth 8t. and Me/Ha aa Are. 

Itn THBATSIOAI. 8UPZT.X aaBaTOaUVaf 



TIGHTS, UNION SUITS 

SYMMETRICALS and 

THEATRICAL SUPPLIES 

Write for Catalogue Ho. t 



WALTER G.8RETZFIELDC0. H 

INC. 

1367 BROADWiT, N. T. ' 

Cor. 37th St. S 




Otbm Bonces*. Wby Can* I Teat 

STAGE TRAINING 

Organ. Cese.fr. Vaae-nr.. stags Sax 
• Play TaaskL Twsuitrai 



Bal- 
Devs. 

Mil* 



and Practical Conrssa. 
studlad snder Mr. alrleao; 

lersuau, Nora Bares. I 

Joseph Sutler, Bam now. 
DaaleT afan Feller. Dotty eMsrs. 
Hoiav*. VMaa Praatott. Eleanor Painter 
and others Write for estalegaa asa- 
donlag study desired. 

Alriene Theatre Sceool ai Artkf 

S7th St, at Broadway 

Entrance MB W. BTth St. New Tort 

SECOND-HAND 



GO WNS 



ANDREWS. 506 S. Stat. St.. CHICAGO 



Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQUIN'S 

6th A«., bat 27th and 28th Sta., N. Y. 

MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC SJS P. M. to 1 A. M. 

CIRCUS and JUGGLING 

Apparatus, Rolling Globes, dobs. Batons, 
Gnni, Wire Walkers' Apparatus and Novelties. 
Stamp for catalog. EDW. VAN WYCK. 
Cincinnati, O. 




aa-aP" ■*_ 
LET US FBOVB^l 
Send 100, for aamplea. 



.MAKE- 




IT IS BEST. 

113 W. 48th St., V. Y. 



DR. JULIAN SIEGEL, the Theatrical Dentist 



Suit. 2S4 PUTNAM BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



Phono Bryant Sen 



EXCEPTIONAL RATES TO THE PROFESSION 



Telephone 

Connection 



Need Photos Quickly? 



J Proiaaslonal I a 7 Photograph* FaaJahacl in U Hours for il.se. Duplicates can ba had as 
needed. Quality guaranteed. Large studio. Bring costumes. CAREY ART STUDIO, INC 
553 7th Ave, New York, at Met. Opera House. 



Me tnvile ill Singing Members of the Theilricil Profession to Humine in Atsortir.er.1 ol 

GREAT NEW UNPUBLISHED SONG NUMBERS 



;■„:::;,;;> KNICKERBOCKER HARMONY STUDIOS 



) 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, 95.00 

Big Bargain. Hare bean ased. Also a few 
Second Hand Innovation aad Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunks, fit sad tlS. A few extra large 
Property Trunks. Aleo old Taylor Trunk* 
and Bal Trunka. 
Farias- Floor, IS W. Jla t 3t_ New York City 



u™tt» 




WIGS 



~- Bosun Hair. Irish. Dates, ft*. To*, 
ea. Sonantta ar Men's Draw wig. 
tl.OO. Sl-80; Negre. IB*.. BO... 
TSe. ; TlgMa. 85c Instant SatjaSSSt 
Catalog rret. Paper Hats. 
kXTfTKBT 



raweluea. Praps. 

19 Cooper (a.. It. T. 



NEARLY NEW 



Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Foil Dress, Tuxedo aad Prince Albert Salts 

LUCY GOODMAN, 2115 S. State St.. Chicago 



WIGS 



TOUPEES, GREASE 
PAINTS. ETC 

A. M. BUCH * CO. 

lit N. Ninth St, PhOedelphW 



PLAYS 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS. ETC 
N. Y. PLAY BUREAU. Tre 
mont Theatre, N. Y. City. 
Stamp for catalog. 



NEW DROPS, $10.00 

Painted to Order. Any sice up to 15x30 feet, 
in either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water Colore. 
12.00 deposit with each order. Sehali'a .Scenic 
Studio. Columbus. O. 



PLAYS 



-»> SIS. 



oo 

IN MANUSCRIPT A TZAX 

New winners — Tried Succeeeee. Special Pictorial 
I'rlntlnp. Send atamp for catalog. 8TAGEX0BE 
FLAY CO., 1400 Broadway. N. Y„ Bept. a 



"Ladies Free" Tickets 

10,000 Ualei Free Tltuu X7.50 

20.000 Lailai Free Tlelatj 12.50 

30,000 Lsilsi Frss TleUU 17.50 

CAboTe prleei are for tlrzeti cot rroo one color, or 
asjorted colon of bogus brtstoL) 

LETTERHEADS and ENVELOPES 

<T<nw wtrt u. ens) 

One Color. T»o Colora. 
250 lettsriitaii 10S 250 Esrtleaat, 

la aaat en S5.50 n.50 

500 Isthvktss. us 500 Earileass. 

In want, kexet 7.00 10.00 

Is ealti K eeien, sssar aad SaitJeeet Is Badsa. 
LetterSeeaa, S'/, x II. Eeraleee. 6 1 /,. Aaamaeal aaarae 
aase tor N t. 10 Esnlesai. 

Sssl tar artes list sf .taw taeatrlesl anatlss. Bvaa 

Bee*. IDs. Prltss, Swiss ts snstet essSrlleas, askiart 

ts ceases attaast aetke. Taran, eaak wits areer. 

GAZETTE 8NSW PSIITIBG CS . 



C L I F» F» E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding one line In 
length will be published, properly classified, in 
this index, st the rate of $10 for one year (S3 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 

CHEWING GUM— BALL-CANDY COATED. 
Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factoriea Bldg., 
Toledo, O. 

LAWYERS 
F. I__ Boyd. Attorney. 17 'N. La Salle St., 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader, 10 South La Salle St., Chicago, BL 
Joseph A O'Brien, 1402 Broadway, New York 

City. 
Edward Doyle, Attorney, 421 Merchants Bank 
Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

MUSICAL CLASSES. 
A. Brauneiss, 1012 Napier Ave., Richmond 
Hill. N. Y. 

MUSIC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 
Chas. L. .Lewis. 429 Richmond St. Cincinnati. 
Ohio. 

■• SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tuttlc, 141 Burleigh St., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

581-583-585 South High St., Columbus, a 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 
Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

SONG BOOKS. 

Wm. W. Delaney. 117 Park Row, New York. 

STACE LIGHT EFFECTS, LAMPS 

(Bought, Sold) 

Newton Art Works, 305 W. ISth St., New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goes Co.. 10 Atwater St., Detroit, aflek. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 387 Washington St.. Bos- 
, 'ton, Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Grsvee Hardware Co.. 47 Eliot St., Boston. 
Mass. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
E. Walker, 309 W. 39th St., New York. 

TRANSFERS. 
Walton, 4SS W. 33d St., N. Y. 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Hobson. 910 Prospect Ave., N. Y. C 

Don't Miss It 

THE CUPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For Season 1916-1917 

It contains the names and addresses of Man- 
agers, Vaudeville and Dramatic Agents in New 
York. Chicago, Boaton, Philadelphia, Pitts- 
burgh. San Francisco, Canada: Music Pub- 
lishers! Theatrical Clnba and Societies; Mov- 
ing Picture Firms, and other information. 

Sent only on receipt of 2c atamp, aceom- 
lied by a coupon cut from THE NEW 



panted 
YORK 



CUT OUT AND 

Send this Coupon and 2c atamp for a 

copy of 

THE CLIPPER RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 
(For llls-1117) 

To THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

1SS4 Broadway, Now York 



MAaC! 



ACTS TOR BALK OaOIAa*. We 
Bay, Bell or Jsxehange aaed 
Apparatus, PnfeeaJonal Cata- 
log 10c. Parlor Trick catalog rBJtB. Write or 
".it Saeataaa afagie Oo., Bis. 1. «M Stk At.. n\T. 



PLAYS 



List or searaaaaaal and sa- 
iled P I s y s. VsodrrniJ 

BKrtchrs. MODOIop. 
Dlalots. Hake-op 



Material. Becftstlons. 
CATALOG FREE. 

FITZGERALD FOB. CSIP'I. 
Statrssor to Dlek I FlUfrrald. 20 Ann St., Mr* Tort. 



TBX TECHNICAL FRES8, NEW YORK 



MARTY BROOKS 

Wishes to Announce His Productions for the Coming Season 



"Wedding Shells" 

Military Musical Playlet 
WITH TEN PEOPLE 

By JAMES HORAN 



"Olives" 

Musical Farce in Three Scenes 
TEN PEOPLE 

Book and Music by 
CLIFF DIXON and MARTY BROOKS 



"Oh the Women" 

Miniature Musical Play 
TEN PEOPLE 

By HARRINGTON REYNOLDS 



"At the Country Inn" 

[Musical Comedy 

Featuring BILLY ARMSTRONG and a 

COMPANY OF TEN 



"Miss Hamlet" 

Musical Travesty 
ELEVEN PEOPLE 

With PAULINE BARRI 
By JAMES HORAN 

"Fascinating Flirts" 

Musical Comedy 

EIGHT PEOPLE 

With PHIL E. ADAMS 

and JACK WALSH 

By JAMES HORAN 

"Bon Voyage" 

Musical Comedy Panorama 

Seven Scenes' 

TEN PEOPLE 

With JIMMY GILDEA. 

HOWARD CLINTON and 

GLADYS DAVIS 

By JAMES HORAN 



ALSO PRODUCER OF 
"Betting Bettys" 

Racy Pacy Musical Comedy 

EIGHT PEOPLE 

With JOHNNY MORRIS 

and EDDIE PARKS 

By EDWARD CLARK 

"Six Peaches and a Pair" 

Musical Comedy 
EIGHT PEOPLE 

With CLIFF DIXON 

and FRANK SINCLAIR 

By CLIFF DIXON 

"Phun Phiends" 

Musical Comedy 

EIGHT PEOPLE 

With JACK HALLAN 

and MURRY HARRIS 

By JACK HALLAN 

and MARTY BROOKS 



u 



Bell Boy and Belles" 

Musical Comedy 
EIGHT PEOPLE 

"Vacation Days" 

Musical Comedy 
TEN PEOPLE 

"Bachelor Girls" 

Musical Comedy 
EIGHT PEOPLE 



ALSO IN PREPARATION 

" Daffy dills and Daisies" 

Musical Comedy 

TWELVE PEOPLE 

"Summer Girls and Fall Guys" 

Musical Comedy 

TEN PEOPLE 



\X7" A TVJ TT T^ T~*\ m Comedians, Juveniles, Soubrettes, Ingenues, Prima Donnas. Also 
▼ ▼ **> H lEi U • want Chorus Girls, Specialty Girls. 

Call at Once and See MR. BROOKS, Room 30 H Putnam Building, 1493 Broadway, New York. 

After September 10th, Suite 510-510i Putnam Building. 



AL FREEMAN 



PHIL MORRIS 



Gen. Business Rep. 



Phone Bryant 2727 



Booking- Rep. 



1 



n ob <x> m m »? txj ci> w *o a> »> <x> cx> m cu <x> txx 



n 




S^€ v ^ NEW YORK 




THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



tn m» m on in in m u > in f yt tin m tvt im m ra m W 




THE NATIONAL THEATRICAL WEEKLY 




THE NEW YORK CLIPPER September 12, 1917 






I 



mabel ford SISTERS D0RA 
HENRY MARSHALL 



I 



A Miniature Musical Production 



SYNOPSIS 

ACT I. — Opened at Riverside, Sept. 3rd. 

ACT II. — Stopped show completely; Speech; Flowers. 

ACT III. — Moved from 3rd position to 5th for Night 
Show. 

ACT IV. — Stopped show again; Speech; Flowers. 

ACT V. — Booked at the Palace this week (Sept. 10.) 



I 



LOVE AND KISSES TO JOE SULLIVAN 

FORD SISTERS and HENRY MARSHAL! 



■ 



Copyrigkt, 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 1453. 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 12, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— Net S 
Price, Ten Cent* 



WEINGARTEN 
LOSES HIS 
FRANCHISE 

BURLESQUE CENSORS RAP SHOW 



The American Burlesque Association 
has swung its axe on Izzy Weingarten's 
"September Morning Glories," and that 
show will end its career on the Circuit, 
Saturday, Sept. 29 at the Olympic thea- 
tre. This measure on the part ef the Cir- 
cuit is probably only a forerunner to 
similar treatment which may be meted ont 
to other shows playing the Circuit which 
have been found lacking and have been 
warned to spruce up or be eliminated from 
the "wheel." 

This is the second season that Wein- 
garten has run "afoul" of the American 
Circuit censorship committee, as last sea- 
Eon he almost shared a similar fate with 
this show, at about the same time of the 
year. But, last year he was more for- 
tunate in rounding his show into shape 
after the censors had looked it over, than 
this season. The show was then looked 
over by the censors at the Olympic and 
they fonnd it wanting. They informed 
Manager Joe Carlisle that he would have 
to whip his organization into proper shape 
by the time it reached the Gayety theatre, 
Brooklyn, or another one would be placed 
in its stead at the next stand. He took ad- 
vantage of the warning, and, after eliminat- 
ing several of the members of the cast, 
finally had it in shape to pass muster when 
it played the Gayety, two weeks later. 

This year, Weingarten started off by 
using the book, equipment, costumes and 
other effects of the Star and Gaiter show 
with which he played the Columbia Circuit 
last season and used them for the "Septem- 
ber Morning Glories" production. Appar- 
ently, the equipment and show did not bear 
up as well as it did last season, for, when 
Censors Jennings and Baker first looked at 
it in the Star theatre, Brooklyn the middle 
of last month, they immediately condemned 
the production in its entirety. They 
ordered Weingarten to procure a number 
of new principals, new scenery and cos- 
tumes and have the book spruced up a bit. 

This notice was communicated to Wein- 
garten in Chicago and he immediately came 
to New York to engage the new cast and 
supervise the change. Three weeks time 
was allowed. At the end of that period 
which was last week, Jennings and Baker 
prcoeeded to Springfield, Mass., where they 
again viewed the show and made a report 
to General Manager Peck of the Circuit 

The report showed that only three new 
principals had been engaged and that the 
show, even though changed as far as the 
book waa concerned was no improvement 
over the other one. They declared that the 
change did not bring the show up to the 
standard of the Circuit and recommended 
the revocation of the franchise. They also 
stated in their report that the scenery, 
which had been substituted for the original, 
was old and did not make a good impres- 
sion. 

The cast of principals with the show at 
•its; original presentation were Sert Bert- 
rand, George "Bed" Martin, Aug. Flaig, 
(Continued on ptffe 4.) 



MOROSCO AND LASKY ARRESTED 
Union Hrtx, N. J., Sept. 8. — Oliver 
MoroBco and Jesse Lasky were arrested 
here yesterday for speeding their automo- 
biles on the Hudson Boulevard. They 
were racing against each other along the 
boulevard, at a speed proper for a motor- 
drome, when taken into custody . by Of- 
ficer Seifkin. When brought to the police 
station Lasky gave bis age as thirty-six 
years and his address as 485 Fifth Avenue, 
while Morosco said that he was forty- 
three years old and resided at the Hotel 
Claridge, New York. They were released 
on bail for a hearing before Recorder 
Miles next Friday. 



HAVEZ COMPLAINT SLASHED 

The Supreme Court has stricken out 
eight of the thirteen paragraphs contained 
in the complaint of Jean Havez against 
Cecil Cunningham, in an action for 
separation. The expunged paragraphs 
stated that the comedienne's salary was 
not more than $100 a week until she met 
Havez who enabled her to secure a firmer 
position in the theatrical world ; that he 
had sacrificed many opportunities so that 
she could develop her talent ; that bis wife 
did not desire the association of men, pre- 
ferring a career to marriage, and that his 
wife constantly boasted of her earning 
capacity! 



WANTS RECEIVER FOR THEATRE 

Hobokek, N. J., Sept 10. — Claiming 
that Herman Schoenbach, head of the 
acusement company which operates the 
Strand Theatre, is guilty of a breach of 
trust, Floyd Ramsey, a real estate dealer 
of Jersey City, has made . pplicationin the 
Court of Chancery to have a receiver ap- 
pointed for the theatre. He claims that 
he has an assigned claim from J. M. Bren- 
nan for 25 per cent of the yearly prolits 
of the theatre and that Schoenbach, or the 
corporation which iperates the theatre, has 
failed to give him any of the profits or 
an account of the income or expenses. 



"SCRAP OF PAPER" OPENS 

Atlantic Ctty, N. J., Sept. 10. — "The 
Scrap of Paper," with Robert Billiard as 
the star, was presented tonight at the 
Apollo Theatre by A. H. Woods. It is a 
new melodrama dealing with the effects 
of the endeavors of three Americans, in 
conjunction with several German bankers, 
to control the natural resources of the 
United States. The company includes Ed- 
ward Ellis, Rusb Whytal, Dudley Hawley 
and David Glassaford. 



WANTS ALIMONY FROM MANAGER 

A motion to grant Vivian Fhinney $35 
a week alimony, pending the trial of her 
action for separation from W. R. Phin- 
ney, a theatrical manager, will be heard 
by Justice Richard Mitchell in the Su- 
preme Court to-day. S. B. Lilienstern 
appears as attorney for Mrs. Phinney in 
the action. 



FORMER AGENT DIVORCES ACTOR 

Carolyn Lawrence, formerly a dramatic 
agent, has been granted an absolute 
divorce from William Frederick Wagner, 
actor and stage director, and granted the 
castody of their two children, with a 
maintenance allowance for each nntil they 
become of age. 



MUSICIANS IN 

CLEVELAND 

STRIKE 

WALK OUT OF HIPPODROME 



Cleveland, Sept 11. — Encouraged by 
the granting of an increase in the scale 
of wages to musicians in the Bast, the 
members of the orchestra in B. F. Keith's 
Hippodrome here, walked out of the thea- 
tre yesterday afternoon when Manager 
John F. Royal refused to grant their de- 
mand for an increase from $35 to $38 a 
week. The stage hands and scene shifters 
joined tbem in a sympathy strike. 

The question of granting the increase to 
the men has been under consideration for 
a number of weekB and, from all indica- 
tions, it did not seem that there would be 
a strike, as it was thought the matter 
would be adjusted before it reached a 
crisis. However, yesterday morning, when 
Herman Birringer who is in charge of 
the orchestra, returned from a conference 
with the theatre managers and announced 
that no increase could be obtained, the 
men decided that they must go on strike 
immediately and get their co-workera in the 
theatre to join them. 

Nevertheless, the management of the 
house was prepared to put on the opening 
show. Manager Royal quickly got into 
touch with the local police and they, with 
private detectives, guarded the theatre and 
the entrances to the stage, while Royal, 
with a number of house employes, set the 
stage for the acts. Another orchestra was 
also obtained and they furnished the music 
for the performance, which was given with- 
out a hitch or any delay, despite the fact 
that the regular crew was missing from 
the stage and orchestra pit. 

Even though handbills were passed in 
front of the theatre advising the people that 
a strike was in progress, the house was 
filled to its capacity at the afternoon and 
evening pei formances. 

Manager Royal stated that, as $35 a week 
was the scale paid musicians in New York, 
he did not see why the men in Cleveland 
should receive any more. 

It is more than likely that a conference 
which is scheduled to take place today will 
bring about an amicable settlement and 
that the men will be back in their accus- 
tomed places at the night performance. 



STEWARD NOT TO CHANGE 

Chicago, Sept 10. — Earl Steward is to 
be retained as manager of the Palace 
Music Hal!. He was to have moved to 
Oakland, Cal, to manage the Orpheum 
there, in which case he would have been 
succeeded at the local bouse by W. G. 
Tisdale, who has been acting as resident 
manager of Powers' Theatre. Mr. Tisdale 
is to be put in charge of another Orpbenm 
Circuit house, not yet announced. 



"BRANDED" GOING INTO PARK 

Oliver D. Bailey thinks he can nut the 
Park Theatre back on the theatrical map 
with his drama "Branded," which has had 
a successful fortnight of preparation in Al- 
bany, Schenectady and Providence. 



CORT AFTER LAFAYETTE 

The Lafayette Theatre, at One Hundred 
and Thirty-first Street and Seventh Ave- 
nue, which has been playing colored mu- 
sical stock, is on the market, with sev- 
eral managers attempting to get control 
of it. The theatre, which ia part of the 
B. Jarmelowski Bank estate, is in the 
hands of the receiver who was appointed 
by the Federal Court. It is said that 
John Cort is dickering to obtain the house 
with the idea of running combination 
shows there under a policy similar to 
that of the Standard Theatre. It is also 
said that Charles W. Morgenstern, who 
had the lease on the theatre several years 
ago, is again desirous of re-establishing 
a vaudeville policy there. 



PERFORMER STABBED AND BEATEN 

Ed. Calam, of the vaudeville team of 
Dolly & Calam, while on his way home 
last Wednesday night, was set upon and 
brutally beaten by gangsters at 26th street 
and Seventh avenue. He was badly bat- 
tered besides being stabbed fen the neck and 
about the throat with a penknife. He was 
taken to the New York Hospital where his 
injuries were dressed, and was later re- 
moved to his home. The Detective Bureau 
was notified and is looking for his assail- 
ants. Through the injuries to Calam, the 
aet was compelled to set back a tour of 
the Sun Circuit for several weeks. 



HITCHCOCK LEASES THE 44th 

Raymond Hitchcock and B. Ray Goers, 
confident that "Hitchy-Koo," now playing 
at the Liberty Theatre, could stand a sea- 
son run on Broadway, have leased the 
Forty-fourth street Theatre from the Shu- 
berts for the balance of the present the- 
atrical season. The San Carlos Opera Co., 
which is playing in the house at present, 
will vacate on Saturday and, after the 
bouse is in the hands of the decorators for 
a week, it will open with the Hitchcock- 
Goetz production on Sept 24. Tbis show 
will vacate the Liberty on the previous 
Saturday. • 



SACKETT GOES TO WINNIPEG 
Chicago. Sept 10.— George Sackett, the 
former Chicagoian, who has been manag- 
ing the Orpheum at Des Moines, la., has 
been transferred to Winnipeg, Can, 
where he is now in charge ef the house 
formerly under the direction of Edward 
Sullivan, the latter now being located as 
manager of the New Orpheum at St 
Louis. 



OLD PERFORMER IS DERELICT 

Mrs. Annie Reinbart, known a decade 
ago on the stage as "The American Night- 
ingale," and a member of the team of the 
Reinbart Sisters, is now a derelict in the 
Harlem Hospital, a victim of the drag 
habit. She is bung kept there out of 
courtesy of the hospital authorities who 
are endeavoring to cure ber. 



NICOLAI HAS WAR PLAY 
George Nicolai has arranged to produce 
a war play dealing with current events, 
entitled "Cant. Russell, U. S. A.," em the 
International Circuit aboat Oct. 1. T*a 
play ia by Hal Reid. The cast is now 
being engaged -and the compaay wBI go 
into rehearsal next Monday. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 12, 1917 



HITCHCOCK TO 

OPEN REVUE 

ATTHEPARK 

HAS SIGNED DOLLY SISTERS 



After weeks of deliberation and con- 
saltation with his partner, E. Ray Goetz, 
Raymond Hitchcock announced on Mon- 
day, that they would produce an all-star 
revue in December at the Park Theatre, 
only a few blocks distant from the Cen- 
tury, which will probably have among its 
cast a number of people not at all unfa- 
miliar to Century audiences. Among those 
who have been already signed are the Dolly 
Sisters and the Three Dooleys. 

Hitchcock stated that be and Goetz had 
signed a contract with the Dolly Sisters 
to star them in a big production, and he 
feels that, surrounded with a galaxy of 
such luminaries as he intends engaging, the 
girls will be seen to better advantage than 
they bare in any previous production. 

It is more than likely that Sam Ber- 
nard, who was a member of the Century 
company last season, will also be enrolled 
under the Hitchcock-Goetz banner, as ne- 
gotiations have been going on with him 
for some time. Eddie Foy and his troupe 
of Young Foys may also be members of 
the cast. Hitchcock says that he has a 
great admiration for Foy, and that he 
would be a valuable asset to the show. 
He says that he has spoken of the matter 
to Foy, but, as yet, has not received an 
affirmative reply. Another person whom 
the producers are angling for is Belle 
Story, and it seems likely that she will 
be signed up. 

About twelve to fifteen more well known 
persons are being sought for the produc- 
tion. Rehearsals are scheduled for the 
middle of nest month. 

Hitchcock, outside of saying that it 
would be the biggest thing of its kind, 
refused to reveal the nature of the book, 
lyrics or music, claiming that it was to be 
a surprise production and would not be 
unveiled until the opening performance. 



NEW SPIEGEL HOUSE OPENS 

Newark, N. J., Sept. 8. — Spiegel's New 
Newark Theatre was opened to the public 
last Sunday as a motion picture house. 
The work of remodeling the old house began 
about a year ago, and a beautiful new 
structure has taken its place. The Spiegels 
have spared no expense in giving Newark a 
theatre which compares favorably with 
the Strand in New York. An elaborate 
promenade between the broad entrance and 
the auditorium is a distinctive feature, and 
is furnished in keeping with the rich deco- 
rations of the house. An orchestra of 
twenty-five and an echo organ furnish the 
music. There are twelve hundred seats on 
the orchestra floor. The house will be 
open continuously from 1 to 11 r. m., and 
prices range from 10 to 50 cents. John 
B. McNally is the resident manager. 

KOUNS GIRLS SUE FOR BIBLE 

Topeka, Kan., Sept. T. — Claiming that 
their stepmother, Mrs. Margaret Kouns, 
has no right to the family record, Nellie 
and Sara Kouns have filed a suit in re- 
plevin against her to recover the family 
Bible and a set of J. Fenimore Cooper's 
books. With the death of their father 
some months ago, the Bible and books fell 
into the hands of his second wife. The 
girls claim that their stepmother has noth- 
ing whatever to do with the entries writ- 
ten in the family Bible and that therefore, 
they, who occupied the space on the record 
leaf before the second Mrs. Kouns was 
even thought of in the family, are entitled 
to its possession. Kouns also left an 
estate of $200,000, but the girls are not 
contesting this. 

MUST REPORT TO DRAFT BOARD 

Gnctnnati. Sept. 7. — Walter Knight, 
a clown, and Albert Theo. Scheolwer, a 
showman, have been notified that unless 
they report to local Draft Board No. 8 
they wiQ be certified into the National 
Army. 



"SOMETHING DIFFERENT" OPENS 

Lynchburg, Va., Sept. 5. — "Something 
Different," a novelty musical entertain- 
ment was offered as the season opener at 
the Academy of Music last evening by 
the Charlotte Company, and was given an 
enthusiastic reception. The show was given 
its premiere here, the company having 
come direct here from New York. 

The roster includes: Stella Norelle, 
Obrad Dijnrian, Albert de Kosaigle, 
Harry Tebbutt. Bianca Rodriquez, Char- 
lotte Gaynor, Bertram Bailey, Sam Gor- 
dobn and Rocco Del] Aquils. Albert M. 
Peace is leader of the orchestra. 



"THE RIVIERA GIRL" OPENS 

PHn-ADrXPiriA, Sept. 10. — "The Riviera 
Girl" was presented here tonight at the 
Forrest Theatre by Klaw & Erlanger, and 
received the stamp of approval- Among 
those prominent in the cast are: Wilda 
Bennett, Sam B. Hardy, Juliette Day. 
Carl Ganrvoort, J. C. Harvey, Louis Cas- 
savant, Viola Cain, Frank Farrington and 
Eugene Lockbart. The play goes to the 
New Amsterdam Theatre, New York, in 
two weeks. 



GET POWERS FOR CHINESE PLAY 

Tyrone Powers has been engaged by 
Elliott, Comstock and Gest to play the 
title role of "Chu Chin Chow," which they 
will produce at the Manhattan Opera 
House next month. This will be Powers' 
first appearance in New York in four 
years. During that time he has been doing 
picture work on the Pacific Coast. 



TO BUILD THEATRE IN PATERSON 

Paterson, N. J., Sept. 8.— Jacob 
Fabian has purchased a plot of land in 
the heart of the business district here, 
which has been vacant since the fire of 
1902, and will erect a theatre on the site. 
The deed was completed yesterday. $5©,- 
000 is mentioned as the purchase price of 
the property. 



THEATRE BUILDER DIES 

Nbwakk, N". J., Sept. 5. — John S. 
Booth, consulting engineer, died to-day at 
the Presbyterian Hospital, from the effects 
of a general breakdown resulting from 
overwork in the construction of Spiegel's 
new Newark Theatre which opened last 
Saturday night. 



MILLER ENGAGES RAINEY 

San Francisco, Cal., September 8. — 
William Rainey, who has been prominent 
with the Players' Club here, will return 
East with Henry Miller who has engaged 
him to take a leading juvenile role in one 
of his new productions. 



WA1XICK SHOW FOLK MARRY 

McAixster, Okla., Sept. 5. — C. H. 
Sisk, of North Manchester, Ind., and 
Pauline Rachell, of Coweta, Okla., mem- 
bers of F. G. Wallick's Shows, were mar- 
ried in this city, August 30, by County 
Judge S. F. Brown. 




*-^»". .«». 



ACKERMAN AND 

HARRIS TO 

EXPAND 

PLAN TO EXTEND CIRCUIT 



With a desire to extend their interests 
and to materially, increase the number of 
theatres in their chain, Ackerman and 
Harris, owners and directors of the West- 
ern Hippodrome Circuit of vaudeville 
bouses, have definitely started plans to 
reach that end. New theatre sites are 
now being chosen in the Far Western 
territory and it is contemplated that, by 
the first of the year, the circuit will be able 
to give performers between twelve and 
fifteen weeks' booking time, without any 
layoffs. 

Bookings will be handled from Chicago, 
and acts engaged there will be given com- 
plete routes and contracts at the time 
they are engaged, according to the plans. 
The acts will go out in road shows, play- 
ing intact over the entire circuit. 

nouses in Fresno and San Jose will be 
added to the Hippodrome chain. Both 
theatres are now being built. The house 
in Fresno will be ready abont October 1st 

The Hippodrome interests have also ac- 
quired the Strand Theatre, in Stockton, 
which will be re-opened soon and will be 
re-named the Hippodrome. 

The Ackerman and Harris interests ex- 
pect to be able to give a better quality of 
vaudeville with the extension of its circuit 
and Ackerman is now in the East making 
booking arrangements. 



WM BAXTER BACK 

William M. Baxter, formerly associated 
with Pan! Durand, is back from South 
America. 

Baxter declares that conditions are ripe 
for clean entertainment throughout Brazil, 
Argentine and the other leading republics 
of South America and that he fully expects 
within the next year to have a circuit run- 
ning down the Eastern and np the West- 
ern coast over which he can play acts a 
full year, giving two shows nightly. 

Baxter went to South America on June 
9 last and put out a small show which did 
so well that he is now undertaking, with 
Willard, "The Man Who Grows" as part- 
ner, the exploitation of a company of forty 
people, to open at Rio Janeiro for four 
weeks, the latter part of October or the 
first of November, and then play down the 
Eastern coast. 



COLONIAL, CHICAGO, CHANGES 

Chicago, Sept. 9. — The Colonial is Boon 
to be restored to its former place among 
our first-class theatres. The success of 
"Parlor, Bedroom and Bath," has brought 
abont the change as the play must leave 
the Olympic at the end of five weeks. No 
other house being available, Klaw and Er- 
langer have arranged with Jones, Linick 
& Schaeffer to suspend their present policy 
and book the Woods comedy. The engage- 
ment at the Colonial will begin on Sept. 
30. . 

NEW CONTRACT WATTS ON KLAW 

Upon the return of Marc Klaw, president 
of the United Theatrical Manager's Pro- 
tective Association, from Boston, to-mor- 
row, it is very likely that the Actor's 
Equity Association contract will be taken 
up at a meeting of the managers' board. 
Tbe report of Ligon Johnson, regarding 
his interpretation -of the contract and 
recommendation of changes, will be gone 
over and," within the course of a few days, 
be ratified by tbe managers. 



PRIMROSE SEMON 

With , "Hello America" 



"THE TRINITY" OPENS 

New Haven, Conn., Sept 10.— "The 
Trinity," by Lem Parker, opened here 
Saturday with the following cast: Law- 
rence Evart,, Roma Lanri, Gwendoline 
Williams, Iva Edmondson, WaUy Norris, 
Ben Bailey, M. H. Harriman, Frank 
Backus and Jack Joell. The production 
ia being presented by M. T. Mtddleton. 



SMITH GETS ANOTHER JOB 

Cekctnnati, Sept. 8. — Wm. Smith will 
add a new tabloid show to his attractions 
this season, called "Tbe Yankee Doodle 
Girls." It will start out with new scenery 
and wardrobe and with Dave Meyer in the 
leading comedy role. Thos. J. Mack will 
be business manager with the show. 



HEAVY RAINS PREVENT SHOW 
Beaveb Faixs, Pa-, Sept. 6. — Heavy 
rains the evening before, caused the Sells- 
Floto Shows to cancel their engagement here 
today. After viewing the lot, which ia lo- 
cated in Junction Park, a three-mile haul, 
Manager H. B. Gentry, decided not to at- 
tempt to erect the canvas. 



ACTRESS' SON ENLISTS 

Toledo, Ohio, September 10. — Alan 
Synge, son of Charlotte Granville, the act- 
ress, has enlisted in the officers' training 
camp for this district. He ia a cousin of 
the late John Synge, the Irish playwright. 



L. V. B. RUCKER IS BUND 

Richmond, Mo., Sept. 9. — L. V. B. 
Rucker, for many years a well-known 
dramatic writer for the Associated Press, 
the United Press and the International 
News Service, has become blind and is lo- 
cated in this city. 

BLANEY MAY OPEN COMPANY 

Baltuiobe, Sept. 7. — It is rumored that 
Harry Clay Blaney may open a dramatic 
stock company at the Colonial Theatre 
here, aB he was in Baltimore recently to 
ascertain the cost of fitting the building 
for that purpose. 



SAN ANTONIO HOUSE REOPENS 

San Antonio, Tex^ Sept 5. — The 
Royal Theatre, thoroughly overhauled and 
with several thousands of dollars worth of 
improvements was formally opened last 
Sunday with the feature picture "The 
Slacker." 



BERNHARDT ENGAGES SABINI 
Vera Sabini, the dancer, has been en- 
gaged to perform a specialty with the 
Sarah Bernhardt road show, opening in 
Boston next Monday. The engagement 
was secured by Jack Hughes. 



ACTOR ARRESTED AS SLACKER 

Hackensack, n. J., Sept 10. — George 
Stock, a moving picture actor, has been 
arrested here as a slacker and committed 
to the Bergen County Jail to await an in- 
vestigation by the Department of Justice. 



KNOXVLLLE FAIR OPENS OCT. 8 

E^oxvTiiE, Tenn., Sept 10. — The East 
Tennessee . Division Fair will be held in 
this city October 13. J. L. Bnrdette, Jr. 
is general secretary and Ed. S. Albers, sec- 
retary of Amusements. 



"SHORE ACRES" TO RE-OPEN 

"Shore Acres'' will make its debut on 
the International Circuit at the Lexington 
Theatre, next Monday. Hy Morton will 
play the role created by the late James 
A. Heme. 

WEINGARTEN LOSES FRANCHISE 

(Continued from page 3.) 
Hattie Beall, Lester Dorr, Sidonne Dixon, 
Edna Flynn, Erie Clark and the Olympic 
Four. After the censors inspections, Flaig 
and Miss Beall resigned from the cast and 
Dorr and Miss Dixon were released. Those 
to take the places of these people were 
Norma Bell, Daisy Mayfair and Jules 
Jacobs. 

The franchise was revoked last Monday 
evening and the American officials stated 
that the new show to take its place would 
be "The Gay Morning Glories." Bnt they 
would not disclose the name of the owners 
of the franchise or production. 

It was learned at" the American head- 
quarters yesterday that Baker and Jen- 
nings, who were to have started on a West- 
ern trip Monday evening, have delayed 
starting for about two weeks, so as to give 
producers a chance to profit by Wein- 
gart'en's experience and get their shows into 
proper shape before they get around. 



September 12, 1917. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



PEMBERTON RAT 

CASE HEARD ' 

BY COURT 



DECISION EXPECTED TODAY 



Justice Mitchell heard argument lilt 
week, of counsel, on the application at 
Goldie- Pemberton to have the books of the 
White/ Rats Actors' Union examined in 
an- effort to ascertain the disposition of 
toe fands of the organisation. He ia ex* 
pected to hand" down hbr decisios- in the 
matter to-day. 

This matter has been in the Supreme 
Conrt for the last three months and, during 
that time, J. J. Myers, attorney for the 
Eats, hag protested against arguinr the- 
matter/ onless all- of the directors were per- 
sonally served: About a dozen adjourn- 
ments were taken, in. the ease, until two 
weeks, ago,, when Alvin T. Sapinaky, at- 
torney., .for Miss Pemberton, obtained 1 an 
order' from Justice Donnelly, allowing him 
to serve those defe n dants, he had not 
r e ach ed, ■ by, substitution, by sending" them 
a. copy- of tie complaint by registered; mail' 
to their home address and the White Rata 
clubhouse. This was done, and the case 
was. then placed on the motion calender. 

In his argument before the Court,' Sapin- 
sky, on behalf- of Miss Pemberton; stated 
that,- despite the fact' that the. White Bats 
organisation, for all practical purposes, is 
defunct, there are many who were members 
who would like an inquiry into the manner 
in which- it was conducted; to see whether 
the blame for- running the organization on 
the rocks cannot be fixed upon some one. 

He declared that the officials and officers 
of the union wrongfully diverted moneys 
and assets of the union into a real estate 
venture, known as the White Rats Realty 
Company, the stock of which Is owned by 
a- few individuals, who are also directors 
of the union. 

He stated that, at the expense of the 
union, and with its funds, a clubhouse was 
erected, the profits of which were to go 
to these individuals. 

Another contention was that the annual 
income of the union waa a great deal 
more than was necessary to meet expenses, 
and that, since the union is now penniless, 
the assets have gone somewhere other than 
in ordinary running expenses. He also said 
that the Union wrongfully operated The 
Player, at a loss to the organization. 

These charges were supported by affi- 
davits made by various individuals who had 
been members of the organization. 

Meyers, as soon as the proceedings be- 
gan, raised the objection that the director 
defendants had not been properly served. 
Justice Marshall stated that these were 
only obstructive technical objections, and 
stated that the case would have to be 
argued on its merits. 

Meyers then stated that the proceeding 
was. not brought in good faith, but was 
merely brought to discover the names- of 
those members of the union,, who had paid 
their levies, so that the Vaudeville Man- 
agers* Protective Association might black- 
list them: Sapinsky," in answer to this 
statement, informed- the Court that this 
was not the purpose at all, but, on the 
contrary, he was willing to hare the ref- 
eree' seal the membership book, because he 
did' not care to know who paid dues, and 
who paid levies. AH that he wanted* to 
ascertain, he said, was- what were the assets 
and what became of them, and who was 
responsible for their disappearance. 

To substantiate this statement, he sub- 
mitted afTi davits from. Fred Niblo and J. 
Greenfield, directors of the. Rats, who 
stated that they would be glad to have 
the books opened for inspection for the 
benefit of the members. 



U. S. BrG TOP MEN IN FRANCE 
Frederick Sargent, an outdoor show- 
man, ia now in France with a contingent 
of Big Top men who have volunteered in 
the service of the United States. Sargent 
has the rank of Captain. - More than a 
thousand circus men are reported to be 
under his command, including "Lady" 
Bob Montgomery, who has the rank of 
First Lieutenant, "Blackjack" Sullivan, 
Jimmy McGuire, "Punk" Brunswick, Bald- 
win Soars and a host of others. Sargent 
collected' most of his army during last 
Winter's outdoor show conventions at Chi- 
cago, many of the men being recruited 
from the Wortham Show, the Con. T. 
Kennedy carnivals, and the Hagenbach 
Wallace outfit. 



HARRY DAVIS TO TAKE EMPIRE 

PmnBUU OH, Pa., Sept 10. — It ia. un- 
officially reported that Harry Davis win 
take over the Empire Theatre- in the Bast 
End district here. 



BERNIMO GOING TO LONDON 

J. H. Benrimo will sail for London the 
latter part of this month to supervise the 
production of "The Willow Tree" at the 
Globe Theatre there next month. He will 
produce' it' in conjunction with Gilbert 
Miller, son of Henry Miller, who has been 
abroad' for the- nasi year as his father's 
representative. Rene* Kelly, who will act 
the part- of the "Princess," will be the 
only' American member' of the cast. 



HARVEY ORR SHOW OPENS 

Benton. Harbor, Mich., Seat 6.— 
Harvey D. Oir'a: new show, "There She 
Goes,*' by Louis Weehra, had it premeir* 
performance here. It is a musical offer- 
ing- with thirty- 9ve people and Harvey and' 
Harold' Orr playing- the feature comedy 
parts; It will play- two weeks in- Ohio and 
West Virginia territory and: then move 
into the vicinity of New' York. 



FRED THOMPSON LOSES MOTHER 
Mrs. Margaret Thompson, seventy-seven 
years old and mother of Frederic Thomp- 
son, died- on: Monday in the Polyclinic 
Hospital, following an operation. Thomp- 
son was at the bedside of his mother at 
the time of her death. Besides her son, 
a daughter survives her. 

KITTY GORDON SINGS AT GAMP 

The military prisoners on Governors Is- 
land were entertained Saturday by Kitty 
Gordon, Jack Wilson and Vera Beresford. 
This is the first time since the declaration 
of war that the authorities have allowed 
a private party to enter the prison on a 
mission of that sort 



WAR CAUSING CANCELLATION 

Hutchinson, Kan., Sept. 5. — Prom a 
representative of the Chicago Grand Opera 
Co., it is learned that that organization 
contemplates the cancellation of its date 
to play in Oklahoma City, this Fall, owing- 
to railroad conditions, due to the war. 



WAR SAVES OLD THEATRE 

Philadelphia, Sept 7. — The old For- 
rest Theatre is not to go. It has been 
decided to postpone tearing down the house 
on account of the war and it is likely that 
road productions will be housed there for 
at least two years. 



STAGE LAWYER TURNS SAILOR 

Thomas E. Murray, associated with the 
theatrical law firm of O'Brien, Malevinsky 
and Driscoll, has enlisted in the naval re- 
serve and has joined the crew of one of 
Uncle Sam's submarine chasers. 



ENGAGE SOUSA BAND MEMBERS 

Dillingham and Ziegfeld have arranged 
to employ twenty-seven of the musicians, 
formerly members of Souse's band. They 
will form a part of the orchestra at the 
Century Theatre. 



ALVORD TO MANAGE BRONX 

Ned Alvord, resident manager of Keith's 
Bronx Theatre, will retain that position 
when the house inaugurates a vaudeville 
policy on September 17. 



CUPID SIGNS BOB AUSTIN 

Union Hrxx, N. J., Sept. 8. — Bob Aus- 
tin,, playing at the Lincoln Theatre here, 
was married to-day to Jean Do Rember, 
of Bethlehem, Pa. 



SENATE PASSES 

BIG THEATRE" 

WARTAX 

AMOUNTS TO $18,000,000 YEARLY 



Wabhikgtoh, D. C, Sept. 10. — Begin- 
ning November 1, the theatrical and 
amusement field will have to add to the 
coffers of the United States Treasury $18,- 
100,000 as its annual share of the war 
revenue tax, according to the- measure 
which waa approved by the Senate to- 
night. Those who opposed the- measure 
were Senators Borah, La Follette, Gronna 
and Noma. 

The bill. levies a tax, of 10 per cent, on 
every theatre ticket sold, a tax of 10 per 
cent; on the expenditures of- patrons of 
cabarets, a tax of 6 per cent, on ticket 
speculators charging fifty cents in excess 
of box-office.- prices, a, tax of 30 per cent: 
on all speculators charging more; than CO 
cents in' excess of box office rates, and 
a tax of 50 per cent.- on. theatres charging 
more than: standard prices, But exempts 
motion theatres from the- tax when their 
maximum price of admission is twenty-five 
cents. 

Amendments, added at the last minute to- 
the amusement tax section were : 

A tax of on* cent for each ten cents or 
fraction thereof paid for admission to any 
place, including admission by season ticket 
or subscription, to be paid' by- the person 
making such payment. 

Also, that a tax of one cent be levied 
for each ten cents or fraction thereof paid 
for admission to any public performance 
for profit, at any cabaret or similar en- 
tertainment to which the charge for admis- 
sion is wholly or in part included in the 
price of refreshment, service or mer- 
chandise, to be paid by the person paying 
for such refreshment, service or mer- 
chandise. 

For all tickets sold at newsstands, hotels 
and places other than the ticket office of 
theatres, operas, or other places of amuse- 
ment, at not to exceed 50 cents in excess 
of the established price therefor, a tax in 
addition to the regular theatre tax equiv- 
alent to 5 per cent, of the amount of 
such excess is to be charged, and, if sold 
for more than 50 cents in excess of the 
sum of such established price, plus the 
amount of other taxes imposed, a tax 
equivalent to 30 per cent of the whole 
amount of such excess is to be -charged. 
This tax is to be paid by the persons, cor- 
poration or associations selling such tickets. 

Where persons have the permanent use 
of boxes. or seats in an opera bouse or 
place of amusement, a tax of 10 per cent.' 
of. the amount for which a similar box. 
or seat ia sold for a performance will be 
levied. These taxes shall not be imposed 
in places where a maximum charge of 
five cents is made for admission, such as 
outdoor amusement parks, or in the case of 
moving picture shows, main gates shows 
and rides therein, the maximum charge 
for admission to which is 25 cents. 

No tax is to be levied on admission 
where the proceeds go exclusively to the 
benefit of religious, educational or charit- 
able institutions, societies or organizations 
or admission to agricultural fairs nor in 
respect to admission to bona fide Chau- 
tanquas and Lyceum courses, which are 
contracted for and guaranteed by local 
companies, associations or individuals. 

All persons, corporations, partnerships 
or associations, which receive payments 
for admission, must collect the tax from 
the person making such payment, and shall 
make returns and payments of these 
amounts, so collected, to the proper author- 
ities, as prescribed by the act. 

Those persons- who sell tickets above 
the box-office price, or those who charge 
a price above the . standard price, where 
the tax' ranges from 5 to 50 per cent, 
must make monthly returns, under oath, 
in duplicate, and' pay the tax imposed to the 
Collector of Internal Revenue for the dis- 
trict in which is located his principal place 
of business. 



"HAMILTON" IS SEEN 

Atlantic City, N. X, Sept. 7.— The first 
performance of "Hamilton" was given at 
the Apollo Theatre last night, with George 
Arlias in the title role. The play deals 
with the life of Alexander Hamilton 
during the period of Washington's admin- 
istration. The scenes are laid in Phila- 
delphia. Miss Mary P. Hamlin and 
George Arliss collaborated as authors. 
Mr. Arliss* support includes Miss Jeanne 
Eagles, Mrs. Arliss, Miss Marion Barney, 
Carl Anthony, Hardee Kirland, George 
Woodward, John D. Ravold, Guy Favieres, 
Pell Trenton, James O. Barrow and Wilson 
Day. "Hamilton" goes to the Knicker- 
bocker Theatre on September 17. Klaw - 
and Erlanger and George C. Tyler are the 
producers. 

LOEW RAISES $2,1 19.63 
The efforts of the Dolly Sisters, Rosooe 
Arkbuckle, Raymond Hitchcock, Jack Nor- 
worth, Lillian. Lorraine, Will Rogers, 
Helen Rook, Doris Ken yon, Mollie King, 
the girls of the "Follies" and a host of 
others for. the "Sun Tobacco Fund," plus, 
10 per cent, of the gross receipts, of the 
New York Theatre, resulted in bringing, 
the contributions of the Loaw offices to' 
$2,110.03. Mr. Loew sent.* chock, for this 
amount to the fund, last week. 



SAUNA WANTS SUMMER PARK 

Hutchinson, Kan., Sept. 6. — Boon 
Beck, manager of the 8nmmer park here, 
will go to Salina, Kan., next week to 
confer with a committee of business men 
regarding the opening of an amusement 
park there next season. This park will 
be similar to the one in Hutchinson, and' 
will feature the theatre attraction. Work 
will be started this Fall; so the park, can be 
opened early next Spring. 



MACDONALD. FORMS CLUB 

Boston, Mass., Sept 9. — Donald Mac- 
Donald, playing here in "Have a Heart," 
has formed a Donald MacDonald Club. 
Donald MacDonald will head the club, the 
members presenting musical comedies that 
have been written by Donald MacDonald. 
It is planned to give three productions a 
year. 



WON'T HIRE ELIGIBLE SOLDIERS 

Edward B. Perkins has made sure that 
no one in his play, "The Red Clock," has 
failed to fulfill his military obligations by 
eliminating the male chorus entirely and 
using only men who have been rejected 
by the authorities, or who are not within 
the draft age. 



TO PRODUCE CHAPIN PLAYLETS 
Mrs. Alice Chapin, mother of the late 
Harold Chapin, who was killed in the 
trenches at Loos, France, has collected the 
short plays written by her son, and plans 
to produce several of them in New York 
for the benefit of the war funds. 



DOONE HAS NEW PLAY 

Allen Doone, the Australian actor aad 
manager, is planning the production here 
of "ffleary, V. C," a comedy of the pres- 
ent war. He acted the piece in Australia. 



BRADY GEMS BRING 9800,000 

The jewels of "Diamond Jim" Brady 
were sold last week te Stern Brothers £ 
Co. Although no figure wss given out, 
it is estimated that they brought about 
$500,000. 



WOODS GETS NEW PLAY 

A. H. Woods has accepted for produc- 
tion a new play from the pen of Michael 
Morton, the author of "The Yellow 
Ticket." It is called "On with the 
Dance." 



REHEARSE 2ND "LOVE O' MIKE" 
The Shuberts have put into rehearsal a 
road company of "Love o* Mike." The 
original company is to remain in New 
York. 



McGregor has new play 

Edgar McGregor is- at work translating ' 
"The Adorable Pest" from the French for 
early production. 



Tttlv HEW STCXRiC CLIPPER 



September city 1917 




N.V.A.TOGREET 

1918 IN NEW 

HOME 

WILL START NEW ERA ON JAN. 1 



The National Vaudeville Artists', Inc., 
will celebrate New Year's Day in their 
new home, once the clubrooms of the 
White Eats. 

The plana for remodeling and altering 
the building on Forty-seventh Street 
have been' drawn up and filed with the' 
Building Department and the work of re- 
construction will begin almost immedi- 
ately. 

The new clubrooms of the N. V. A. will 
include a stage and an auditorium, a ball- 
room, card rooms, writing rooms, a res- 
taurant and cafe, a billiard room and sev- 
eral reading rooms. The old swimming 
pool will be replaced with a large kitchen. 
The upper floors will contain living rooms 
exclusively for the male members of the 
club. . ' 

It is anticipated that £. F. Albee, who 
supervised the laying out and decorations 
of the present N. V. A. clubrooms, will 
also personally superintend the altera- 
tion and redecomtion of the new site. 
When the clubrooms are opened the first 
of ti>e year, it can be safely assumed that 
there will be no finer theatrical clubrooms 
anywhere in the United States. 

It is rumored that an amendment is 
about to be proposed to the N. V. A. by- 
laws to provide for the raising of the dues 
when the organization moves into its 
more commodious quarters. The dues at 
the present time are very nominal, and 
many believe that they could be raised 
without working any injustice to the 
members of the organization. It is 
thought that Moving Day would be an 
appropriate time to put this rule into 
effect, and the backers of the due-raising 
amendment will probably put their propo- 
sition forward at the same time that the 
election of officers is held at the club, 
shortly. 

A provision to increase the number of 
associate members is also being thought 
of, for, with the moving into larger quar- 
ters, many feel that more associate mem- 
bers could be provided for. It is said 
that there is a large number of. persons 
who desire the privileges of associate 
membership at the present time, but find 
that a filled list precludes them. 

ECKL BOOKS S MORE HOUSES 

Joe Eckl has added a number of vaude- 
ville bouses throughout New York State 
to his booking list. They include the 
Lyceum Theatre, Elmira, which is playing 
four acts on a split week; the Opera 
House, Ilion, which has five acts, playing 
a split week; Oneonta theatre, Oneonta. 
playing two acts, split week; Quirk thea- 
tre, Fulton, playing four acts pn a split 
week ; the Madison Theatre, Oneida, play- 
ing four acts on a split week commencing 
Sept. 20, and the Empire Theatre, Glens 
Falls, playing three acts on a split week, 
instead of changing every other day. He 
la also supplying twelve acts of vaudeville 
to the Bastable Theatre, Syracuse, the last 
half of the week, until the International 
shows commence their season there. 



STARTS TWO-A-NIGHT POLICY 

San Antonio, Tex.. Sept. 6. — The 
opening of the Majestic Theatre last Sun- 
day was the beginning of an innovation 
here, for the management gave two per- 
formances on Saturday and Sunday nights 
and will continue to do so for the rest of 
the season. The outlook for a good season 
hare is bright owing to the number of 
soldiers stationed in the city. 



BILLS CHANGED ON MONDAY 

Adelaide and Hughes withdrew from 
the bill at the Palace Theatre this week 
by giving notice that they would not split 
top line honors with any other dancing 
act in vaudeville. Henry L Marshall and 
the Ford. Sisters substituted. Adelaide 
and Hughes win return to- the' Palace 
shortly, with a new arrangement of their 
present vehicle, which scored last week: 

John X. Bay and company could not 
open at- the Fifth Avenue Theatre last 
Monday on account of Alness, and Frank 
Moore and Joe Whitehead were held over. 
This is the first time an act from the last 
half has ever been held over to the first 
half of the succeeding week at this house. 
Moore and Whitehead have a route on the 
strength of their Fifth Avenue showing, 
going to Buffalo next week. 

Harriett Rempel and company could not 
open at Proctor's Theatre, Yonkers, Mon- 
day matinee, as Miss Rempel suffered 
from a loss of voice. Brenda Fowler and 
company substituted. Harriett Rempel and 
company are on the bill at the Palace The- 
atre for next week. 

It was stated that McClellan and Car- 
son might withdraw from the show at the 
Riverside Theatre on Tuesday, as they 
were also rehearsing with" "The Red 
Clock." Up to the time of going to press 
no other act bad been substituted. 



MANAGER IS AN INVENTOR 

William Russell Meyers, manager cf 
the Hamilton theatre, has applied for a 
patent on a new style of announcement 
sign, to be operated on each end of the 
footlights. It is to be about two feet in 
height and will have a roller on which the 
names of the acts win be placed. The 
rollers are to be operated by a lever, 
which will simultaneously announce the 
act that is to appear. 



STOCKHOUSE HAS BURGLAR SCARE 

G. P. Stockbonse, of the Eighty-first 
Street Theatre, had a burglar scare in Ms 
apartment last Saturday night and, in 
going into another room, accidentally ran 
into a door-jam, opening the skin over 
one eye, and leaving an unsightly wound. 
He reported in the booking office on Mon- 
day with enough bandages to equip a well 
outfitted ambulance surgeon's bag. 



LA MONT HAS TWO NEW ACTS 

Bert La Mont has produced two new 
acts which are breaking in this week. 
"Hogan's AUey," with ten people, is at 
the Halsey Street Theatre, Brooklyn, the 
first half of this week, and "The Uncon- 
quered" is at Perth Amboy. The latter is 
a sketch with only two men. The acts 
are being groomed for a local showing early 
next month. 



SINGING PARSON ASKED TO QUIT 

Zauesviixe, O., Sept. 5. — Rev. F. W. 
Gorman, of this city, who has been divid- 
ing his time between the. pulpit and the 
vaudeville stage has been asked to resign 
his charge at the First Congregational 
Church. Mr. Gorman was billed as the 
"singing parson" during the Summer sea- 
son on the Keith circuit. 



PERFORMERS AID WAR RELIEF 

A number of vaudeville artists, includ- 
ing Adele Rowland, John Charles Thomas, 
Margaret Romaine, Houdini, H. Cooper 
Cliff, Minnie Dupree, Gladys Hanson, 
Hazel Dawn. Harry KeUy, Lucille Gardner, 
Ward De Wolf and Ernest Ball gave a 
performance in aid of the Stage Women's 
War Relief, last week. 



ALLEN BACK AT HAMILTON 

Billy Allen, stage manager of the 
Jefferson theatre during the Summer 
months, has returned to take charge of 
the Hamilton Theatre stage. Allen was 
in the Hamilton Theatre when it opened 
four years ago. 



BOOKERS FEEL 

DEARTH OF 

PLAYLETS 

WANT BIG TIME STUFF 

Playlets for big time bills are needed and 
needed badly, according to advices from the 
booking offices. Never in the history of the 
two-a-day was there such a dearth of good 
playlets nor such an urgent need for them. 

The present big time vaudeville programs 
are made up almost entirely of song and 
dance offerings, because good playlets can- 
not be found. It is the desire of .the book- 
ing officials to put this style of offering on 
vaudeville programs both to add color and 
variety to the bins, but the average playlet 
of today does not measure up to big time 
standards. 

There is no scarcity of playlets so far as 
the small time houses and so-called "break- 
in" theatres are concerned,, but few of these 
acts possess the quality desired for big 
time consumption. Almost every family 
theatre and "break in" bill contains a play- 
let in its roster of acta, but hardly any 
possess sufficient merit or strength to get 
bookings over the bigger circuits. 

War playlets have been tried out in large 
numbers lately, and some of them show 
considerable merit. Bnt the bookers of the 
big time houses have put a ban on the war 
playlet and, therefore, many of these offer- 
ings, although well acted and written, find 
engagements scarce. 

Other playlets, for the most part, lade 
originality and are poorly constructed or 
have an incapable cast. 

The booking officials are on the lookout 
for meritorious one-act plays and any play- 
let possessing the desired qualifications will 
find bookings an easy matter, it is assured. 



LOEW TEAM READY FOR PLAY 

The Loew Booking office Basketball 
team will inaugurate their season of play 
on Sept. 24 at Brown's Gymnasium. Moe 
Schenck is captain of the team and the 
other members are Alex. Hanlon, Sammy 
Smith, Sot Turek and Abe Friedman. The 
team's schedule for this season calls only 
for games with teams in the theatrical 
business. 



L1TT AND NOLAN FORM NEW ACT 

Faboo, N. D., Sept 7.— Ad. Litt, for 
ten years in blackface, and Harriet Nolan, 
formerly of the sister team of Harris and 
Nolan, produced a new act here this week 
in which are featured original songs by. 
Miss Nolan. The act is in one, both per- 
formers appearing in evening dress. It 
was well received. 



POU CELEBRATES ANNIVERSARY 

Habtpobd, Conn., Sept. 0. — To-day is the 
fourteenth anniversary of Poli's Theatre, 
and a big special bill has been engaged 
to commemorate the occasion. A benefit 
performance for- the tobacco fund for the 
American "Sammies" was given here to- 
night before a tremendous audience. The 
following acts appeared: "The Rising 
Generation." Frank Moran, De Wolf* 
Sisters, "Tango Shoes." Manning. Feeney 
and' KnowU, George Bernard and Gladys 
Scarth, Bell and Monti, and "The Man off. 
the Ice Wagon." Mr. and Mrs. PoU and 
bis two daughters attended. 



ACTOR COUNT RE-MARRIES 

Chicago, Sept. 7. — Count De Beaufort, 
who some time ago appeared in vaudeville 
with his dog "Don" has added another 
chapter to his marital career by eloping 
with Helen Reiman, the eighteen-year-old 
daughter of a wealthy merchant of Terre 
Haute, Ind. 



"SHERMAN WAS RIGHT" SEEN 

Union Hnx, N. J., Sept 8. — "Sherman 
Was Right" a new act received its pre- 
miere at the Lincoln Theatre here, this 
week. The cast consisted of Billy Wat- 
kins. Al Lavan, and Dora Wahl, assisted 
by six girls. 



RUTH ST. DENIS MADE $72,000 

Ruth St Denis made $72,000 during her' 
tour of the United Booking Offices route, 
last season.' Of that amount, she very 
wisely banked a total of $40,000, which 
has been tied -up in an annuity. 



ORGANIZES NEW RECRUITING ACT 

George Sofranski and Jack Crisp, mem- 
bers of the Quartermasters' Department 
at the State Arsenal, are arranging to 
place an act in vaudeville composed of 
members of their department to play the 
Loew Circuit and obtain recruits for thejr 
corps. Twenty-two men are to be in the 
act which will open about Oct 1. Abe 
Thalheimer will route the act in Greater 
New York. 



MOSS BOOKING THE DYCKMAN 

The B. S. Moss vaudeville booking offices 
on Monday began the booking of vaudeville 
acts at the Dyckman Theatre, Broadway 
and 207th Street Five acts are being sup- 
plied on a split week policy. The house, 
which opened last week under the direction" 
of .Jacobs and Jermon, had its vaudeville 
supplied heretofore by Sam Bernstein. A 
feature picture is being run in addition to 
the acta. 



LEVY LEASES OFFICES 

Jack Levy, husband of the late Delia 
Fox, ' who, after an absence of several 
years from the booking floors of the' U. 
B. O. is lining up a number of new offer- 
ings for presentation on that Circuit baa 
taken a suite of offices in the Strand 
theatre building which' will be ready for 
occupancy the end of this week. 



ACT HAS TO DROP SONGS 

The Futuristic Revne has been requested 
by G. Ricordi and Co. to discontinue the 
use of certain numbers which have been 
used in the act or face an action at law, 
the publisher claiming that he baa these 
numbers copyrighted. The numbers re- 
ferred to have been eliminated from the 
Revue for the time being. 



HARRY RAPF PRESENTS NEW ACT 

Jersey City, N. J., Sept 3. — Harry 
Rapf presented a new act at Keith's, to- 
night, entitled "The Fishing Trip." It is 
a "girl act" of seven people, featuring Bert 
E. Leigh ton, Bay Chidlow and Edith Man- 
doza, who are assisted by four girls. The 
act is fall of laughs and was well received. 



MENTAL MARVELS REJOIN 

Fargo, N. D., Sept 7. — Dr. and Mme. 
Hark ins, billed as "The World's Greatest 
Mental Marvels," who split up at the Grand 
Theatre here several weeks ago, and de- 
cided to "go it single" have come together ■ 
again and are now touring the west by 
automobile. 



MOSS TO BUILD UP -TOWN HOUSE 

B. S. Moss last week denied reports to 
the effect that he had abandoned bis plans 
to build a theatre at 181st street -He said . 
that he had been having some trouble over 
the zone law, but would put up the house, 
nevertheless, when that is straightened 
out 



BOXY SISTO RECOVERED 

Billy Sisto, the Italian statesman, has 
entirely recovered from his recent accident 
and baa continued his vaudeville engage- 
ments. He opened for the TJ. B. O. in 
Richmond this week. "'-'-'* '••"" 



ligHimM ir If IH17T 



THE «EW >YORK CLIPPER 




PALACE 

After the - pictures, the Garcinetti , 
Brothers, assisted by an active dog, held 
attention. They do several acrobatic 
stunts, with a trampoline, and using an 
old melody as incidental music. They 
next perform with a big rubber ball in 
which the dog assists, by butting the ball 
out into the audience. The men are. dress- 
ed in white trousers and blue coats, and 
shed their coats to do several' hat tossing 
tricks. A faster routine would help and the 
purchase of a new carpet would enhance 
the appearance of the act. 

- Frank Crummit in the second spot, did 
very well, although he wore the identical 
garb that the Garcinetti Brothers used. 
Crummit has an excellent personality,, a 
splendid delivery, several good songs and 
well told stories, and plays the mandolin 
and ukelele in a . masterly style, accom- 
panying himself. However, he should 
stop using the spot light as much as he 
does, even if he is on second. 

Bonita and Lew Hearn, in the third 
spot, got the first big laughs. Bonita looks 
splendidly in new wardrobe and is a brill- 
iant foil to Hearn's quaint rural humor, 
Hearn, by the way, has greatly improved 
in voice and several new gags and bits of 
business came in for big appreciation. Ben 
Shaffer is assisting in the well known 
drinking scene, which finishes in great 
style, with a new double version song. 

.The Avon Comedy Four cleaned up in 
the number four spot, they being in their 
second week. The boys have several new 
gags for the holdover and a great many 
songs which are new to this theatre. The 
picture interpolated near the finish of the 
act, after the "doctor" bit, was a big 
comic surprise and the fact that the coys 
came out and made good with gymnastics 
after they announced they would appear 
as European acrobats was another big 
punch, compelling them to finish with a 
neat speech by Joe Smith before they 
could get. away. 

Henry I. Marshall and Mabel and Dora 
Ford closed the first part with a scintillat- 
ing singing and dancing specialty which 
should make all so-called sister acts take 
notice. Marshall is a clever entertainer at 
the piano and famished several songs of 
his own composition, filling in the inter- 
vals while the girls changed from, one 
charming dress to another. They in- 
terrupted Marshal] near the finish of his 
song with a dance that depicted the melody 
in dance steps. The act is arranged in a 
showmanlike manner and scored all the 
way, finishing in great style. 

One point not to be overlooked in this 
offering is the smoothness and finish of the 
routine of dances, and the splendid way the 
girls do the steps, while Marshall is to be 
commended for his clever work at the piano. 

After intermission Lucille Cavanagh, 
Paul Frawley and Ted Doner offered their 
well known act, in which several minor 
changes have been made. Miss Cavanagh 
has interpolated her Indian dance and a 
new waltz melody, while Frawley is now 
singing as if he were selling a song via 
the illustrated song route. 

The Three Dooleys, composed of William. 
Gordon and Ray Dooley, literally cleaned 
up. The three clever Dooleys, with their 
bright patter and nonsense, were a big 
comedy hit. BUI Dooley is doing his well ' 
known falls, and Gordon and Bay Dooley 
help out with their comedy antics, songs, 
dances, chatter and falls, which convulsed 
the audience with laughs that were well 
earned and fully deserved. The act as it 
stands is a comedy, treat on any bill and . 
should have little trouble in commanding 
attention for its comedy alone. The open- 
ing talk is especially well pointed and 
starts the act off nicely to a very fast 
finish. 

Private Bernard Granvirp. c-sittf' 1 J*r a 

-detachment of the recruiting force of the 

Seventy-first Regiment, closed the show 

and field all seated to the very finish: The 

act is more fully reviewed .under, new. acta. 

8. Ix H. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on Paces S and Z7) 



RIVERSIDE 

Lovers of good music will find much 
to interest them in this week's bill at 
this house, which includes Mme. Chilson 
Ohrman, tiie concert soprano, who ren- 
dered an excellent repertoire of classical 
selections, and Paul Periera, violinist, 
who, with his string sextette, gave one 
of the best miniature concerts heard in 
vaudeville in many a day. 

Jack McLallen and May Carson, roller 
skaters, opened the bill and gave an ex- 
cellent exhibition. In addition to the 
usual work done by skaters, they did all 
the modern and old time dances, 

Britt Wood followed with his clever 
dancing and harmonica playing. Wood is 
improving in his work very fast and is 
showing such rapid development in. his 
comedy that he would do well to devote 
more attention to this portion of- his act. 
While he plays the harmonica well, a lit- 
tle of it goes a long way and one of the 
numbers could well be eliminated. 

Raul Periera, billed as "the Portuguese 
Court violinist" - and supported by his 
string sextette, rendered a classical pro- 
gram which was a musical treat. Periera 
is a fine violinist and an excellent mu- 
sician, who strives after none of the ef- 
fects which the usual vaudeville violinist 
attempts. Instead he confines his work 
to' an artistic and musicianly interpreta- 
tion of his repertoire. His support was 
excellent, the concerted work of the sex- 
tette being excellent. It will be further 
reviewed under "New Acts." 

Sam and Kitty Morton, assisted by 
Martha and Joe, forming what they now 
term the second edition of the Four Mor- 
tons, presented "Then and Now," a com- 
bination of the new act the Mortons have 
been presenting for some time past and 
a portion of the one done by Sam and 
Kitty thirty years ago. 

Their work is so well known to vaude- 
ville patrons that' comment is unneces- 
sary. 

Elizabeth Brice and Charles King have 
the best collection of popular songs they 
have ever rendered and, in consequence, 
their act scored a decided hit. These 
young people know how to get the most 
out of every selection they render, and, in 
consequence, every one of their songs 
stands out as though it had been specially 
written for them. 

Mme. Chilson Ohrman, prima donna so- 
prano, opened intermission with ten min- 
utes of concert, in which she, in excellent 
voice, rendered a short program of classi- 
cal compositions. Her voice is a clear, 
excellently placed soprano, wide of range 
and beautiful as to quality. She sings 
with fine intelligence and gave an artistic 
rendition of all her selections. . Those who 
doubt the right of a prima donna to ap- 
pear in a classical repertoire on a vaude- 
ville bill, should hear Mme. Chilson Ohr- 
man. 

Raymond and Caverly in "The "Sub- 
mariners" were the comedy hit of the 
bill. The German comedians have a lot 
of exceptionally good comedy material 
which they put over with fine effect. 

Belle Baker has a new song repertoire, 
every number of which was applauded to 
the echo. The hold which this young lady 
has upon vaudeville audiences is wonder- 
ful. The number of songs she sings, her 
place on the bill or the lateness of the 
hour never dulls the' enthusiasm of her 
audience. 

Jack Wyatt and his Scotch Lads and 
Lassies closed the bill and furnished such 
a clever collection of bright songs and 
dances,- presented in such an attractive 
manner, that in. spite of a late running 
bill of Monday afternoon, not a person 
left his seat until the act was finished. 

W. V. 



BUSHWICK 

Lawton, presenting what he terms "o 
few ideas in juggling" opened the show at 
a well attended matinee on Monday. A 
rather effeminate walk detracts from Law- 
ton's work, although his juggling feats are 
adeptly done and form an excellent rou- 
tine. 

George and Lily Garden, billed as the 
world's greatest xylophonists, will be re- 
viewed under New Acts. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Wilde do some 
excellent shadowgraph work. Wilde prob- 
ably has no peer in his peculiar line. Mrs. 
Wilde does little more than assist, although 
she shares equal honors on the billing. The 
shadow likenesses to well known men are 
remarkable, and, in fact, all of the shadow 
work is very entertaining. Not as much 
can be said, however, for the patter in the 
act, most of the gags being older than this 
reviewer. 

Homer Dickinson and Grade Deagon 
did so well that they took two encores and 
could have forced another had they cared 
to. Miss Deagon, as an eight-year-old, 
does some great work. The pair work well 
together and are proving themselves capa- 
ble of being able to more than ' hold their 
own on any bill. 

The Futuristic Revue, featuring the 
Countess de Leonard!, presented a classy 
flash and brought the first half of the bill 
to a big close. A new drop curtain which 
is now being used introduces the act most 
attractively. The Countess plays the 
violin well and the different singers all do 
their part of the work excellently. It de- 
tracts from the act somewhat, however, 
when the Countess conducts the orchestra 
from the stage. A big act, such as this 
Revue, should either carry its own 
orchestra leader or have its pianist do the 
conducting. Particular praise is ' due to 
the woman -who sang the "Miguon" aria 
and to the man who rendered the clown's 
song from "PagliaccL" 

After intermission, Lydia Barry ren- 
dered several exclusive numbers and a 
popular war ballad. Miss Barry should 
re-arrange her routine so that she does not 
open with the ballad, because it would be 
more effective later in the act, although, at 
present, she uses it as her opening num- 
ber. The audience liked Miss Barry and 
she worked hard throughout her routine. 
However, the act ended very weakly, and 
we are nnder the impression that some- 
thing probably went wrong at the end. 

Show stopping seems to have become 
more or less of a habit with Jack Ingliss 
and Jimmy Duffy, and their hokum songs 
and comedy were so much to the liking of 
the Bushwick patrons that the pair found 
it a difficult task to bow off. Judging from 
the applause, they could have gone on with 
their work indefinitely, although they bad 
been very liberal with their efforts. The 
"dollar down and a dollar a week" bit 
seems to be the biggest laugh getter in the 
turn and it might be well to put it further 
along in the routine, making the Hawaiian 
number precede it. 

The applause that greeted these two 
boys did not seem to materially affect the 
success of L. Wolfe Gilbert and Anatol 
Friedland who also found it a difficult task 
to bid a final adieu. Of all the song-writ- 
ing performers, Gilbert probably is the 
most successful when it comes to putting 
over popular numbers. Friedland did his 
share of the work well at the piano and the 
pair introduced one after the other of their 
own. compositions until, probably,, there 
were no more on the Hot. 

General Pisano and Company closed the 
show with a shooting act which is very un- 
usual. Pisano did some accurate shoot- 
ing, and the act closed a good bill nicely. 

H. G. 



EIGHTY-FIRST ST. 

Under its new policy, the Eighty-lnf 
Street Theatre is presenting a strong 
vaudeville bill this week, in conjunction 
with "Redemption." 

The orchestra has been. augmented and 
plays its overtures and film music excel- 
lently. J. Walter Davidson, the conductor, 
seems to be having a little trouble, how- 
ever, in getting his musicians to work 
smoothly with the vaudeville acts. Af 
several points at Monday night's perform- 
ance the orchestra and performers were 
considerably at variance. This was notice- 
able several times during the Truly Shat- 
tnck and Emma O'Neill turn, while, for 
Felix Adler's single, poor work on the 
part of the orchestra all but spoiled the 
opening part of his act. If this had been 
the first performance some allowance might 
have been made for the deficiency. 

After a travelogue ' picture and a news 
pictorial, the show was opened by Roberto, 
billed as "Europe's famous juggler." As- 
sisting him in his work was Bea Verera, a 
woman with a winning smile and an evi- 
dent desire to please. Roberto is a skilled 
juggler, performing all of his feats, some 
o{_ which were very difficult, accurately. 
His work runs much along the standard 
line, but is marked by earnestness and 
hard work. There is no tendency on 
Roberto's part to resort to hokum methods, 
as is the case with many jugglers of to- 
day. Nor does he miss a trick several 
times before doing it correctly to impress 
upon his audience how difficult it really Is: 

Truly Shattnck has invaded vaudeville 
again, working this time with Emma 
O'Neill. The pair scored nicely in the 
second spot The turn will receive a more 
detailed review under "New Acts." 

Hassard Short and company fonnd the 
Eighty-first Street patrons a harder audi- 
ence than they have been accustomed to. 

Just why a playlet of this sort should 
be given bookings in the better grade ot 
houses is rather inexplicable. Many per- 
sons resent comedy which depends upon 
drunkenness for its inspiration. To many, 
the sight of a girl becoming intoxicated is 
disgusting. 

At best, the plot of Short's "The Ruby 
Ray" is of the flimsiest sort, and furnishes 
little more than an opportunity for him and 
his associates to display their ability in 
"souse" roles. There are so many cleaner 
subjects for playlets and skits that it would 
seem such capable performers would take 
the hint and seek a more wholesome 
vehicle. Short has also developed the 
habit of sing-songing many of his lines, 
and, if he is going to continue to present 
this playlet. r be should at least overcome 
this unpardonable fault. 

After an overture by the orchestra and 
the showing of "Redemption," the vaude- 
ville show resumed its course, Felix Adler 
entertaining in some of bin comedy crea- 
tions. With apparently no effort he ex- 
tracted laughs from the audience at pleas- 
ure, and got good comedy out of his open- 
ing song jingles, despite the orchestra's 
shortcomings. His operatic bit was ap- 
preciated. He concluded his routine with 
his well known "I Know Them All" 
number, introducing bis ventriloquist bor- 
lesqn" It has lost but little of its comedy, 
even r'ongb many have tried to imitate it 
sinrr Adler first introduced it The turn 
seems a little rough in spots, but will 
probably run smoother by the end of the 
week, when Adler is completely in vaude- 
' ville harness again. 

A diverting novelty act closed the bill, 
when De Witt, Burns and Torrence pre 1 
sented "The Awakening of the Toys." The 
jack-in-the-box. the wooden soldier and 
the plerrot doll all do their shsrs wen. 
and the novelty of the turn, excellently 
worked out pnts the act over in great 
shape. The business of the hungry giant 
was well done, too. Vaudeville has too 
few grotesque novelty acts such as this 
one, for they lend color to a bUL 

A film comedy brought the show to a late 
close, it not being screened until . 11.06. 

B. «. 



8, 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 12, 1917. 




FIFTH AVENUE 

Dufty & Daisy, man and woman, had 
number one position, and scored a well 
deserved success with their bicycle riding 
act. This team is one of the cleverest in. 
its line. Dufty performs some Terr re- 
markable stunts on a wheel and Daisy 
follows him very closely. The latter is 
one of the Tery few lady wheel riders who 
works oo a tricycle. Their finish, posing 
on the back wheels of their cycles, right 
down- at the footlights, shows remarkable 
twiatwlng Daisy makes, three changes of 



Northlane and Ward,' man and' woman, 

open In one and talk -a. song. The/ then 
go to dancing. The rest' of the act is 
done in two, with a red plush drop. The 
wo man plays the piano for her partner to 
do a dance in which, she later joins. She 
than talks a song, pitying her own accom- 
paniment and. they. do. some more dsncingt 
For an. encore, they. fls—aV They were 
well liked. 

Mabel Burke aang/aa. illustrated i song, 
for. wkieh aha- received much hearty, as* 



Basil Korcroaa - and company,' two-, men" 
and a woman, presented •' a clever sketch 
entitled "Lore in- the Sotarbs." The skit' 
tells the story of a- husband who arrives 
home ■•sonsed" at 7 o'clock In the morn- 
ing, after an all night poker game. Their 
maid has left them- and.' when the wife 
starts to get breakfast; she discovers that 
all of the eatables have disappeared; with 
the maid. Hobby is dispatched 'to replen- 
ish the larder and, is his absence, . the 
maid's policeman friend appears fOr a 
"hand-oat." He mistakes the wife for the 
new girl and attempts to make love to 
her. He makes no headway. He tells of 
the liberality of the former girl and calls 
her master and mistress a couple of 
"boobs." The husband returns and the 
"cop" learns that he has been talking to 
the mistress of the house. It is a well 
written skit and is well acted, each of the 
three players doing good work. 

Jennie Mlddleton, a violinist, scored a 
well earned success by her playing. She 
rendered three numbers and an encore. 
Miss Middleton is a very capable per- 
former. She plays with' much feeling and 
expression and her technique shows her to 
be an artist of more than ordinary ability. 
Frank Moore and Joe Whitehead, call- 
ing themselves, "Just Two Eccentrics," 
presented a new act made up of talking, 
singing and dancing, and made the big 
comedy hit of the bill. (See New Acts). 
Rudinoff, smoke picture and whistling 
expert, was so well liked that he had to 
respond to an encore. He began by mak- 
ing a smoke picture of New Xork harbor, 
showing the Statue of Liberty and big ves- 
sels steaming up the narrows, changing it 
to a scene in Holland. He then gave his 
bird imitations. 

Rudinoff is an artist in the fullest sense 
of the word and is also an entertainer of 
high standard. For his encore number he 
rendered Mendelssohn's Spring Song with 
bird notes. 

Arthur McWattera and Grace Tyson 
presented a new revue of songs and scored 
a decided success. (See New Acts.) 

Harry Cooper, assisted by Jim Reaney 
were seen in "Changing His Job." Cooper 
appears as a postman who is tired of his 
job and Reaney as the man who tries to 
get him a new one. He offers him the 
position of salesman for a matrimonial 
agency and demonstrates how to go about 
his work. The material is of the rapid 
fixe kind, with Cooper having the cream of 
it, and many laughs are the result. At 
the close Reaney sings a song in which 
Cooper joins. The -act was well liked. 

The Two Travilla Brothers presented a 
tank? act In which - they do diving stunts, 
assisted by a diving' seal, which works in 
the tank with them. One of the brothers 
stays under water for nearly three minutes. 
Sh* setting for the set Is elaborate, E.W. 



WILL PLAY SUNDAY VAUDEVILLE 

Hutchinson, Kan., Sept 6. — The 
management of the Riverside Park Thea- 
tre has made an arrangement with the 
Western Vaudeville Association, whereby 
the vaudeville performers who show dur- 
ing the week at Topeka or Wichita, will 
come here for a- matinee in the afternoon 
and two shows on Sunday night Neither 
of the towns mentioned allows Sunday 
shows, which leaves the companies idle 
and able to come here for one day only. 
The shows will either come. from. Topeka 
here and. then go to Wichita, or. vice 
versa, depending on the way the routing. 
is arranged. This plan will go into effect 
immediately after the park' season doses 
which will' be in a few weeks. If the 
venture proves successful no doubt the 
out-door theatre will be . boarded, up. and 
heated for the winter season. 



HAVE NEW, ACT 

Grace . Carlyle and Jules Homer who 
have, appeared in., big., time vaudeville- for 
several seasons with ; their-, act- "Just' a< 
Kong at Tyilighi" have- a new- act, written. 
by Jules'Romer, .entitled.- "The Composer" 
which makes its first local bow at. the 
nighty-first Street Theatre^ October 1j 



BARTON HAS. NEW- ACT 

Dhioit Hnx, N. J., Sept. 10 .■ — Joe .Bar- 
ton,, who. recently, returned from the West, 
appeared last' week at the' U. Sv Temple 
Theatre in- a new vaudeville 'act The turn 
will be shown shortly in New York: thea- 
tres. 



TOWLE BEGINS ORPHEUM ' TOUR 

San Francisco, Sept 10. — Joe Towle, 
billed as "The Cleanest Act on the Bill," 
began his tour of the Orpheum Circuit at 
the Orpheum Theatre yesterday. He has 
a route of twentytwo weeks on the circuit 



ELSNER SIGNS LEAH WINSLOW 
Edward Eisner, who wrote Emily Ann 
Wellman's flush drama, will take another 
plunge into vaudeville producing when 
Leah Winslow will shortly appear under 
his direction in a new piece. 

HAVEZ COMPANY OPENS OFFICE 

Offices of Jean Haves. Productions, Inc., 
have been opened in the New York The- 
atre Building. Several vaudeville acts are 
being prepared for production. 

TRIO GETS PAN. TIME 

The Strand Trio has obtained bookings 
on the Pantages time, opening Sept. 16 at 
Minneapolis. 




KATE ELINOR 
Of Elinor and Williams, who are presenting 
a novel act this week at the Alhambra Theatre. 



AMERICAN 

Capacity business ruled here Monday 
night and the bill presented was well re- 
ceived. 

Oakes and De Lure, man and woman, 
started the bill on the- roof with dances. 
When the curtain. rises on a scene in one 
it- discloses two old-fashioned clock cases 
of the "grandfather's clock" kind.' In 
these, the performers go through a variety 
of 'dance- steps. 

The .rest .of the act is dona in two, the'. 
nevt. number being :a modern cabaret-dance.. 
The man. then does a single soft-ahoftracro- 
batie dance,-, which. is> followed' with' a 
song by the woman. They.- finish' - strong-. 
with a whirl wind acrobatic- dance. 

Seligv and 'Norman, tw<y men, present' a' 
song and ■ patter-' act They render:' 8 lx' 
songs,' with two* solog- each and, for-' a 
finish, one of the: tsamu dresses ak a -Hula' 
dancer end they do- a' travesty -of' an 
Hawaiian song Tend dance.' They made- a 
pronounced success. 

Fennell 1 and:' Tyswi, matt and' woman, 
open' in one- with'. a song, at 'the' finish of 
which'' the' woman 1 ! taxes off" a- wig and 
discloses-' a- head ' of closely ' cropped hair, 
giving ' the- impression she in a man.' Her' 
partner then'- sings; and ! the ' woman - , next' 
appears,'' dressed in Hits, for' a- Scotch 
number.' TEe • scene ■ th»n goes- to two, 
where the -woman, behind a screen;' changes 
to a 'man's fair Vlress suit. They close with 
a song 1 and 'dance and,' at 'the finish, the 
woman- lets down her hair, thus setting at 
rest any doubt as to her sex. The act was 
well liked. 

ST Jenks' and Victoria Allen presented a 
comedy rube offering of songs, . talk and 
dancing. They open with a song, and 
Miss Allen exits. Jenks then gives some 
rural patter, made up of jokes and sayings. 
He' then says he will sing a song and, in 
a spotlight, stands near the right entrance - 
and goes through the motions of singing 
while his partner, off stage, actually does 
so. For an encore, they did a song, and 
finished ' with an eccentric dance. They 
deservedly scored one of the most pro- 
nounced hits made by any act on this 
stage In many a day. This team would go 
big in any company. They are talented 
performers, and are . among the best ex- 
ponents of rural characters on the vaude- 
ville stage. Their material is fresh and* 
snappy, and they put it over to the best 
results. Jenks' rube work differs from the. 
usual run; and Miss Allen's is equally new. 

Arthur R. Edwards and his little com- 
pany of three presented a sketch entitled 
"Neglect," and found favor. 

Peggy Brooks, with her songs, was so 
well liked she was accorded an encore. 
She sang five numbers. in good style and 
received well merited .approval for. each. 

Evans Lloyd and Grace Wbltehonse, in* 
"Bits of. Travesty," were weH liked. They 
open with comedy patter.- which': can be 
traded from very good to i poor. They 
finish strong with a burlesque'- operatic 
selection. They . are capable • performer* 
and, with their material properly built up 
the act would be greatly ■ Improved. Miss 
Whitehouse sings well and, if she were: 
given a good popular number' In place- of 
the burlesque one she sings, it would help 
greatly. 

George M: Rosener, in- characteristic 
types, earned a deserved success. He 
opened as an English.- fop; past middle 
age, and told several stories.- He then 1 
impersonated a dope fiend and finished with 
an impersonation of a Civil: War veteran.- 

Rosener is an artist.' His characteriza- 
tions show him to be an actor of marked 
ability; His material is excellent, that 
which he uses for the Englishman' being 
comedy, which brings laughs, while that for 
the other' impersonations Is dramatic 

The Three Gowell Brothers, In closing 
position; presented a clever acrobatic act, 
made-' up of hand stands,' balances, and'' 
other, stunts usually fonnd in the Tontine • 
ofacts'ot'this class. - They were welt II ked. 

B. W. 



WALTON SISTERS ARE BOOKED 

Terse Haute, Ind., Sept 10. — The Wal- 
ton Sisters, Mae and Rose, who began 
their stage career as local amateurs about 
seven years ago, are booked over the 
Keith and Orpheum circuits. They sing, 
dance and play' various musical instru- 
ments.- 



"I LOVE THE LADIES" OPENS 
Elizabeth, N. J.', Sept 0. — "I Love the 
Ladies," a musical comedietta, with- a 
cast of eleven persons, received its- vaude- 
ville premiere here this week. Bernard 
and Sharp are featured in the set; which 
is under' the- direction' of -Harry. Weber. 



SOPHIE TUCKER AIDS FUND 
New- Obuaks, Lav Sepfc lO^-Soptde 
Tucker and Frank Westphal made a plea 
for the New York ■ S*w Tobacco -Fund here 
and. collected fifty-one . dollars' at: the" Cot- 
ton Exchange,, which has -been* forwarded - 
to the fund. 



JO, PAIGE SMITH WELL AGAIN 

Jo Paige Smith h»B' fully ' recovered front 
bis'reeent illnessand is bark In his office; 
doing business as usual.' While away be 
kept uv constant' touch' with -his business 
through'' a telephone at' his bedside.' 



REVIVE "THE WORLD DANCERS" 
"The v World " Dancers" is being revived 
by May Tul Iy who is allowing- Charles J. 
Adler to stage it Lester' Sheehan; for- 
merly with Bessie Clayton, will be -featured 
in the new- turn. 



SAVOY OPENS ROOMING HOUSE 

Bert Savoy, of Savoy and Brennan, bas 
opened a rooming house on West Forty- 
fifth Street' for theatrical folk and named 
it "Miss 1817' Inn/' In honor of the new 
Century show. 



BESSIE ROYAL TO BOOK ACTS 

Bessie Royal has left the office of Cutis. 
J. Fitspatrick to enter the vaudeville 
booking field, for herself. She has taken 
offices in the Putnam building. 



SHOW NEW ACT TOMORROW 

To-morrow, at the Halsey Theatre, in 
Brooklyn, Herman Becker will launch his 
girl act "Mr. Chaser," for the second sea- 
son. 



EMMA CARUS CANCELS DATES 

Emma Carus is suffering from throat 
trouble and has cancelled all vaudeville 
dates until 'she opens on the Orpheum Cir- 
cuit next month. 



OLIVE MEYERS HAS NEW ACT 

Olive Meyers;, doing a novelty single 
specialty, will show a new act at Norfolk 
next week. The act is under the direction 
of Rose and Curtis. 



N. V. A; DUES ARE DUE 

Dues- are now payable at 1 the National 
Vaudeville Artists; Inc., and the new : re- 
ceipt 'cards are blue. Ail members- holding 
pink cards are in arrears. 



MEYERHEIM BOOKING ON FLOOR 
Walter Meyerbeim, associated with the 
Harry Weber offices, is- now booking ' on 
the' floor"for that firm. 



ROSENER GOES ON I.OF.W TIME 
George ' M. Rosener has started ' a sea- 
son on Loew time, heading- the bill at the 
American. Theatre this week. ■ 



LEVY ENTERTAINS CHILDREN 

Bert Levy gave one of Us free chil- 
dren's entertainments,' last. Saturday 
morning, .at. the Riverside Theatre. 



NATALIE ALT REPORTED ENGAGED 

Natalie Alt Is t* ported engaged U marry 
a prominent New York business man. 



September 12, 1'917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




BERNARD GRANVILLE CO 

Theatre— Palace. 

Style — Patriotic novelty. 

Setting — Full stage. 

Time — Forty minutes. 

dosing the show at the Palace The- 
atre, Privates Bernard Granville, Arthur 
Fields and Earl Carroll, assisted by 
Lieutenant Barrell, of the Seventy-first 

Regiment recruiting staff, had things 
their own way, holding the house to the 
very finish of their comedy talk, songs 
and special drill. 

The act opens in a wood set with 
twenty-five men going through a short 
drill. A camp fire is shown and a piano 
is also seen in the woodland setting. 
An aviation number is rendered by one 
of the boys in uniform, while the re- 
mainder of the company are at rest, 
lighting cigarettes and joining in the 
. chorus. 

Lieutenant Barrell then makes a great 
appeal for recruits, explaining that the 
regiment he represented had its full quoto 
months ago, but some had to go with the 
69th Regiment to make up the 165th 
Regiment of the "Rainbow Division," 
now at Mineola. 

Arthur Fields next sang two popular 
patriotic numbers in spirited style. 
Earl Carroll was next introduced as 
the author of the lyrics of several shows 
and sang three songs from the shows. 
He followed it np with a new patriotic 
song which has a corking good title. 
Carroll was the only one who worked in 
a spot light. 

Bernard Granville next stepped out 
with some appropriate remarks about 
being known as a dancer who specialized 
in a drunk dance, bnt could not do it 
now, as he now wore a different suit of 
clothes. He told several stories, and 
.also went into the recruiting question. 
stating that while at Brighton Beach, 
and in the last ten days, his department 
■bad recruited 2,000 men, of whom Only 
420 -were 'found to be 'physically 'fit. He 
stated that bis regiment only needed a 
few tmore hundred -to fill its required 
strebgth, ana finished with a drill and 
song, "Good-bye Broadway, — Hello, 
France," " as the curtain descended. 
It i« understood 'that the act '!« to re- 
main -at the Palace for another week, 
mSking two straight. 

Musically 'the entertainment banded 
out is -exceptionally well handled, 'In- 
cluding ' h iplano 'player who has some 
pantomimic 'comedy bits that are gems. 
In staging the act, no detail is lacking, 
and Private Granville 'has surrounded 
himself with some very classy talent. 

B. X. >H. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued on Page II) 



GEORGE AND LILY GARDEN 

Theatre— 'Bushwiek. 
Style — XylophonisU. 
Time — Twelve 'minute*. 

Setting— In one. ....'. 

.George and Lily Garden are -adept 
xylophoniBts. The numbers rendered 
are mostly popular and. are well played. 
Whether they are -the world's f greatest 
xylophonists, as .per -billing, we are -not 
in .a position to say, but it can be safe- 
ly assumed that they are not; although 
they more than .pass muster. A more 
modest billing would get the act just 
as far and would "be much more fitting. 

They employ two xylophones, the man 
playing the -melody on one while the 
girl plays the bass accompaniments on 
the other, for the most part. A popular 
medley starts off the routine. The girl 
then leaves the stage to the man, who 
plays, a rather difficult classical selec- 
tion. The girl then re-enters, in a sec- 
ond gown, and a rag medley concludes 
the turn. 

The pair possess considerable person- 
ality, particularly the girl. They seem 
to enjoy their work and put a lot of 
ginger into an ordinary xylophone rou- 
tine IT. G. 



SHATTUCK AND O'NEILL 

Theatre— Eighty-first Street. 
Style — Songs ■and talk. 
Time — Eighteen minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

Truly Shattuck and Emma O'Neill are 
presenting a torn which runs along the 
same lines as the older turn of Miss 
Shattuck and Marta Golden. Compari- 
sons are neither here nor there, for this 
turn must either stand or fall entirely 
upon its own merits, but, in passing, we 
cannot help but comment upon the 
striking similarity in style between 
HiBs O'Neill and Miss Golden. Miss 
Shattuck might well consider herself 
lucky to have found another partner 
who can work with her along the lines 
that she has been accustomed to work- 
ing. 

One does not need to be told that 
Miss O'Neill has been recruited from 
the burlesque field, for it stands out in 
her work. Here and there lines are 
more suited for burlesque than for 
vaudeville, and a little pruning would 
not hurt the act. Miss O'Neill is a 
very capable comedienne, however, and 
more than upholds her half of the act. 

The routine starts off with a widow 
and bride song. Miss O'Neill as the 
widow proving to be a Job's comforter 
to Miss Shattuck, the bride. The num- 
ber is good, though rather long. Miss 
Shattuck follows this with a ballad and 
displays a fine singing voice. Miss 
O'Neill renders a coon-shouting song, 
done very cleverly. Another ballad is 
then rendered by Miss Shattuck. Some 
.talk follows, after which the pair use 
the same finale song and business as 
was used in the Shattuck and Golden 
turn, taking them off nicely. 

The women should hasten to consult 
a vaudeville writer for. some up-to-date 
patter. One old gag follows another in 
the present routine. The Gordon gin 
gag, the joke about the boarder on the 
free list, the sardine in ' oil gag, and 
the talk about the ring which . she not 
only admires, but recognizes— all have 
seen service. 

Miss Shattuck's solos are excellently 
rendered and .Miss . O'Neill's . song . is a 
"very acceptable bit of work. When the 
turn is toned down here and there and 
•when newer gags are employed, the , act 
should get by nicely. H. G. 



RAUL PERIERA 

Theatre— -Riverside. 

Style— Violinist. ■■ 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

-Raul -Periera, solo -violinist, assisted 
by a string quintette and piano, has 
selected an excellent repertoire of classi- 
cal compositions,, with a popular song 
medley for .an encore. All are rendered 
in -a. manner which not only stamps him 
as an accomplished musician -but .a di- . 
rector of ability as well. 

The act is presented with a special 
sotting of heavy plush curtains, the 
front of which part during the opening 
bars of the first selection revealing the 
men, clad in dress clothes with red 
coats.- 

The men are all good musicians, the 
act has been well rehearsed and -their 
ensemble playing compares favorably 
with that of musicians on the concert 
stage. 

Periera is a fine violinist, his tech- 
nique is remarkable and his tone beau, 
tiful. The increased interest in good 
music which all vaudeville theatres are 
experiencing at present makes this act a 
valuable feature for any bill. W. V. 



"TABLE FOR THREE" 

Theatre — Dyckman. 

Style— Sketch. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. 

Setting— Ful I stage. 

Employing a plot, the ending of which 
is visible at the beginning, the two men 
and the woman in this act are wasting 
their time. The turn concerns an uncle 
who desires to have bis nephew marry 
a girl of whom he is the guardian, 
although be loves her himself. It is 
her eighteenth birthday, and the nephew 
is expected to rail. The opening chatter 
gives everything away when the ques- 
tion of marriage is broached between 
the uncle and his ward. 

The nephew arrives shortly afterward 
and tells the girl that he is already mar- 
ried. So, that lets him out. The rest of 
the playlet runs to a . happy finish, 
wherein the uncle is to marry the girl as 
the curtain descends. 

The girl pronounces the word guar- 
dian as "gardeen" throughout, and such 
bright bits of humor as "everything Is 
as clear aa mnd" are interpolated. The 
youth cannot read his lines properly, 
while the girl shows bad taste in 
dressing. S. L. H. 



FRANK MONTGOMERY & CO. 

Theatre — Dyckman. 
Style — Colored revue. 
Time — Twenty-sia minutes. 
Setting— Special. 

Opening with three chorus girls, 
three chorus men and four principals, 
this act, advertised as a twelve-people 
revue, carried only ten. 

The turn opens as the choristers come 
on in a freight yard scene, singing a 
number full of pep. The men start a line 
•df chatter which leads nowheres and la 
pointless 'as far as comedy is concerned. 
Then, the principal woman, wearing 
socks and made up as a white woman; 
sldrjfo another popular number. 

Four popular songs are rendered by 
'the choristers and principals after that, 
land -one df the •comedians tries 'an to- 
centric -dance Which 'has nothing new to 
commend it. The 'talk about the goat 
and the perhaps -gags 'saw usefulness 
when ' the reviewer was -still a crying 
'infant. . 

.. There is little in 'the act worthy 'df 
■commendation. The act is a Cheap revue 
-of nothing, and -certainly -not twenty 
six minutes of -entertainment. S. 'Ii. H. 



MELINO BROTHERS 

Theatre — Proctor'* '58t» Street. 
Style— Acrobatic. 
Time — Eight minutes. 
Setting— In one end full stage. 

A stage hand enters, dressed 'as a 
ihug, and -quickly exits to elude the. pur- 
suit of two policemen, who are. the 
Melino -Brothers, dressed as comic cops. 
-A little cross-fire follows, and one of the 
men asks the other: 

"What do you do for exercise?" 

This starts off the acrobatic routine, 
the men performing a number of band- 
springs in one. 

The curtain then rises on full stage. 
One of the boys presents a wrestling 
exhibition with himself. The other then 
puts considerable comedy into blowing 
up a toy balloon. More handsprings 
follow, and then some slapstick work. 
One of the boys walks on his hands 
over a chair and table, after which some 
grotesque mid-air somersaults conclude 
the routine. 

The boys work fast and pnt more tban 
the usual amount of enmedr into their 
act II. O. 



MOORE AND WHITEHEAD 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Nut comedy, singing and talking. 

Time — Twenty minutes. 

Setting In One. 

Frank Moore and Joe Whitehead are 
assisted by a woman, whose name does 
not appear on the program. 

The act opens with a song by Moore. 
Then it goes into nut comedy talking. 
Whitehead is one of our most popular 
nut comedians and, in the present act, 
uses the same style of material that won 
him his popularity. His work is a good 
proof of the old saying "that it is not 
so much what you do as how yon do it." 
He is a showman and entertainer and 
knows how to give bis audience just 
what they want. 

Moore makes a good foil for his 
partner and helps to accenntate some of 
the best of the material. 

It la a capital act and one that would 
be a feature on any bill. E. W. 



WILLISON AND SHERWOOD 

Theatre — Dyckman. 

Style— Singing. 

Time — Twelve minute*. 

Setting — 7n one. 

Dressed simply in outing attire, and 
making no attempt at comedy, these 
two men offer a poorly running act that 
could be greatly improved by just a 
dash of comedy here or there. - 

They open with a yoddling arrange- 
ment of "SlTvry Moon." Sherwood 
next sings a ballad in the style of a 
singing waiter. Willison then offers a 
popular ballad in which he shows some 
freak head-tone notes in the chorus. 
This falsetto works ont well, later, when 
they harmonize at the finish with a lull- 
aby arrangement of yoddling melodies. 

The act needs strengthening at the 
opening and an improvement in stage 
dressing, when the voices of the men 
should carry them over the small time 
with big success. S. I*. H. 



M'WATTERS AND TYSON 
Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 
Style — Singing revue- 
Time — Eighteen minutes. i 
Setting; — In tthree and erne. 

Arthur McWatters and Grace Tyson 
'have a -very pleasing singing revue, 
'which opens 'in three, goes to one and 
•returns' to 'three. 

They 'open -with a song which -gave - 
'them a -good 'start. McWatters then 
plays the piano, and Miss Tyson -stags. - 
McWatters fellows 'with a song about 
'mother, the second 'verse of 'Which be ' 
'recites in dramatic style. Then comes a ' 
song by Miss Tyson, which she renders - 
in her : best style. After singing one ' 
verse she gives 'her impression of bow : 
Anna Held, Theda 'Bars and Eddie Foy •' 
would sing it. They finish strong with 
another song, in -which they both take' 
part. 

They have 'a good act. It is com- > 
pact and gives them an opportunity to • 
be seen at their best. E. W. 



MANTILLA AND CAHILL 

Theatre — Dyckman. 
Style — Singing and dancing. 
Time — Ten minutes. 
Setting— In two. 

Opening with a popular song that 
has a double arrangement, Mantilla and 
Cahill go into a dance. The man is 
dressed in evening apparel, and the girl 
makes one change during the running 
of the act which shows excellent taste. 

After Miss Mantilla's dance, which 
shows grace, Cahill follows with a few 
dance steps and a song that speeds 
things up a trifle. However, the act 
has a weak finish in the dance line, 
although it shows possibilities with a 
new routine and the elimination of some 
of the songs. S. L. H. 



10 



the NiEcw imm j<m**m 



September |2;';l9tf 




INA CLAIRE SCORES 
AS STAR OF PLAY 
"POLY WITH A PAST" 



"POLLY WITH 
comedy In tbr«?e 

Ulddieton and Gay 
Thursday evening, 
the Belasco Theatre 
CAST 


A PAST"— A 
acta by George 
Bolton, presented 
September 6, at 

CyrU Scott 

Herbert Yost 




..H. BeeTes-Smltli 




..William SHmpson 




Commodore "Bob" Barker. 

Thomas Reynolds 


Mn. Martha Van Zlle 
Mr*. Clementine DaTli 


...Winifred Frsser 

Anne Meredith 

Lonlse Galloway 

Mildred Dean 





Dainty and delightful are the two ad- 
jectives which appropriately describe both 
this first Belasco offering of the new sea- 
son and work of a new Behisco star, Miss 
Ina Claire. 

In the story of "Polly with a Past," 
Rex Van Zile is in love with Myrtle Davis, 
a young woman more taken tip with sav- 
ing human derelicts than with affairs of 
the heart. Harry Richardson and Clay 
Collum, friends of Rez, decide to aid the 
latter in winning Myrtle, and hit on the 
plan of having her rescue him from the 
clutches of a vampire. 

Polly Shannon, a worthy young woman, 
who 1b keeping bouse for Harry and Clay 
to earn money to have her voice cultured, 
is persuaded, for a good-sized money con- 
sideration, to play the part of the vam- 
pire. As she speaks French fluently, it 
is agreed that she shall assume the name 
of Paillette Beaudet, and, as such, she and 
Rex begin their little masquerade. 

Richardson acts as press agent and, 
between the stories he gets into the pa- 
pers and the clever acting of Polly, every- 
one is convinced that Faulette Beaudet is 
a dyed in the wool vampire. Myrtle 
finally decides to nave Rex but, to the dis- 
may - of everyone, it transpires that' Rex 
hag fallen in love with Paulette (or, 
rather, Polly). Matters are finally 
straightened out and Polly is welcomed 
by Rex's mother, aa the future wife of 
her son. 

From this light story Middreton and 
Bolton have succeeded in writing- one of 
the daintiest comedies our stage lias seen 
in many a day. The ' dialogue is -bright 
and crisp, the characters are- well fashioned 
and distinctive. '■'"'. 

For Ina Claire, it was a moat auspicious 
event, marking, as' it did, her debut as a 
David Belasco star. The character of 
Polly Shannon is well- calculated to bring 
out, the bout that is in her, as it gives her 
an opportunity to appear as one char- 
acter, and impersonate another: • ■ • 
I T/hw she does with remarkable- artistry. 
Aa Polly she is a winsome and lovable 
little creature. As Faulette, she is the 
typical vampire, with all the abandonment 
that proves so- alluring to mere man. We 
have long recognized Miss Claire as an 
artist, but never before has her art been 
so brilliantly ..displayed and, despite all 
her part successes, Polly stands out aa 
her best achievement v . ,,;", 

Cyril Scott gave a most pleasing per- 
formance as Harry Richardson.. This is 
a role that might easily be spoiled by 
over acting, .but Scott never fell in t<v this 
error. He played with a deft touch of 
light comedy, hut was always convincing. 

William Sampson gave' an 'excellent 
characterization of Stiles and once again 
proved himself to be a character actor of 
marked ability. 

WHAT THE DAILIES SAT: 
Herald — Seem* sure of bright future. 
Tribune — Well groomed comedy. 
Time*) — lAght. polished comedy. 
Sua— Ina Claire shines brightly at star. 
World — Ina Clair* charming as heroine. 



OPENING DATES AHEAD 

New York City. 

"Over the Phone" — 18th Street — Sept. 12. ; : 
"The Landlady" — Yorkvllle — Sept- 12. 
"Lombard! Ltd." — Morosco — Sept. 17. 
"Misalliance" — Broadhnrst — Sept. IT. 
"Hamilton" — Knickerbocker — Sept* 17. 
"The Family ExltV—Comedy — Sept. 18. 
■•The Riviera Girt" — New Amsterdam — 

Sept. 24. 
"Tiger Rose" — Lyceum — Oct. 2. 

Out of Town. 

"Odds and Ends of 1917" — Stamford, Conn. — 

Sept. 15. 
"Eve"a Daughters" — Long Branch, N. J. — 

Sept. 15. 
"The Judge of Zalamea"— Milwaukee— 

Sept 27. 

"GOOD NIGHT PAUL" 
NEW MUSICAL FARCE 
SHOWN AT HUDSON 



'DE LUXE ANNIE" 
IS AN ATTRACTIVE 
PLAY OF MYSTERY 



"GOOD NIGHT PAUL"— A musical 
farce In three acts, book end lyrics by 
Roland OllTer and Charles Dickson, - 
music by Harry B. Olsen, presented 
September 3, at tbe Hudson Theatre. 
CAST 

Mrs. Audrey Hay ward Audrey Maple 

Madam Lonlse ....Louise Kelly 

Robert Haywaid Burrell Barbaretto 

I'aul Forster Ralph Hers 

Frank Forster Frank La lor 

Elizabeth M. O'Brien. 

Elisabeth M. Murray 



In the presentation of "Good Night 
Paul," the Hudson Theatre, for once in its 
history, broke away from the drama and 
offered musical comedy of the brand of 
long ago. Slapstick, hokum and jazz, form 
the principal component parts. 

The story, such as there is, has as its 
central figure Paul Forster, a confirmed 
bachelor, and member of the firm of Hay- 
ward and Forster. He boards with his 
partner, Robert Hayward, who is ex- 
tremely jealous, and resents anyone's at- 
tentions to his wife. 

The firm gets into financial difficulties 
and Paul, together with Mr. and Mrs. 
Hayward, plots to obtain from his brother, 
Frank, a large sum of money with which 
to recoup their losses. 

After trying other means, they Anally 
resort . to the expedient of having Paul 
represent himself to be the husband of 
Mrs. Hayward. This brings the desired 
money from Frank 'and it also helps to 
stir up things generally, owing- to Hay- 
ward's jealous disposition. 

As Paul Forster, a crusty old woman 
hater, Ralph Herz did capital work and 
kept the audience laughing. In the second 
act he is the leading factor in one of the 
funniest scenes the New York stage has 
seen: In -this, Paul, who is given to 
somnambulism, strays into the bed room 
of his partner's wife and unconsciously 
gets into bed with her. The situation, aa 
he developed it, is a scream. 

: Audrey Maple, as Mrs. Hayward, the 
young bride whose intuitions are eon* 
tinually getting the partners into hot 
water, was pleasing. 

Frank Laior, as the rich brother, did 
good work, as did Burrell Barbaretta as 
the jealous husband. 

Elizabeth Murray sang -several songs, 
among which -were "Enie- Weenie" . and 
"Sailing on 'the Henry Clay." \ >TS 

Ralph Herz.. is the, producer -and Ida, pro- 
duction, ''while of the old-fashioned!' kind; 
is not without considerable merit. But it 
needs going over. -Judicious enttinp; of 
the opening act would be an improvement, 

■ ■;'. WHAT THE DAILIES' SAY: 

San— Composed principally of jazz, • 
Herald— Keeps audience laughing. 
Times — Bat funny situations. 



"DB LUXE ANNIE - -—A Psycho- 
logical play of mystery by Edward 
Clark. Based on a abort story by 
Bcammon Lockwood, published in tbe 
Saturday Brenlns Post. Presented 
Tuesday night September 4, at the 
Booth Theatre. 

OAST. 








Vim Herbert 




Jack MacBrlda 

..Robert W. Smiley 








Jlmmle Fitzpatricl 








































Doctor StandUh 

Jefferson D. Bamonde. 


..Robert W. Smiley. 
Edward Mack ay 





SKINNER SEASON OPENS - . ' 

Syracuse, N. Y., Sept. 7. — Otis ' Skin-; 
ner opened his season in "Mister 'An- 
tonio'* at the Empire Theatre, here, ■ last 
night 



In the smoking compartment of a 
sleeping car on the way west a learned 
doctor and two of his acquaintances begin 
a discussion of coincidences. One re- 
marks upon the peculiar coincidence of 
them all meeting on the train, going to 
the same destination. The doctor states, 
however, that happenings of this sort are 
not coincidences, but all a part of life's 
great scheme. 

For example — and then the curtain 
slowly descends and the story he relates is 
enacted. It Is a crook drama, opening in 
the apartment of De Luxe Annie, a clever 
and skilful blackmailer who, although 
known to tbe police for years, has always 
escaped Imprisonment. 

With her confederate she has been prac- 
tising a -clever scheme upon elderly mar- 
ried men of wealth. . Her plan is to call 
upon them in their offices in the guise of 
a book agent, get them into -a compromis- 
ing position, when the confederate would 
break in and demand a money, settlement. 

The last attempt realistically shown in 
one of the scenes goes wrong, and tbe In- 
tended victim, . instead of. buying their 
silence, calls for the police, and Annie and 
her confederate escape by sliding down a 
rope from a window and,- donning skates, 
take to the river in an attempt to lose 
the bloodhounds which are ' put on the 
trail. - .••.'. 

'They snecceed-in this, and take refuge in 
a house that is closed for the winter. Tbe 
surroundings seem familiar to Annie and, 
as she explores, ..the place, memories are 
awakened and a sudden. realization .comes 
to her, that 1 she is not a Criminal at all. 
This home is her own," she is the wife of 
a prominent man: and for years her mind" 
has been a blank regarding her past, doe 
to a blow received upon the' head. The 
blow was delivered by a burglar who. while 
robbing the house, had awakened her. ' 

While suffering from amnesia due to 
this blow, she. left her home, and in Chi- 
cago became a nurse in a hospital. Here 
she met the man who taught her the wiles 
of the confidence game, and her career 'as 
De Luxe Annie began. Although nn- 
know to/ both, the man who made of her 
a partner in his' crimes' was the ' burglar 
who had assaulted, her months before: An, 
operation restored her ' mind completely; 
with alt "the criminal portion of her life 
obliterated. '•-"'• " ; V ■' > : ' «*» '' -..'.,; 1 -, 1 ; 

Jane Grey acted the ; role of the tvoronw 
whose mind. Trttt/'ae'str^ypd, by .the blow, 
niid Vincent Serrano was the crook who 
caused all. the. trouble. : Both were excellent 
in 'their parts. •'•"-•.->.;".. - 

; WHAT THE DAILIES SAY: 
. Timet — Original and cleverly worked 

out. .. -'. .. -; ■■■ ~ _ ... _ a -. J 

World — Keeps audience interested. 
Herald — Starts well, finishes poorly.- " 
Tribune — Most absorbing play. 
Bun — Admirable act ii» all roles. ' n-.: 
American — A tangle of psychology. 



A. H. WILSON PLAY OPENS 

Reading, Pa., Sept. 7. — Al. H. Wilson, 
singing comedian, began a tour in "The 
Irish Fifteenth" at the Rajah Theatre, 
here, Monday night. It is a romantic 
comedy dealing with the war, and was 
written for him by Theodore Burt Say re. 



MITZI HAJOS OPENS SEASON 
Newport, R. L, Sept. 10.— The "Pom 
Pom" company, with Mitzi Hajos as the 
star, opened its season here to-night. 
After a week in New England, tbe com- 
pany will start for a tour of the South, .and 
will work its way west, reaching Sail 
Francisco tbe week before Christmas. 



ALLEN DOONE MAKES 
HIS REAPPEARANCE 
IN "LUCKY aSHEA" 



"LUCKY O'SHBA." — An Irish . comedy 
In three acts by Theodore Burt Sayre, 
presented September 3d at tbe Thirty- . 
' ninth Strict Theatre. , .- .,' • 

'•■."-.■ OAST. ■-; V.- * _ 

Prologue. ,"• '-.r.,-', 

De Vlgny -...Gerald Fring- 

Vljrncr V. .William Wagner 

0'8bea Allen Doone 

La Salle .Robert Brleter 

Aubert Leonard WlUey 

Bo» MeMlchn.-l Edna Eeeley 

Abbe Dureeo... Robert F. Davis 

Play. 

Thaddeus McMlcbael Fat 8. Barrett 

Roderick O'Toole Seth Smith 

Phellm McN.lr Edwin Burke 

Rosa McMlcbael Edna Keeler 

Larry O'Shea ...Allen Boons 

Captain Aubert Leonard WlUey 

Lieutenant La SaUe.. Robert Blister 

Nancy O'Dowd ".....alary Kennedy 

Danny McNsbb. Maurice Lynch 

JuUua Caesar McQInnla Prank Cotter 

Colonel De .Vbmy Gerald i»rln» 



Allen Doone has transplanted a bit of 
Ould Ireland to tbe Thirty-ninth Street 
Theatre, via Australia, and on Monday 
night of last week presented . "Lucky 
O'Shea," a new romantic Irish play of the 
Napoleonic Era by Theodore Burt Sayre. 
Mr. Doone deserves, much credit for the 
artistic performance; and personally scored 
a hit. His rendition of the serenade of 
bis obstinate lady love was. one- of thn 
most charming bits of an altogether 
charming production. Miss Edna Eeeley, 
as bis sweetheart, was a -fascinating Irish 
lass; and the' purity of' her diction was a 
real delight. >••-". '.-■•'. 

The play is based on a forced marriage 
between the Irish lass and an Irish sol- 
dier of fortune in Napoleon's army mas- 
querading is the enemy's camp as a half- 
witted gypsy spy. To save the girl- from 
the- attentions of the commanding officer, 
the gypsy marries her, and his friend de- 
ceives her Into believing him to have died 
immediately after the ceremony. Two 
years later they meet in Ireland, where 
the girl Ms ae belle of Dublin and the hero 
an ' improvident but fascinating . actor 
deeply in love with her. , He does not di- 
vulge the. truth until forced to do so by 
the machinations of. an unscrupulous rival 
who pretends to be the husband himself. 

The play gives wide scope to Mr. 
DobneV. talents and breathes the very 
spirit of romance. Miss Eeeley won"- her 
audience by her spirited- pe>f ormarfee : of 
the /Irish belle; land the -entire company 
Was excellent, particularly Pat S. Barfetfc 
M the -Irascible . old uncle with an" abhor- 
rence of play-actors, and his : crony, 'played 
by Seth; Smith; Mary Kennedy, as a pretty 
play-actresB, and; : Maurice ■•Lynch? 1 as 
VDanny McNabb," the bailiff'. ■'' - " 
: Mr. Doone should have a; 'tone visit* in 
New York. : — '■?.<■ - ; -. - 

BRADY GETS FRENCHPLAY" * 

William A. Brady has. acquired Mi 
rights to a new French play by "Henri 
Bernstein, caHed '■?*L i EIevatioii.' , . : He will 
star Grace George in it: -Jules' Eckert 
Goodman-is making the adaptation. • 



September 12/ 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



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tut eumvmSStittSucoto^ mtmmti 



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Published by the 

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ORLAND W. VAUGHAN, EDITOR 

Paul C Sweinhart, Managing Editor 



NEW YO RK, SEPTEMBER 12, 1917 

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N. S . W.i Australia. ■ 

Raising the Blacklist 

The raining of the so-called black-list by 
vaudeville managers is one of tbe surest 
eigne that a new era has been inaugurated 
in vaudeville. The wiping out of old scores 
and the evident disposition on the part of 
the managers to let bygones be bygones, 
strikes one of the most cheerful notes in 
the history of the variety world. It shows 

- that the manager holds no grudge against 
the performer who waged an unsuccessful 
war against him, but, Instead, is willing 
to meet him more than half way, and start 
afresh. 

It would have been a very easy matter 
for the managers to have continued to do 
no business with the black-listed acta. The 
turns were not so numerous nor so import- 
sht to vaudeville but that the managers 
could have steadfastly refused to book them, 
had they cared to do so. Nor did public 

■sentiment demand the reinstatement of 
these acts, for they bad waged a battle, and 
tad lost and were doing nothing more than 
paying the price of defeat • 

The managers have shown a generous 
disposition, therefore, in their attitude — a 
disposition which should tend to more 
closely cement the interests of manager and 
performer. 

• The: manager has extended his hand to 
the performer.' It 'now lies- with the per- 

' former to grasp the hand that has been ex- 
tended in' a spirit of friendliness and to 1 do 
bis share to bind' the tie. 



A Plea for Curtain Speeches 
We question whether the Shjiberts are 
altogether wise in - abolishing/ .--curtain 
speeches doting the intermissions *if a play, 
stating that they dispel the illusion of an 
audience,. .. J.r" '^ • >•.•' lit 

. We think that their stated reawm (or 
this move is groundless, for curtain: speeches 
do no more to dispel an illusion that long 
intermissions, orchestra' selections > between 
acts, or, intermission chats in the lobby or 
smoking room. Everjone in the audience 
knows, that, in the theatre, he is watching 
events in the world of make-believe and the 

mere fact that an actor steps out of his 
role 'f or . .one . or t wo . minutes ' does . not ' spoil 
the. play >n the theatregoer's' mind. • 

After all, the audience Is the one to be 
pleased.. Half of .the Joy of the -first night 
of a successful play fat to hear the actor 
and playwright express' their oral gratitude 
to the audience. 

We can hardly agree with the Sbuberte, 
therefore, when .they state that "more good 
plays have been ruined in New. York by 
•urtaln speeches in the wrong places on 
opening nights, than by bad reviews by the 
critics in the papers." . . .',.-. 



Answers to Queries 

E. L — (1) George M. Cohan wrote 
"You're a Grand Old Flag." (2) Maurice 
Richmond. 

• • • 

W. F. — For the original roster of the 
Weber and Fields' Stock Co. consult tbe 
files of "The Cutter." 

• • • 

W. R. — Elsie Ferguson is now in pic- 
tures. She was on the legitimate stage, 
but never in vaudeville. 

• • • 

A. IT. N. — Earle Browne, not Earle 
Williams, was Mabel Taliaferro's leading 
man in that production. 

• * * 

F. S.— William Collier starred in "Noth- 
ing But the Truth" last season, and will 

continue in it this season. 

• • • 

R. S.— You are right Sam Bernard was 
in burlesque. He has been headlining in 
vaudeville for a long time. 

• • • 

P. M. — It is hard to tell which is the old- 
est theatre in the country. There are many 
old ones in every large city. 

• • * 

M. S. — (a) Sarah Bernhardt is seventy- 
four years of age. She is French, (b) 
She has been all over the world. 

• • • 

I. S. — (1) Allen Dale is the dramatic 
critic of the. 2feio York American. (2) 
Two thirty-eight William Street. 

' • • • 

E. P. A.— Write to Marcus Loew, 1493 
Broadway, and you will find out. We do 
not know the person you ask for. 

• • • 

S. X. B. — Chas. K. Harris is the pub- 
lisher of "Break the News to Mother." He 
can tell you the author's name. 

• '• • 

F. X. H.— Nazimova was, on the Russian 
stage before coming to America. She has 
been in both vaudeville and pictures. 

• • • 

A. Z. — (1) The Friars is an organiza- 
tion of theatrical and newspaper men. (2) 
It baa a clubhouse on Forty-eighth Street 

• • • 

O. O. — Franklyn Ardell played the role 
of Dick Le Roy in "The Family Cupboard" 
where that play was first produced in New 
York. 

• • a 

.8. P.— (a) David Warfield Is under the 
management of David Belosco. . (b) Yes, he 
was. (c) Tbe "Music Master" is what yon 
mean. • ... •■• ■••:.'• 

'*>' • • 

N. EJ. A. — Sarah Bernhardt was play- 
ing In San Francisco at the time and was 
taking an automobile trip through the 
country. 

• *. • 

T. R. A.— Charles A. Stevenson was 
leading . man for Mrs. Leslie Carter . for 
several seasons under David Belasco's 
management. 

• * * 

N. A. M. — The Longacre Theatre was 
opened to the public May 1, 1918, with 
"Are You a Crook?" as the attraction. H. 
H. Frazee waa manager of the- house. 

'.•'•.«;'. 

. E. Y. — It is hard to Judge by your letter 

Just who you mean. It would be better for 

you to go to Jacobs and Jermon or any of 

the big burlesque firms and ask them. ■ 

• •'.*'• 

B, E. G. — "Romance" waa presented at 
the. Maiine Elliott Theatre, Feb. 10, 1913. 
and had a long. run. It opened at -the 
Lyric Theatre. Londop, Eng., Oct. 0, 1916, 
and' Is . still playing i there- . Doris' Keane 
played 'the leading role in New York and 
(a. .playing it , In.- London. ■ - ,. ,..-- ,■ 

tWknty-five years ago 

- Tbe Old Academy of Music, Cleveland; 
waa burned. 

U. S. Senator David B. Hill bought J. 
K. Emmetfs residence at Albany, N. Y. 

Johnny Weber returned to the Globe 
Museum, New York, aa stock comedian. 

James J. Corbett defeated John L. 
Sullivan, at New Orleans in 21 rounds. 

"The Female- 40 Thieves" was' pro- 
duced by Billy Lester.' ' ' - 



RIALTO RATTLES | 



'TIS A SAD STORY 

What we want to know is: What hap- 
pened to Jones? 

SPEAKING PERSONALLY 

In The Cuppeb office "Good Night, 
Paul," means we're through work for the 
day. 

HE IS BEING CHASED 

Erwin Huffman is in advance of "The 
Daughter of the Sun." And she keeps 
chasing him. 

SEEMS REASONABLE 

It shouldn't cost Jack Norworth much 
to dress his play, since all of the company 
■will apear in "Odds and. Ends." 

A BIT 0' FREE ADVERTISING 

When Joseph Remington was operated 
upon he didn't need a doctor. Any stenog- 
rapher can operate on a Remington. 

HE OUGHT TO BE READY 

After press-agenting "The Sucker" and 
"Draft 258," Arthur James should be 
ready to respond to the call of the colon 

FINANCIAL NOTE - 

The checking rooms have a new graft 
now, since Mike Selwyn has ordained that 
women shall check their knitting on en- 
tering the Harris Theatre. 

ARE YOU SUPERSTITIOUS? 

Those who have been drawing a fat sal- 
ary for more than a year now in "The 
Thirteenth Chair" have been absolutely 
cured of all superstition. 

LESS MONEY TO BE MADE 

Kingsbury Foster was formerly assist- 
ant director' of the United States Mint. 
Now he is in the theatrical business. But, 
he says he made more money in the mini. 

A PROCHASTINATOR 

Besides inventing theatrical devices, 
writing and rewriting acts, discoursing on 
current topics and managing the Hamilton 
Theatre, we wonder what William Russell 
Meyers does with his time! . 

WEEK'S MOST STARTLING NEWS 

Raymond Hitchcock knows the Kaiser's 
weak spot, and, with three hundred brave 
followers, is going, to Berlin to get. the 
Kaiser's' goat. (N. B. — Perhaps he is 
going to tell the Kaiser some of his best 
gags in the hopes that Bill HohenzoUern 
will laugh himself to death.) 

HEARD ON THE RIALTO ' ' 

"I went out of town over Labor Day 

with a friend." • ■ 

"Is the man with those tortoise shelled 

glasses William Rock!" 
"Aa soon, as I got a good war playlet 

the U. B. 0. put the kibosh on them." -. 
• "You ought to see him since he joined 

the army." ... 

SEEN ON BROADWAY'S BORED WALK 

.Raymond Hitchcock, with a fire chief'* 
badge and a gold wrist watch. 

Harry Bailey wearing glasses. 

Jack Goldberg, with hair trimmed a la 
Sully. 

Walter Kingsley, yelling into Wolpin's 
to a friend. 

Benny Piermont, with a red draft ticket. 
(Tearsl) " " ' : • • ■ 

Bessie Royal, without " a stenographer's 
note- book.- -'••'. '•'■ ■ •■"<' ' • ■ " '■ 

Prepare for a rainy day 

During a recent rain storm patrons of a 
certain seaside' theatre- became drenched 
with water ..when the rain began to leak 
into the bouse. Those who were lucky 
enough to have umbrellas put them up 
and proceeded to again enjoy ( T) the show. 
One of the less fortunate patrons com- 
plained to the manager. 

"I am sorry," replied the manager, "but 
it, ia your own fault. If yon were a regu- 
lar patron of the house you would have 
brought your umbrella.'' 



THIS WEEK'S FOOLISH THOUGHT 

We'd like to see Julia Arthur doing at 
"Dainty Marie" turn. 

EXPERIENCE WORTH WHILE 

No one knows the value of "Experience" 
better than Comstock, Elliot and Gest. 



ENGINE ROOM FOR HIM 
Floyd Stoker is doing his bit. He baa 
• enlisted in the navy, and they need lots 
of stokers there. 



SO SAY WE ALL OF US 

Fred Rials says he'd rather have a bad 
act with a good route than a good act 
with a bad route. 



BRILLIANT STUFF 

If names count for anything, Arthur 
Briliant, who now assists Horace Orpbeum 
Mortimer, ought to be a shining light. 

NOT EGG-ZACTLY 

Because Frank "Eggs" Gordon proved 
physically incapable for military service 
does not necessarily make him a bad egg. 

Sex THESE TO MUSIC: 

I'm considering several offers. 

You ought to Bee me stop tbe show. 

I wasn't working well tbe night yon 



NEW MATERIAL NEEDED 

Now that Walter Brower ia married, be 
might decide to cut all the marriage gaga 
out of his aet, in which case a new act 
will be needed. 



WANTED: A VAMPIRE 

Harry Ellis is looking for a vampire. Ha 
says you need one in order to sing a sung 
now-a-dayg because the direction on all 
songs is "Vamp till ready." 

THIS EXPLAINS IT 

We read that the military camp at Yap- 
hank looks like a big circus lot Albert 
E. Klralfy, who is working up there, must 
have put in some good licks. 



ONE LONG SHOW 

Henry Clive. says that ho Is doing his 
bit, three show* a day. That's nothing 
when you think that in the Theatre of 
War it s a continuous performance. . 

ORDER IN THE CORT 

When John Cork produses "The Verdict" 
with Josephine Victor in the. title' role, we 
hope that tbe verdict of the critic's eort 
will declare it a victor. 



CAN YOU ANSWER THIS? 

We read that George Cohan; has mad* 
$21,000 on a song it took him ten minutes 
to write. How much would bis profit be 
if he had spent an hour on it T 
'».'-. . » * m —~^~-^ ' • - ■ * 

IT'S A STORE NOW 
• At the Temple Theatre', Saratoga, then 
ih a sign over the entrance: "Lace* and 
Embroideries." Joe Michaels, the agent, 
passed the place and remarked that he had 
never beard of that team. 



A BROADWAY SONNET 
"The Man' Who Came Back 
■■■■ -With His Eyes of Youth, 
Looked at Mary's Ankle 

And saw Nothing but the TrntB.' 
He then became The Wanderer,'.' 

Packed his trunk,' ' ' 
'Said, -This Way Out! ' " •' 
'»" I'm some Mad Monk!" 



<! 



DOUG AND HE D0NT SPEAK 

At the Deiancey Street Theatre,. Benrde 
Mills, the .manager, was advertising "In 
Again, Out Again," in large type with the 
name of Douglas Fairbanks in a much 
smaller case. He was called to tsass by 
Nick Schenck. "Don't you realize that 
Fairbanks is the drawing card and that 
the name of the picture is secondary?*' 
asked Schenck. "But the people down here 
don't know- Fairbanks," answered Mills, 
"In fact, : I don't even know him— never 
met him in my life." 



12 



T«IE NEW YO« K C*L I Pf£iR 



September 12, -1917 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 
35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 




FOR ADVERTISING 
RATES 

Phone Rudolph 5423 



SHUBERTS AND 

K.&E.T0B00K 
STUDEBAKER 

TAKE OVER HOUSE OCT 1 

The Studebaker Theatre, about the 
management of which there has been much 
curiosity during the past few months, is 
to house attractions from the Klaw & 
Erlanger and Shubert offices, beginning 
Oct. 1. Regular legitimate and musical 
offerings will be the rule. 

In order to make the theatre fit for the 
highest type of productions more than 
$150,000 has been expended in enlarging 
the stage and making other alterations in 
the house. The playing stage was practi- 
cally rebuilt, bo that it can now accom- 
modate even the largest organizations. 
Sunday performances, it is understood, 
will be given in the house, something that 
the original Studebaker who built the 
house, would never permit. 

The opening attraction and the house 
staff have not yet been announced. Guy 
Harding, present manager of the Play- 
house, is said to be chosen as the manager. 

There have been many rumors regard* 
ing the next management under which the 
house would pass, it having been frequent- 
ly stated, but as often denied, that the 
Shuberts would have it. Many other 
names were also mentioned in connection 
with it. 

The house has come to be considered 
somewhat of a Jonah, which was partly 
induced by the fact that no Sunday shows 
could be given in it. The Jones, Liniek 4; 
Schaefer offices relinquished their lease on 
it Sept. 3, after having dropped consider- 
able money, according to reports, in en- 
deavoring to make a feature film policy 
pay in it. 

BARNES' TIME GETS MIDGETS 
Following the closing - of -the Singer 
Midgets' tour on the Pantages Circuit, at 
Kansas City, the act is playing four weeks 
of fairs for Fred Barnes, of Chicago, ap- 
pearing for two weeks at Wichita, Kana., 
and two at Dallas, Tex. The act •will 
then go otto the Middle West -for Jones, 
Liniek and Schaefer and C H.-Milea. In 
February the act will begin a retain -tour 
of the Pantages time. 

START LONG ROUTE 

-Dave Vine, the "nut" comedian, and 
.bis wife, -Luella Temple, the soubrette, 
landed in Chicago last week and started 
on a long route through the Middle West 
with their engagement at the Great North- 
ern Hippodrome. They are playing the 
"Kedzie and Avenue this week. BUly Wat- 
son Vine rejoined the duo Monday, coming 
on from New York. 



ITALIAN FILMS DRAW 

The engagement of "The Italian Battle 
Front," a. three-hour show of wax films, 
which has been drawing capacity houses 
afternoons and evenings at the Audi- 
torium, has been extended. There is talk 
of keeping the war films on at the house 
until the policemen's benefit, the middle 
of the month. 

William Moore Patch, business manager 
and representative of the Ft. Pitt Theatre 
Company, will shortly leave for Western 
territory to present the pictures in sev- 
eral theatres there. 



"TURN TO THE RIGHT* CLOSES 

"Turn to the Bight** closed at Cohan's 
Grand last Saturday night and moved to 
Buffalo for a week, from where it con- 
tinues to Detroit for a fortnight's engage- 
ment, being succeeded at the Grand on 
Sunday by "Captain Kidd, Jr." Following 
the Detroit stand the "Turn to the Bight" 
production will play Grand Rapids a few 
one-nighters and then Milwaukee. 

"GOOD-BYE, BOYS" IS WEAK 

"Good-Bye, Boys," the musical farce at 
the Princess Theatre, though scheduled 
for a four weeks' stay, is about ready to 
quit, attendance being miserable since 
the opening. The show . was brought to 
Chicago by Sam Blair with Sam Cunning- 
ham managing the company. 

"PALS FIRST" ROUTED 

With the termination of "Pals First" 
at the Illinois Theatre, that production 
wfll move from this city to Milwaukee for 
the week of Oct. 14. After that it will 
play Detroit, with Grand Rapids, Rock- 
ford, Peoria and Springfield, filling in be- 
tween there and St. Louis. 



GARY THEATRE OPENS 

The Gary Theatre, of Gary, Ind., under 
the management of D. Werner, opened 
with its new policy of vaudeville, booked 
by Frank Q. Doyle, of the Loew office, last 
week. Stock musical comedy is also run- 
ning at the Lyric there, under the man- 
agement of J. R. Gollenstein, with Qua 
Rapier doing the producing. 

PLAYERS ARE REPLACED 

Elaine Ivans and Louis Christy have re- 
placed Grace Valentine and Leo Carrillo 
in the cast of "Upstairs and Down" at 
.the Cort Theatre, the latter going to New 
York to start rehearsals for the Hattons* 
new-comer, "Lombard! Ltd." 



PARRY WON A HAT 

Manager Frank Parry, of the Columbia 
Theatre, won a new hat last week from 
"Beef" Watson on the question of how 
much business the house would do. 



DAVE MAURICE HERE 

Dave Maurice, who manages the -Fam- 
ily Theatre at La Fayette, Ind., was in 
Chicago last week, arranging bookings 
for Bis house next season, through C C. 
Crowel, of the local United Offices. The 
policy of the Family, will, as usual, be 
vaudeville and pictures. 

RJOOLETTOS MAKE LONG JUMPS 

The Rigoletto Brothers laid off in this 
city the last half of hut week, one of 
the hoyB making r a hurried trip to New 
York, and leaving there after a two-hour 
Wop for Madison, Wis. fie then went to 
Minneapolis, where 'the act opened on the 
Pantages time. ' 

WARFIELD TOUR ANNOUNCED 
David Warfield is announced to play 
several cities in the vicinity of Chicago 
early in October, filling time between 
Louisville and Kansas City, at -Evansville 
and Teite Haute, Tnd., and Springfield, 
Jacksonville, Bloomington and Peoria, DJ. 

GUMPERTZ JOINS ARMY 

S. G. Gumpertz, who formerly edited 
the Year Book for the Western Vaude- 
ville Managers' Association here, is now 
in the army, being attached to the Second 
Infantry of Illinois. He has already seen 
seven years of military service. 

HAS NEW PLAY 

Howard McKent Barnes, author of "Her 
Unborn Child," of which four companies 
are now on tour under the direction of 
Gazzolo, Gatts and Clifford, is writing a 
new play for Florence Holbrook. 

HODKINS GOES TO HOUSTON 

Charles E. Hodkins left Chicago Sept. 
7 to witness the opening of the first Pan- 
tages show at Houston this week. Cap- 
tain Sorcho and his submarine exhibition 
is the feature. 



COLORED V AUDE. 
CIRCUIT IS 
UNCERTAIN 

CANT GET ENOUGH ACTS 



Efforts to organize a circuit of colored 
vaudeville houses, which were undertaken 
two weeks ago, are still in progress, but 
meeting with opposition which may be 
too great to overcome. 

As Outlined, the plan is to start a chain 
of houses extending from New York to 
Chicago and St. Louis with every town be- 
tween those peints that will stand a col. 
ored theatre, hooked onto the circuit. 
Among the latter are Philadelphia* Wash- 
ington, Baltimore and Indianapolis, where 
the prospects are declared to be unusually 
good. Detroit, Cincinnati and Cleveland 
are not so attractive, it is said, an -in- 
vestigation into their drawing power hav- 
ing convinced the promoters of the idea 
that they would not be profitable. 

Chicago has a colored house at Thirty - 
first and State Streets which makes big 
money, but only plays two or three col- 
ored acta on a bill because it is impossible 
to secure enough meritorious colored at- 
tractions. Occasionally, it plays tauring 
companies such as "The Smart Set," but 
Johnson "and Home, the managers, insist 
on two shows a night, arguing that no 
money can be made with the limited seat- 
ing capacity excepting on that policy. 

Recently an effort was made to obtain 
the Grand for a circuit- on-paper which 
was to play colored attractions ene show 
a night, with each company having more 
than one bill. The Grand turned down this 
proposition. Lew Cantor, who 'books the 
house, -contends that vaudeville, with two 
shows a night, is a better proposition and 
will align that theatre with the vaudeville 
circuit if it goes through. 

Billy King closed a sixteen weeks' en- 
gagement at the Grand last week, Where 
he had put on different acts each week. 
One of tnem witnessed was inclined to be 
dramatic in spots, and was called "The 
Undertaker's Daughter."' Many white 
showmen saw it and found it very 
amusing. 



HAYMARKET THEATRE OPENS 

The Haymarket Theatre came to life 
last week, when Joseph Kessler and J. 
P&ley re-opened the bouse with a Yiddish 
stock company, the -initial offering being 
"Without a Mother." ~. TT^ 

The success of the Yiddish drama pro- 
ducers at the Empire Theatre last season 
is likely to be duplicated at the Haymar- 
ket. The opening night was marked with 
.speeches by prominent Chicago court 
judges and enthusiastic applause for Mr. 
Eessler and his organization of players. 
Kessler, as usual, gave an excellent per- 
formance and was capably supported by 
Messrs. Goldstein, Schoenholz and Bock- 
shitzky. "The Two Sisters" is the bill 
this week. The prices range from twenty- 
five, cents to a dollar with a matinee Satur- 
days, best seats going then at seventy-five 
cents. 



EUGENE BONNER BURIED 

Eugene Bonner, the local booking agent 
who died at his home here Labor Day 
was laid to rest Sept. 6.. 



CARRELL BOOKS GREEN BAY 

The C. L. Carrel] agency, of this city, is 
now booking the Grand Theatre, Green 
Bay, Wis., which opened with a vaudevflle 
policy, Sept. 10, the first bill including Mc- 
Cormick and Shannon, Crawford' and 
Terry, Helen Savage and company and 
Frank Voerge. •"-•>- 

new play Opens Sunday 

"Make Yourself At Home," another Chi- 
cago productioriby Harry Segall, originally 
written for May Irwin, will open its sea- 
son at Michigan CUj Sunday, Sept. 1«. 



UNITED ADDS NEW THEATRE 

The United Booking Office has added 
another theatre to its endless chain, the 
latest being the New Oakland Theatre, at 
Pontiac, III, recently completed at a 
cost of '$160,000, and having a seating ca- 
pacity of fifteen hundred. The policy of 
the new house, as mapped out by Tim 
Heeler, of the local United Offices, will be 
made up of shows coming direct from the 
Butterfield Circuit, and screen travelogues. 

The 'bouse win open Sept. 13 with a 
split bill, changing Sundays and Thurs- 
days, with John Loveridge, formerly at the 
Orpheum, Hammond, Ind., as manager. 

VIRGINIA BROOKS IS SUED 

Virginia Brooks, author of :"The Little 
Lost Sister," is made defendant in a suit 
for divorce brought by Charles S. Wash- 
burn, an ex-newspaper writer on the Chi- 
cago Tribune who charges desertion. Miss 
Brooks gained some recognition a few 
years ago for her part in the reformation 
of a vice-ridden suburb called West Ham- 
mond. The couple were separated once 
before,- but a reconciliation followed. 



CHOOSE "HIS BRIDAL NIGHT" 

Perry J. Kelly and Robert Campbell's 
"His Bridal Night," which played, the -De- 
troit Opera House, Detroit, last week, 
after breaking in at Wheeling, W. Va, is 
chosen. to -open the new .Fulrath Theatre, 
at Savanna, HI. It then moves on, booked 
by the Central States Circuit of this city. 

O'HERREN GETS NEW HOUSE 

J. J. CHerren, who has the Family 
Theatre at Belvidere, HI., has taken a 
lease on the Woodstock Opera House, 
Woodstock, and opened it with vaudeville 
Sept. 5. Both theatres are being booked 
from the Carrell offices. 



OLD TIME MAGICIAN HERE 

Frederick, formerly a magician in ' the 
varieties, is in Chicago, having just re- 
turned -from Florida. His last active show 
venture was in conjunction With Ms 
brother, running a theatre at Pekin.iB. •'-' 

. i u^. - OJ J.-. 

POWELL HAS 'FIVE SHOWS 
Halton Powell has five shows on the 
road this season. They include "Step 
Lively," with Hal Johnson; "O, Doctor," 
"A Hawaiian B u tt er fly," ^"Broadway After 
Dark," and "Any Man's Sister.** ' :• 

DOUGLAS FLEMING ENGAGED 
Douglas Fleming and wife are in this 
city rehearsing with Pepple and Green, 
wald's "Wintergarden Girls," the aet 
which was most -successful for the •firm 
last season. 



CAROLINE WHITE TO BE STAR 
Caroline White, who sang with the 
Grand Opera '.Company at Ravinia Park 
this summer, is to be associate star .with 
Donald Brian in a new musical comedy 
this " season! ■"" 



VIOLET BARNEY HAS NEW ACT 

Violet Barney is playing in the Middle 
West with' a new act 'and is due to open 
in Chicago, at the Wilson Avenue next 
week, with the Kedzie te follow. 

"UNCLE TOM" STILL POPULAR 

William Kibble's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" 
company opened its season at Mt. Clem- 
ens, Mich., recently, and has been drawing 
capacity at each stand. 

KQERNER HAS NEW ACT 

Otto Koerner and company will soon 
show a new act in Chicago. It has re- 
placed his last season's success, "The Auto- 
mobile Salesman." 



BYAL AND EARLY BOOKED 

Carl Byal and Dora Early, have been 
given a route over the Pantages time to 
open late next month. 



September 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




FHILIPP STOCK 
CO. BEGINS 



OPENS WITH 'THE LANDLADY" 

Tonight will be a regular. Adolf. Philipp 
night' at the Yorkville Theatre, -which opens 
aa a stock producing house. The organiza- 
tion begins . the' new season with" "The 
Landlady," a new three-act' musical farce 
comedy by Adolf Pbilipp, which has been 
staged under his direction and in which he 
will appear in the leading male role. In- 
cidentally the house, is under the manage- 
ment of Rachmann and Pbilipp. 
. The company assisting Philipp includes 
Mizi Gizi, Wiiy Frey, Etail Berla, Fritz 
Kldalsch, Otto Kbttka, Kurt Goritz, Kurt 
Rasquin, Oscar Hoffman, Ernest Morlitt, 
Carl Lippert, Ferdinand Golz, Hans Unter- 
kircher, Lieschen Schumann, Dora Bregow- 
ska, Lilly Ackermann, Editha Benjar, Lie 
Schmidt; Elsie Renne, Johanna Fraenkel, 
Fritti Graf, and Erne Krueger. 

The" management intends to make new 
productions of plays by American authors 
and ' adaptations- of foreign works, and has 
secured ■ the- rights to a number of plays,' 
among which are: "The Movie Star," by 
Haller & Werner; "It's Easy," a farce 
comedy in; three acts- from the French; by 
Jules Fabrer; "Three Good Things," a 
comedy in three acts- by Charles Renaud; 
"A Joy Ride," a musical comedy, by. Adolf 
Pbilipp; "That Night," a farce comedy by 
Rjchard Hall;, "A- Kiss in : ther Dark," 
comedy in three acts, by- James Watson ; 
"The Bank Cashier,'.' and a- play in three 
acts, by- Francois Picard. - 

All of these works -will be tried 'out dar- 
ing this season and. should any or all of 
them; warrant it, will be produced by -Bach- 
mann and Philipp at a Broadway .theatre. 

■All' productions wQl - be made; under the 
personal supervision of PhUipp. 

NEW MUSIC AL.STC CK OPENS 
Bockfobp, HI., - Sept. ■ 8: — Beginning 
Sept. 15 the Grand .Theatre; will, install a 
musical . stock - company, instead • of-, playing 
traveling ' road attractions; . All ' dates for 
road shows subsequent to- that time .have 
be^n cancelled. There is a United States 
Army eantoment : in" this town .and the 
management of the theatre figures that it 
wpuld be more. profitable to have a perma- 
nent stock company here than play road 

shows. The opening attraction will be 

"Three Twins." ... . . 



BESSEY BOOKS FAIR DATES . 
Mineral • : Fonsr," ., .Wis.' — Jack- Bessey's 
traveling, stock- company has booked several 
fair. . dates '. for. ■ the- . Fall. . The. company 
opened' here and took away more' than 
$T,50Q for six 'Bights,.. figuring $300- more 
than any' other' repertoire attraction- cai- 
ried off on a fair date at this place. The 
show is booked for Lancaster. Wis. Sept. 
17. with week stands at PlatteviHe and 
Richland Center to follow. .*..• 



SALEM STOCK OPENS • 

Salem, Mass., Sept'. 8. — The Empire 
Theatre stock opened last Monday under 
the management of Harry Katzes, with 
"The Man Who Stayed at Home" as the 
bill. The company - includes : Julian Noa, 
Jane Salisbury, Priscilla Knowles, Florence 
Hill, Elmer Thompson; John B. Mack, 
David Baker and Raymond Capp. Nicholas 
Yellanti is 6cenic artist. 



QUITS BUHLER CO. TO JOIN CORT 

Columbus, O, Sept 5. — Mabel Car- 
ruthers closed her season suddenly with 
the Richard Buhler Players here to return 
and begin rehearsals in the new John Cort 
play in which Josephine Victor is to be 
starred. 



BUNTING STOCK OPENS SEASON 

San Antonio, Tex., Sept. 5. — The 
Emma Bunting Stock Co., formally opened 
the theatrical season here last Sunday 
when she appeared at the Grand Opera 
House with a matinee performance of 
"The Return of Eve." This season's com- 
pany is the best balanced organization that 
Miss Bunting has ever brought with her 
to- San Antonio. George Whit taker is the 
leading man, and with Joe L. Friedkin, 
and Albert Vees, is- the only one of the old 
company held over froth 'last year. 



BURKE MANAGING MUNICIPAL CO. 

Northampton, Mass., Sept. 10. — The 
management of the affairs of the Municipal 
Stock Co. at' the Academy of Music for this 
season will be in the hands of Melville 
Burke, recently of the Little Theatre, St. 
Louis. Those already engaged' for the 
company are: Frank Morgan, Aline Mc- 
Dermott, Blanche Frederick I/. Estrange 
Millman, Corbett Morris, Jack Amory, 
Eugene Powers, Margaret Vale and Frank 
Dawson, stage director. 



HALIFAX STOCK OPENS 

Halifax, N. • 8;— The . Academy Play- 
ers- opened their sixth season last week, 
presenting "The House of Glass." The 
performance was under the distinguished 
patronage of- Lieutenant-Governor Grant, 
and' General Benson, commanding, the 
Sixth Division; The players received a 
hearty welcome. Charles Dingle and Irene 
Summerly scored" heavily in the leading 
roles: . . 



ROCKFORD HAS MUSICAL STOCK 

ROCKFORD, II!., Sept. 10. — A musical 
stock company will open next Saturday at 
the -Grand' Theatre, under the management 
of George M Gatts and George Peck. They 
have' engaged' a capable, company and the - 
shows will be well put on. 



GRACE HUFF TO LEAD CO. 

SETTLE, Wash., Sept. 11. — Grace Hnff 
has been engaged as the. new leading lady 
for Wilkes' Theatre here- and is now - re- 
hearsing in "Romance." Henry Hall has 
also been added to the local stock company. 



• ' ' STORK VISITS FOX HOME . 
Fttcubcec , Mass., Sept. 9.— A . baby, girl 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. Franklyn .Fox 

(Winifred DeLay) last Thursday.- Fox is 
playing^ heavies with the Laudo Stock Co. 
at the Whalom Theatre,' here. ..-.- ;.: :; ... 

QUINCY STOCK SEASON ENDS 
Quijs-cy, DL, ■ Sept 9- — Ed. William's 

closed his third season i a this city to-day' 
and -begins an, engagement at the Sipe The- 
atre, Kokomo, Ind., Sept 17. Tiny Loomv 
is. still. playing leads.. ' ■ 



■ ARTHUR MACK IS DRAFTED 
Arthur Mack, director of the Hudson' 
(Keith's) Stock Co., arTJnion Hill, N.. J., 
has- been: drafted into the National' Army 
and: left: Saturday for Camp Dix at 
Wrigbtstown; N. j: 



ALBBE STOCK CLOSES SEASON 

Pbottderce, R. I, Sept 9.— The Albee 
Stock Co. closed its seventeenth consecu- 
tive season at Keith's Theatre here, last 
night with a- "Pair of Sixes" as the fare- 
well -bill. 



DUBTNSKY OPENS FALL SEASON 

St. Joseph, Mo., Sept 6. — The Du- 
binsky Stock Co. beginning its Fall season 
at the Tootle Theatre, is presenting "The 
Heir to the Hoorah." 



ACTRESS HURT IN AUTO SMASH 
Toledo, O., Sept 8. — Sarah Gibney, a 
well-known stock actress, was injured in 
an auto accident here last week. 



C00PER-BA1RD 

COMPANY HAS 

OPENING 

MAKES BOW AT ZANESVILLE 



Zanesvuxe, Ohio, Sept. 10. — The 
Cooper-Baird Stock Co. has opened here 
for an indefinite run at the Orpheum The- 
atre. The company is unusually strong 
this season; and is presenting nothing but 
royalty plays, doing' two a week. Business 
this year has started out better than ever 
in the history of tins company, and ca- 
pacity audiences are becoming usual events. 

Former Broadway successes are being 
produced, but only the best-known are be- 
ing chosen for local presentation. Although 
the company has only been playing here a 
few weeks, the successful' result of this 
policy is already very apparent, and James 
H. Cooper, manager of the company, pre- 
dicts that this season will be a record 
breaker. 

"Kick 'In" started a local run to-night 
and' played- to such' a large crowd that it 
may be necessary to extend it, although 
"Don't Lie to- Tour Wife"' has been an- 
nounced to follow. 

The roster of the company' that is scor- 
ing this pronounced success, includes Irving 
Kennedy, Tex Perry, James A. Bliss, 
Charles' Ohlmeyer, Helen Louise Lewis, 
Gene Harper; Claude Lewis; Grace- Baird, 
Leiia Hill, Nellie Barnard and Helen 
Baker. 

. The company is under the direction of 
James H. Cooper. 



ST. CLAIRE STOCK CLOSES 

Trenton, N. J., Sept. 5. — Winifred St. 
Claire, who last Saturday closed a season 
of forty weeks at the Trent Theatre, will 
go to her home in Kokomo, Ind., for a 
vacation. The members of jber company 
including Frances Woodbury, Howard Hall, 
Bertha Allen, Bennett Mercer, Ted 
Bracken, and Clifford Mack, Thomas Cof- 
fin Cooke, director, and Wm. A Peters, 
scenic artist, will make the most of their 
holiday by going to their various homes. 
After a needed rest Miss St Claire will 
open in Hoboken, where she will remain 
until next April when she will return to 
Trenton for another season. 



CHICAGO STOCK BEGINS TOUR 

Ithaca, N. Y., Sept 7. — Charles H: 
RbasKam's Chicago Stock Co. opened its 
road tour last week at Norwich, this State. 
RbssKam is giving his personal attention 
to the direction of the company. ' Carl B. 
Sherred' is business manager and Harry 
Bnbb is advance representative. 

Valarie Valaire is filling' her second sea- 
son as leading lady' and Edward Varney ap- 
pears in the • opposite' rote, while • the re- 
maining company includes Georgia Titus, 
Rae . Mack, , Viola - GranfT Florence Blaire, 
Georgia' Douise- 8herred, Mabel, Vernon, 
Milton Byron, Edward; , Mosses; . George 
Brown, Lawrence Arnsman, EmmeH O'Co'n- 
neil; Clarence Hainey, Arthur- Webster and 
Master' Buddy. ' The company spdred a 
success in this : city with the production of 
"The Unchastened Woman," pronounced 
one of the best ever given here by a stock 
company.' "- '.'; ;' '.. 



WILLIARD OPENS STOCK CO. 

White Plains, N. . Y„ Sept 1L— A new 
season of- stock production was brilliantly 
opened Monday night at the Palace The- 
atre., here, tinder the management . of Fred 1 . 
R. Williard, with' an excellent rendition. of 
The Outcast 

The .leading roles aire in. the bands of 
Clyde Franklin and Margaret Fields and 
other important parts are ably handled by 
Al McGill, Glen Argoe, Alma Blake, Lew 
Welch, Aston Newton, Frederick Ormande, 
Harold Claflin. Sidney Macey, director; 
Joseph Jacobs, business manager, and 
Scott Williams. 

Mr. Williard is also manager of the Lin- 
coln Theatre, Union Hill, N. J. 



WINIFRED ST. CLAIR IS 24 

Tbenton, tJ. J., Sept 7. — Winifred St. 
Clair, who is the star of the Winifred 
St Clair Stock Company, celebrated her 
twenty-fourth birthday here on September 
6. She received gifts and congratulations 
from many theatrical friends. 



NESBITT STOCK BEGINS SEASON 
Wii-kesbabbe, Pa., Sept 6. — The Nes- 
bitt Theatre stock company opened Labor 
Day with "Potash and Perlmutter" as the 
offering. The roster of the company is : 
Albert Gebhardt, Francis Herblin, Dorothy 
Beardsley, Franklin MacDonald, Herbert 
DeGuerre, Hooper Atchely, Minnie Wil- 
liams, Irving Lancaster, Anna Layng. 
Anthony Blair and' Harry Russell. M. P. 
Kreuger is Manager and H. Percy Meldon. 
stage director. 



MACLEAN STOCK GIVES "KICK-IN" 
Jamestown, n. Y., Sept 5.— The Paul- 
ine Maclean Players are appearing this 
week in "Kick In." The company in- 
cludes : James K. Dunseith, Earnest East, 
Ronald Rosebraugh, Katberine Kirby, 
Robert McKinley, Ed. Clarke Lilley, 
Pauline Maclean, • Lucy Neal, Jane Lewis, 
George Ormsbee and Josephine Bond. 



"MARRIAGE QUESTION" RE-CAST 
Chicago. — Ed. Rowland and Lorin J. 
Howard' having decided to re-east their 
"Marriage Question," which was shown at 
the National and' Imperial Theatres, the 
play is being shown this week by the 
Crown Theatre stock players. Maude 
Truss was especially engaged for the 
Crown production of the play. 



. COMPANY MAKING RECORD 

Mqrboe, Wis., Sept. 8. — The Sherman 
Kelly. Stock- company, of eighteen people, is 
playing- to record breaking business' through 
the Northwest They- are covering the 
some' territory .they have .played for the 
pajt' five years. Mock Sadi-Alll is conv 
pony manager and. Dave Heilman business 
manager. 



JAY. STRONG GOES TO OMAHA 

Omaha, Neh., Sept. 8.— Jay Strong,. re- 
cently, juvenile man with the Ramsey 
Players at Rochester, is playing juvenile 
leads with, the Niggemeyer Stock. Co. here. 
He opened, last week aa the boy in 
"Romance." 



BEN ERWAY PLAYING LEADS 

Oakland, Cal., Sept. 8. — Ben Erway, 
who- was the juvenile with the American 
Players, of Spokane, last season, is play- 
ing the leads this year with the Bishop 
Players here. 



STOCK ACTOR JOINS COLORS 

Earl Mayo, leadinr man of the Swafford 
Players, has been called to the colors. He 
has been succeeded by Ralph Menzie and 
Rubia De Farris, who joined at Concord, 
N. H. 



REVERE QUITS LOVENBERC STOCK 
Providence, B. I.— Eugene Revere, the 
juvenile who has been playing with the 
Charles Lovenberg Stock at Keith's, this 
city, has closed his season with this com- 
pany and gone to the country for a rest 



Stock and Repertoire Continued on Pago 31 



REESE JOINS NIGGEMEYER STOCK 

Minneapolis, Minn., Sept 8. — Edward 
Reese has joined C A. Niggemeyer's stock 
company here as juvenile. Albert Mc- 
Govern is leading man. 



tf* 



THE HEW YORK ;CV*PPER 



September -12, 1917 



JL^rJ& Jsssssl Sr \ m 




*k 




SPECIAL SONGS FAIL 

TO IMPROVE ACTS 



Flood of the»« Number* Heard in Vaude- 
Till* Do Not Compare Willi the 
FublUhed Songs 

The scores of singing acts, that in the 
past obtained their entire repertoire from 
the published catalogues, but have this sea- 
son changed to the specially written or ex- 
clusive numbers, bave in many instances 
found that instead of improving their of- 
fering they have lowered its standard. 

One of the principal reasons for the 
flood of special songs which is heard in the 
vaudeville houses this season is the fact 
that the publishers bave discontinued the 
payment of singers to introduce numbers 
and they in turn feeling the cut in their 
income have in a spirit of retaliation de- 
termined to sing as few published numbers 
as possible. 

Nothing could be more short-sighted than 
this, for in a great majority of instances 
the published songs are infinitely better 
than the specially written numbers. 

Music publishers are continually on the 
lookout for writers of ability and the 
amount of money paid each year to the 
successful one is enormous. Their songs 
are carefully gone over before releasing and 
the individual requirements of each singer 
is considered before a number is submitted. 

There is another point which the singer 
would do well to consider before' selecting 
his repertoire, and that is the fact that an 
audience would far rather hear a song that 
has been sung once or twice before than a 
new one. This has been demonstrated 
time and time again and scores of the big- 
gest popular hits bave failed to register 
■access in the vaudeville houses until heard 
four or Ave times. 

A big percentage of the singing acts 
which are this season featuring the special 
numbers would do well to discard them all 
and select their repertoire from the pub- 
lished numbers. 



HOWARD HAS NEW SONG HIT 

Joe Howard returned to the scene of his 
former triumphs on Sunday evening .when 
he opened at the Majestic Theatre, Chi- 
cago, with his partner, Ethelyn Clark, in 
their big Revue. To say .that he received 
an ovation would be patting . it mild Jy. 
The walls pf the theatre fairly rang with 
applause, and it is doubtful if anybody 
that ever stepped .on that stage ever met 
With. a. greater .reception. The climax of 
all, however, was reached after he sang 
his very latest and what looks like his 
greatest song .success, "Somewhere in 
France Is the Lily." , He .first had the 
audience in the orchestra, then in the 
balcony and then in the gallery singing 
and whistling it. Hundreds of other acts 
are now singi ng this altogether remarkable 
song that M,. Witmark ft Sons publish. .It 
strikes a new note, and perfprmers and 
public are alike enamored of it. Joe How- 
ard's name is associated with a long- list 
of song hits, but never with one with more 
promise of brilliant "iktvrk than "Some- 
where in France Is the lily." 

BALL HAS NEW IRISH SONG 

■ Count the people who sang those won- 
derful song successes, "A Little Bit of 
Heaven," "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" 
and "Mother Machree," and one has some- 
thing like an idea of the number of those 
who are now using J, Keiru Brennan's and 
Emest K. Ball's latest Irish hit, "You 
Brought Ireland Bight Over to Me," pub- 
lished by M. Witmark * Sons. From the 
popular standpoint neither Brennan nor 
Ball has ever done anything finer than 
this. 



BUCK A STAMPER WRITE REVUE 
Gene Buck and Dave Stamper are writ- 
ing the lyrics and mnsic for the big Klaw 
& Erlanger Revue, which will be presented 
early in November. 



BALL & LAMBERT HAVE NEW ACT 

Ernest R. Ball and Maud Lambert are 
about to start on their vaudeville tour, 
being booked solid over all the big time. 
Ball promises some very interesting sur- 
prises during the course of the trip, and 
as he has never yet failed to make good 
in this respect, a new chain of song hits 
may confidently be expected from this 
busy and versatile writer-entertainer. In 
the meantime, he and his clever wife will 
include in their offering many of their 
past and present-day successes, including 
"All the World Will Be Jealous of Me," 
the biggest popular ballad hit of the year; 
"You Brought Ireland Right Over to Me," 
the smashing successor to "A Little Bit of 
Heaven," and going stronger even than 
that famous classic; and "My Sunshine 
Jane," which is veritably another case of 
"Sweet Adeline" all over again, and likely 
to be as universally popular. These are 
all numbers from the catalog of M. Wit- 
mark ft Sons, and represent bat one cor- 
ner of the wonderful spread of song suc- 
cesses that this house is offering to a de- 
lighted world, both professional and 
public. 



VON TILZER HAS A NOVELTY 

Fred. Nice, who will be seen in the new 
Century Theatre production; Doyle and 
Dixon, Joan Sawyer, and Jack Edwards, 
who will be with the Nor wort h production 
"Odds and Ends," are all rehearsing new 
dances to be executed to the strains of 
the Harry Von Tilzer fox trot "At the 
Old Town Pump." 

This number, just composed by Mr. Von 
Tiber, looks like a real success. 



MORTON SINGS BRATTON SONG 

Ed. Morton is simply "cleaning up" with 
"Then 111 Come Back to You," published 
by M. Witmark ft Sons. It is one of the 
cleverest songs that these wonderful times 
have evoked. The lines of its many chor- 
uses constitute a happy combination of 
comedy and earnestness, and the audiences 
that listen to "Then Fll Come Back to 
You" seem to think there ought to be 
still more of them even after Morton has 
sung them more. than- half a dozen. Here 
is a : song that every performer in any 
kind of a singing act can get away with, 
and from the records to date they are cer- 
tainly doing it. 

EDNA SHOW ALTER FOR VAUDE. 

Miss Edna Showalter, the concert so- 
prano, will make her vaudeville debut be- 
ginning the week of. Sept, If... Miss ShO: 
waiter possesses a beautiful .voice, and ia 
one of the finest artists on the concert 
•tage. ,. . _ , ' „..,... .\ : , ■ . . 

She will render a' repertoire of BJUJalsJ 
compositions with the Watqrson, Berlin ft 
Snyder ballad "Bluebird" as her closing 
number. %>.-■■■■ - -■-'■ ■--•■> - • 



FEIST BUYS "DIXIE" SONG 
Leo Feist has purchased from .the Misses 
Campbell' the publication rights of the 
song "You're As Dear to Me As Dixie Was 
to Lee." This number- is being featured in 
the. clever vaudeville act presented by the 
Misses. Campbell, where it is scoring a 
great success. 



BA YES SINGS NOVELTY HIT 
Nora Bayes Is scoring a big success in 
vaudeville staging the new Kendis-Broek- 
man Music Co.'s novelty hit, "O'Brien Is 
Looking, for Yon." Van and Schenck are 
also singing the number, which is a big 
feature of their clever act. . 



"SAMMY" SONGS ARE FORGOTTEN 

The "Sammy" songs had a short life. 
Most of them were written under the ap- 
prehension that the American soldiers in 
France enjoyed the nickname, but as soon 
as the real facts were discovered the songs 
were quickly buried. 

The only one which really amounted to 
anything was written by Chas. K. Harris, 
who changed the name before publication 
and under another title has a Bong which 
will doubtless enjoy popularity. The bal- 
ance of the "Sammy" numbers are already 
forgotten. 

WENRICH HAS RUSTIC BALLAD 

Percy Wenrich has just completed a new 
rustic ballad entitled "In Berry Picking 
Time," which will be released at an early 
date by the Feist house. Jack Yellen 
wrote the wor ds, a nd the melody which, on 
the style of "When You Wore a Tulip," 
compares favorably with any of Wenrich's 
previous compositions. 

IRISH SONGS FEATURED 

Walter Lawrence, who is starring this 
season in the Irish comedy drama "Come 
Back to Erin," is singing two Harry Von 
. Tilzer Songs. They are "Says I to My- 
self, Says I" and ,r She Had the Ways of 
An Angel." 

HARRIS TO PUBLISH HERALD SONG 

"Three Loud Cheers for the Boys," the 
song which won first prize in the recent 
New York Herald patriotic song competi- 
tion, will be published by Charles K. Har- 
ris. Two hundred thousand copies of the 
number will be distributed with the Herald, 
issue of September SO. 

JEROME SONG AT THE HIPP. 

Among the many, successful songs in 
"Cheer Up," the new Hippodrome produc- 
tion, William Jerome's clever novelty 
"The Blushing Bride and the Groom," 
never fails to evoke enthusiasm. 

It is one of the best comedy numbers 
ever written by the talented Jerome. 

VON TILZER GETS NEW BALLAD 

The new ballad success "When the 
Lights Go Out On Broadway," by Burke 
and Harris, which is being featured in 
the local vaudeville houses by Selden and 
Steptj will be published by Harry Von 
Tilzer. .-... . ' 

The new number, which bears all the ear- 
marks of a big popular hit, will be re- 
leased this week. 



TAYLOR TO OPEN N. Y. OFFICE 

Tell Taylor, the Chicago publisher, is in 
New York looking for a suitable location 
for a branch office. Mr. Taylor expects 
to remain in New York for several weeks. 



FRANK SNOWDEN IN NEW YORK 

. Frank Snowden, manager of the San 
Francisco office of Shapiro, Bernstein ft 
Co., is spending a few days in New York. 
The new Shapiro-Bernstein songs are meet- 
ing with much success on the Pacific coast, 
Mr. Snowden says, and are being featured 
in all the principal theatres, cabarets and 
restaurants. 



EMMA STEPHENS WRITES A SONG 

Emma Stephens, the prima -donna who 
has been heard in all the local big time 
vaudeville houses, has temporarily turned 
her attention . to song writing, and has 
turned out a clever popular number which 
will be issued by the T. B. Harms .Co. 

JACK MILLS HAS NEW POSITION, . 

Jack Mills, formerly connected with the 
Broadway ' Music Corporation, has . .been 
appointed professional manager of the 
McCarthy ft Fisher Music Co. •. ; . 

NEW ACT SINGS "OVER THERE" 

Bernard Fryer and Lew Porter, who 
opened in a new act this week, are mak- 
ing a special feature of the George M. 
Cohan song "Over There." 



RICHMOND ON WESTERN TRIP 

Maurice Richmond is making a three 
weeks' business trip in the West. 



HARRIS WRITES SONG FOR ACT 

Charles K. Harris has written a waltz 
number entitled "Dry Those Tears," which 
Lucille Cayanagh introduced in her act at 
the Palace Theatre on Monday afternoon. 



SHARPS AND FLATS 

By TEDDY MORSE - 



Maestro Maceo Pinkard says he's the 
writer of "Real Kind Mamma," and sends 
in a copy of his new one "Those Draf tin' 
Blues" with this chorus: 
"When Uncle Sam calls out your man, 

Don't sigh and cry because you know he 
cert'nly can't refuse ; 
To dress in black can't bring him back; 

Just say you've got those draf tin' blues."' 

Old Eld Maceo's lyrics may not sound 
like an awful lot when read without the 
tune, but, dm, urn! that boy's melody has 
some mighty jazzy stuff in it. Um, um! 

Ever since the two Jameses, Brockman. 
and Kendis, Joined hands there has been a 
strange quietness in their particular hit 
corner. And such a business laying 
around loose for a couple of young fellers- 
like those'ns. 



Signed in the. flowing, managerial hand' 
of Maxwell Silver, comes, a warning 
against infringing op the Billy Gaston 
ditty about "Little Doll Girl." Max, old 
top, as far aB we are concerned, we swear 
by all the royalty, statements we've over 
received to leave it absolutely alone. Hon- 
estly we do. And we hope you feel re- 
lieved. 

Melody Lane heading says "Ball has big 
ballad hit in 'All the World Will Be Jeal- 
ous of Me.' " There's no question about it, 
for didn't a couple of souses roll down the 
hall of our exclusive apartment house- 
hiccoughing the chorus on Saturday night, 
and Sunday morning a poor misguided* 
youth took his life in his hands by gargling 
it in this same "exclusive" apartment'* 
back yard! It's a hit, all right. 

The two Dolce sisters bill themselves 
as "Somewhere in Songland." Take it 
from an old gink who knows, these fair 
ones are ALL there in songland. Ask any 
music publisher. 



Mae Earle bills herself as the Ragtime 
Whistling Jim Girl. And that recalls the 
boosters of "Whistling Jim" having little 
wooden whistles thinking to. promote the 
chorus. They fried it the first tune at 
Stauch'a, Coney Island. ' The din was so 
terrific when all the whistles got going 
that the owner, of the place never would 
let that song in his place again. And no 
ended a' grand {dea- 
lt takes a. long time for the truth to 
come out. Here we were giving Francis 
Scott Key all the credit for the "Star- 
Spangled Banner," tune and all, when it 
Was a plain, ordinary guy, with the plain, 
ordinary same of John Stafford Smith, 
who jazzed out that melody. And he did 
certainly, put some range to it while he 
was about it. 



Say, at composin' I'm a baby, 
Here's a sample Fll give youse; 

Just. sit there. Bo, and listen 
To my Red, White and Blues. 



This country: has simply been over- 
whelmed with visiting commissions. : Just 
like the actor and his little 6 per cent. 

_— .^_ ... - * . ,.f »■"'' 

Old Bill Jerome says imitations can 
come and go, but that Old Manse George 
Cohan's master song. "Over There" con- 
tinues to go Uke the very devil, both 
when sung and in sales. Well, if a regu- 
lar song by a regular fellow don't go, 
what are we coming tot 



HARDEN JOINS THE ARMY 

John Harden of the music publishing 
house of Chappell & Co. has enlisted in ths 
U. S. Army. '■•■ - ' • ■ -■■- •' 



September "12,- 1917 



T H E i: - NEW YOR K CLIPPER 



15 




TRENTON GRAND 
TO PLAY WEEK 
STANDSAGAIN 

SHOWS MUST BE IMPROVED 



The Grand Theatre, Trenton, having had 
l a four and three-day burlesque policy last 
season, will this year try a .full week, 
beginning Sept. 24. This was decided upon 
.at tbe quarterly meeting of the. American 
' Burlesque Association held last Friday. 
• Tbe reason for the change in . tbe play 
dates of the Circuit is that the theatres in 
Coatesville and Pottstown, Pa., where the 
..shows have been playing the first two days, 
■have not proved profitable adjuncts to the 
: Circuit. Therefore, it was decided to give ' 
the dates to the Trenton house. The first 
show to play Trenton under the new ar- 
rangement will be "The Cabaret Girts." 
' - In discussing the advisability of playing 
j shows in Trenton for a full, week instead 
of three days it was brought' out that at 
Wrights to wn, a few miles from Trenton, 
there is anLarmy mobilization' .point where 
' forty thousand men will shortly be in train- 
ing. It was, figured that with the camp 
located there 'the theatre business of Tren- 
ton would profit considerably and warrant 
. the .playing . of shows in the town for. a 
longer period than at present. 

'Three shows were reported to the direc- 
tors to "be in bad condition. They are 
"September Morning- (Juries," "Biff, Bang, 
,.Bujg";ana "Forty ; Thieves." The man- 
agers of these shows were given three weeks' 
i time to get them Into shape and if, upon in- 
spection by the censors, .they are found 
.lacking at the end" of that time it is likely 
; that" other shows, will -be put in their 

; «%ns. M. Baker and Win. V. Jennings, 
' members of the Censor Committee, have 
! been touring the Circuit for the past week 

und visiting the various shows. They have 
" been sending daily reports to the Circuit 
< offices. .,.■.': 
i Those', of the members of the board of 

directors present at the meeting included 
'George Peck, "Doc" George E. Lothrop, 
5 Ohas. Frankly and Izzy Hcrk. 

i V. HUB* LUSBY QUITS 

Ruby Lueby, one of the beat- known- 
J Boubrcttea on the' American Burlesque Cir- 
cuit, who was with Mar Spiegel's "Social 

Follies" Jast season, has retired from bur- 
i lesque., .".She is doing a "single" in .vaude- 
"■ ville opening . on the United Time this 

weeky.'' -.-•- . . ••• - '• ». ",<i' : v' 

': , KAHN IMPROVES HOUSE 

1 The' Union Square Theatre has been en- 

' tirely redecorated both " inside -'and out. 

New. carpet and electric lights 'ire also to 
, be found. Manager Ben Kahrr has had 

men at work for the past three weeks. 

The house looks like new. . ••■: ■? 



FRELS JUMPS REID'S SHOW 
Wilkesbarre, Pa., Sept. 10. — Without 
a notice of any nature Joe Frels jumped 
the Jack Reid "Record Breakers" Satur- 
day night here. Frels, whose right name 
is Peter Siegel, failed to put in on appear- 
ance at the Empire, Hoboken, Monday and 
sent no word of explanation to the the- 
atre. Reid learned that he had requested 
the post office authorities to forward' bis 
mail to a certain address in Pittsburgh, hut 
neglected to communicate with the manage- 
ment of the show. 



HUGHEY SHUBERT ENGAGED 

Toledo, Ohio, Sept. 6.— Hug by Shnbert 
has been engaged as leader of the orchestra 
at the Empire Theatre, this city'/ for next 
season. -.. Shnbert is now musical director 
of the Sliding Billy -Watson Show-on toe 
Columbia Circuit. 



- HARRIETTE LEE REPLACED 
Chicago, Sept. 8.— Ella Gilmore has re- 
placed Harriette Lee as sonbrette' of Boyle 
Woolfolk's stock company at the La Salle 
Theatre. Miss Lee's husband, .Guy Voyer, 
remains in the cast. ' 



BEWARE OF C. W. BROWN 

A man giving the name of C. W. Brown 
has been passing worthless checks in Phila- 
delphia, New York, Albany, Washington, 
Rochester and other cities, chiefly to mem- 
bers of the burlesque profession during the ' 
past month. His latest victim is I.ozetta 
Hoge, who cashed a check for fifty dollars. 
The Ten Eyck Hotel, Albany, and the 
Seneca Hotel, Rochester, both cashed bad 
checks for htm recently, also. '" - ,, 



MAYER FORMS VAUDE. ACT 
Arthur Slayer; who replaced Dan Mar- 
ble with the "Million Dollar Dolls" for 
the Hurtlg and Seambn week, finding the 
part not fitted to him, closed with tbe com- 
pany during rehearsal last week. ' He 
opens on the Loew Time this week with 
Murray Belmont, formerly of Belmont, 
Lewis and Belmont. The act will be 
known as Mayer and Belmont. 



WAR AFFECTS T. M. A. DUES 

Tbe Newark Dodge of the.T. M. A. has 
notified Tom Miner that, in the case of 
George Ammerman, or. any member of that 
lodge who is called to the colors no dues 
will be accepted during the period of the 
war. They will also pay- him or other 
members for ten weeks .disability and, in 
case of death, the beneficiary will receive 
$160. 



WAR BUSINESS 

IS DELAYING 

SHOWS 

"BLUTCH" COOPER'S HELD UP 



BURLESQUER ENTERS LEGITIMATE 

New Orleans, La., Sept. 7i — Norma 
Brown late of the Union Sqnarc Stock 
Company, New York, 'is successfully play- 
ing the- role created by Christie McDonald 
■ in "Springtime" 'at. the Tulane Theatre, 
here, this week. Miss Brown is a mem- 
ber' of the Peck Players who a re^ offering a 
different bill each week. '-.-'■ 



HURTIG INCREASES ORCHESTRA 
' Lou Hurtig 'has added a bass violin to 
his orchestra at Hurtig and Seamon's New 
Theatre,' making eight' pieces now in the 
pit. He has also added another man back 
stage, making a stage crew of seven men. 



The war is already being felt by the 
burlesque business, through the Govern- 
ment commandeering railroad trains for 
the transportation of troops. 

This field will probably be hit harder 
than any other branch of the theatrical 
business, as a schedule of jumps are made 
weekly by the various shows. With the 
Government taking over trains and the 
shows .having only a short time to get 
to the next town performances arc likely 
to be missed during the next few months 
while troop traffic is at high ebb. 

No redress can be sought by companies 
from the railroads for this delay. All of 
the roads have stipulated in their con- 
tracts that they. will haul the shows to 
their destination on time, providing the 
Government does not take over their 
equipment. 

An instance of delay through this cause 
was when "Blutch" Cooper's "Army and 
Navy Girls" failed to arrive in Akron, 
Ohio, last Thursday until so late that it 
was impossible to get the curtain up until 
3 o'clock. The show came from Wheeling 
by way of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. 
The train the company was to have taken 
originally, however, was taken off the regu- 
lar schedule by the Government, and the 
company was compelled to take a later 
one, which arrived at its destination be- 
hind schedule time, making it impossible 
-to ring up the curtain for the matinee 
when it should have gone up. 

To prevent further delays of this sort, 
the American Burlesque Association has 
made arrangements with the Pennsylvania 
Railroad to place a sleeping car at: Bridge- 
port,. Ohio, across the river, from. Wheeling 
and have it ready, immediately after the 
Wednesday evening- performance. As soon 
as the baggage' Is loaded, which should be 
shortly after midnight, the train will take 
tbe route via Welleville and Hudson to' 
Akron arriving there about in,,, the 
morning. 

This arrangement will give the working 
crew plenty of time to haul their equip- 
ment to the theatre and be - rca.dy for the 
matinee on time. ,'' .- 



BARNES JOINS IRWIN - 

Joe Barnes, who was to go ahead of tbe 
"Only Girls"- company, left New York for 
Newark Monday to do the advance work 
for Fred Irwin's Big- Show. 

HERK AND LEVY LEAVE 

Issy Herk and Sam Levy, who were in 
New York last week to attend the quarterly 
meeting of the American Burlesque Cir- 
cuit, left for Chicago' Saturday evening. 



AMATEUR NIGHTS NEXT WEEK 

Manager Jim Curtin, of the Empire, 
Brooklyn,"' 'will commence , his regular 
Amateur nights' next Wednesday with the 

"BOwerys." - - ' -;'''. ' "" " 

RUTH GALE REPLACED 

• Evelyn Stevens opened at . Ben Kahn's 
Union Square last week as. prima donna, 
replacing Ruth' Gale, woo closed Saturday 
night. - ..' 



CHAS. WESSON IS DRAFTED 

Cbas. Wesson has been drafted for the 
National Army. He is a member of the 
"Best Show In Town." 



BURLESQUERS ENTER VAUDE. 

...w-Bobby Nugent, and Earl Kern are doing 
a doubkucomedy act in vaudeville. 



GEO. AMMERMAN. WOUNDED 

. Brighton, Bug., Aug- 31- — George .Am- 
merman is confined at the Ohertaey, Surrey 
Military Hospital, this city, having arrived 
here from the battle front seven weeks ago, 
where he was injured by a shell while driv- 
ing a tank. He is. getting along nicely and 
should be' ready' to 'return'to' active service 
within a month. 



Ammerman left Newark, N. J., about 
two years ago to join the. English army. 
He' had been In" the employ of Tom Miner, 
owner of the Empire Theatre, for several 
years as a chauffeur. Eleven of tbe Miner 
employees have joined the colors. 



: " BRAGDON GETS CONTRACT 

Cliff Bragdon, with a burlesque show 
for the' first time this season, has been such 
a success with the "Million Dollar Dolls" 
doing the principal comedy work, that John 
G. Jermon has signed him to a contract 
for" five years. 



FRANCE IS WITH "DOLLS" 

" George France. ' formerly leader with 
"The Girls from the Follies," is now with 
"The Million Dollar Dolls." 



GLOBE TRANSFER GROWING 

James Williams, president of the Globe 
Transfer Company, purchased another firs- 
ton auto truck last week, makiug six larga 
trucks, this well known theatrical transfer 
firm now operates. The Globe has mads 
many important contracts for hauling big 
shows this season. 



ROSE SHOW OPENS SEPT. 20 

Ike Rose will open on the K. and E. time 
Sept. 20 with "The Only Girl." Rose Was 
part owner last season of tbe "Midnight 
Maidens." 



H. & S. CONCERTS START 

Hurtig and Senmons started their eon- 
certs last Sunday. 



Conhnnod en Pages 33 and 35 



"SOME BABIES" IS 
PRODUCTION OF FUN, 
SPEED AND GIRLS 

"Some Babies," the offering at the Star 
last week. Is a production of speed, pretty 
girls and fun. —"• • . 

Tom Coyne, a familiar figure to the pa- 
trons of burlesque, is the featured comedian 
and is seen in tbe Irish character that has 
made him famous. He works with energy 
and always for the betterment of his com- 
pany. Coyne's dialect is good and he works 
up many funny situations. 

Playing opposite to Coyne is Harry S. 
Leran, who holds his end. His Hebrew im- 
personation is neat and clean. He is a 
fast worker and makes bis character funny 
without offending. 

Eddie Fox. in the first act, does a 
"nigger" mammy well, but shines as. a 
tramp, to which he changes in the second 
part. Ht gets much out of the part and 
offers a corking good specialty in one. • 

Ray Bottach is one of those "straight" 
men .so essential to a show. He is a good 
"feeder" for the comedians, dresses well 
and has a voice of which tbe management 
has taken advantage by giving him several 
numbers alone and with the chorus. In 
his specialty he did some fine yodellhg. 
He has a clear tenor 'voice. 

William McGarry, as the owner of the 
Eugenic Institute, hadn't much to do, but 
what he had was well taken care of. 

'IQ Percie Judah, the owners have a 
prima donna and leading woman com- 
bined, of whom, they can be proud. 

Miss' Judah is a beauty of the 'blonde 
type, 'who has a fine voice and renders ber 
numbers cleverly. Her' costumes are really 
worth seeing, particularly the gold spangle 
one she wears in the opening of the second 
act. Her carriage is distinctly different 
from the usual run of women in snch roles 
and, still,- she does not take the' part 
seriously. Her .work'- with 'the male mem- 
bers of the company is '.pleasing. 'Her 
specialty went big Tuesday afternoon,' 'She 
presents » shapely form in tights. ' 
' Eleanor Revere handled her part nicely, 
although there was not much to it, 

Grace Fletcher handles the sonbrette 
role add had her share of numbers' to lead. 

Billy McGarry and Eleanor Revere do 
a good singing and Wooden shoe dancing 
specialty which went over nicely. 

In Princess Doveer the management has 
one of the most attractive classic dancers 
in burlesque. She offered last week two 
distinct' numbers, hex first One being an 
"Egyptian Arm" dance, which is one of the 
most graceful dances ever seen at this 
bouse. . Her "Passion" dance, presented as 
a second offering, will, class with the beat 
It is purely, a combination of grace, art 
and loveliness, with no bint of suggeative- 
ness. 

The chorus does well and is prettily cos- 
tumed. 

The scenery looks well, is well con- 
structed and designed. 

The show is in two acts with two scenes 
in the. first and'- three in the second with 
a drop in one used twice. 

The cast is well balanced and works with 
plenty of ginger. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 12, 1917 



IT'S A RUNAWAY YEAR FOR 



HARRY VON TILZER 

Leave it to Harrv *o hand you the goods when- he is on the job, and he. is there both ways from the middle thisyear with the 
greatest bunch of- stage material of all kinds that he has ever published. Every song on this^page has been tried and proven 
a success. Pick out the ones you think.you can : use and -we'll shoot 'em on to you. 




Another -'"Last Night Was the End of the World 



GreAt Comedy Soni; Lots of Extra Ch< 



LOVE WILL FIND THE WAY WONDERFUL GIRL, GOOD NIGHT 



I DON'T KNOW WHERE I'M GOING 

BUT I'M ON MY WAY fe:^ 



IF SAMMY SIMPSON SHOT THE SHOOTS 
WHY SHOULDN'T HE SHOOT THE SHOTS? 



THE MAN BEHIND THE HAMMER 
AND THE PLOW 



SOME LITTLE SQUIRREL IS GOING TO GET 
SOME LITTLE NUT 

Great Comedv Double 



Watch for Some Wonderful Songs bv Vincent Bryan and Harry, Von Til: 



HARRY VON TILZER MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 

BtNRORssiEiN.Pr.,f.M B r. 222 West 46th Street, New York City kieyer cohen. b u .. m^ 



Meyer cohen. Bui. Mm 



September 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



FAY MABE will soon be seen in motion 
pictures. 



Victor Motley has been engaged for 
"The Grass Widow." 



Ed. Holland is now the twenty-four 
hour man with the Sparks' shows. 



Charles Feinberg is the new manager 
of the Grand Theatre, Hartford, Conn. 



Rom Kesner, character comedienne, has 
been engaged for The Gnus Widow." 

Hazel Miller will be featured in S. Miller 
Kent's playlet "Over the Ballustnde." 

: John H. McCair on is again a member of 
the booking forces of the Jos. Eckl offices. 

Florence Seed will play an important 
part in Elliot Comatock and Gears "Chu 
Chin Chow." 



William ' Smy the, formerly with Toby 
Claude, is arranging a new 'act with a 
lady pianist assistant. 

William Goldhardt, treasurer of Hud- 
son Theatre, Union ..Hill, N. J., has been 
drafted into the National, Army. 



John Goldsworthy replaced Thomas 
Cbhkey in the cast of "The Rambler 
Hose,** at Washington, last week. 

Daniel Ciiminins, stage manager. of the 
Lawrence, Mass., Empire Theatre, who 
was seriously ill for a time, is again on 
the job. 

- Don. P. Trent is the manager of Wells 
Bijou,. Knoxville, Tenn., which opened the 
season last Monday, playing Keith's 

vaudeville. 



Harry Frazee will shortly re-enter the 
production field by offering a three-act 
drama, entitled "The Slacker," by James 
Montgomery. 

William CDonneQ, brother of Bob 
OTtonnell, manager of the Harlem Opera 
House, is now treasurer of the Prospect 
Theatre, Brooklyn. 

S-H.De Bruler will manage the Grand 
Theatre, Macon, Ga., this year, for die 
Capital Theatre Co., playing high-class 
vaudeville and. pictures. 

Joe Fields, twenty-three yean old, a son 
of Lew Fields, is a member of the New 
York Naval Reserves, and is doing active 
duty about the harbor. 



Martha Mayo and George Graham are 
the only two members of the original 
"Thirteenth Chair" company, credited 
with never having missed a performance. 

Erwin Huffman is in advance of Row- 
land and Howard's "The Daughter of the 
Sun." Harry E. Howe is the manager of 
Rowland i. Howard's "The Daughter of 
the Sun." 



George S. Kaufman will leave the New 
York Tribune to. replace. Brock Petnberton 
on the dramatic, staff of the Timet. Pem- 
berton leaves to head, the publicity de- 
partment, for Arthur Hopkins.. 

Harry Halt, of the U. S. Theatre, Ho- 
boken, who has been selected for service 
in the National Army,, will probably be- 
on e of the first to go to tile state can- 
tonment at Wrightatown for training. 

Louis M. Granet, general business man? 
ager of the Clark Ross Enterprises prior 
to. going on the road, w&l be given a thea- 
tre party in a. Hoboken theatre to-morrow 
night, after which he will attend -a . ban- 
quet -In. his honor, given by. his friends in- 
West New York, N. J. 

Lieutenants Earl Metcalfe, motion pic- 
ture actor,, and Basil Broadhurst, son of 
George Broadhurst, the playwright, who 
were recently graduated! from the Platts- 
bnrg. Training Camp, for reserve officers. 
hare- Mat* assigned- to the 165th Infantry 
(formerly the 69th, N. G., N. T-). 



ABOUT TOU! AND YOU!! AND YOU!!! 



Sammy Lee is directing a revue for a 
cabaret. 



Joseph Remington has undergone a seri- 
ous operation on his nose, at Trenton, 
N: J. 



Barney Reich is making a trip through 
the middle west far Ed. Hush. 



Frank Hutchinson has opened a new 
movie saWBaa in S rt n ts" t a_ Kans. 



John WOstach is ahead of WHham Col- 
lier in "Nothing; Bat the Truth." 

Joe Barnes will go ahead of "The Only 
Girl" when it opens this month! 

George HasseH, comedian with "Love o' 
Mike," is being featured in that piece. 

- Lou Holts is preparing a new act by 
Arthur Jackson and himself. He will open 
September 24. 

Philip Bartholemae is the author of 
Justine Johnson's new revue "Ob, Justine," 
now in rehearsal. 



Dave Posaer will manage the "Common 
Clay" company, in which Thomas E. Shea 
will star this season. 



George M. Ram mi* will be the manager' 
of the Schenley Theatre, Pittsburgh, when 
it opens late this month. 

Harry La Pearl is to be featured with 
Jules Lovette's Circus when it goes into 
vaudeville on September 17. 

William Robyss will shortly produce a 
revival of "Counsel for the Defense," 
under the title of "The Counsel." 



Harry Knoblauch is the manager of the 
Empress Theatre, Philadelphia, which has 
just reopened as a vaudeville house. 

Joe Lane has gone out ahead of Herman 
Moss's "Beauty Shop" company that will 
play to -the coast over K. & E. time. 

Charles Hazzard Kennedy wishes it 
known that he volunteered his services 
to Uncle Sam, instead of being drafted. 

Charles C Wanermaker, former manager 
of the Garrick, Philadelphia, is press 
agent for the Fred G. Nixon Enterprises. 

Blanche Yurka has written a play which 
she has offered to Miss Cowl, in the hopes 
that the latter will consent to star in it. 



Peggy Woods, Charles Purcell, and 
Gertrude VanderbQt have . been engaged 
to make some records for the Aeolian Com- 
pany. 



Irene Franklin and De Wolf Hopper, 
godparents of the Chic Sale twins, have 
. presented the Chiclets with a pair of 
baby rings. 

Manager Philley, of the Lyeeam The- 
atre, St. Joe, Mo., has had the interior of 
the house entirely redecorated and over: 
- hauled for the coming season. 

Francis E. Muldoen, who acted as treas- 
urer of Henderson's Music Hall and the 
Brooklyn Academy of Music, has enlisted 
in the Quartermasters' Corps of the Army. 

Helen Westley announces that she will 
be a. member of the Washington Square 
Players this season, all reports to the 
contrary, notwithstanding. She is now 
playing with "The Lassoo," but leaves 
that, company when the regular season of 
the Washington Square Players opens at 
the Comedy. Theatre in October. 

Martin Bmhl has purchased: the Grand 
Opera House, Burlington, la., and opened 
it last Friday night as Bruhl'a Grand 
Theatre, with "Watch Tonr Step" as the 
attraction. Bruhl announces- that he will 
run- a limited number of high, data road 
shows and: the remainder of the time the 
bouse will be devnted. to Paramount pic- 
tures. 



Dan Slattery is the new general press 
representative for Weber and Anderson. 



James Moore has been appointed man- 
ager of the "The Beauty Shop" company 
which Herman Moas is sending on the 
road. 



Eileen Wilson, of the Boston "Oh, Boy" 
company, was operated on for appendicitis 
last week. 



John Charles Thomas win be featured 
by the Shuberts in a musical production 
early this season. 



J. C Garrison, of the Providence Journal, 
is now editor and publisher of the Narra- 
gansett Pier Breeze. 

A. A. Deuchmann is to be the busineas 
manager and press representative of the 
new Norworth Theatre. 



Victor Kiraly, Billie Burke's old business 
manager, is to assume the same position 
when she returns to the stage. 

Otto Hauerbach is writing a play for 
Cecil Lean and Cloe Mayfield. It will be 
ready for production about the first of 
the year. 



William J. Wilson, who, since bis return 
from London two weeks ago has been in 
Chicago, is expected, to return to New 
York tomorrow. 



Lew Herman, owner of "The 8ong and 
Dance Review," has been exempted from 
service in the first draft on account of 
being underweight. 

Battle Carmontel, who wfll play a role 
in "Irish and Proud of It," on account of 
the Irish east will use her own name, 
Margaret Dempsey. 

Harry K. Hamilton has been commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the Officers 
Reserve Corps, attached to ' the 326th 
Regiment, Infantry, at Camp Gordon. 

Lew Wilson has been engaged by Flo 
Zeigfeld, Jr., for the "1917 Follies," and 
will join the show Nov. 1. At present he 
is playing the Loew Circuit with a single. 

Charles C. Bine, carnival and street fair 
promoter, has filed suit in Cincinnati for 
divorce from Gertrude P. Blue, of 108 
State Street, Albany, Ga. Wilful absence 
is alleged. 



Thelma Carlton, of "Cheer Up," is the 
mother of a new baby boy. Frank Burns, 
of the "Hip Hip Hooray" company Is the 
father. Miss Carlton, in private life, is 
Mrs. Burns. 



A. F. Maish, secretary of the Coney 
Island Company, Cincinnati, had a narrow 
escape from serious injury when his auto- 
mobile dashed over an embankment near 
California Junction, Ohio. 

Gnatave Ferrari arrived In New York 

recently to take up his position as musical 
director of "Chu Chin Chow," which he 
directed in London. He will work with 
Lyall Swete, the stage director. 

Morris Nestler, a brother of Harry 
Nestler of the Loew Booking Offices, is 
acting as Abe Thalheimer'a assistant dur- 
ing the absence of George Sofransld, who 
is in the Quartermaster's Department of 
the army. -. 



Benny Piermont, of. the Sheedy office, 
was tendered -a dinner recently at the 
home of Joe Shea. Fifteen guests were 
present to bid good-bye to Piermont, who 
will soon depart for the National; Army 
training camp. 

Kingabnry Foster, " formerly assistant 

director, of the United States Mint, for 

-. which- position Be forsook the- theatrical 

: l ii ml u ra a,. has- returned- te his- first lew, 

with off ces at 25 West 42d Street. 



Louise Wolf has joined the Jimmy 
James Show. 



WardeU Brothers have been engaged for 
Mary Marble's new act. * 

Blanche Merrill has written a new sin- 
gle act for Mabel Hamilton. 



Edward J. MacGregor is staging "Under 
Pressure" for Klaw & Frlanger. 

John Wilson, a retired circus bareback 
rider, has celebrated his 74th birthday. 

Dare Ferguson is the new director of the 
Western company of "Very Good Eddy."' 

Bert Perkins, who was with the Won- 
derland Show this season, has returned to 
Broadway. 

J. P. Peck haa moved his musical com- 
edy company from Richmond, Va., to New 
Orleans. 



Harry HOI is managing the first of Gus- 
Httl's "Mutt and Jeff* shows to take the 
road this season. 

J. L. Sachs, the English producer who 
has been paying New York a visit, sailed 
for home last week. 



Charles Eggert wfn wield the baton this 
season at Fox Riviera Theatre instead of 
at his old home, the Harlem Opera House. 

Lee Baker did not like the part assigned 
to him for Elsie Ferguson's tour, so de- 
serted the play to go into picture work. 

Conway Teazle has secured a judgment 
• of $64554 against the American Play 
Company, Inc. 



Max and J>n» Gordon have both 
escaped the draft on account of defective 
eyesight. 

Frank Craven has rewritten the first 
act of "This Way Out," and has elimi- 
nated the prologue. 

George Sidney will shortly appear in a 
play being written especially for him by 
James Montgomery. 

Coleman GoeU haa retired from the 
musical publishing field and contemplates 
returning to vaudeville. 

Frank P. Spellrnan Is reported to be 
•somewhere in Ohio," still hoping to put 
out his motorized drens. 



Rae Lorens has been assigned a son- 
wette role in one of WUUam B. Fried- 
lander's new vaudeville offerings. 



George E. Last who was suddenly 
called to San Francisco several weeks aeo, 
will return to New York early next week. 

Henry Chesterfield state* that the 
N. V. A. is seeking volunteers to appear 
at future entertainments for the soldier* 
and sailors. 



Hilton Hochcnberg, formerly assistant 
SLv£-,5? , 5 c * Mwtfnwr, of the Orpheum 
P"bli«ity Depnrtnient is now stationed at 
Fort Sloenm at Y. ML. H. A. headquarters. 

Louie SU vers, the lyridat, haa formed a 
company to be known as Louis Silvers. 
Die., capitalized at $5,000. Offices have 

£*-?.,. # P« Bed *" the Stand Theefae 
Building. ~ 

Mortimer FUhei, of Dittenhoeffer, Ger- 
ber and Fubel, has been elected chairman 
of the executive committee to promote the 
election of Judge Hyian for Mayor. 

MaxwaQ inner Kennedy, who waa on 
the road for several weeks with his 
Taane e Farrtarte^ act, £ hack in New 

^b , Tne%wr?tlen* ,Ct,0,, ° rm ** 



18 



/THE. S N E W i?CT* m &%l FBE-R 



; Sop m b s* sit;- 1917 



THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE NAME 

' — — OE IRELAND — --— 

THAT THE WHOLE WORLD SEEMS TO LOVE 



Everybody's 
Raving 
About It J 

Sura Sign 
It's a 






A WHALE 

^ OF A HIT I 




UNQUESTIONA BL Y 
THE BEST IRISH SONG 
OF THE SEASON! 



MAKES 

GOING 

EASY 

ON ANY 

BILLY 

Even 
better than 
"IRELAND 
MUST BE 
HEAVEN," and 
ive publish that! 

ORCHESTRA TION 
IN YOUR KEY READY I 



BOSTON 



in tun 



PHILADELPHIA 



LEO. FEIST, Inc 

135 W. 44itl St. IMEW YORK! 

CHICAGO, GRAND OPERA HOUSE BLDG. 



ST. LOUIS 



7th and Olive Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

'intages^Theatre Bldg. 



Septjeinber 12M917 



NEW* YOllK CLIPPER 



19 



i: *i' : *„ 



... EDNA RICHARDSON . ? 

Tkeatre— Tractor'* Fiftreighik Street* i' 

Style— Song* and recitation*. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. . 

Setting— 7n one. • ,"'.--.' 

'Edna' Richardson has considerable 
talent, which only needs farther develop- 
ment and better exclusive material, to 
win her success. As' matters stand, the 
act drags, and the material, although 
along original lines, is weak,' being 
poorly written. Bliss, Richardson pos- 
sesses considerable personality and' 
shows signs of unusual talent that only 
needs to. be. bnilt up." '. ".' ,,£. 

She; opens with a military song, and . 
then renders a recitation. '''*#£ moving 
' picture song, follows, after "which she 
raiders an Irish number. \.' 

As matters stand, Miss Richardson 
may succeed on an early spot dn small 
time, but the wiser. coarse,. for her to 
■pursue would be to look around for new 
-suid better material and try for .the big- 
ier houses. _....-... . w-.j.t;>^ <?• 

K ^"^DNADREON 

Theatre— De Katb, Brooklyn. ■ " -'• 

Style— Character singing. 
Time— Twelve minutes. 
•Setting— In one. Special. 

■:'■&?'. very pretty drop, oft..- black and 
white, which matches her costumes, 
greatly helped the offering presented by 
' Miss Dreon . Her opening is novel,' as 
the special drop parts in the center and 
a hat box of black and white- is shown, 
with Miss Dreon emerging from its 
- center when the lid is raised. ' She then 
presents a novelty song, after which A 
routine of the characters in a "Home 

: Opera" is rendered. Her, next number is 
of the syncopated variety, with the con- 

. -eluding number a patriotic offering, for 
which she is garbed in a dress made of 
the colors of the Allies. 

The act is. neatly presented and should 

. prove desirable for small time houses in 
a good position. - A. U. 

WARD AND LUM 

Theatre— American. 
Style — Singing and talking. 
"Time— Fifteen minute*. 
i Setting — In one. 

Ward and Lum .call themselves the 
"Two Eugenic Boys," taking their name 
from a song they sing. They open with 
talk and go into a song. Then more talk 
.and another song follows. For a finish, 
they sing a medley of old-time popular 
.songs. ',-.:■ 

The boys are clever performers. They 
ihave good material and put every bit of 
it over in good shape. ..The act should 
find bookings for an -early spot on most 
any bill. . BL'W. 



Ul'.'l 



VAUDEVILLE ACTS 



(Continued from page 9) 



CAPES AND SNOW 

Theatre — Hamilton. 

Style— Singing and novelty dancing. 

Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting — Special in tico. - 

Using an elaborate setting and beau- 
tiful costumes, the man and woman who 
present this turn have an offering which 
will.be well liked in the middle class 
theatres about New York in a good, or 
closing, spot The act ia one of the 
speedy kind, and has a sort of magnetism 
which holds the attention of the audi- 
ence throughout.- • 

Their opening number is a novelty 
song, with a few terpsichorean steps 
for' its conclusion. The second number ' 

v - is one in which they are garbed as a 
country boy and girl, and sing a novel 

- song about 'coming down to the town 
. where the Summer roses grow. Follow- 
ing the song, the man executed a novel 
eccentric dance. . .'.... 

For the next. number, the woman ap- 
pears in a very smart hunting costume 
and does a character., dance which is 
construed as "Going to the Hunt." This 
number is very dainty and novel. \ 

Their concluding number is the man 
singing a war song costumed hi military 
-. raiment, .with the woman joining him in 
a dance of .military ..type and similar to 
the one Cavanaugh and White hare been 
doing for some time. A novelty is . in- 
terpolated into this number in the form 
of sabre combat which greatly enhances 
the merit of the da Oct. 
. All in all, the' tat* is tt let* deserving 
one for the three-a-d'ay bills, but has not 
sufficient body to carry' it through in the 
big houses. A. U. 

.'. - SHERMAN AND REESE 

Theatre— Fu lion, Brooklyn. 
Style— Comedy' and tinging. 
Time — Twelve minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

"The Bridegroom and the Best Man" 
is the title of the skit presented by these 
men, one of them doing a "boob" char- 
acter while the other' portrays a straight 
role. - Their entire routine of talk Is 
based npon the "wedding" of the straight 
man, the talk referring to the foolish 
actions of the character comedian. 

One song is interpolated in the middle 
of the act, by the straight man. It is of 
the patriotic variety. The concluding 
number ' of the act is a parody medley 
of song titles. The act is a good "ho- 
kum" laugh producer, and well assembled 
for the time it is playing. A. TJ. 



' . . THE LITTLEJOHNS 

Theatre— Proctor's Twenty-third Street. 
•Style — Juggling. 
■ Time — Eig h t minute*. 
•Setting — Special. , ... f- - - . 

Working in a special cydorama drop, 
the Llttlejohns, a man and'- a>. girl, do 
': some effective juggling. All of/tho clubs 
and hoops which the pair joggle ihave col- 
ored spangles which shine prettily and 
make the act very at tractive;' ',- Some of 
.-the. juggling is done while balancing on 
a tight rope. '•".,-'.- ;7. 

'.-'• .The act would be particularly accept- 
able, opening any bill. " .. ; :, 1SL<1. 

\ : P:'.- FIVE SERVIANS § "Q$ 

Theatre— Proctor's 23* Street. " 
Style — Instrumental. *■ ■ '* ■.- '.i,,-.^*.'-: '-.' -,' 
nine— Eleven mmutt*. •'■•■":•• r -; ; /' : .'-•-, 
Setting— In on*' '/,.'■ \). if?. ;M.- U 

Attired . in native Servian costumes, 
•five men, foar of them playing an. 'In- 
. strument similar to-' the guitar, and -one 
using a base viol, form this act. - . 

Tufa, quintette plays five medley gelec- 

, tiona on their instr uments, all of which 

" are of a popular vein. The act as a 

novelty, Is adapted for an. opening spot 

-. -on the three a ^ay bills, but has no 

aal qualifications] to .give it a better 



PRINCESS WHITE DEER 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Indian. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting— Special. . ...... 

Princess White Deer and Co, have an 
attractive exterior set, representing an 
Indian camp. ■ - . 

The "company" consists of Oskimon, 
who, several weeks ago, .was doing an 
Indian single, and another Indian who 
has little to do. Although the -Princess' 
name is featured in the billing, Oskimon 
shares the honors, if there- are any, in 
the act. The turn also carries its own 
orchestra leader, dressed in Indian at- 
tire.-- '• l :'-••••■- " 

'The act opens with the princess .sing- 
ing, off stage, while the two men add to 
the stage_picture. She enters and- does a 
solo dance, after which Oskimon. recites 
an impressive bit about America. A. gui- 
tar specialty follows, after which the girl 
'* does a Jig. Oskimon then sings, and 
then an ensemble dance concludes the 
routine. - ' - - 

. -"Without endeavoring. to be facetious, 
It- can be truthfully said that, through- 
out the turn, one is constantly reminded 
of Hawaii. Give the, girl a shredded 
wheat costume, and her "torn torn" dance 
would be a hula. The guitar specialty 
is certainly more Hawaiian than Indian, 
and if Oskimon had a ukulele, the Hono- 
- lulu picture would be complete. 

The pair are only mildly, entertaining. 
They present quite a -flash, with only fair 
talent to back it up. It would be a good 

- feature on small time. H. Q. 



PERO AND WILSON 

Theatre-r American. 

Style— Juggling and barrel jumping. 

Time — Nine minute*. 

Setting— In two. 

Pero and Wilson, the man in business 
- suit with down make-up, and the woman 
dressed as a Pierrette, did some clever 
juggling, the man doing the work and the 
woman acting as his assistant. His rou- 
tine includes the regulation stunts with 
plates, balls, short sticks, etc.' 

As a finish, the man ties his feet to- 
gether and jumps in and out of four bar- 
rels placed in a row. It ■ la a very . meri- 
torious act. The man works, with dex- 
terity and dispatch and 'wins approval 
;■'.;• legitimately.:- •.'-"•"-. b. 'w. 



DRESSLER AND WILSON 
Theatre-- Proctot't Twenty-third Street. 

Style — Dancing. .... 
Time — Ten minutes. 
•Setting— 7n one. 

Dressier and Wilson, a man and a girl, 
do some good work in the stepping line.' 
•'.. Their singing : voices are. practically nO. 
and they show good judgment in doing 
as little singing as possible.' For the 
•closing dance, the girl appears in male 
.attire and the pair make a natty jret- 

' ' .oft * ' :• • : "fi&r? r" * ; '- ; - ~ H.G: '. ■ 



NINE LITTLE RUBENS 

-■ — • ?-. '.' *.■ 

Theatre— Harlem Opera Ho***, 
Style— Rural musical act. 
Time— STtoenty minute*. 
Setting— Special. 

There': are ten members of the Nine 
little ; Rubens company, consisting of 
six girls and four boys, a girl called 
Rose and a boy called Charlie being 
featured. -Some of the Little Rubens are 
considerably smaller than others. 

The act \» a kid turn, and occupies full 
stage, with ah attractive rural set. 

After an' opening chorus, Charlie and 
Rose enter. The boy renders a ballad. 
All then engage in a Virginia reel. A 
girl. and a boy then sing a popular num- 
ber, the rest of the company assisting 
them- in the'- chorus. The two smallest 
girls dance and play violins simultane- 
ously and poorly, after which they hold 
mandolins back of their beads while they 
-play. a short selection. ----- 
Two of the boys then do a rube dance. 
. Boss Imitates Frances White singing her 
famous" Md Bong, and it is this reviewer's 
impression that the girl never saw- Miss 
' White," so -differently does she render the 
. .number, A see-saw number concludes 
_^the_routtoe_of_the_ect, seesaws being 
- made by placing boards on big 'milkman*. 
This number brings the turn to a strong 
i- "close. 
•'■ The act is rather novel and furnishes 
a nice flash. The Little Rubens go 
through their routine with a snap and 
there is something doing every second 
they axe on the stage. Rose should 
sing her number without announcing 
that ska is imitating Frances White. 

H. Q. 



WATSON AND CLARK 

Theatre — Hamilton. 

Style — Piano and ringing. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting — In one. 

Lillian Watson, who formerly ap- 
peared in a character single, and. 
Dorothy Clark, who appeared, recently 
with her husband Lew "Cooper, have a 
novelty piano and singing offering, with 
Miss Clark presiding, over the keys. 

Their opening number ia a well ren- 
dered novelty duet. The second offering 
is a character song by Miss Watson. 
The third number ia a double talking 
novelty song, in which Miss Watson 

' goes to extremes, especially in manner- 
isms and character expression. A piano 
solo, played by Miss Clark, is well 
rendered and of an artistic character. 

The next number rendered by Miss 
Watson is a "yiddiah" character song 
she used in her single act, which, by this 
time, is a bit moss worn and should be 
eliminated for a more up-to-date selec- 
tion. The closing song is the "Military" 
Ball." which was well rendered. 

Miss Clark is a very pretty and at- 
tractive woman, and .makes a very' good 
Impression. The gowns worn by Miss 
Watson ore also of a meritorious calibre. 
If Miss Watson will drop some. of her 
mannerisms the turn should easily be a 
very acceptable turn for a next to dos- 
ing spot on the tnree-a-day bills. 

A. TJ. 



GERALD GRIFFIN 

Theatre— Dyekman. 
Style— Singing. 
■ Time— Tweloe minute*. 

Setting— In one. 

Singing a routine of popular and clas- 
sic Irish songs, -with a few nasal top 
notes, Gerald Griffin shows -that he ha* 
a chance' to sueeeed if he will learn bow 
- to breathe properly. He dr oss es in ro- 
mantic Irish folk costume for his songs. 
- He announces his second number as his 
- own composition, and follows with several 
published songs, which went exceedingly 
wen. 

What Griffin most needs to improve 
his offering is a knowledge of the proper 
--time to make gestures and bow to make 
them properly. . The elimination of slight 
nasal notes at the finish of each number 
will also help. "8. L. H. 



^ JEAN ARLYN AND COV 

Theatre— Proctor's 125t» Street. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Fourteen minute*. 

Setting— Kitchen. 

There are three characters in this 
playlet. Miss Arlyn takers the role of 
Marjorie, a sales girl. Her widowed 
mother and her uncle are the ether two 
characters. 

It is midnight and the girl is not borne 
yet. Her mother thinks she is working 
at the store, but her uncle, a deep, dyed- 
in-the-wool villain, has been spying upon 
his niece and has discovered that the 
store is not open at nights. He im- 
parts this information to the mother. 

When Marjorie does arrive she gives 
the uncle a slangy worded ride over 
the coals and explains to her mother 
that the husband of one of her girl 
friends is in the army, and her friend 
has been forced to work in the chorus 
of a show to earn a living for herself 
and her little baby. Marjorie has been 
taking care of the baby while the mother 
is working. In this way, Marjorie feels 
that she "is doing her bit." 

Incidentally, the uncle is indicted as 
one of those stay-at-home scoundrels who 
has tried to tempt Marjorie's friend 
while her husband, is at war. 

Miss Arlyn gives a good portrayal of a 
salesgirl, bnt the mother and uncie are 
rather weak. The playlet Is not well 
written, and Miss Aryln would show up 
better In a stronger vehicle. In the 
present offering small time audiences 
will like Jean Arlyn and company. 

H. O. 



HAYES AND WYNNE 

Theatre— Proctor's 68t* Street. 

Style— Song and dance. ?■'■. 

Time— Eight minutes. . •" , i ; 

Setting— In one. ■ "" \ 

This is a song and dance set employ- 
ing a man and a woman. 
' They open with a song, after : which 
they do a dog. The woman then sings 
aa Irish-Jew novelty song, which Is fol- 
lowed by another song and dbg duet 
Both exit after tills number, and then 
the girl returns to do some solo step- 
ping. The exit and the re-entrance 
make a Miner awkward pause, and It 
would be better if the girl did not retire. 
The pair finish -with another donee. 
Clogging is the act's strong point and 

- this part of the work is done excellently. 

- The rest of the act just about 
'muster. ' H." O. 



20 



THE N E W Y O R K G L I FP E R 



September 12, 1917 



l 



HAV 






p»-y. 



This season is no exception to #ie rule; on the contrary, m 
business career have we had such a Wonderful and varied be 
our professional friends; each and eoejry song {listed was 
thorough trial by artists of reputati<m ^ before jbmngexploj 
our various professional departments, and it was qrily afu 
trials and the songs, each and every one of them, were fom 
genuine successes, that we submit them to you. 



PROFESSIONAL COPIES & ORCHESTRA, 

TIONS IN ALL KEYS 



Swee 

Beautiful 

g|yy 

Also 



WITM AUK & SONS 

Uptown Prof. Rooms, AL. COOK, Mgr. 
1562 BROADWAY, NEXT TO PALACE THEATRE 



THEN 



I'LL 
FIND 



MY PARAC 



By JAQUES ADRIAN d/LEDN/HOL 
weet, with ''punch" climax that 
themth rilled. 



CHICAGO 

SchHTer Building 

TOM QUIGLEY, Mgr. 

BOSTON 

218 Tremont St 

JACK LA HET, Mgr. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

18 Belknap Street 

J. CROWLEY, Mgr. 



PHILADELPHIA 

35 So. 9 th St. 

ED. EDWARDS, Mgr. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Pantages Building 

AL BROWNE. Mgr. 

LOS ANGELES. CAL 
Continental Hotel 
B. HA6AN, Mgr. 



-t> i 



YOU BROUGHT IRELAND 



RIGHT OVER 
TO 1YJE 



Another!' LITTLE BIT OF HEAVEN" by the same writers, 

J. KEIRN BRENNAN &. ERNEST R. BALL 

That's what they all say— watch it! 



lit 

WAL" 




THEN I'LL GOME SACK TO YOU 

By JOHN W. BRATTON 

-Goodfor srx encores every time. A genuine 

surprise riot ■■■".a baJjad-T-greateSt extra 

choruses ever written— each a riot 



WHEN HE'S ALL DOLLED U 

HE'S THE BEST DRESSED RUBE IN TOWN 

8y DONALDSON r.ncj BBtCE A ro>.lick«n«j A'uoe S'onij wth Ttunerti- 5 ' 



TONYS P AGO H VS CAB ARE 

Sy GASK1LL eiia OU.Bf\. Primiul cf Action , • c t£ ot '''- cfevftr lifieV*. -' 
bul[y s*qo3 twne- Not a diaiectaona, butc^n be wed Vs suc^. 



.ci.'sd oslc itiy 



September 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



FTER YEAR 
LED TO 



mers. 

in the history of our 
of material to offer 

na_ 

in 
\tese 

be 




ALL 

THE 



WORLD ^ L J E A LOUS 



ERNEST R. BALL never •wrote a more beautiful ballad. 
"The lyric iayAL DU BIN -a wonder. - 

BIGGEST BALLAD HIT OF THE PRESENT TINTE 




THERESA LONG, LONG TRAIL I I SOMEWHERE IN f RANGE 



IS; -THE 
§klLK 



By STOODARD KiNG and ZO ELLIOTT % 

The one and only "Trench" and "Camp" song 
New " Plattsburgh" refrain a sensation. 



SUNG ALL OVER THE WORLD 



HINE JANE 

:ine re-incarnated. 
;ony- response refrain. 
lulQtte. Song. 
ALL-BRENNAN. 



S U K I S A N 

By WALTER DONALDSON 
v& J. KEIRN;BRENNAN 
Dai nty . Pictu re s q ue J a pan e s e num b 
excellent for production, 



JOE HOWARD'S: sensational novelty. 
Striking, original and tuneful. Can't : 
Lyric by Philander Johnson 
An inspiration. 



MY YIDDISHA BUTTERFLY 

ByALDUBtNijbsVBURKE 
A '.SCREAM'.: 

WILLIE HOWARD'S big success 



E HONEY & ONLY KNEW 

By ERNEST R. BALL &. WILLIAM GARDNER 

s Charming "southern song." Sweety sympathetic 

appealing. ' 



l' wo m o r A o e: 




HE NICEST 

HOME IN 



O- 1 - X - 1 - E I I YOUR COUNTRY NEEDS YOU NOW 



DONALDSON'S latest and best with a 
e "patter" and, Gee Whiz, what- 
a "fox-trot" melody! 



By ALvDUBiN,:RENNIE'CORMACK 
& GEORGE McCON NELL 
The Song that gets Recruits and Recalls. < 



St ANYBODY THERE M T E ? 



MEET 



THE ROAD FOR YOU AND ME 



YOU'VE GOT EM THAT'S ALL COME 



on IAADV to 

)ver HiMnl OLE 



FATHER 



TWO CRACK ERJACK N OVELTIES 



■•■■■* 

! L 



over mHni old rHinwi 

LYONS A- YOSCb'S two big hits 
GOOD anywhere 



22 ~~ THE NEW^ Y0&K^€1IFPE» 'Sep^im»mi<mf 



dih 



..U.v 



CRAWFORD and BRODERICK 

at B. F KEITH'S ALHAMBRA Theatre this week 



** -P. . -" 









BOOKED SOLID V* Direction JO PAIGE SMITH and GENE HUGHES 



EVELYN \ DOLLY 





OFFERING A NEW ACT- 




NOW AT B. F. KEITH'S ALHAMBRA THEATRE 

Direction— Jo Paige Smith and Gene Hughes Next Week at Proctor s Fifth Avenue Theatre 



AT B. F. KEITH'S RIVERSIDE THEATRE THIS WEEK (SEPT. 10) 

RAUL PEREIRA 

Supported By His Own Original String Sextette 

Direction— MAX E. HAYES 



"You Can Tell It's Time To Say Good-lye" 

By TRACEY, ROTH & BREUER 
A Whale of a Novelty Number with Lots of Extra Verses, Choruses and Catch Lines 

Published toy RICHMOND MUSIC PUB. CO., 145 West 45th Street, New York 



SONHIE JUSTIN -..-.. BILLY '-*■■ - 

In "HOW IT HAPPENED" 



dinkins, McCarthy & everett 



DiredSen IRVING COOPER 

(Formerly Dinkini-Evcrett Sc Co.) 



"BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER" 



is.^s-i*?i7Zk+ji\:^ • -•: ■ ,-•• ..;:• ._. -'•••• fi^^-w* .■•.---. ■- -. - •-•; . - \"T;:^rvTO-' '~>^>.v^ 



StpU&mJ&rEP 



3l3C£xNJBW^VORIG CfclFPER 



23 



u.a,cv 






• j • »XW YORK CITY. 

rslsno lasiai Bawyer and George Harcoort — 
Wellington Cross — Bernard Granrllle Co. — Mont- 
gomery Hd Perry — Harriett Rem pel and Co. — I 
Lucille Cannangh and Co.— The Gaudsmldts — 
Wit pictures. (One to fflU . ' ' 

Alhnmhra— Moore * Gerald — " 'Futuristic Berne" 
jllbert A Friedlender — Breen Family — Belle 




F©-T e^®S# Wk^-fe 



-rGllbe 
liter. 



RiTerela* — Jessie Bualey A Co. — Bee E. Ball — 
fiie Volunteers — Ven A Schenck. 

.Bejel — Dickinson A Deegon — Avon Comedy Four 
-rXTette A- Sanson. 

Eighty- llrst Street— Dawne Jane — Helen Vln- 
•est— Grew, Pstes end Co. — Clark and Verdi — 
Smith end Austin. '-..'* • V. ,-_- 

BROOKLYN, N. T. 
Ornhaum — Cecil Cunningham — Bert Leslie A Co. 
—Mr. A Mrs. George Wilde — J. Luces A Oo. — 
Briee A Kins— ""Race of Han" — Bankoff A Girlie 
-j-Four Mortons. _ . 

[Boahwiok— Annie Sntor — Loner HaekeD— Kana 
tawa Jape — Winston's Seals — Benny A Woods — 
Collins A Bart — Alexander O'Neii A Sexton. 
I BOSTON, MASS. 

Keith's— Ed. Leonard A Co. — M. Btteeell A Co. 
— E. KoMmao 4 Co.— Lelgotner A Alexander — 
Edna Ant; — Frank Crummlt. 



j sEaJfytaad- — Gene Greene — Browning- A Denny — 
RartmeU A Harris— Pelreb-e Sextette— Wheeler A 



BTTFTAXO, H. T. 
Shea's — Lewis A White— Kalmar A Brown — Man- 
kltetd ;Tronpe— Lew Msdden A Co.— Will Oakland 

U ':. ". CJOLUMBIA. B. 0. V 

Colombia (First Half)— Harry A EtU Connelly 
—The Skatells. (Leat Half)— Edwin Qso ige 
Arfcassanny Birda. • ■ .-i ' 1*5 ■ 

^--ohaeijmtos; B."o.^ssr.:" .' '£. 

Academy (First Halt) — Edwin George — Arbae- 
eenr Birds. (Leat Half)— Harry A Etta Connelly 

—The SkateUs. jr.. -.\ . 

COLUMBUS, 0. - „ :' .- 

Keith's— Fox A Ingmham— Ethel Hopkins— Mc- 
cormick A Wallace— Peacock Alley— Bum* A 
Frsbito. ; -- - 

CLEVELAND. 0. 
Keith's— Leroy, Talma A Boseo— Ladell A Hig- 
glns — Onuki — Three Daring Slaters — Bowman 
Brothers — Stan Stanley- Three. 

CntCTNNATI, OHIO. 
Keith's — Dooley A Sales — Bene* florirny — . 
Doree's Celebrities, oj ' . 

■ DETasoubXr HXCH. 
Temple — SalUe Flaher — Ed. Morton — J. M. Har- 
kine— B. A C. Berry— Blssett A Vestry — Allen A 
Howard— Fire Mctiettia— Akl Kama Co. 
DATafct, OHIO. 
Keith's— Adelaide Francis— Porter J. White Co. 
— James J. Morton — Four Husbands — J. H. Cnllen. 
GRAND RAPID 3, HIGH. . - 
Finuisss — "Corner Store" — Dare Bote — Conroy A 
leuiaire— Mae Curtis— Jack A Forls— Felix A 
Dawson Girls. 

HAMILTON, CAS. 
Temple — Herman A Shirley— -Alexander McFsd 
den — Seebnry A Shaw — Ashley A Allman — HalUgan 
A Sykea. 

INDIANAPOLIS. 1HD. 
Grand — Glaldo Randegger— Hill A Sylranny. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 
Orphesjn (First Half) — Warren A Templeton — 
Eadle A Ramsden. (Last Half)— Plate! A Cosh- 
Ing— Ward A Useless. ■ 

MONTREAL. CAN. 
Orpheona — Bennett A Richards — Paul Dickey Co. 
— Bonlta Goold— Lyons A Yoeeo. 
HOBFOLX. VA. 
Keith's (First Half)— Three Chome— Archer A 
Belford— Hunting A Francis. . (Last Half )— Gas- 
ton Palmer — Schwarta Bros. 

PROVIDENCE, B. L 
Keith's — Brltt Wood — Geutier'e Toy Shop — Ken- 
nedy A Bart — Ed. A Lew Miller — Adair A Adelphl 
— Selma Breeta — Diamond A Brennan — H. Short A 
Co. — Palfrey, Hall A Brown. 

HBMHi pa. 
Darts— Boatock's Biding School — Joe Browning. 

PHILADELPHIA, FA. 
Keith's Sam Mann Co. — Flying BnsaeUa — Prim- 
rose Four — Bert Lory — Felix Adler — Al A Fannie 
flti siliiisn' Dolly Sisxeie — Hltemnxa Jape— Mario A 
Trevetto. 

WTHtinomi, VA. 
Richmond (First Hall)— Gaston Palmer — 
Schwarta Bros. (Last Half)— Three drome— 
Archer A Belford — Hunting A Francis. 
ROCHESTER, N, Y. 
Temple— Camilla's BIrde — Walter Brower— Mack 
A Earl — McConnell A Bltnpson — Marguerite Farrell 
— Albertlna Beech A Van — "Memories" — Bezel A 



'" ' EOANOKE, VA. ~: . 
Boanoke (First Half )-Dan Burke * Girls— 
Harry La Vail A Stater— Sexton A FarreO. (Last 
Half)— Mend Ryan— HlrscbeuT'a GyradeaVJ- -.---■ >a« 
j, ■ - ■ S*TAJislAH, -OA. 
Basannah (First Half) ^-Plstel A Cashing— Ward 
A Useless. . (Lest Half)— Warren A Templeton— 
Eadle A Bamaden. •.-.■.;- 

TORONTO, CAN. 
Shea's— Howard's Ponies— MisSee Campbell— 
"Dancing Girl of Delhi"— Three Hlckeys— Asakl 
A GIrUe— i. E. Wade Co.— Hernr Fox— Street 
Urchin. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 

Xadth'e— Francee Kennedy— "The Cnxw7--Feny 
—"Dream ■ Fantaelea!"— Koooey. * - 



WASHIHOTOH, B. a - ' *. 
. Keith's— Morgan . DsmtsB-TrHotan * I H efa 
Helen TrU * Hm^WSanm Winiensi rtaij >He- 
Oktry OS.— Witter Kerry. 



TOTTHGSTGWH, 0. 

Keith's— Alfred Bergen— Emmet Deroy Co.— 
Whttfleld A' Ireland — Selgfrana A Co. — Three 
Eqniuia— Foster Ball Co.— Learltt A Lockwood. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. : 
■: Haieatlo— Sophie Tocker A Co.— Fonr Hark 
Bros.— Hack A Walker— Rich A Lenore— Frank 
Westpnal — Bert Hoghea Co. — Four Janaloya.. 

Falaoe— Donald Brian A Co, — Willie Weston — 
"Corner Store" — Don Fong One A Haw — Saroy A 
Co. — Gladiators. 

, OALSAXT, CAN, 

Orpheam— G. Edw. Bandbox Beene— "Prosper- 
ity" — Wm. Ebe A' Co. — Jordan Glrla — Frank Hart- 
ley — Santly A Norton — Al Herman. 

• DENVER, COLO. 
Orpheam — "America First" — Chang Hwe Foot — 
Norton A Nicholson — Hamilton A Barnes— Bena 
Deely A Co. — EI Clere A O'Connor — Bert Melrose. 
9ES HOUTES, La. 
Orpieam— Handall A Myers— ssWHsM Shoae ft 
Co. — Patrlcola A Myers— Three Vagrants — OrrtBe 
Stamn— The Flemings— Santos A Hayes. 

DTJXUTH, MLNN. 
. Orphenni — "Snbmartne FT" — Brown A Spencer 
—Georgia' Eerie A- Co.— Mllo— Gonld A Lewie— 
Hoghea Moalcal Trio — Nina Payne A Co. 

Kansas crrr, ho. 

Orphsnm — Melntyre ft Heath — Johnston ft 
Hardy— Cooper A Blcawdo— "Motorboetlng"— 
Countess ' Nardlnl— Harry CarrolL 

LOS AKQKT.ra. CAL 

Orpheam— Leona La Mar— Spencer A WUUanu — 
Kethryn Murray — ^LorenDerg slaters A Co. — Wm. 
Gaxton A Co. — Chaa. Olcbtt— PhUlpIno String 
Band — LonlStt Dresser. 

LINCOLN, NEB. 
Orpheam — Kathleen Clifford— Etaa Baegger — 
"Vacanm Cleaners" — Bay Snow — Hofford A Chela 
—Three Jahne— "Hit the Trait " 

MINNEAPOLIS, MTNN. 
Orpheam— Stella Mayhew— Arthur Htrel ft Co. 
—Betty Bond— Gallagner A Martin — Boland Tra- 
■ rere— Fern,; Blehellea ^k-Fern — AreUng A Lloyd. 
MEMPHIS, TENS. 
Orpheam — Karl John— Margaret Yoang — Jimmy 
Hossey A Co. — Bernard A Jaots — Clown Seal— 
McMahon. Diamond A Brennan. 

MTLW ATTKEE, WIS. . 
Orpheam — Nellie A Sera Konna — Williams A 
Wolfox — Media Watte A Townea — Mlrano Broe.— 
Alexander Kids— Lockett A Brown— Arthur Salll- 
van A Co. — Marmeln Slaters. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Orpheam — Emily Ann Wellman A Co. — Bert 
Baker A Co. — David Saplrsteln — Harold Dokane ft 
Co. — Heager A Goodwin — Nertns A Erwood — Bath 
Bros. 

OMAHA, NEB, 
Orpheam — Jails Arthur — De Leon A Dartee— 
Marie Stoddard — Vera Berliner — Long A Ward — 
Australian McLeans— Hngh Herbert A Co. 
ST. LOOTS. XO. 
Orpheam — Howard A Clark Re-rue — Alan Brooke 
A Co. — Herbert Clifton — Golet, Harris A Moray — 
Hardy Bros. 

BAH FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Orpheam — Elsie Jsnts — D'Artgneea'e Chinese 
Dno — Clara Howard— Frits A Lucy Brncb — Era 
Taylor A Co. — Joe Towle — Three Bobs — Billy 
Beerea A Co. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Orphenm — Jean Adair A Co. — Wood A Wyde — 
Clifford A Wills— Delro— "Act Beautiful"— Jog- 
gling Nelson— McCaxty A Faye. 

SALT LAKE CITY, HO. 
Orpheam — Lew Brlce A Berr Twins — Harry Qlr- 
ard ft Co.— "The Headline™"— Rita Boland— 
Darto A Blalto— Edwin House. 

VANCOUVER, CAN. 
Orpheam — Merck's Jungle Flayers — Norwood A 
Hall— Diamond A Granddaughter— "The Night 
Boat"— Hang ft Snyder— Chas. Howard ft Co. — 
Frankle Heath. . 

WINNIPE G. CAN. 
Orpheam — Eddie Foy A Family— Lillian Fltager- 
ald.ft Co.— TJbonatl— Kitner. Hawkaley A McClay 
— Gonnc A Alberts— Fern Blgelow A Mehan— 
Saonder'a Birds. 

■ 
LO EW CIRCUIT 

NEW YORK CITY. 

Assarlnsa (First Half) — The Zanaros— Patten ft 
Marks— Morgan, A Arms trong— College Quintette— 
Wo. Lyttel ft Co.— Lander Bros. Last Hslf) — 
The . Soattucks — Kelly A Fern— Clarence Wilbur — 
- Klnkald Kilties— Craig ft Cody— Hal Sterena A' 
Co.— The 'Le tf k b h a . ...... 

Bettleearil . (sTlrat . sssasaO-i Hearn A. Butter— 
Nsda Keeser— "Neglect"— Bud A Nellie Helm- 
Models Deluxe. (Last Half)— Whirlwind Higans ' 
— Dunn Bist ers Preacott — Geo. M. . Bosener— La- 
Petlt. Cabaret. ^ ^ _. 

Steams B dint Haiti— Irene: A Doagiaa Car- 
brej— Daniels ft Moon — Leonorl ft Simmon— 
'■Dawn to Mldnjgbt.." (Last Half)— Gertie De. 
Milt — "All Wrong." . yi .-..-. ... 

Greeley Sonars (First Half)— Breakaway Bar- 
lows— Louise Mayo-fNelson ft ' Castle— Howard 
Chase A Co. — Leonard A Ward— Kihkald Kilties. 
(Last Half) — Almond A Pearl — Mary Donahue— 
Cunnlnrham A Bennett — Lloyd ft Whltehouse — 
Eddie Foyer— Models DeLoie 

Selaaoey Street (First Half) — The Schmettan — 
Forrest ft Church— "Between Trslru"— BidosIUoo 
JukQee Foar— Whirlwind Hagans— Clifton . A Can- 
tod. ■ (Last BalO— Breakaway Barlows— Harry * 
Myrtje QUbea-t— Wfaard' Ho teWr ss nTl ^A Co.-^Weber 
ft EDiott— Anva-os ft Oner. 



. Lincoln Square (First Hslf) — Oakee A DeLore 
—Alexander A Fields— Harry A Myrtle Gilbert- 
Lloyd A Whltabooss — Peggy Brooks — LaPetite 
Cabaret. (Last Half)— Hearn ft Rutter— Nelson 
A Caatle — Townsend A Wilbur Co. — Weat A Bale 
— Weber A Wilson. 

BROOKLYN, N. TV 

BAJea (First Half)— Challs A Lambert— Mabel 
Page ft Co. — Geo. Bosener — Bell A Grease; (Laat 
Half)— Patton A Marks — Howe ft Howe— Clare ft 
Bawaon — Exposition Jubilee Four— Nlobe. 

DeKalb (First Half)— Fero A Wilson — Adele Os- 
wald — WlUard Hutchinson— The Lelgbtona— Daw- 
son. Lantgsn A Covert. (Last Hslf) — Oskee A 
DeLnre — Manning A Hall — Challla A Lambert — 
Morgan A Armstrong — "Do Your Bit* 1 — Adelaide 
Lowe A Co. 

National (First' Hslf)— Mary Donah ne— Hooper 
A BuTknardt — Jenka A Allen — Maude Leone A Co, 
— Geo. Armstrong— Bose ft Ellis. (Last Half) — 
Burns A Forsn — Nada Kesser — Wm. Lytell A Co. 
— Bod A Nellie Helm— The Zanaros. 

Orpheam (First Half)— Nlobe— Harmony Trio- 
Tom ft Btaila Moore— rTescott— Clarence Wilbur 
—Weber A Wilson, (Laat Half) — Aerial Bart-, 
lathi — Louise Mayo — Neglect — Jenka A Allen — 
College Quintette— Lender Bros. 

Bersnth Arenue (First Half) — Almond ft Pearl 
— Cunningham ft Bennett— Howe A Howe — Hod- 
ler. Stein A Phillips— Adelaide Lowe A Co. (Last 
Hslf )— Hearn A Bntter^-Nelaon A Castle— Town; . 
send. Wilbur A Co.— West A Hale — Weber AW11- 
son. , 

Wsrwiok (First Half)— Dunn Staters — "When 
Women Bole" — Leonard' A Ward. (Last. Half ) — 
Robinson ft McKlsslck — DeVoe-ft Ststxer. 

Pulton (First Half)— Aerial Bartletts — Leonard 
A Dempeey — Gordon, Eldred A Co. — Eddie Foyer 
— Amoroe A Obey. (Last Hslf)— Pero A Wilson 
— Msnnlng .A Hall— Mande Leone A Co.— Dawson. 
Lanlgan A Corert. 

Falaoo (First Half)— Gertie DeMllt. (Last 
Half)— Irene A Douglas Carbrey. 
BALf DMORE. MD. 

Bappodxome — Vincent A Haxlne— Flo A Ollle 
Walters — Mack A Lee— "Greater Doty" — Bob 
Hall— Eskimo A Seala. 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Orphenm (First Half) — Gordon A Gordon — 
Helen MoratI— Carry A Graham— Princess Klnnet 
— Dunham, Edwards Trio— Kate A Wily. (Laat 
Half) — Musical Ohrystles— I-ee ft Bennett— Well. 
Well. Well— Burke A Harris— Gardner's Maniacs. 

St. James (First Half)— Dolce Staters— Pbun- 
pblends — Frank Fsrron — WIU ft Kemp. (Laat 
Half i— Ryan A Juliette — Mllloy, Keough A Co. — 
Jim Beynolds— CeUl Opera Co. 

FALL HIVES, MASS . 

Bijou (First naif)— Musical Cnrystles— Lee ft 
Bennett— Well, Well, Well— Burke A Harris — 
Gardner's Maniacs. (Last Belt)— Kate A Wily 
— Curry A Graham — Princess Klnnet — Dunham, 
Edwards Trio — Gordon A Gordon. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. , 

Loew's (First Half) — DeVoe A Statser— IxVrlee 
Staters — AU Wrong. (Last Half)— Harry Do 

Vora Trio. 

HOBOKEN. H. J. 

Lyrio (First Half)— The Hennlags— Barblou, 
Thatcher ft Co. — BlUIe Rutland— Norton A Earle. 
(Laat Half) — Daniel Moore — "When Women 
Rule." 

PROVIDENCE, B. I. 

Emery (First Half) — Ryao A Juliette — Mllloy 
A Keough Co. — Celil Opera Co.— Jim Beynolds. 
(Last Half) — WIU A Hemp— Dolce Waters— Frank 
Fsrron — Phnnphlends. 

BPRINGFEELD, MASS. 

Broadway (First Hslf)— Craig A Craig— Ward 
A Prjor — Townsend, Wilbur- A Co. — Smith A 
Troy— Weston's Models. (Laat Halt)— Helen 
MoratI — Gordon, Eldred A Co. — Fox A Mayo. 
TORONTO, OAK. 

Yoase Street— Ernest Packet — Congressman 
Kitty — Fraaer. Bonce A Harding — Whitney 'a 
Dolls — Sadie Sherman— Great Santell. 

PANT AGES ' CIRCUIT 

BUTTE, MONT. 
Pantages (Fire Days) — Fonr Earls— Tom Ed- 
wards 4 Co. — Sllber A North— Aileen Stanley — 
••Count and the Maid." . " 

CALOAEY, CAN. 

Wantages — dandle Coleman — Six Piano Girls— 
WlUard — Claude Younger — "Dream of the Orient" 

—WlUard. 

DENVER, COLO, 

Pantages— WIU Morris— "Oh. Mr. DeteettTe"— 
Stuart — "Woman Proposes" — Green, MeHendry ft 
Dean*," 

EDMONTON, CAN. 
: Pintagao Parsons and Irwin— Lord and Fuller 
— "Fireside Reverie"— Wilson's Riding Lion— 
Wilson Brothers. - ' 

■ .-■ eBXAI FALLS, -MONT. 
. Pantages— Goldberg A, Wayne— Von Cello— Mer- 
cedes— Cook " A towns— Four BoUoways — Judla 
Cnrtla. 

KANSAS cm, MO. . 

Pa n tag es Zertbo's Dogs — Schooler' ft Dlckln- 
con — Fremont, Benton .A Co.— Motrissey A Clinton . 
— Singer's Midgets. 

. LM ANOELES, CAL. 

Fantaa-as> — The Lemplnla — Smith - A McCulre — 
Joe Bobet ts "The ' Mimic World"— Abrams ft 
Johns. "' . '. " . ■". 

. , JUBNEA70U8, MJJTM. 

Pantagse— Doris Lester Trto— Four Casters — 
Strand Trio — Winifred Gilfraln Dancers— Harry 
Jolson— Peorinis Monk; --: " 

■r- . ' OODEN, UTAH, " 

Pamtaeros (Ttiree Dsya)— Howard Klbel A _Her- 

ft Nash. 



Hamtat"— Leila Shaw A Co.— Klots 



OAKLAND, CAL. 
Pantages— Kane ft Herman — Nelson A Nelson— 
"Birth of a Rose" — Ahearn Troupe — Godfrey A 
Henderson — Gulllanl Trio. 

PORTLAND. ORE. 

Pantages — Bert Wheebn — Johnny Small A Sis- 
ters — Owen McGlrney— Al- Wohlman — "Oh! Doe- 
tor." ' ' 

SPOKANE, WASH. 
Pantages — Jessie A Dolly Miller— The Cross- 
wells— Brady A Mabonej— "Saint and Sinner"— 
"Bon Voyage." 

SAN FHABCXSCO, GAL. 
- Pantages— Moran A Welser — DeVlne A Wil- 
liams — Harry Coleman— "New Producer"— Bead A 
Armstrong. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 
Pantages — Julian HaU — The CaaeoJgnss— 
"Women"— "Wanted, a Wife"— Loey Lneler Trio 
— Rhelngold A Kaattman. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

Pantages — Three Mori Bros. — Fire SnUys— 

Norlne Coffey — Winter Garden Berne— Willis 
Solar. 

BAH DEEOO, CAL. 

Pantages— Bob Albright— Burr ft Lea— Hondas 
Trio— The Marie Girls— "A Breath of Old Vir- 
ginia" — Holmes A Le Vere. 

TACOMA. WASH. 

Pan tagssj— Foar Boees— Octette Handworth A 
Co. — Swor A MeCormick — Harry Bree n — "Utile 
Miss Up-to-Dsrle." 

VICTORIA, CAN. 

Psntacss "Girl from Starlsnd" — Chaster Or* 
ber— DeMicheUe Broe. — "Breryman's Stater"— 

"Miss America." 
'», . ' ']■ VANCOUVER, CAN. . ' 

% Pantag es Domltrescu Dunham Troup*— Lads) ft 
Harper— "A Friendly Call— NeU McKlnley— "Oh. 
Yon Dertl." 

WTNNIPEO, CAN. 
Pantages— Morris ft Beaslej— Ash ft Shaw— Six 
Serenaders — Blfoletto Brothers — Larson ft Wilson. 

POLI CIRCUIT 

BBXDOET0BT, CONN. 

Plan (First Half)— Gray A Graham— Steppe ft 
Cooper. (Laat Half)— oil re Green A Co.— Kitty 
Flynn — Howard A Fields. 

FaU (First Half)— Three Herbert Sisters— JsJ. 
Orady ft Co.— Manning. Feeny ft Knoll— Bed ft 
Bloody. (Laat Half) — Greenly A Drayton — Wens, 
Ncrworth A Nelson— "Tango Shoes," 

HARTFORD, COSN. ' . 

Falaae (First Half )— Kitty Flynn— "A Fishing 
Trip"— " Volunteers"— Ralph Bahly ft Co. (Last 
Half)— Wood ft Halpln— O'NeU ft Walmaley— 
Kltaro Jape. . 

Poll (First Half)— Morlln— Martha Hamilton A 
Co. — Greenly A, Drayton. (Laat HaU)— Brans A 
Lloyd Co.— Steppe A Cooper— Great Leon A Co. 
NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

XMen (First Halt)— Borne A Cox — OUte Green 
A Co.— Wood. MelTlUe A Phillips— Great Leon A 
Co. (Laat Helf)— Three Herbert Staters — Mr. A 
Mrs. Norman Pbllllpa — Manning, Feeny A Knoll — 
"A Fishing Trip." 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS.' 

Palace (First Hslf)— The Pelota— BeU A Monte 
—Syengsll— Howard ft fields — Kilter, Clair ft 
Enter — Six American Dancers. (Last Half) — Dal 
Beanie A Co. — Mehoney Broe. A Delsey — Adrla 

Alnalee ft Co. — "Volunteers" — Brendall A Bert- 
Red A Blondy. 

■OBAnTOV, pa. 

PoU (First Half)— Elliott ft Weat— OcUto— 
Will Ward ft Girls— 8cot Olbson— Gladys Taylor 
ft Co. . (Laat Haiti—Clayton A Conrad — Rutsn's 
Song Birds— Conrad A Conrad — Dairy Maids. 
WTLKEo-BAERE, PA, 

Poll (First Half) — Clayton A Conrad— Butan's 
Pone Birds — Conrad A Conrad— Dairy Malda. (Last 
Hslf)— Elliott A West— OctsTO— Win Ward ft 
Glrla — Scot Gibson — Gladys Tsylor A Co. 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

PoU . (First Half)— Adrla Alnalee A Co.— Bren- 
dell A Bert— "Tengo Shoes." (Leat Belt)— Mor- 
lln — Marts Hsmllton A Co. — Enter, Clslr ft Koter 
— Dnffln fiedcay Troupe. 

Flaxa (First Half)— Brans A T.Iayd Co.— Ma- 
honey Bros. A Dalsey— Kltaro Japs. (Last Half) 
— Srengall — Rome A Cox — Ralph Bahley A Co. 
WATEBBUBT, CONN. 

Felt (First Half)— Dalbeanle A Co.— Wood ft 
Halpln — Wells.' Norworth A Nelson— Mr. A Mrs. 
Norman Phillips — O'Neii A Welmsley — "Foolish 
Factory." (Laat Half)— The Pelots— Bell A Monte 
— Jae. Grady ft Co.— Gray A Graham— Wood, Mel- 
ville A Phillips — Six American Dancers. 

W. V. M. A- 

ALTON. OAL. 
Hippodrome (First Half)— Page. Hack ft Mack 
—Frank Ward. (Last Hslf)— Cecil ft Mack- 
Three Kane*. 

ANACONDA. COLO. 
Bine Bird (Sept. 18)— The Salesman and *h» 
Model— Prince A Crest— Frlek ft Adair— Tom 
Ltndaey ft Lady Bogs — Wells A Bose— Three Mel- 
etos. (Sept. 19)— Vsn Horn A Ammer — Robinson 
Deo — Kraae A Let Salle — J. E dm n ad Davie- A Co. 
—Lyceum Four — The Martians. 

AURORA. ILL. 
-Fox (Last Helf) — Bay ft Emma Dean — FIts 
Violin Beauties— Demsreet ft Cottetts— Herbert 
Germalae Trto. '■.*"• 

BTIXniOrS. MONT. 

Batcoek (Sept. 20)— Tossing Austins— Cooper. 

Simons A White— Virion Earl — "Fountain of Lore** 

— Leaser A Pearson. (Sept. 23) — Gallon — Carson 

Trio — Clayton Drew Players. 

BTTTTE. MONT. 
People's (Sept. 16-18)— Van Horn ft Ammer — 
Rob] neon ' Duo — Krone A La Salle — J. Edmund 

Dntls ft Co.— Lyceum roar— The Martians. (Sept. 
19-221— Arthur VsIU ft Sisters— WDlle Smith— 
Charles Wilson— Zermaioe A Zerraalae — Tom Pow- 
ell's ■Mosteat-' Reme— Darts .A Kitty. 

(Centinvid an patri 34 and 38.) . 



24 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 12, 1917 



THE NORA BAYES' SONG SENSATION IS 

GEORGE M. COHAN'S "OVER THERE" 

ELSIE JANIS in her wonderful imitation of MISS BAYES singing 

"OVER THERE" ■ 

is the talk of Showland 
A dancing Triumph for THE DOLLY SISTERS is 

CEORCE M. COHAN 5 5J "OVER THERE 55 

|1 HARRY ELLIS is a Riot with 

"OVER THERE" 

One of the Big Hits of THE HIPPODROME is 

"". COHAN'S; "OVER THERE" 

GEORGE M. COHAN'S "OVER THERE" 

IS PUBLISHED BY THE 

WILLIAM JEROME PUBLISHING CORP., Strand Theatre Building, Broadway and 47th Street, New York 

PUBLISHERS OF DALY & COOL'S GREAT FAST SONG, "COTTON PICKIN' TIME IN ALABAM." BERT 

HANLON'S GREAT COMICKER, "HE'D RUB, RUB, RUB HIS LITTLE' LAMP," AND ARTHUR GREEN AND 

BILL JEROME'S "IF I CATCH THE GUY WHO WROTE POOR BUTTERFLY." 



FOOTLIGHT 



Americas Representative 
Dancers 

ADELAIDE 

and 

HUGHES 



HARRY 



WARD 



JOB 



VAN 

in "OFF KEY" 

CLAUDE AND GORDON 
BOSTOCK 



GEORGE 

SKIPPER 

and MYRTLE 

KASTRUP 

Singers of Songs 
that arc different 

DIR. ALF T. WILTON 



FRANK EVANS 
Presents 

BERT 
FITZG1BBON 

The Doffydill of 
Vaudeville 

Booked Solid 
United Time 



SYLVESTER 



AND 



VANCE 

in a skit by Willard Mack 
DIR. PETE MACK 



BERT 
BAKER&CO. 

in 

' 'Prevarication * ' 

Dir. HARRY FITZGERALD 



NAN 
HALPERIN 



Management 
E. F. Albte 



ROBERT 

DO RE 

Direction Ed. B. Perkins 
1482 Broadway. N. Y. C. 



FLORENCE 

BAYFIELD 

In Vaudeville 



Dir. LOUIS PINCUS 



F A V O 



I X 



BILLY 
B.VAN 



Management 
KLAW * BRLANGBR 



. CHAS. McCARRON 
presents 

BETTY 
BOND 

In Fine Flight, of Musical 

Comedy. Captured By 

Arthur Klein. 



THE 

FAYNES 

THE ARTISTS WITH A 
SUPREME OFFERING 

Dir. JACK FLYNM 



CHARLIE 
HOWARD 



Management 

Max Hart 



EDYTHE 

& EDDIE 
ADAIR 

if 

"At the Shoe Shop" 

STOKER * BIBRBAUER. 



WALTER 

DELEON 

MARY 

DAVIES 

'Behind. The Front" 

DIR. MAX HART~ 



ELIZABETH 

M. 

MURRAY 



Dir. Aft. T. Wilton 



WILLIAM 

M ALLEN 

and . 

BTHEL 

HUNTER 

Direction—Pete Mock 



TUCKER 

and her 5 Kings of 
Syncopation 

M'g"t Max. Hart 




Ventriloquial Novelty 

At the Stage Door 

I Direction 



September 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



Route « Mut Reach Tbia Office Not Later 
Than Saturday 

DRAMATIC AMD MUS I C A L 

Bernhardt, Sarah— Knickerbocker, Sept. 3-15. 
"Business Before Pleasure" — Eltinge Theatre, 

lndef. 

"Cheer Dp" — Hippodrome, lndef. 

"Captain Kldd, Jr." — Grand, Chicago, lndef. 

"Country Cousin" — Gaiety, N. Y., lndef. 

"De Luxe Annie"— Booth, N. Y., lndef. 

"Daybreak" — Harris Theatre, lndef, 

"Dew Drop Inn" — Illinois. Chicago, lndef. 

"Dollars and Sense" — Princess, Chicago, in 
det 

"Everywoman" — Boston, Haas., 10-29. 

"Experience" — Indianapolis, Ind., 10-15. 

"Eyes of Youth" — Marine Elliott's Theatre, 
lndef. 

"Friend Martha" (Edw. Feples, mgr.) — Ply- 
month, Boston, lndef. 

"Fair and Wanner" (Selwyn as Co., mgrs.) — 
Park St_ Boston, lndef. ' 

"Flame, The"; — Schenectady, ■Sept. 1: To- 
ronto, Ont., 3-8 ; London, Ont., 10-11 ; 
Hamilton, Ont.. 12-13; Majestic Theatre, 
Port Huron, Mich., 14 ; Whitney Theatre, 
Ann Arbor, Mich., IS; Post Theatre, Bat- 
tle Creek, Mich., 17 ; Fuller Theatre, Kala- 
mazoo, Mich., 18 ; Gladmer Theatre, Lan- 
sing. Mich., 19 ; Palace Theatre, Toledo, 
Ohio, 20-22. 

"FTeckle*" — Western (Broadway Amusement 
Co.'s), Edgeley, Sept. 13; Lisbon, 14; 
Oakes, 15 ; Cogswell, 17 ; Webster, 19 ; 
Lemmon, 22 ; Bowman, 29; iBtnsy, Mont., 
20. 

"Freckles" — Northern (Broadway Amassment 
Co.'s), Milton. N. D.. Sept 13; Langdon. 
15 ; Inltster, 17 ; Lankln, 18 ; Lawton, 20 ; 
Series, 22; Munich, 25; Bocklake, 27; 
Cawlo, 29. 

"Good for Nothing Husband" (Hobt. Sher- 
man, mgr.), siHterevllle, Pa., 13; McKees- 
port, 14-15; Boswell, 18; Vandergrlft, 17; 
Beaver Falls, 18 ; Butler, 20 ; Salem,. Ohio, 
21; Canton, 22; Ashtabula, 24: Mercer, 
Pa., 20 : Erie, 26 : Jamestown, N. Y., 27 : 
Corry. Pa, 28; Oil City, 29. 

"Good Night, Paul" — Hudson Theatre, lndef. 

"Good for Nothing Husband" (West) — ' 
Brooklyn, Iowa, 13 ; Toledo, 14 ; State Cen- 
er, 15; Breda, 16; Humbolt, 17; Jewell, 
18 ; Spirit Lake, 18 ; Lake Lark, 20 ; Arm- 
strong, 21 ; Sibley, 22 ; Cherokee, 24 ; Au- 
rella, 25; Rolfe, 20; Forrest City, 27; 
Soutnerland, 28; Iowa Falls, 29. 

"Good-bye Boys" — Princess Theatre, Chicago. 

"Good Gracious Annabelle" — Park Sq. Thea- 
tre, Boston. 

"Have a Heart" — Eastern Co., Savoy Theatre. 
Asbury Park, N. Jw Sept. 1 ; Academy of 
Music, Scranton, Fa* ,3 ; Stratton Theatre, 
Mlddletown, N. Y.^.4; Armory, Bingham 
ton, N. Y. 6 ; Ilnrmnnim Rleecker Hall, Al- 
bany, N. Y., 8-8 ; Enjplre Theatre, Syracuse, 
N. Y., 10-15; Lyric Theatre, Allentown, 
Pa., 17-22; Trent Theatre, Trenton, N. J., 
24-29. 

"Have a Heart" (H. W. Savage, mgr.) — 
Worcester Theatre. Worcester, Mass., 17- 
19 ; Court Square, Springfield. 20-22 ; Poll's, 
Merlden, Conn., 24; Park, Bridgeport, 25- 
26; Shubert, New Haven, 27-29. 

"Hera Comes the Bride" — Hollin, Boston, ln- 
def. 

"Hltchy-Koo" (Hitchcock St Goctz, mgrs.) — 
Liberty, New York, lndef. 

"Henpecked Henry" (Caskell & MacVltty: Inc., 
Merle H. Norton, gen*l mgr.) — Alpena, 
Mich.. 17: Cheboygan. 18; Soo. 19: Soo, 
Ontario. 20 : Sudbury, 21 ; Cobalt, 22 ; 
North Bay, 24; Orlllla, 25; Midland, 26; 
Sarrle, 27 ; Hamilton, 28-29. 
' "Inner Man, The" — Cort N. Y., lndef. 

"Knife, The" — Bronx Opera House, week 
Sept. 10: Majestic Theatre. Brooklyn, week 
Sept 17 ; 8hubcrt. Brooklyn, week Sept. 24 ; 
Boston, lndef. 

"Lassoo, The" — Lyceum Theatre, lndef. • 

"Love-O-Mlk'e"— Casino, Aug. 27 r lndef. , 

"Leave It to Jane" — Longacre Theatre,, lndef. 

Lncky O'Shea— 39th Street, New York- ; 

"MaytJme" (The Shuberfs mgmt) — Shubert 
Theatre, lndef. 

"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 
mgr.) — Playhouse, New York, lndef. 

'•Mary's. Ankle" (A. H. Woods,- mgr.>— Bijou, 
N. Y., Indef.- 

Masquerader, The (R. W, Tally) — Lyric, N. 
1 T.i IndeK ■* 

"Million Dollar Doll, The" (Western, Norton 

& Bunnell, Inc., owners) — Crookston, Minn., 

Sept. 14: Grand Forks, N. D„ 15; Wlnnl- 

' peg, Man.. 17-22; Begins, Bask., 24-26; 

Saskatoon, 27-29. 

"The Million Dollar Doll" (Eastern) — Har- 
vey D. Orr, owner ; Carl zoellner, mgr. — 
Memphis. Tenn., Sept.' 9-15 ; Nashville, 17- 
19; Birmingham, Ala., 20-22. 

"Nothing But the Truth" (Max Figman) — 
Syracuse, N. Y„ Sept. 6-7-8 : Sandusky, O., 
ift; Ft. Wayne. 11; South Bend, 12: Peo- 

rln. III.. 18 : Davenport 14 ; Des Moines, 
la., 15; Sioux City, 16-17; Lincoln, Neb.. 
18-19 ; Hastings, 20 ; McCook. Colo., 21 ; 
Colorado Springs, 22 ; Denver, 23 and week ; 
Ogden. Utah. Oct. 1 ; Salt Lake, - 2-3-4 ; 
Wlnnemucca, Nev., 6 ; Reno, 6 ; San Fran- 
cisco. Cal., 8 and 2 weeks; Fresno, 22: Los 
Angeles, Oct and week ; San Diego, 28-29 ; 
San Bernardino, 30: Pasadena, 31; Santa 
Barbara, Nov. 1 : San Louis Obispo, 2 : 
San Jose. 3 ; Oakland, Oct. 4-5-6. 

"Old Lady 31" — Plymouth, Boston. 

"Our Betters" — Broad, Philadelphia. 

"Oh Boy" — Wilbur, Boston, lndef. 

"Oh Boy" — LaSalle, Chicago, lndef. 

"Oh Bov" — Princess, New York, lndef. 

"Pals First" — Illinois, Chicago, lndef. 

"Parlor, Bedroom and Bath"— Olympic, Chi- 
cago, lndef. 

"Passing Show of 1917" — Winter Garden, 
New York, lndef. 

Peter rbbetson — Republic. New York, lndef. 

"Pawn"— Fulton, N. Y. 

"Polly with a Past" — Belasco, N. Y., lndef. 

"Pom-Pom" with Mitel Hajos (H. W. Savage) 



ROUTj 




House, Newport, K. I., Sept 10; 
Middlesex Theatre. Mlddletown, Conn., 11; 
Park Theatre. BrldKeport. Conn., 12; Shu- 
bert Theatre, New Haven, Conn., 13; Re- 
gent Theatre, Norwalk, Conn., 14; Lyceum 
Theatre, New London, Conn., 15; Academy 
of Music. Newport News, Va., 17 ; Colonial 
Theatre, Norfolk, Va.. 18-19 ; Academy of 
Music, Richmond. Va.. 20-22: Academy of 
Music. Petersburg, Va„ 24; Majestic The- 
atre, Danville, Va., 26: Colonial Theatre, 
Salisbury, N. C, 26; Municipal Theatre, 
Greensboro, N. C, 27 ; Academy of Music, 
Raleigh, N. C, 28 ; Academy of Music, Wil- 
mington, N. C~_29. 

"Blveria Girt" — Forrest, Philadelphia. 

"Rambler Rose" (Chas. Frohman, mgr.) — Em- 
pire Theatre, New York City, lndef. 

Skinner, Otis (Chaa, Frohman, mgr.) — Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., Sept 7-8 ; Powers, Chicago, ln- 
def. 

San Carlo — Grand Opera Co., 44th St, Sept. 
3-15. 

"This Way Oat"— Ge*. M. Cohan's Theatre, 
lndef. 

"TaUor Made Man"— Cohan & Harris, lndef. 

"13tb Chair" — Adelphl, Philadelphia. 

"13th Chair" — Garrlck, Chicago. 

"There She Goes" (Harvey D. Orr, mgr.) — 
New Castle,. Ind., Sept 13 ; Richmond, Ind., 
14 ; Greensbnrg, Ind., 15 ; Middletown, Ohio, 
16; Fremont, Ohio, 17; ChilUcothe, Ohio, 
18-19; Wellston, Ohio, 20; Huntington, 

W. Va., 21 ; Charleston,W. Va., 22 ; Elklns, 
W. Ya„ 24 ; Grafton. W. Va., 26 ; Clarks- 
barr. w. Va., 26; Fairmont, W. Va., 27; 
Wheeling-, W. Va_ 28-20. 

"Torn to the Bight" (Smith * Golden, mgrs.) 
— Grand, Chicago, lndef. 

"Upstairs and Down"- — Cort, Chicago, lndef. 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin" (Wm. Kibble, mgr.) — 
Huntington, Pa.. 18 ; Tyrone, 14 ; Altoona, 
15 ; Johnston, 17 ; Indiana, 18 ; Greensburg, 
19; McKeesport, 20; Washington, 21; 
Wheeling, W. Va., 22; Coshocton, Ohio, 24; 
Cambridge, 25; Zanesvillc, 26; MsConnells- 
ville, 27; Marietta, 28; Parkenaburg, 29; 
Athens, Oct. 1 : Galllpolis, 2 ; Wellston. 8. 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin" Co. (Browning-Ander- 
son-Lewls) — Stroosbarg, Pa., 13 ; Mllford, 
14 ; Hawiey. 15 ; Honeadale, 17 ; Forest 
City. 18 ; Oakland, 19 ; Lanesboro, 20 ; Hall- 
stead,- 21; Montrose. 22; Wyaluslng, 24; 
Towanda, 25. 

"Very Idea, The," Astor (Messrs. Shubert, 
mgrs.) — New York City, lndef. 

"Wanderer, The" — Manhattan Opera House, 
lflfltr tvsro weeks 

Wilson, Al H. (S. R. Ellis) — Reading, Pa- 
Sept. 3 : Hnrrlsburg, Fa., 4 ; Lewlstown, 
Pa., 5 ; Houtzdale, Pa., 6 ; Du Bols, Pa.. 7 ; 
Bradford, Pa., 8; Warren, Pa., 10; St.. 
Mary's, Pa., 11; Butler, I's., 12: New Caa 
tie. Pa.. 18 ; Beaver Falls. Pa., 14 ; Sharon,. 
Pa;, 15; Youugstown, Ohio, 17; Akron,. 
Ohio, 18 ; Canton, Ohio, 10 ; New Philadel- 
phia, Ohio. 20; Cambridge, Ohio, 21; 
Wheeling, W. Va., 22. 

"You're in Love" — Garrlck, Chicago, lndef. 

"Zlegfeld Follies" — New Amsterdam, New 
York, last two week*. 

stock: 

Auditorium Players — Maiden, Mass., lndef. 

Alcazar Players — San Francisco, lndef. 

Albee Stock (Chaa. Lovenberg, mgr.) — Provi- 
dence, R.I., lndef. 

Austin, Mildred, Musical Comedy (Star) — 
Louisville, Ky„ lndef. . . . , . 

Angell Stock (Joe Ahgell. mgr.) — Park, Pitts- 
burgh, lndef.. »I 

Baker Stock Co. — Portland. Ore., lndef. 

Bonstelle, Jesse, stock Co.— Buffalo, N. Y„ 
lndef. 

Bennett, Richard, Stock — San Francisco, in- 

. d*f, .... ..:■-... 

Bryant Marguerite, Players — Altoona, Pa., 

;■ indeft 
; Buhler; Richard, Players (A. G. Delamater) 
. -Louisville, Xy., Sept. 10-15-; Conners- 
vllle, Ind., 17 ; Richmond, Ind., 18 ; Frank- 
fort, Ky., ID; Lexington; 20-21; KnoxvlUc, 
Tenn:, 22 ; Nashville,. 24-6-6': New Decator, 
Ala., '27 ; Birmingham; 28-9 ; Memphis, 
Tenn.,^80-Oct. 1. 

Benjamin, '■ Jack,- Stock' -Co. — Lincoln, Kan., 
week Sept 10 : Wakeeney, week Sept 17 : 
Hoyes. Sept. 24-week ; Russell, week Oct. 1. 

Bishop Players — Oakland, Cal., lndef. 

Bover, Nancy, Stock — Detroit, Mich., lndef. 

Baldwin, Walter, Stock— Duluth. Minn., lndef. 

Blaine's, James, Players — Saskatoon, Can., 
lndef. 

Chicago- Stock Co. — Seneca Falls, N. Y., Sept. 
10-15. 

Cooper Balrd Co. — Zanesvllle, Ohio, indef. 

Colonial Stock, Cleveland, O.. lndef. 

Crown Theatre Stock Co. (E. W. Rowland, 
Sr.) — Chicago, indef. 

Comstock, F. Boy, Stock Co. — Cleveland, O., 
Indef. 

Cornell-Price Players — Wanseon, O., lndef. ; 
Alma, Mich., 3-8; Allegan, Mich., 10-15. 

Dwlght, Albert, Players (G. A. Martin, mgr.) 
K. and K. Opera House, Pittsburgh, Pa.. 
lndef. 

Dale, Kathryn Co. (Krug) — Omaha. Neb., ln- 
det 

Dainty. Bessie, Players — (I. E. Earle, mgr.) 
DalIas,Tex., lndef. 

Denham Players- 1 — Denver, lndef. 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sbarps- 
bnrg, Pa., lndef. 

Emerson Players — Lowell, Mass., indef. 

EUtch Stock Co. (EUtch Gardens) — Denver, 
Col., lndef. 

Felber * Shea Stock — Akron, O.. indef. 

Fifth Ave. Stock— Fifth Ave., Brooklyn, in- 
def. - 

Franklyn. Maurice, Stock Co. — Worcester, 
Mass.,. lndef. 

Garrlck Thieatre Stock Co. — Garrlck. Detroit 
Mich., lndef. 



Garden City' Stock Co.— Kansas City, Mo.. 
Indef. 

Glass, Joseph D„ Stock Co.— Denver, Colo., 
lndef. 

Gordlnler Bros. Stock — Ft. Dodge, la., lndef. 

Grand Theatre Stock Co. — Tulsa, Okla, lndef. 

Graham Stock Co. (Oscar Graham, mgr.) — 
Caster City. Okla.. 14; Erlck, 15; Sham- 
rock. Tex.. 17 : Sayre. Okla. 18 : Hydro, 19 : 
Carnegie. 20 ; Granite, 21 ; Comanche, 22 ; 
Graham, Tex., 24 ; Jacksboro, 25 ; Ryan, 
Okla., 26; Nocona, Tex., 27; Electra, 28; 
Harrold. 29. 

Home, Col. F. P., Stock — Yoongstown, 0., in- 
dex. 

Incomparable Grand Stock Co. — Tulsa, Okla., 
indef. 

Jewett Henry. Players — Copley. Boston, in- 
def. 

Keith Stock— Portland, Me., indef. 

Kenyon Stock Co. (Forry L. Brott, mgr.) — 
Kenyon, Pittsburgh, lndef. 

Knickerbocker Players — Syracuse. N. Y., ln- 
def. 

Kyle Stock Co. (Barber & Howland, mgrs.) — 
Lansing, Mich., lndef. 

Lexington Park Players — Lexington Park, 
Boston, indef. 

Lakeside Mus. Comedy Co. — Denver, Colo., 
indef. 

Lando, Albert. Slock Co. — Fltchbnrg, Mass., 
indef. 

Lawrence. Del., Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Liberty Stock Co. — Strand, San Diego, Cal., 

index. 

Lawrence Playera — Celeron Park, Jamestown, 
». Y„ indeft 

Lleb, Harris, Stock Co. — Wilson, Chicago, ln- 
def. 

Lyric Light Opera Co. — Providence, R. I„ 
lndef. 

Lewis. Jack X., Stock (W. W. Richards, mgr.) 
— Chester, Pa., Indef. 

Lone-Jane Players (Carl F. Hallaway, mgr.) 
— Warburton, Yonkers, indef. 

Liberty Players — Norumbega Park, Auburn- 
dale, Mass., lndef. 

MacLeon. Pauline. 8tock (W. W. Richard's 
mgr.) — Samuel's Theatre, Jamestown, N. 
Y., lndef. 

Modern Players— Pabst, Milwaukee, Wis., in- 
def. 

Marcos Musical Stock Co. — New Bedford. 
Mass., lndef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, lndef. 

Manhattan Playera — Rochester, N. Y., Indef. 

Nestclle Stock Co. (week Sept 10) — Prince- 
ton, Mo. 

Opera Players — Hartford, Conn., indef. 

Orpbeum Players (Geo. Ebey, mgr.) — Oak- 
land, Cat, lndef. 

Oliver, Otis, Players — Lincoln, Neb., lndef. 

Orpheum Players — Clark Brown, mgr.) — 
Montreal, Can., lndef. 

Packard, Jay, Stock Co. — Newark, N. J., ln- 
def. 

Poll Stock Co. — Springfield. Mass., lndef. 

People's Stock Co. — Oklahoma City, Okla., In- 
def. 

Perry. Tex., Players — Zanesvllle, O n lndet 

Poll Stock Co.— Wilkes Barre, Pa., Indef. 

Poll Players — Worcester, Mass., lndef. 

Poll Stock Co. — Waterbury, Conn., lndef. 

Powell, Halton. Stock Co. — Lansing. Mich., 
lndet. 

Price, Stanley, Players — Grand Rapids, Mich.. 
lndet 

Robins, mdward. Stock — Toronto. Can.. Indef. 

Shubert Players — Milwaukee. Wis., lndef. 

8hubert Stock— St. Paul. Mliro., lndef. 

SomervIUe Theatre Players — ■ Somerville. 

Sherman Krll'j Stock Co. (Mock Sod! Alii, 
manager.) 

Grand Rapids, Wis., week 8ept. 10th. 

Birraboo. Wis., week Sept. 17fn. 

Beaver Dam, Wis., week Sept 24th. 
. Sbanon Stack Co. (Harry Shanon) Bucy- 
" rus, O., week Sept. 10, Wapakoneta 17, 
. Xenla 27-29. . _ . 

Spooner, Cecil,. Stock — Grand Opera House. 
Brooklyn, rndef. \ m ■ „ . . ... 

?o!er, Sydney, Stock— Portland; Me. lndef. 
emple- Stock — Hamilton, Can-., lndef . 
Van Dyke * Baton Stock (F. Mack, mgr.)— 

Joplln. Mo., lndef. _ 

Vees, Albert Stock— Wheeling, W. Va„ lndef. 
Wigwam Stock Co. — Wigwam, San Francisco, 

lndef. 
Williams, Ed., Stock — Elkhart.. Ind., lndef. 
Williams, Ed., Stock — Qulncy. HI., Indef. 
Walker. Stuart. Players — Indianapolis. Indef. 
Wilkes' Players— Seattle, Wash., lndef. 
Wallace, Chester, Players — WHUamsport, Pa., 

lndef. _ 

Yale Stock Co.— River Park, Concord, N. H„ 

indef. 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT 
Attractions for the week of September 10. 

"After Office Houre"— Trenton, Sept. 10-11- 
12 : Peterson, 18-14-15. 
-."Come Back to Erin" — Worcester. 

"Common Clay" — Philadelphia (Orpbeum). 

"Dauehter of the Hun"— -Peoria, Sept. 8-10- 
11-12. 

"Going Straight"— Chicago (National) 

"Girl Without a Chance" — (A) Chicago, (Im- 
rwrial) : (b) Indianapolis. 

"Heart of Wetona" — Buffalo. 

"Jack and the Beanstalk"— Picture. Wash- 
ington. 

"Kateenjammer Kids" — Louisville. 

"Leave It to Me" — Providence. 

"Little Girl in a Ble City" — Pittsburgh. 

"Little Girl God Forgot" — St. Louis. 

"Little Miss Innocence" — Milwaukee. 

"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl — 
Kansas City. „ • _ . _.__ ,_ _ 

•Peg O - My Heart"— New York City (Lex- 
ington). 



"Safety First" — Nashville. ... . 

"Step Lively"— Omaha, Sept 9-10-11-1*; 

Lincoln. 13: St Joe, 14-16. 
"The White Slave" — Cleveland. 
"Unborn Child" — (E Company) — Hoboken, R. 

"Unborn cibBd" — (A) — Columbus. ' 
"Which One Shall I Marry" — Detroit. 

BURLESQUE 

Columbia Wheel 

AlJReeves — Palace, Baltimore, 10-15 ; Gaiety. 

Washington, 17-22. 
Ben Welch — Empire, Toledo. O- 10-15 ; Lyric. 

Dayton, O., 17-22. 
Best Show In Town — Gaiety, Omaha, 15-21. 
Bowery* — Miner's, Bronx, N. Y., 10-15 ; Em- 
pire, Brooklyn, 17-22. 
Burlesque Revue — Empire, Brooklyn, 10-15; 

Park, Bridgeport, Conn, 20-22. 
Burlesque Wonder Show— Park, Bridgeport 

Conn., 13-15; Colonial, Providence, B, I„ 

17-22. 
Bon Tons — Empire. Newark, 10-16: Casino. 

Philadelphia. 17-22. *^««>». 

Behman Shows — Gaiety, Toronto, Ont, 10-18: 

Gaiety, Buffalo, 17-22. 
Broadway Frolics — Majestic. Jersey City. H. 

J., 10-15 ; Peoples, Pblladelph!ari7-22. 
Boatonlans — Gaiety, Kansas City. 10-15; 

Gaiety, St. Louis, 17-22. 
Follies of the Day — Gaiety, Montreal, Can-., 

10-15 ; Empire, Albany, N. Y., 17-22. 
Golden Crooks — Des Moines, Iowa, 16-17: 

Gaiety, Omaha. 22-28. 
Hello America— Gaiety. Washington, D. 6.. 

10-15: Gaiety, Pittsburg. 17-22. 
Harry Hastings— Casino. Boston, 10-18: 

Columbia. New York, 17-22. 
Hip, Hip, Hoorah — Gaiety, St. Loots, 10-16; 

Columbia. Chicago, 17-22. 
Howe. 8am — Corinthian. Rochester. N. Y., 

10-15; Bastable, Syracuse, 17-19; i.nmbenr. 

Utlca, 20-22. 
Irwin's Big Show — Casino. Brooklyn, 10-16: 

Empire. Newark. 17-22. 
Liberty Girls— Empire. Albany, N, Y., lO-lB"; 

Gaiety, Boston, 17-22., 
Majesties — Hurtlg & Seamon's, New York, 

10^15; Layoff, 17-22; Orpheum, Paterson, 

Merry Rounders — Jacques, Waterbury, Conn., 

10-15: Cohens. Newburg. N. Y.. 17-19- 

Pougbkeepsle. 20-22. 
Million t Dolls — Paterson, 10-15. 
Mollle Williams— Columbia, New York, 10-15: 

Casino, Brooklyn. 17-22. 
Marions. Dave — Cohan's, Poughkeepsle. 18-16 ; 

Miners' Bronx, New York, 17-22. 
Maids of America — Gaiety. Boston. 10-15: 

Grand, Hartford, Conn., 17-22. 
Oh Girl— Star and Garter, Chicago, 10-15: 

Gaiety, Detroit 17-22. 
Puss Puss— Star. Cleveland, 10-15 : Empire. 

Toledo, Oy 17-22, 
Hondo ml Glrla — Layoff, 10-15; Orubrum. 

Paterson, 17-22. - 

Rose Rydell's — Olympic. Cincinnati, 10-15: 

Star and Garter, Chicago, 17-22 
Step Lively— Gaiety, Detroit, 10-16; Gaiety, 

Toronto, Ont. 17-22. 
ff6 l r , JS a Garter— Beatable. Syracuse. N. Y., 

10-12 : Lemberg. Utlca, 18-15 ; Gaiety. Mon- 

trea). Can., 17-22. 
Sporttna- Widows— Casino. Philadelphia. 10- 

15 : Hurtlg & Seamons, New York, 17-22 
Social Maids — Grand, Hartford. Conn., 10-15- 

Jacques. Waterbury. Conn.. 17-22 
Right 8eers— Oaletv. Pittsburgh. 10-15: Star. 

Cleveland, O., 17-22. 
Sam Bldman — Peoples. Philadelphia. 10-18 : 

Palace. Baltimore. 17-22. 
Spiegel's Revue — Colonial. Providence. 10-15 - 

Casino, Boston. 17-22. 
Some Show— Gaiety, Buffalo, tf. T„ lftlO; 

Corinthian, Rochester. N. Y., 17-22 
Twentieth Century Maids — Lyric. Dayton, O. 

10-15 : Olympic. Cincinnati. 1T-22. . 

Watson's Beef Trust— Gaiety, Omsha. Neb.. 

10-16 ; Gaiety, Kansas City, Mo.. 17-23. 

AMERICAN WHEEL 

American— Holyoke. Mass.. 10-12; Spring- 
field. 13-15 : Howard. Boston. 17-22. - 

Ar FJ7 - aDd Navy Girls — Empire, Cleveland. 
10-15: Park, Brie, Pa„ 17-18 Ashtibula, 
0„ 19 ; Park. Yoongstown, 20-22. 

Aviators— Garden. Buffalo/ 10:16; Star; Tor- 
onto, Ont., 17-22. 

Anto Girlst— Majestic Indianapolis, 10-15 ; 
open 17-22 : Lyceum. Columbus, 24-29. 

Broadway Belles— Grand. Trenton, N. J.. 18- 
16: Gaiety, Baltimore. 17-22. 

Bit Blng, Bang— Gaiety. Milwaukee. 10-15: 
Gaiety, Minneapolis, 17-22. 

Cabaret Glrla — Victoria, Pittsburgh. 10-16: 
Penn Circuit 17-22. 

Charming Widows — Lyceum. Columbus, 10- 
15 ; Court, Wheeling. W. Va.. 17-19 ; Grand. 
Akron, O.. 20-22. 

Darlings of Parts — Majestic Scranton, 10- 
15 : Blnghamton. N. Y., 17-18 ; Oswego, 19 ; 
Nlasara Falls. 20-22. 

Follies of Pleasure — Ashtabula, 0.. 13: 
Yonngstown, 13-16; Victoria, Pittsburgh. 
17-22. 

Forty Thieves — Century. Kansas City, 17-22. 

French Frolics — Penn Circuit. 10-15; Grand, 
Trenton. N. J.. 20-22. 

Grown Ud Bahles — Ssvoy, Hamilton, Ont, 
10-15; Cadillac. Detroit 17-22. 

Girls from Follies — New Bedford, Mass- 10- 
12: Worcester. 13-15: Olympic, New York. 
17-22. 

Girls from Joyland — Warburton. Yonkers, N. 
Y., 10-12 : Schenectady. 13-15 ; Holyoke, 
Mass.. 17-19: Springfield, 20-22. 
. Hello Girls — Court. Wheeling, W. Va„ 10-12 ; 
Grand. Akron. O.. 13-15 : Empire, Cleve- 
land. 17-22. 

Innocent Maids — Wilkesbarre, 12-15; Empire. 
Hoboken, N. J, 17-22. 

Jolly Girls — Standard. St. Louis. 10-16; En- 
clewood, Chicago. 17-22. 

Lid Lifters — Star. Toronto. Can.. 10-15; 
Savoy, Hamilton. Ont, 17-22. 
{Continued on page 86.) 



26 



THE NEW YORK CJJIPPEtt 



Septembe*42, 1917 




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FREDERICK WALLACE 

.'ASSISTED BY • . 

DOLLY LEWIS AND CO. 



Booked Pantages tour after first performance at 
American, New York . . 

Management CHAS. H. SMITH 



W. S. CLEVELAND 

WANTS BIG VODEVIL ACTS 

Soils 208, Ordway Bldg., 207 Market St, NEWARK, N. J. Phono, 65 Market 



FRANK WOLF VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 



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Presenting "A Girl's Weigh," by Harry L. Newton 

DIRECTION TOM JONES 



Nora and Sidney Kellogg 

"Tlie lVfuslc Room" 

Direction SAMUEL BAERWITZ 



WILLIAM FOX CIRCUIT 

OF TOEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX. President 

Executive Office*, 130 West 46th St., New York 

jack v?.ixxeb 

General ' BeeaHng Manager - ; 

EDGAR ALLEN;; 

' Manager ■ 
... Personal inter vi ew s with artists from 12 to: 6, or by appointment . 




IN VAUDEVILLE 



Booked U. B. O. — Direction, 




IN VAUDEVILLE 



. a. 

THE JOYFUL SOMGOLOGBT 




LEVT 




Soafev Nofvlljr 



Direction SAMUEL BAERWITZ 



I 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction, ROSE A CURTIS 



e*f a 



SINGING .COMEDIAN 



MAXINE 



THE ONLY BLACKFACE VENTRILO- 
QUIST. This act Is copyrighted In Its en- 
tirety, also In the Restricted Material 
Depta. of all theatrical Journals. 



"BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER" 



Se&tem1ie!iul2,. 1917 



ME' NEW YORK CLIPPER 



u 



JO PAIGE SMITH 

PRESENTS 



■"S»-: 






is; 



>, ■ . 




DAWNE JUNE 

■■-- THE : 

; ? UNDER-WATER 
7 GIRL 

At the 8 1st Street Theatre 
Next Week 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

Continued from P<f« 7 sad ■ 



WARWICK 

(Last Half) 

_ Opening .Thursday, Berk^and Broderick, 
man and woman, held number one posi- 
tion, and won favor with their dances. 
They opened with an up-to-date cabaret 
number, followed by solo dances. They 
then gave a number which can best be 
described as a ragtime waltz and finished 
with a whirlwind acrobatic affair. 

Harvey and Ashton, man and woman, 
with songs and a pianologue, held down 
number two spot and scored a big hit." 
They render a half dozen songs and the 
man plays an instrumental medley, 
j Evelyn May and Company, a woman 
and two men, presented a dramatic sketch 
and won full approval. The sketch tells 
the story of a young telephone operator 
in a hotel, who is -Questioned ~>by a de- 
tective concerning calls received that day 
for guests. He tells the girl the police 
captain has been, "beaten up" by a man 
named Webster and wants her to tell 
him when Webster phones. The girl re- 
fuses to aid him and, later, is approached 
by a fellow who wants to take her to 
the theatre. Being a stranger to him, 
she refuses. He then forcibly kisses her, 
but 'immediately regrets the action.. He 
goea into, a booth to phone and the girl's 
brother calls her. She learns then that he is 
Webster. The detective then appears and . 
asks for the name of the "skirt" Web- 
ster phoned to as he heard the message 
on a branch wire. As she still refuses 
to aid him he leaves. 

Meantime, the stranger, who has over- 
heard the whole thing, and knows that 
Webster is the brother of the girl,' .leaves 
the room unseen. He is arrested by the 
detective as Webster and asks to be alone 
with his sister. This is granted and he 
tells the girl hell let the "bulls" lock him 
up as Webster till her brother can get 
away. She realizes then that the man is 
making amends for his insult to her. 

Began and Renard, two men, with song 
and talk, scored heavily. They work in 
-one with a special drop representing a 
hotel office. One appears as a traveling 
salesman, the other as a Hebrew bell hop. 

"The Dairy Maids" closed the bill. 
This is a clever musical tab, employing 
three principals, two men, a woman, and 
six chorus girls. B. W. 



PROCTOR'S 125th STREET 

(Last Half) 

The show was opened by Hill - and 
Sil vany, a man and a woman, ' presenting 
a cycle act. The turn is featured by the 
final stunts which the man performs on a 
unlcycle. 

Hayes and Wynne, in the second spot, 
sing fairly and do several clog dances ex- 
cellently.. The Irish-Jew number is well 
rendered.' 

Weber and-' Bedford do a novel juggling 
turn which will be further reviewed under 
New Acts. 

Webb and Bomaine have their sure Ere 
song hit right at the beginning of their act, 
the singer cleaning up at every perform- 
ance. His singing voice, while by joo means 
perfect, is of the quality that makes a 
strong appeal The U-boat gag in the act 
is used with much greater effect by Clark 
and Verdi. It might, be better for the team 
to eliminate all talk and stick to vocal and 
instrumental work Jf'ff^ffr* V- - * 

"Madame Bluebeard," reviewed last week 
under the billing of "The Department 
Store," is a sure-fire laugh getter. One 
cannot give too much credit to the leading 
comedian. He could extract laughs from 
an -undertaker and, immediately upon his 
entrance, the house is convulsed with 
comedy. •• • --•*• 

The Kauffman Brothers, working In 
blackface, harmonized well and delivered 
an effective line of cross fire. 
. Wolford's . Animal* do nothing particu- 
larly sta r tling, and che act is saved by one 
little monkey, which carries off the comedy 
honors and whatever other honors there 
..may be in the .act. •.:.":;. H. G.. 




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28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 12, 1917 



SAM HARRIS CO. 



"His Night Out" 



Working 



In Yaudeville 



NICK VERGA 

The Young Caruso 



In V«od«TOI« 



Direction JACK LEWIS 



AMINA 

The Spanish Violinist 

Booked Solid Playing Loow Tim* Management F. Walden Thank Yon! 



HOOPER & BURKHART 

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Kwr Act Soon— "At th e Foat Caaae," by Jobs P. Mnltmr (Fully Cu py righ t e d? 
Direction IRVING COOPER 



FRANK E, 



JANE 



Ilio-frt a "d Mora 

A Mirthful Pair in a Comedy Skit 

By LEA L>. FREEMAN. IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOBBY HENSHA W 

The Human Ukulele 

A REAL NOVELTY BOOKED SOLID D&v HARRY SHEA 



AT L A N X I S and F* I S K 

SPECTACULAR NOVELTY ARTISTS 



The Oafcr Act ef It» Kind. 



13 MINUTES OF MERRIMENT 



DIRECTION ABE TH4LHEIMER, F»XJT1VAN4 BLDC. 

TASMANIAN TRIO 



Vers&tiLa 



•ufcd - Aravbxcxi Tttnibl«TT? 



IRENE LATOUR and ZAZA 



Direction Jaa J. Armatrong 



In VauderiHo 



The MARTIANS 

ri^jllitiia wr and ori«maL Cskuntctar, ■r.wiry. co«txna*«, apMabiT xatmc 

CootortioTA UlleW^UMBB- 

DIRECTION MAX OBERNDORF / '_■ 

— WINTER & HANLEY ■«-* 

I. "ON THE CORNER" Sinymtv Talking Da 

ai. SHAW fit LEE » 

IB Nor^l Eccentric it irm a 

— JESSON & JESSON 

VAUDEVILLE HARK LEVY 



ada Keser 

The Belgian Nightingale 

PUyiai tk» L oair Circuit D lrtt fa n Too* loom 





Direction HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWERS 

Booked Solid 

U. a O— BIG TIME 



— FR ANCETTI SISTERS **■ 

playing- Loew and Fox Time ■ Booked by 



WALTER SONIA 

1VIA1MXHEY& BARABAN 

Met t> Whfi. Avar at Thee Of VAUDEVILLE 



THE HENNINGS 



REFINED J.COMEDY 
NOVELTY OFFERING 

Direction Chat. Fitzpatricfc 



EARL M. PINGREE & CO. 



In "MISS THANKSGIVING" 



DfavcooB P— If A Jtccim 



Irene 

Of Original Carfcrey Brothers. 



Douglas 



BRUCE and 

A NOVELTY IN ONE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



LEW CARLE & INEZ DOLLY 

in One. Oat of the Oilfieeij. m Zi .'.', Dir. Sua 



TTVOLI 



Tsn 



JaVsadiiilte 



It 




IITte"(ttr Magician 

FN VAUDEVILLE 



MEMBCR M.V.A. 



MAUDE 



DUNN 



"SUVY- 



Lady An buru Qneen Bonypart. Direction Mark Larry. 



MAYO 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



KENNETH GRATTAN & CO. 

La "THE END OF A PERFECT DAY" W VAUDEVILLE 



IN STUDIES OF LIFE 



Di VAUDEVILLE 



TANEAN BROS. 



PLAYING U B O TIME 

September 13-14-15 Keith's Bijou, Philadelphia, Pa. 

September 17-18-19 . Orphcum, Altoona, Pa. 

September 20-21-22 . . „ . v. . -Majesti c , ' Harriabarg, Pa. 



September 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 




Im aardar la avoid mistake* and to bum* too piuuutt dslivery of tha 
as this list. a POSTAL CARD must b* Mat nqaMmi oa to forward yoar 
as aiaaad with your full nam* and taa aililiaai to which Oa lattar la to oa 
■has p haahiaaa foUowad Jar tha aaadar ahoald ba maatfoaad. 

Maaaa maatioa tha data (or oumbrr) of tha CUPPER in which Oa 
wan adunlaad. 



It must 
t, aad taa 



tatters aaat for 



Atlintli A Flai 
Areud. Peter 
im Mtthle 
Brown, Geo. L. 
IHIHnp. J. J. 
gaaa ll. naaili 
Borlsf. Edwin 
Blair, W. W. 
Bailer. Leo B. 
Gut. Henry 



Bernini. Boas 
Bond. Icon* 
Bennett, Billto 
Barke. Grate 
B u i In t er . Dolly 
Barmen. Ubby 

cm) 

Brian, Irene 
Bffllna. to.. 

9E 



Clifford. Vletar 
Cltirj. Vsl C 
CbifBOD. Wm., 

K 

De Coarser. Alfred 
De Ten. Mtttr 
Ford. EafjBt 
Fates, Beats 
Proeblieta. Mirths 
Gold, ad 



Colby. Bonnie 
Clirtson. Bnile 
Callahan, Annie 
Delraar, Hsrle 
De Forest, Cortcne 
Dtmn. Mirtiret 
Dslton. Mariorie 
Dm. Mia D. 
Deimar, Ethel 



GENTLEMEN 

Hisro Kins. Thos. J. 

Hemralat. Alf Klllhrlde. Percy 

Howard, Gesa Urrrtt, Bentfonl 

Hodge, Edwin Link. Harry T. 

Hinders * Shel- Harlow, Charlie 

* doc- Harpby, J. Itwo. 

Haacill. Loa Martlcj, Frank 

Junes. C J. Keren. Walter 

Johnson A Back- lulton. Geo. 

ley Morris, Ed. 1. 

LADIES 

Esdes. Elsie Jewell. Dot 

■w» Mrs, Jack getst. Lorraine 

Sr&.^Msr, «■ SB Luu " 

Cray. Maod MeBrtde. Masai. 

Ball. CkO Mimtna, Mrs. B_ 

Hffll. Anna Msro. Vlrlao - -.' 

JohaaOD, Otoe- : . VeDonOath, Ethsl 

Tins . ..* -*-' rtarrls, .Vtosjle " 



Mian. Wm. A. 
Newton. Harry A. 
Ort. Fred 
O-Nell. Eddie 
Ptmkl. Lewie J. 
Bran. Prsnk W. 
EtBat. Ben 
sUyaand. Fred 
Shu. Harry 
8ylTester, Harry 



Noblett, Venxs 
Potter. Edith 
Raymond, Moos 
Robertson. Jean 
Shannon, Made- 

Ssfetta, Mrs. H. 
wrfc, stay 



Small. Wo. 
SUwat. wm H. 
Titan, X. 
Taylor, Cbss. K. 
Taylor. Jaek 
TtstUIo Bros. 
Taa. T. Y. 
Wills ft anthem 
Warwick!. Tha 
West. Henry 
Wtlck. E. C 



■Wayne, Kstbrjn 
WaaUnrtOD, 

Fannie 
Worth. Oln 
Weston. Ethel 
WoUTbeiB, Kiss 
WhiUor. Sadie 
Zarrow. Hra. H. 

D. 




Albert Gallatin for "The Family Exit" 



Mabel Carrntbers, by John Cort, for 
"Toe' Verdict" s; 

I £ 1 — I 

TOtor Morley, *by Madison Corey, for the 
"Grass Widow." 



Theodore Babcock, by John Cort, for 
"Johnny Get Your Gun." " ' 



Florence Reed, by Elliott, Comstock & 
Gest for "Chn' Chin Chow." 



Martha Mayo, by William Harris, for 
"The 13th Chair." 



Ramsey Wallace, for the new Josephine 
Victor production, "The Victim." 



Cyril Keifhtley, by Lodewick Vroom, for 
"-Broken Threads." 



Eileen Hnban and Julia Dean, by A. H. 
Woods, for "On With' the Dance." 



Charles StevensonViby the Shuberts, tor 
"The .Inner Man." 

Graham Velsey, by Cohan & Harris, for 
"The Willow Tree." 



Henry HartsheH and Frederic Balloway, 
by A. H. Woods, for "A Scrap of Paper." 



Fred Nice and Ada May Weeks, -by 
Dillingham and Ziegfeli, for the Century* 



Edna Waddell, by Madison Corey, for 
"The Grass Widow." 



' Georgia Harvey and Florence Earle, by 
Elliott Comstock or Gest, for "Very Good 
Eddie." ■ '. ' •: " '. 



Jerry Hart (tor -the blackface part in ' 
"The Guest of Honor." 



Maude Gilbert, Marion Abbott, -Judy 
Lewis, Joa-Rorkc, and H. -J. Cavfll by 
Oliver Morosco, for "Lombardi Limited." 



[ 



^DEATHS OF THE WEEK 



You'll Not Go 

wto rig if yon send for the Latest and 

greatest collection of comedy 

material. 

THE NEW No. 2 

McNAIirS BULLETIN 



Naw. Brisks aas 
PRICE $1.00 

atoHAlLT-B BU1XXTIH sTO. I contains 

17 bcxxaxoxq stoHOLootrza. 

10 OHXAT ACTS FOB TWO BALKS. 

t ROARXKQ ACTS FOB MAXX AJTD rX- 



•ANIIOU8 



11 8URE-TTO PAXODIKS. 

A COMEDT SKETCH. Untitled 

TO OUT RICH." 
• xrrxSTXXX. mai-r abts, main*- with a 

scraaatina; Finals. 
A TABLOID CO ICED Y ASS BTIXLISaTJX ; 

also hundreds of Cross-Firs Oaaa and 

Jokes. Remember the pries of sfe- 

NALLY'B BULLETIN No. 1 U only OXX 

DQTiT.ATi par copy, with i 

antes. 

mLswtNAlLY, 81 E. 125U. St, New York 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

E V ER Y HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Lit arty St, T A H. ■ II •. H. 
aad at Hidalrht with alias an 

II MINUTES OF THK HOUR 

From W. ad St. 

VOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult 1*. W. HEROY, E. P n 

Mai BROADWAY. NEW YORE 



Jack Housh 



Kathryn LaVelle 



WHEN THE WORM TURNS 



I 



Wearers. Raar-aatatlr. WAYTIE CHRISTY 
Eastern Bewreea ataU sa rETF. MACK 

Wharfs tha Fh-al N. V. A. WlaVwT MEt 



*a> 



m 



J AM^S J. BOSCMELU, atred thirty-two 
Tears, a film salesman, died of Bright' a dlsr- 
aaae in St Mary's Hospital. Decatur. HI, 
jut.week.' He was there on a business trip . 
; Tor the Allen Film Corp. Hia home was 
: in Elisabeth, N. J., where lie -lived with -an :'- 
■- unmarried sister. •. -. 

-MOTRV J. BROCK, a motion picture pio- 
neer owner of theatres In various parts of 
Canada and Europe; and well known In the 
amusement field In this country, waa killed 
' in an automobile accident last Friday. -at . 
Kingston, N. Y. The deceased, who was 
forty- two years of age, founded his fortune- 
. as the junior partner of the Mark-Brock 
Enterprises. - Which originated the penny 
arcade system In the early days of mo- 
tion pictures. The Mark-Brock concern 
g r e w -with the growth of motion pictures, 
and, finally, when Mark withdrew from the 
Arm Brock succeeded to the entire business. 
Latterly. Brock bad handled feature films 
and controlled the foreign rights to the best 
products of Ameriean producers. He leaves 
"a 'widow and four children. 

JUANITA PERRY, a young bareback 
rider with the Barnum and Bailey Circus, " 
filed In Chicago Last week at theMercy Hos- 
pital from the effect of injuries received 
at White' City. The accident occurred at 
the close of her performance, and -while she 
waa executing a somersault on the horse's 
back. As she made the rise for the somer- 
sault the animal slipped. Miss Perry landed 
on the sawdust and the horse fell on her, 
breaking her neck. She la survived by her 
mother, who lives in Riverhead, LI, N. Y. 
AtONZO FOSTER, proprietor of the Star 
Lyceum Bureau, died last Thursday In St 
Catherine's Hospital, Brooklyn, aged sev- 
enty years. Foster, who established the 
Star Bureau in 1878. formerly managed the 
tours of lecturers and orators, but of late 
years devoted bis attention to entertainers 
and concert singers. He was vice-president 
of the Booking Agents Board of Trade of 
New York. The deceased is survived Try 
hia wife and two sons. 



m 







JOHN MURRAY, proprietor ot the "Ro- 
man Gardens/'' 'in West Forty-second 
Street, and who waa Interested In several 
theatrical companies, died, enddeniy last 
week. His^business has -been conducted 
by Pat. V. Kyne, who baa been bis general 
- mana ger -for the past twOTyears Had will 
continue -In the same -capacity. Mr. "Mur- 
ray is survived by a widow and daughter., 

HENRY WOOD, aged nlnety-aaven yefcrg, 
former chief of .the San Francisco Volun!- 
<eer. Fire Department and later a theatrical 
manager, died in bis home In that city on 
Sept 6. Mr. Wood was the father of Joe 
and Leo Wood, who produce vaudeville 
and girl acts In the Bast He was r a native 
of California, was In Frisco' at the time of 
the '49 Gold, rush and amassed a large 
fortune at that time. 

JAMES E. HENRY (SEE) of the Well 
known vaudeville team ot Henry and 
Young, and manager of Shellpot Park, and 
Srandjrwine Springs, of -Wilmington, -Del., 
died suddenly on- Thursday Sept. S,at his 
home in Wilmington, Del., age forty-seven. 

GEORGE STUMPS, a circus man of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, died" last week of tubercu- 
losis, at a sanatorium in Detroit. He was 
fifty ye ars -of nfee, familiarly' known 'ah 
"Buggy" Stumps and waa master of trans- 
portation for Rlngilng Brothers. John Rob- 
inson and the Hagenback shows for years, 

FRANK H. FEY, died 'August 29 at the 
home of his sister In Allston, Mass., from 
pneumonia. He is survived by his wife, 
Emma De Weale,. a member of the Emer- 
aon Players, and a son, Frank, who is soon 
to go to France with the U. S. army. 

DR. W. A. FORRESTER, fifty-six years 
old. of the Jaa. Welsh Medicine show, was 
killed oh August 30 by being run over by 
a motorcycle at Fulton, N. Y., on Aug. 30. 
During hia career be baa travelled with 
"Doc" Dailey, Win. "YerpUett and Dr. 
Kraus. He la survived by two nrothers. 
The remains were interred at Cleveland, 
Ohio. — 




CHICAGO 



. i n "a , ; i M l 



THEATRICAL SUPPLIES 

Tigfets, Wigs, SnpporWa, <«' f "'" 
- - Hosiery 

• - -\ -Send for Price List 

JOS. H. MASSEY 
lis No. Ita St, Near Areh St, -PUks, Pa. 



^MAfwSC 



CHIGHG0 
fiUnUSCRiPT GO 



wttrtAYs : 



■"UStCAa-COHtWES 
■^^-STASLOIDS. bt«J.| 



£31 HO. CLARK ST. CHICAGO. ILL 



Reliable Proteaslonal 
FRANCIS X. HENNESSV , 

Irliti.PlICT — BcotcH rlpw — Irish Step Daa- * 
i err — Scotch rung Dancer — VlftUnbt (lfa- 
l tldaii) — Teacher — Plsj Part*. 

322 Satess «•*.. «sw tart. . 




PALACE 

Broadway • 47th St 
MSt. Dsllj at 1 P. at 

2S, SO sad TSc. 

Inrr Night 

24-50- T5-»l»1.50. 



PXIYATS BKUTAsUt 
eXASYXXXE. ADZLAISX 

* htjoheb, LT/cmji 

OAYANASR, BAY OOH- 
SOX ft WHXIAX POO' 
LEY. B NIT A ■ m LEW 
BEAUf, AYOH COXEDY 
FOUR. OAXCTXETTt 
BH08., FRANK CBUX1T. 



1? I T I rVT C 1? Wut 42Bd a '-- *»•* 

fcLllNfjL ^^^r w,d - ■ 

A. H. WOODS yrsssaui 

BUSINESS BEFORE PLEASUBE 

A nsT esmaay by Xaatarae Olass aad Jalaa 
Xoksrt eecdmia. with XAXXXY SXRXAXD 

aad ALEZABIIEB niaa 

LYCEUM § 5?.% r ., w *- ■• 

Xvea. t.U, stats Than, ft Sat. 'at i.l». 

Yirat saasaaaaXaa asrs of a modsra ssaiacy 
aonady aatitlad 

THE LASSO 

By YIOTOX XAFBa, Ce-Antbar of "The 
Xoemeraag." 



GEO. U. 



Theatre. B'way ft 43rd St. 



CO If A M r"^ e Brvsnt" 392. Bts""^ 8.°B. 
3. FXED liTXllTtRXAX prsssata 

THIS WAY OCT 

A aww comedy By FE1NK OBAYZX. 



"CHEER UP" 

AT THE 



. Stared by 
X X BtTANglDB 



UATlhtT 

HIPPODROME 

Sasta 6 WasU Assad 



BHJVSCO 



West 44th St. ETenlars it 
8.80, ItetlDeea Thoradaj and 
Saturday at 2.30. 

DAVID XXLASOO Praasats 

POUT WITH A PAST 

A Ownsdy by Oaarars X lddlstea aad Gay Balsas. 

17Arfl>TDI? Broadway ft 40th St. Xvaa. 

Caurllllj 8.15. Mats. Wed. ft Sat. X1B. 

faaTaasaawaal FB0HXAN Pnaaata 

Jnlia Sanderson Joseph Cawthorn 

-la tha -Xaw Xosleal Oamady 

RAMBLER ROSE 

{1 aVlVI'V Bntiwty ft 48th St, Iras. 

W4*a\IEi M. X 8.1S, Mats. Wed. ft Sit. 2JS, 
Direction Xlaw ft ErlaOaTST, Qso. a Tyler. 

THE COUNTRY COUSIN 

By Beath Tsrkiartoa -4V Jalisn tHrsst with 
ST.TrrswDs^s. nsaT.TarsF 

REPUBLIC SSf £ 8 * ,.rt t SS: 

Xsasara. Untbart praaaat 

JOHN B ARRXMORE CONSTANCE COLLIER 

LIONEL, BARRYMORE 

" la tha Drsmstlo Trtomph 

PETER 1BBETSON 
HUDSON lTeX.^T? 5 ; B KSSi 

Wedseadsy ft aapaXway HAS. 
-Xalp*> Hers offer, a farce with Wnsle 

"GOOD NIGHT PAUt" 



-Traak -Istler, : ZLtsjrtwtt Xorray. Aaotsr 

tUsie, BerreU -Barbarwtto, Loaiss Xsllsy. Hslph 
Hers. 

fWvSffiF5HS5xl* = 

Hsar^.-R Ha rris Erts ts, Dpi - 
Tha af SXSXS . SmTBZXT Present 

MR. WALKER WHITESiDE 
in THE PAWN 



"The Theatrical 
Route" 

Comfortable steamers leave New 
York, Pier 32, N. R» foot Canal 
St 6.00 P.ML, West 132d St 6J0 
P.M. dairy, inclodingr Sunday; also 
Sunday morning st 9J0 for At 
bany, Troy and the Ncrtk. 

Save money 
•j . Travel m comfort 

HUDSON NAVIGATION COMPANY 



30 



T H E NEW YOR K C fel PRE R 



September 12, 19J7 



B.F. Keith's Circuit oi Theatres 

" A. PAUL KEITH, FrnHiH K. F. ALBES. V h» f W . A Oaa, afar. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DIRECT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODGDON, 
Muuger of the UNITED 



OFFICES 

F. Keith's Palace Theatre Building 
NEW YORK crnr 



DOLLY & CALAME 

Nifty Little Pair 

In Sorif » and Dance Direction Bcsrie Royal Alwaya Working 



EDITH HOCKERSON 



ELEONORE KOBUSCH 



FIVE MELODY MAIDS 



EVA BASCH 



BESSIE PECK 
N.V.A. 



FRANCES FISKE 



ELSIE 



HARVEY 

Crazy Movement* 



CEO. 



AND 



ASHTON 

Direction Low Leslie 



LAIDLAW 



In Vaudeville 



Direction HUGHES and SMITH 



ROSE * CURTIS 
Eutm Rial. 



BEEHLER * JACOBS 
W«»tan» Rapt. 



And HU Talking Violin 
BOOKED SOLID 



II II 



■' Tba Tcrpaichorean Artiat* Supreme '^ /• 

STAFFORD ® IVY 

- ••■■ u Varioo. Modaa of Oataical Da»da». Dirortin. Sol U^<r. 



THE 



2 WHITE STEPPERS 2 



LOAW CIRCUIT 



DIRECTION, CHAS. FJTZPATRICK 



BLANCHE 



Mclaughlin & evans 



"Courtship on die Bowery" 

B(, Talkmif and Ducb( In VaoaWffla. 



N. V. A. 



JOE 



MARGARET 



COOPER & LACEY 



MBM BB WBB Dancing 



In VauHcrvill o 



Gallarini Sisters 

IN MUSIC 

Direction PAT CASEY and WM. MORRIS 



WILLIAM WAHLE 

MANAGER, OLYMPIC THEATRE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



HELEN MORETTI 



in a Novelty Singing Specialty 



Now oa Loaw Circuit 



Direction — MaadaO &Rou 



MARY DONOGHUE 

Sparkling (Single) Songstress 
PUy ing Utw Circuit — Tbanka to M andal and Roaa 



ED. r. REYNARD 



BIANCA 



laaSarfaa al 



MLLE. BIANCA 
. ED. r. 



REYNARD 

Taa Vaatiaiiqalat Ca— Oaay 
at "BEFORE THE COURT." 



Minnie <" Bud "> Harrison 

"The Girl From Dixie" J 
Direction Roaa * Cnrtia la Vaodavilla Mar. Maa Window 





IN SONGLAND 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



» ROBB - ROBERTSON 



MICE 



i Taatr OlVMl datatfeft "Baek ta Bcaooldaya" 

D ir a cli oa of Tlialhahnar aVSofraaaU 



laVi 



FREDRIKS AND PALMER 

Lo«w Circuit Ncr» '. '. ' '" 



LOUIS PINCUS 



WILLIE EDELSTEN 



KENNEDY and KRAMER 

PaeMhif MAUDE KRAMER (Etct See Hrr D«ih:c7) Dir. CHAS. FrTZrATRICX 






— 



J^tp 



TOM 





?£»■ 



NAD A 



B;ELI,E 

A Vaudeville Confection 



la THE NEW JANITOR 



MULLEN 

Tha Riot of Evary BO 



September 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



STOCK AND REPERTOIRE 

(Continued from page 13.) 



RUTH SHARPE JOINS EMERSON CO. 

Lawrence, Mass., Sept. 8. — Rath Shnrpe 
joins the Emerson Players this week at 
the Colonial. "Sinners" is the current 
bill with "Common Clay" underlined for 
next week. 



DUBINSKY STOCK OPENS 
St. Joseph, Mo., Sept. 10. — The Du- 
Winsky Bros.' Stock Co. opened an engage- 
ment here to-day under the management 
a/ Ed. Dubinaky, in the comedy drama 
"Onr Wives." 



COOPER-BAIRD CO. IN 6TH YEAR 

Zamesviixe, O., Sept. 9. — Mr. Cooper 
and Miss Baird, of the Cooper-Baird Stock, 
now in its seventh successful month, here, 
are in their sixth year of co-partnership. 
They have given Zanesville a stock com- 
pany it is not likely to forget soon, for they 
present a class of plays which, heretofore, 
were played here by road companies only. 
The play- announced for presentation dur- 
ing the next week is "To-Day." 



DOT PHILLIPS RE-ENGAGED 

AlXENTOWN, Pa., Sept. 9. — Dot Phil- 
lips has finished her stock season here, 
which was one of the best for W. D. 
Fitzgerald. Miss Phillips is a favorite 
here, having played for four consecutive 
seasons, with the result that she has been 
re-engaged for next season. 



EDISON CO. TO OPEN SEPT. 24 
The Madge Edison Stock Co. will open 
its season on Sept. 24. 



CHAMPLIN CO. HAS RECORD WEEK 

The Champlin No. 2 Comedy Co., under 
the direction' of H. M. Addison, played to 
$2,500 at the Lowler Theatre, Greenfield. 
Mass., last week. This establishes a record 
at this theatre. 



WANTED— Location for Maddocks' Park Players 

Permanent Stock, will lease, rent, or play on percentage any first class 
house. Address FRANK L. MADDOCKS, 14-A South Davis Ave., 
Richmond, Va. 

WANTED Sevan Leading Men, Five. Heavy Men. Tim Canard Actor, with 
w w ^T j . Spaeialtiae— to take the places ot those drafted with eleven of the 

beat stock and repertoire companies west of the Mississippi. Alan want two Ingenues three 
General Business Women and lour Specialty Teams. State lowest first letter, send photos and 
■/warns if I don't know you personally. At. MAK1NSON. IIS Grand Ave.. Kansas City. Mo. 

WANTED— TEN NIGHTS PEOPLE 

Full acting company for Ten Nights in Bar Room. Quick. State lowest salary 
•fiS,?" first letter. Pay your own hotel. Agent capable of securing guarantees. 
EDWIN DALE, 49gL»W. Exchange St., Akron. O. 

WANTEI?-STOCK LOCATION FOR 
"Happy" LOU WHITNEY ISSoSS— 

One or two bills a week. 40 weeks Anderson, Ind., last season. Everything 
essential to give complete productions. Will entertain rent or percentage propo- 
sition in any live city. WELSH AND WALBOURN, Imlay City, Mich. . 



OLIVER ECKHARDT PLAYERS 



(lBtK Successful Year) 




esxucuurs, lowest salary, photos, and state 
petent ladles and gentlemen. OLIVER J 



ECKHARDT. Grand 



■st letter, hoot .season to'eom- 
Thaatra, Mlnot, North Dakota. 



WANTED 

"W let; Property Man with SpecUlHaa; Lady 
far specialties and assist star in dressing 
M. R, W. MARKS. Christ!* Lake, Ontario, 



WANTED 

The Best Agent In' America to limn. lie 
proposition on percentage. Must be swell 
•restcr, strong; personality, and be able to 
address lodge meetings. State what lodges 
ran sre > member of, and send photd ,'and 
references. Trefer such a man who is an 
Al pianist. Address PAUL GLAUTON, 
ISIS Aanfanat A**, Evaaataa. III. 



WANTED 

FOR STOCK OR ROAD ... . 

Musical Comedy People 

*f all kinds. Wire or write all. HORWITZ, 
Colonial Theatre, Toledo, Ohio. f . , z - . 



TALL YOUNG LADY 

weald like leading part 'with' dramatic afcateh or 

War in pictures. Good. stage appearance and re- 

•rtkv^Hsre p layed In stock. Address 

raaaTOJM." care ULITPKH. 

AT LIBERTY 

■■ - JXADS-HEAVTES-CHARACTER 

Frank lVforley 

Wardrobe, Experience, Reliability. Rep.' or 
ftffk Can join on wire. Salary, your limit. 
Address 9 Johnson Place, Keshsbnrg, N. J. 



WILLS' MUSICAL TABLOID 

Can use., good-straight man, . singing 
woman, and 'a' few smart chorus girls. 
Write. 14($ Woodhaven Ave., Wood- 
haven, N. Y. 

' ~*V ' AT LIUERT Y 

■ LIHt an Lord 

'■••'i, haavie, or second business, age 24. 5' T, 
'. : weight ilO. - 

Berenice Lennox 

'Jaganu or aeabratta, aga St, a* 4", weight' 18J. 

' - * ' 8 pod al U as . 

Experience and reliability. Stoclt,' good rep. or 
one piece. Adaresa 11 Albemarle Chambers, 
Boston, w 



N 



E> 



-Location -for permanent stock in Middle West. 
Two bills a week. ' Company now playing tip 
in twenty-five bills. Vaudeville between act*. 
Operf foVjUg^ business proposition. Address 
J. L. PERCY, car* ot Percy's Attractions, 
Farmer City. 1U, . «j •/;;;■.» ,,...,. „<. ....,, .? 



CULHANE^iC" 
OMEDIANO 

Wants Quick Younaf- Juvenile Bfan. who can 
do Characters: must be right. A year's work. 
State all particulars: age, height, weight: 
photo and program; pay own; week stands. 
Address Will E. Culbane. Binghamton. N. Y. 



Wanted .For Repertoire 

Seeetany ass aha ran change entr night. Mast sees! 
Is ■iSss. TlMBsS* P I WW anf arse. Company plsn) «ntk 
stands East. Addreaj IDDD 



BSD CSV, ears CHsser. 



YOU 



Say You Are Clever? 

Say You Can Prove It? 

Say You Never Had a Chance? 



Why don't you see or write us, sending photo and full particulars? We 
can use just such people with our big brand new music snow, 

THE NEWLYWEDS' 
GROWN UP BABY 

The Greatest Laughing Show on Earth 

with the somewhat different singing comedian, LOU POWERS, supported 
by clever entertainers, including a chorus of picked peaches. 

LEFFLER & BRATTON 
Knickerbocker Theatre Bldg., New York 



Napoleon was a scream as a BABY. He will be a not as a big school BOY 



Wanted to Support 

PAULINE 1VI AC LEAN 

I Young leading man — the best — Permanent Stock— one bill a week — open 
in ''Seven Keys to Baldpate." Other people write also. ED. CLARKE 
LILLE Y, Samuels Theatre, Jamestown, N. Y. 

PROPERTY MAN WANTED 

Must have experience around a theatre playing dramatic attractions. Also 
must be non-union. Address Manager, P. O. Box 493, York, Pa. 

The Ernie Marks Stock Co. 

Wants Piano Player 

(A. P. ot M.) sight reader and must be able tp tranipost. Must join immediately. Wire Whitby, 
Oat.. Sept. 10-11-12: Coboury. Oct.. Sept. U-14-1S: Barrie. (int.. Sept. 17-18-19. ERNIE MARKS, 
Manager. 



DOUGLAS HOPE FLORENCE MADEIRA 



Juvenil ea and Lug hi Comedy 

Joint Only. Address Cumberland, Maryland 

WANTED FOR 



Rep. people in all lines. Two companies. Permanint stock tab.; fonr to six weak 
stands. Can use good comedian with specialties; heavy man; character woman, »t 
once. .Specialty people write. Open Sept 24. Old. friends ' write JOE . ANGELA, 

Manager,- Brookville. Pa. • ■ < •*■.<• — ••.-_. .-.A. ....'. .■>.-. 

AT LIBERTY AFTER SEPT. IS 
LaA TBLL,E & RYVERS 

ULA R Y VERS 



leada, 2nd bos. Weight, 120, height, 
5 ft. 9; age, 29. 



■ , A, J, LATEIXE 

Comedy and Juvenile*. Weight, 160; height, S rt- Ingenues, 

-... ~\-8wpag»,' oW'jeaiav-y " 

Single and doable specialties, baritone, soprano, stock, rap. or musical comedy. Address » inadatnr It. 

A»fcun. H. T. " : • ■ - - "• '■ ■■■■■■■'■■■---■■•■ ■ ■■ •■■ ■ ■ 

!■■ ■ i i i ■ ■ i i i ii i n I 'UU 

Bargain in Wardrobe 

Handsome evening and walking gowns, size 36 : 38; beautiful set of white fox form, 
one large mink neckpiece, also, a trunkiul of Character wardrobe, including all 
'sorts of costume stuff, wigs, boots, slippers, bats, jewelry and makeup, sold very 
cheap: Address MRS. F. C. BITNER, 302 S. Union St., Olean, N. Y. 

First Class Agent Wanted 

Live agent for one-night stand Musical and Burlesque Snow. Must be first class man and 
hustler. Long season. Good salary to right party. Wire all particulars immediately. This week 
Thursday, Colon, Mich.; Friday, Coldwater, Mich.; Saturday, Three Rivers, Mich.; Sunday, 
Benton harbor, Mich.; Opera houses ..EUGENE WOLLHE1M, Manager "Girls in Toylauo." 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 12, 1917 



BILLY (BEEF TRUST) WATSON'S 




IS NOT A SENSATION— NOT A RIOT— BUT 



A REV 



ION 



A CORKING GOOD, FAST-MOVING PRODUCTION 

Beautiful wardrobe and scenery and played by the following artists: Leo Stevens, Doris Claire, Ben Bard, Joe McCoy, Dolly 
Clifford, Jean Schuler, Vida Sopoto, Daisy Gallagher and 18 regular Chorus Girls. 

ALL THIS WEEK OLYMPIC THEATRE DAN GUGGENHEIM, MGR. 



WANTED 

AT ONCE— Principals, Men and Women— Chorus Girls- 
Leader and Crew — For 

GAY MORNING GLORIES 



Addren CHAS. BAKER, Room 610, Gaiety Theatre Building, New York 



GOOD LOOKING SHOW GIRLS 

WANTED 

Can use a few with good voices and looks. Salary no object to right 
kind. Can also use girls playing instruments. BARNEY 
GERARD, Suite '901-902 Columbia Theatre Bldg., or SAM RICE, 
Mgr. "Follies of the Day." Week Sept. 10— Gayety, Montreal. 
Week Sept 17— Empire, Albany. 




>»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*• —»—♦♦»♦♦♦♦»»♦* 



E BURLESQUE 



That Little Fire Fly 

FLOSSIE EVERETTE 

Burlesque Revue 



GLADYS SEARS 



p& 



\*Z& 



FLORENCE TANNER 



ntGHwntt* 



voic, ww. atkc«tB7 



aadRicnaras 



JULIETTE BELJVIOIMT 

"Juliatte," Gypmy Violinist — Ingenue 



JACOBS aad JERMON 



aTH century maum 



CHARLIE N. V. A. QUINN 



EOEHM & RICHARDS 



ECCENTRIC 



skating DAN MURPHY 

Direction, JACOBS and JERMON WITH BURLESQUE REVIEW 

JENNIE ROSS 

Soubreltc 

"SMILING" NELLIE WATSON 

Ingenue Soubrette 

WITH DAVE MARION? OWN SHOW-A REAL SHOW 



BLACK FACE ORIGINAL. F— toad with "B— t Show m Town" 

HERMAN GIBSON 

and Dmncinx JoTenfle, with Hurti* and Seaman's "Bowery Burle»quer»" 



KATE J»LJLLJVIAI\I 

WITH ROSE SYDEXi-3 UONDON BELLES 



EASTER HIGBEE 

aVw# 1I..Hii«.' Big BWw 



FW 



PRIMA DONNA 



im WulJami 1 Own 



Teresa V. Adams 

;.; -IVWtfcmnn with Hnrti« and a i — im<» "WhtHia CtrBa «W 

L U C I L, L E A iVf E & 



Ingauua SuaLiWa. Gattm« Alan* Nidy With 
JACK REOyS RECORD BREAKERS— SEASON OF 1917-18 



SPORTING WIDOWS 



TEDDY DIJF»OIMT 

The Girl with Pliaiiiig PaCTonalky wtte SOCIAL MAIDS. 

GLADYS PARKER 

BOSTONIAN NUT ' WITH »l,000,O0O DOLLS 

H A R R Y MA N D E L 

Straight with Million DoBar DoDa — 2nd Saason Direction Jacob* and Jarmen 

ETHEL RAY T 3E BLUE 



SOUBRETTE 



SINGER 

HIP-HIP HOORAY GIRLS 



CHARLIE NEIL 

DOING IRISH AVIATORS 



September 12, 1917 



"FtfE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from page 15.) 



MOLLS WILLIAMS 
HAS THE BEST SHOW 
OF HER CAREER 

Mollie Williams, the little lady with the 
greatest, drawing power of amy woman in 
burlesque, is at the Colombia this week. 
She has,- without doubt, the best show of 
her career. It is uproariously funny 
thxoashoot and is interspersed with catchy 
music, well staged numbers, pretty girls 
and handsome costumes. 

Miss- Williams does not appear in the 
first part: She is not seen - until her new 
act is offered. In this, she* shows her dra- 
matic ability. 

The act is programmed as a. "sensational 

playlet" called "The Trap," telling a 
story of an employer who instructs his 
stenographer to call at- bis: home, as he 
wished to dictate' some' important letters. 
She' comes, and- be" tries to embrace' her. 



Bat she repulses him and finally, when 
he brings a gun into play, it is discharged 
in the struggle and he is killed. Miss 
Williams is the stenographer, Frank de 
Camp- the employer, and James Mack the 
butler. 

The act is a novelty to burlesque and fit 
for a two-a-day vaudeville house. Miss 
Williams proves herself a clever emotional 
actress, while de Camp handles his part 
well. 

Paring the second act Miss Williams 
is much in evidence. She offers several 
bright numbers, changing her costumes on 
the stage, surrounded by show girls, and a 
specialty. Her "High Cost of Living," in- 
troducing, the Vegetable Girls; is a novel 
ideai and' well, pat over. "Egyptian Bag- 
time Girl" she- offered- artistically-,, assisted 
by the chorus and several principals. This 
number, however; loses its' fall value where 
it is. It should be placed further up. 
(Continued on page 35.) 



BEN BARD 

A STRAIGHT WITH 

The Clothes, the Appearance and the Diction 

With WATSON'S ORIENTALS at the Olympic All This Week, Who b Adding 
Claaa and Spe«l to the Clasaieat and Spaedieat Show 

in Burlesque This Season. 

DIRECTION ROEHM & RICHARDS 



tttei+ ieveeiitem&f&Q ****?**************** *** * **** 





» > »» gff »»OfrO»00 » »»O tfBf ee»OOg » »0 ^ 00»a^^ 



A REVELATION Ifltf BURLESQUE 

IVIATT KOLB 

Principal Featured Comedian and- Producer 
"DARLINGS OF PARIS" AMERICAN WHEEL 



ALTIE MASON 

PRIMA DONNA HUGHY BERNARD'S AMERICANS 

-PEF^sCIE JUDAH 

American Beauty of Burlesque Prima Donna. "Some Bahies" Still Leading as Usual 

BOB RADKFDC ZAIDA 

rretoc-r «d M3 r%. jW 11 jLLf MV iJ prima 



DONNA 



SIM WILLIAMS' "GIRLS FROM JOYLAND" 



JIM PEARL 

Eccentric Comedian and Dancer. Doing Irish ia Army and Navy Girl*. 

KITTIE GLASCO 

Ingenue of "Hallo America'' 

DoOie CLIFFORD and GALLAGHER Daisy 



Sp*ctAlty 



With Watson'* Orientals 



NEW TO BURLESQUE 



PRIMA DONNA, GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES 



DAINTY BONNIE LLOYD 

SOUBRETTE— GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES Direction, ROEHM «fc RICHARDS 



BEAU BRUMMEL 



WITH SPORTING WIDOWS 



COMEDIAN 




SPORTING 
WIDOWS 



SAlVIlVfY EVANS 

Hebrew Slide and Laugh With Aviator. 





PRIMA DONNA 



INNOCENT MAIDS 



Glad to-be featured with theareatest atrow on tb> Anarican Borlaaqua Circuit, SIM WILLIAMS" 

Girl, from J cry Land, featured aa 



CCI 



»l 



illy Gilbert 



BEULAH KENNEDY 

SOUBRETTE SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 

D'AIM DEIHL 

DOC. QUICLEVS COUSIN 
THE RICHARD CARLE OF BURLESQUE Sim Williams' Girls From Joyland 

VIVIEN SOMXRVILLE 

INGENUE HUGHY BERNARD'S AMERICANS 

IDA IMlI C O L. A I 



CHARACTERS 



SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 



R*jjrtinMr WKijtKiiy Jim GiH 



With Chaa. Taylor 1 . "Darlin.. -f Peru" 



IRENE CHESLEIGH 



BON 
XOIMS 



DORIS CLAIRE 

SOUBRETTE, WATSON'S ORIENTALS. 

MAE DIX 

SOUBRETTE WITH BILLY WATSON'S BURLESQUE W ONDER SHOW 

TEDDY RUSSELL 

The Only Women Producer in Buri—nuo Management Stroma and Franldfav 

PRIMROSE SEMON 



The American Girl 



Featured with "HeUo 



Maud 



In a 



With Hurtia; A. Seamen's "HeUo America" 



Doa 



"Darlings of Pari." 



34 



THE iNEW YOIUC CLIPPER, 



September 12, 1917- 



WANTED 

ALL KINDS OF COMEDY ACTS 
MANDEL and ROSE 
Suite 408, Putnam Bldg. 



1493 Broadway, New York 

Bryant 



Tkf\ Villi rOMPnCr SONGS OR INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC7 If »o, be sure to 
Mt\9 M.\J\J vVmr Vi9B have tame arranged by an expert; an artistic arrangement 
may mean success. I have done hundreds of bis hits. Write or call afternoon*. 3 to 5. 

EUGENE PLATZMANN 145 W. 45th St., New York 

GERTRUDE ROSALIE 

TWO DOLCE SISTERS 

- - SomtwlurB he Bonglanrl 

MILLER, PACKER & SELZ 



THREE GROUCH KILLERS 



Direction MARK LEVY 



Mr. 



Mil 



BERT and LOTTIE WALTON 

CRETONNE DUO Direction PAT CASEY 

NAT. SHACK and CHARLOTTE WORTH 

SONGS AND DANCES. Direction HARRY FITZGERALD 



PERO and WILSON 

EUROPEAN NOVELTY ACT 



Juggling, Barrel Spinning and Jumping 



Playing Lorw Circuit 



Tenney 



The. vaudeville writer of v»od«»illo'a beat aeti, sketches and mono- 
logues. If you own yourself a good act, better let me write it for 
too now. 

ALLEN SPENCER TENNEY. 1493 Broadway. New York. 

BONIGER AND LESTER 



Id Vaudeville 



Comedy, Singing and Violin 



AERIAL BARTLETTS 



LIGHTNING GYMNAST 



BOOKED SOLID 



PERCY 



ML1.F- 



In "The Antique Shop" Dancing Novelty 



Direction. SAM BAERWTTZ 



FLO & OLLIE WALTER 

Direction— Mark Levey 



EMMA 

NOVELTY EQUILIBRISTS IN VAUDEVILLE 

JOHNSON & DEAN REVUE 

IN VAUDEVILLE BOOKED SOLID 

WELLS »>«FISHER 

? WHAT IS IT ? 



FUNNYBONE 

PRICE. 35 CENTS 

Latest monologue*, sketches, parodies, min- 
strel first parts, patter, gags, etc., by Araer 
lea's best vaudeville authors. COMPLETE 
set of FT/ITNYBONE (6 Issues). J1.50. Address 
lUOHMUt 1052 Third Avenue. Hew York. 



Drops and Curtains $12.50 

Painted to order, any size np to 14 by 20 It., In 
either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water color s. A D 
kinds ot SCEN ERY at lowest prices. BCHELL 
SCENIC STUDIO, Columbus, Ohio, 



ACTS 



PLAYS. SKETCHES WRITTEN 

Terms for a Stamp 

E. L. GAMBLE. Playwright 

East Liverpool, Ohio 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

' (Continued from Page 23) " 



'■■SSSSS.S.SMSSMiSSSWeSSSSSSMS.SM 

BLOOKXHOTOS, IBB. 

MaJerBo (First Half ) -Valentine * BeU— Fisher, 
Luckic & Gordon — "A Submarine Attack?' — Tabor 
A Green — Karl Emmy's Pets. (Last Half) — The 
Tan Camps — Earl A Sunshine — Lottie Williams A 
Co. — Harry Boss— Boy A Arthur. 

CEDAB BAPXDB, IA. 

Majeetio (First -Half)— Degnon A Clifton — Geo. 
McFadden— Daniels A Walters— Tennessee Four. 
(last Half)— Wm. Hanlon A Co. — Morris A Allen 
—Belle Olrver-^Fasclnating FUrU. 

'- Chicago, ill. 

■Windsor (First Half)— Paul Fetching A Co.— 
Willing' A Jordan — Chauncey Monroe A Co. — Vine 
A Temple — Velde Badie Trio. (Last Half) — Flor- 
ena Duo — Duval A Slmonds — Donegon A Curtis — 
Moore, Gardner A Boee — Torcat'o Novelty. 

Wilson (First Half) — Earl A Sunshine — AI White 
A Co. — Arthur Blgby — Aaard Bros. (Last Half) — 
Cameron A Tufford. 

Kediie (First Half) — Harvey A Co. — Demarest 
A Collette — Donegon A Curtis — Cameron & Tuf- 
forfl— Torcat'a Novelty. (Last Halt)— Pan! Fetch- 
ing A Co. — Al White A Co. — Arthur Bigby— Aaard 
Bros. 

Avenue (First Half)' — Florenx Duo — Bay A Emma 
Dean — Anderson ft Gelnes — Sextette De Luxe. 
(Last Half)— Hector— Bernard A Merrltt— 
"Honor 'Thy Children" — Anderson A Gelnes. 
OH00KBTON, MINN. 

Grand (Sept, 16)— Denny A Perl— Victoria Four 
— Badlum Models. 

DUXUTH. MINN. 

New Grand (First Half )— The Wonder ' Dog— 
Mitchell A Mitch — "Dr. Joy's Sanitarium." (Last 
Halt) — Aerial Bartletta-r-Grance Linden — Amer- 
ican Comedy Four" — "On the Beach at Waiklki." 
EAST BT. LOTJIB, ILL. 

Erbex's (First Half)— Hays ft Kives— Lucklo ft 
Tost — Basil ft Alien — American Girl Berne. (Last 
Half)— Three Kanes— Schcen ft Walton — The 
Smart Shop. 

FOB! DODOE, IA. 

Princess (First Half)— Wilfrid Da Bole— Carter 
ft Waters — Moore, Gardner ft Bose — Asahl Troupe. 
(Last Half)— Keene A Foxworth— Chief Little Elk 
A Co. — Danlela A Walters — Fred A Albert. 
FOHT WILLIAM. GAB. 

Orpbeum (Sept. 17-18) — Wellington Trio — Omega 
Trio — Sam Hood — Herbert's Seals. (Last- Half) — 
The Wonder Dog— Mitchell A Mitch— "Dr. Joy'a 
Sanitarium." 

OBAND FORKS, B. S. 

Grand (Last HaU) — Vernon A Co.— Mahoncy A 
Rogers — The Balambos. 

OBEAT FALLS, MONT. 
Palace (Sept. 18-16)— Arthur Vaiil A Sister— 
Willie SitiCtli — Davis ft Kitty — Chaa. Wllaon — Zer- 
malne ft Zermalne — Tom Powell's Musical Revue. 
(Sept. 20) — Swsln's Pets — Three Dixie Girls — 
Little Csruso— James Teddy. 

LTVINOSXON, MONT. 

Strand (Sept. ' 18)— Arthur Valll ft Slater- 
Willie Smith— Charles Wilson — Zermalne A Zer- 
malne — Tom Powell's Musical Berne — Davis A 
Kitty. 

LINCOLN, NEB. 

Lyrio (First Half)— Coscta A Verdi— Stone A 
Hayes. (Last Hslf)— Wilton Sisters— The Vet- 
erans. 

Orphaum (First Half) — Superba'a Vision — Foster 
Walker A Henley— Granville A Mack— Billy Kll- 
gard — Five Borstal Troupe. 

U.WIBTOWN. MONT. 

Judith (Sept. 18) — 8waln's Pets— Three Dixie 
Girls — Little Caruso A Co. — James Teddy. (Sept. 
21) — Tossing Austins— Cooper, Simons A White — 
Vivian Earl — "Fountain of Love"' — Lamey A Pear- 

MABON CITY, IA. 
Resent (First Half)— Billy Kllgsrd— Bay Brace 
A Fay. (Last Half)— Spanish Goldlnls — Carter A 
Waters — Spauldlng's Pigs. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINIS'. 
New Palace— Beekless Trio — Ila Grannon — Dun- 
liar's Colleens — Jones A Sylvester — Gilmore A 
Bomanoff. 

New Grand— Danny ft Pert— Victoria Four- 
Radium Modela — Balancing Stevens. 

' NORTH YAKIMA,. WASH. 

Empire (Sept. 16-17)— Mllo Vsggs ft Co.— Kroger 
A Kins: — Eatson ft little — Burglars' Union — Bel- 
glum Trio— Fatrman ft Patrick. (Sept. 21-22)— 
Deveaux, Bell A Joe— Virgil A La Blanche— Jen- 
nings ft Barlow— Eugene Page Players— Le Petite 
Elra — "When We Grow Dp." 

OMAHA, NEB, 

Empress (First Half) — Keene ft Foxworth— 
Chief Little Elk ft Co. — Link A Robinson — Mndge 
Morton Trio. (Lest Half)— Walter 8. How ft Co. 
—Granville A Mack— Billy Kllgard — W1U Stanton 
A Co. 

(Continued on page SS) 



KL AW TO AID U. S. 

Upon receiving a request from Secretary 
of War Baker last week to become a 
member of the Commission of Training 
Camp Activities, of which Raymond Fos- 
dick is chairman, Marc Klaw immediately 
wired his acceptance. He will commence 
his new duties immediately, 



CLYDE PHILLIPS 

Offers That Bemuttfnl Act 

MABEL 

NAYNON'S 

BIRDS 

Not just an act, but a big, 
bright, sparkling spectacular 
novelty feature. 

When a manager offers this 
show to his patrons, he is 
giving them something for 
their money. . 

Palace, Little Rock. Ark. 
Sept. s-ls-11-12. 




Bal's Dreadnaught 




AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

» Inch..,. flMe M Inch.. Cl.sS 

32 inch. U.OS M inch.. 

M bub. ,. BUs «• inch.. 



42 Inch tZUe 

WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

148 W. 45th St., M.Y.' 4 W. 22d St., N.Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 



Mail Orders Filled,. .Same Day Received 
' P Deposit Required 

MANUSCRIPTS FOR SALE 

To Publishers. Cash or Royalty. 
Oar Flag — Oh Help the Bed Cross Today — Wave 
On Old Glory, Wave On — Come Across My Boys, 
Come Across — Where the Mill Stream BJpples 
Past — Keep the Home Fires Burning — We're on 
Our Wsy to France — Three Cheers for Our Soldiers 
and Sailors snd Their Mothers, Too— The Begin- 
ning of the War — Stand Up for America— If 
Every Mother's Hesrt Was Like Yours — I Am on 
My Way Back Home — With the Yankee. Boys In 
Fraocs— Our Flag — Ilold the Trenches — Those 
Cuetles We Built la the Sky — She Is the Ideal of 
My Heart— When the Bugler Sounds the Call — 
And We Won't Come Home Till Germany Is 
Conquered — Don't You Think Yon Could Learn to 
Love Me— Take Me Way Down South— All Hall 
Oar Boys la Kliokl Clad— Thoa Art Like Onto a 
Lily — The Boys Are Marching Away — My Coun- 
try's Calling Me — Oh Sammy What Are You 
Going to Do— Old Glory — I'm Going to France, 
Good-bye — The Picture of My Mother and My Dad 
— Oar Country's Call — Broken Home Ties — Hnrrsh 
for America — Kaiser BUI, Sam's on Your Trail — 
We're the Husky Frisky Boys of Dncle Sam— 
The Soldier's Soliloquy — Dennis O'Dowd ' Goes 
Abroad— America's President— Neath Oar Bed. 
White and Blue — I Will Miss Yon Dearie aa 
Mnch as You Miss Me — While the Drums Boll 
Again for America — No Smiles for Me of Late — 
Shall We Let Germany Bule and Buln This 
American Nation — Hold the Trenches, the Ameri- 
can Men Axe Coming — On to France, Oh France — 
A Soldier's Last Good-bye — Cheer Old Glory — Be 
True to Dncle Sam — Come Along Boys, Dade Sam 
Is Calling You — Once More Old Glory — Dncle 
Sammy's Sammies — The Time Hss Come for 
Every Man to Be a Soldier— There's No Sach 
Place as No Man's Land— Liberty — Let Dncle 
Sam Do It— For the Stars snd Stripes and You— 
I'm a Patriotic. Waltrlotlc Girl — The Last of the 
Fighting O'Nells — Uncle Bam Hss the Millions 
and the Men — When This Cruel War Is Over — My 
Boy Is Now a Soldier — Our Sammy's Gone to 
France — I'm Longing for My Tennessee Bose — 
Fighting for D emocracy and the Good Old D. S. A. 
BBENNEN. 14S1-MS3 BROADWAY, 
NEW YOBK, N. Y. 



WARDROBE PROP 

TRUNKS, $5.00 

Big Bargain. Have been need. Also a tew 
Second Head Innovation and Fibre Ward- 
robe Trunks, jit and 115. A few extra large 
Property Trunks. Also old Taylor Trtraks 
and Bsl Trunks. 
Farter Fleer, » W. list St, Near York Crty 



"BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER" 



September 12i-1917' 



THE NEW WICK CLIPPER 



35 



"tit 



burlesque; NEWS 

( Continued from page 33.) 



XI* /"Winei Woman and Song" ."num- 
ber. i» another odd but clever number of- 
fered by Miss Williams and Mentis, All 
and' Gilbert- , 

The comedy of the production is well 
taken .cere .of by Ambark Ali, Billy Mc- 
Intyre and Bob Gilbert. All offers a dif- 
ferent line of comedy than has been seen 
at the Columbia this season. He works 
easily and in an eccentric manner. His 
tumbling and odd clothes caused no end 
of laughter. 

Billy Mclntyre does a corking good 
black face. His witty lines were well 
received Monday afternoon. 

Bob Gilbert is doing a fine eccentric 
comedy role. He is a dandy dancer as 
well. . The three men work nicely to- 
gether. 

May Sheridan la an excellent prima 
donna with a sweet voice. She has a 
beautiful wardrobe and looks particularly 
well in tights. Her "Help Help" went 
over big as well as "Tillie Tip Top, Some 
Top." 

Nell Gilbert is a lively soubrette who 
does many acrobatic stunts in her num- 
bers.' 

Florence Kelly, as shapely as in the past, 
is a .picture as "Columbia." Her • suf- 
frage bit was well rendered. 

Earl Sheehan is a good "straight" and 
a fine dancer. "His Rolling Chair" and 
"Willie Slick, He's Slick" number were 
encored. 

The chorus, of twenty girls' were a 
sprightly lot in their many changes of 
coBtumes, which are an array of many 
colors carefully selected and prettily de- 
signed. The girls sing and work with 
plenty of vim. 

The phonograph scene, worked np by 
Ali, Mclntyre and several principals, i& 
funny. The banana bit, by All, Mclntyre 
and Sheehan, causes no. end of amusement, 
and the motion picture~bit by Mclntyre, 
Ali, Gilbert and Miss /Sheridan is a big 
laugh. All the scenes, and bits, were nicely 
pnt over. ! Jj* 

Nell and Bob Gilbert offered a good danc- 
ing specialty. The comedians burlesque 
the dance, and do it well, but should wait 
until the specialty is over, as it detracts 
from the other act 

Sheehan and Bob Gilbert offer a neat 
dance. 

Mclntyre and Sheehan do a good 
comedy talking act in one, opening the olio. 
Mclntyre gets a lot of laughs with bis bat. 

The show ran smoothly for its opening 
Monday and scored a big hit. 



AGENT STRANGELY LOSES TRUNK 

Cleveland, O., Sept. 7. — Charles 
Kaster, agent of the "Follies of Pleasure," 
lost his hotel trunk in this city last week. 
It is a mystery. how the trunk disappeared 
and Kaster has offered a reward for its. 
return. 



BURLESQUE NOTES 



Miss Cora Cohen, of the American Bur- 
lesque I Office, is spending her two weeks' 
vacation at Atlantic City. 



A letter from Billy Hezter dated Wash- 
ington Sept 8 states the "Sightseers" is 
going over at great speed. Will J. Ken- 
nedy, Jack Miller and Harry P. Kelly were 
never better. 



Albert Frank, who is doing a juvenile 
Hebrew character with the Sam Sldman 
Show, is making his first appearance in 
burlesque this season. Frank has been 
with Gus Edwards School Boys and Girls 
in vaudeville.' 




A. FRANK 

Formerly with Gus Edwards' "School Boys 
and Girls," now featured with Sam Sidman 
Show. Columbia Burlesque Circuit. 

WM. F. (Billy) HARMS 

EMPIRE THEATRE, 

Hobokrn. N. J. 
(Member or T. B. C) 



ALAMAC THEATRICAL HOTEL 



F< 
JOS. T. 

Northwest Corner 14th & Chestnut Sta., St. Louis, Mo. 

Theatrical Hostelry, Cafe and Cabaret 

Union Help (Member N. V. A. and Burlesque Club) Beat Bat « the Circuit 



MEYERS and SELTZER, Pr opriet o rs 

ZEISSE'S HOTEL 

PHILADELPHIA . 



Where all Show People meet 
Beat Home Cooking in Town. 
Music Every Evening. 
Pay Us a Visit. 



THERE'S A. REASON 

When "laylno Ptdratdelptiiai Slop sat 

THF lMABI^ARFT 202 N. FRANK UN STREET 

M. nEj 1-1/*.1\.0/A.ll.lll J. MARGARET SHERIDAN. Prop. 



KENSINGTON'S POPULAR THE ATRI CAL. HOUSE 

MOTHER MATHERSON 



1SJ2 E. Cumberland St, PhJUdelphU 



Around the Corner from Peoples Theatre 



STOP 
AT 



Whan Purine the Peoples Theatre, Philadelphia. 

• 1C* 1918-14 E. Cumberland S tr aa* 

Half Block from Theatre 



BUCKLEY'S 



He* .~i r*ia WatJM . a, gamrr Room 



E ur opea n and American 



*>«>s>s)s>s>s>s>a^s>s>s>s»4^s>s>s»s>s»s>s>s>s^^ 

I STARS OF BURLESQUE 



MIDGIE MILLER 

AND THB 

Callahan Brothers emmett 

Featured with Spiegel Revue 




MAYBELLE GIBSON 

LEADS. 

WITH AL REEVES' BEAUTY SHOW 



Bert Bertram! 

Principal Comedian September Morning Glories 



I 


rresiatible 


IVlarveloue 


R 


adiant 


fcj ntertaining 


hi 


ntrancinsr 


Agile 


IM 


atural 


art cfined 


E 


verlaiting 


A musing 




"SPORTING WIDOWS" 



•JEAN BEDINI'S 

ENTERPRISES! 

"Puss-Puss" 
"Forty Thieves" 



JAC 



WOODS SISTERS 

With AL REEVES BEAUTY SHOW 



OLGA 



WESTON— SYMONDS 



JOE 

MAIDS ' AMI KH 



ALFARRETTA 
SECOND SEASON 



FRANKI 

LEADS— SOUBRETTE 



EMI 



SAM SLDMAN SHOW 



•V 



TINY" DORIS Dc LORIS 

Miley Dancer Sim William. "Girl, from Joyland" 

E1VI1V1A KOHLER 

The Prima Donna at Voice, Perm and CUss 
BON-TONS CO. Season 1117-1" 



Well— TOM ROBINSON 

la bach with as once more. Doing Irish with Girls from the FolUas 



SID 



GOLD 



2nd Season with Ben Welsh. Bigger Hit Than Ever. Vaudeville Next Season. 

G E O. I_ E O IV 

HAIR-LIP COMIC-SEASON 1117-111. WITH FRED IRWIN'S MAJESTICS. FRED IRWIN 

AND SAM LEWIS DID IT. 



FLORENCE ROTHER 



PRIMA DONNA 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 



GEO. 

Notorioo. Sensational 



MARTIN 

With September Morning Gloria* 



GEORGE BROWER 



DOING A NEW STRAIGHT 



SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 



36 



Ti^iNgW tMK CLIPPER 



September 12, 1917 



DR. JULIAN SIEGEL, the Theatrical Dentist 



PUTNAM BUHjDIMC^MEW YORK CITY 

EXCEPTIONAL RATES TO THE PROFESSION 



Plum* Bryant MB 



9 WSEBBV Tt*€ * 
PROFESSION 



Send for 1917 Catalogue 
C. A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 

678 I. HUM St. CMMj* 
210 V. 441k St. hsw T«ft 



Theatrical Profession 

ATTENTION 



WlaX~ Stir Haul to the morning or otter 
■tau* trwatuea, I want yon to ham ■ 
sample of Prteefs Indigestion Powder. Seat 
free to any aUareaa. Dealers earrr the 3Se. 
and 41.00 alaaa, bat I want TOO to try It ant 

H. X. PaUZET, Ph. 0„ Baasor Ha. 




TIGHTS 



» pas f LOO. 



— i !**» ajfir. 

Wonted Twos, kasvy •««». 
13.00 a pair. Imparted atlk 
tinted UUrta. la brkjat lad and 
BHdto Brown, only $1.00 a' 
pair. •*"-"— ladtts ta an 
eckn. 43.50 a pair. Baarf T* 
par eatf. latortad am urhu. 
in brliat lad on ty. reduced frapj 
10.00 to 44.00 a pair. Fall 



auu prka at tteBta. 

Mlad DreawUy. Olppw 
rna on separation, 

BERNARD MAlVni . 



Ordn 



«10-tlf w. MADISON IT. 



CKXOA0O. tt.t. 



SCENERY 

Tasatrsa and productions 
▼aadavflla Aots Zaulspad ____ 

HURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO:.', 

444 4th A«... bat. z*-3*th Sis. 
TaL Had. Bq.. MM Tom Crsamw, Mgr. 



Phone Bryant 13SI 



GLOBE-THEATRICAL 
TRANSFER 

Long-and-Short-HauIing, Motor- 
Truck Service 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

MOLES AND WARTS. HOW TO GET 
RIO OF THEM; ASK PROF. BRUECK, 
11 WEST 34TH ST., N. Y. 



*TTCIJTI(itJ w e hoy and sell FLATS, 
HI I Cnl lun songs. aU kinds or goad epa- 
clal material. Music composing and. arranging. 
V. T. PLAT-MTJBIO BUREAU", 4744 Broadway. 
H. T. Brokers. 



Wigs and Toupees 

Scientific Patent 
Granted with Nino 
Superior Claims. 

Notice to our customers and people who 
wear wigs and toupees: We still' hold our 
former prices and our good* are better than 
ever. Write or call; catalogue tent free. 
LO MB ARD BAMBINA CO.. manufacturers of 
the world famous Bambina toupee plaster. 
m Monro. St_ Lm.. Meaav 





a No. 4 



THEATRICAL GOODS 

Wi*. -1 

Tights Y - Catalog*. 

Hosiery J 

Spangle* ) P 

Gold & Silver - CUt-Jcnxo No. 

Trimming* ) 

Jwelry} " c * bdo * vm N * » 

GOLD aad: SILVER BROCADES 
SATINS aa 



Catalogues and aamples 
When asking for catalogue, picaae men- 
tion what goods are wanted: . 

S1EGMAN tfc WEIL 

8. W. Car, matrass aad Hi Sua at n i.Baw Tarn 
The Theatrical Supply Emporium 



YOU CAN RENT SCENERY 

For Try Outi. for VaiitUsiuta ' Aetaj 
Complete Producticma 

We Supply Amateurs and Stock Come 
panics with E-verytJaing 

MILLABD B. FIANCE CO., Set tak Sadies 
444-444. Weak 34th> St. New York) 



Musical Glasses 

Maries! Electric Belli, Coins. Flowtr Ms. 
Punnelf. Xylophones, ete. rat sln to s- ea 
receipt of llamas. A. 4IAUIEISS. 1012 
■aatar aw.. Kftbawas lilt, I. T; 





m her. gamul. way Osart Tast 

STAGE TRAINING 

OrasM. Caaawt. rsaeartlts. Itaas tans. 
ist ass easts flay Isaeai TeeknJeaJ 
aba PrarUeal Cosrsss. Ostorttaw. vfte 



mxnsd oaoar M>. Alness: Insitli 



gal- 
Desa. 

Baatley. Ham fllojr. 
I'asle. Han' roller, Dolly 
Rnlnua. VlrUn f lB S MIt l. 431 

snd oUMn. Writs fay (alilorat ssss- 

Unotai rtodj dnunal 

Arris** Tkaatra Scaaal af Aetata 
47th St, at Brosufw.y 

235 W. oTia St.. Ms* Torfc. 



SECOND-HAND 



G O W IV S 



ANDREWS. 506 S. State St, CHICAGO 



Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQUINS 

6th Aa... baL 27th and 28th Ste., N. Y. 

MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC 4ja P. 44. to 1 A. M. 

CIRCUS and JUGGLING 



Stamp 



Apparatus, Rolling Globes. Uubs. 

Guns, Wire Walkcra* Apparatus and Novelties. 

for catalog. EDW. VAN WYCK. 

itL O 



FOLDING ORGANS 

t Bt3T ON sauc asasssf 



•S&S2: •— $15gg_ 

3i LHORN BROS. as^^K a7 




MADISON'S 

BUDGET No. 16 

Standard Book of 
Stage Fun 

Ma ONE DOLLAR 



MADISON'S 
BUDGET No. 17 
READY IN 
SEPTEMBER 



For 41.60 will send No. Iff at once and ad- 
ranee copy No. IT whan ready. JAM - 
KADDJOB, 10SS Third Arenne, Mew Tork. 



COMPANY ROUTES 

(Contlruiad from Page 25) 



Lady Buccaneers — Gaiety, Minneapolis, 10- 
15; Btar, St. Paul. Minn., 1T-22. 

Mischief Makers— Trocadcro, PhlUL, 10-15; 
South Bethlehem, Pa., 17; Easton, 1810; 
Wllkeabaire 20-22 

Military Maids— Gaiety, Chicago, 10-15: 
Gaiety, Milwaukee, 17-22. 

Monte Carlo Girls — Gaiety, Baltimore, 10-15 ; 
Trocadero, Philadelphia, 17-22. 

MUe-e Minute Girls — Bnglewood, Chicago, 
10-15; Empire, Chicago, 17-22. 

Orientals — Olympic, New York, 10-15 ; Gai- 
ety. Philadelphia. 17-22. 

Pacemakers— Open, 10-16; Lyceum, Colum- 
bus. 17-22. " 

Fat White's— Cadillac, Detroit, 10-15; Gai- 
ety, Chicago, 17-22. 

Parisian Flirts — Century, Kanaka City, 10- 
.15; Standard. St. Louis, 17-22. 

Berlew of 1018 — Empire, Chicago, 10-15 ; Ma- 
jestic, Indianapolis, 17-22. 

Record Breakers — Star, Brooklyn. 10-10; 
Gaiety, Brooklyn, 17-22. 

Social KoHlett — Empire, Hoboken, 10-10; Star, 
Brooklyn. 17-22. 

Some Babies — Gaiety. Brooklyn, 10-lOj War. 
burton, Yonken, N. Y.. 17-19: Hudson. 
Schenectady, N. Y» 20-22. 

September Morning- Glorieee— Howard. Boston, 

10-10; New Bedford, Mas*. 17-18; Wor- 

caatar. 20-22. 
Speedwa* Girts— Oswego. 12 : Ntajanft Fall*, 

1S-15: Garden, Bnttflo, N. T., 17-22: 
Tempters— Gaiety, Fbilaaoipbia, l0=-lo"; M&- 

JeBtlc, Scranton, Pa„. 1T-22; .... 

Whlrly Glrtr, Girls— Star. St. Paul, - 10-15 ; 

Lyceum, LmlnMi, 1<T; open, 17-22; Century, 

Kansas City. 24-28, 

EfinW.-' CIBCTJIT , . 

■ Monday— NewcasUe, . Pav 
Tuesday — Johnstown, Pa. 
Wednesday— Attooaa.. Pa, 
Thursday— Harrlsbarg; Pa. 
Frtd*^Ytyrlc.jK: ^-, 
Saturday — BaaiTlngt Pa. 

MWSTREtS 

.Carter's, Sutann, Black A White— Blrmlng- 
I ham, Ala., Aug. 27-Sept. 1; Chattanooga; 
Tenn.. 4-15. , 

Coburn'B, J. A.— Urbans. O.. indef. 

Field's, AL G., Greater Minstrels— Frankfort. 
Ky., 6; Lexington, 7-8 ; Chattanooga. Tenn., 
10-11; GreenetrrDle, S. C, 17; Spartan- 
burg. 18; Charlotte.' N". C, 10; Durham, 
20 : Greenesboro, 21 ; Danville, Va., 22 ; 
Lyncbbnrg, 24; Norfolk. 25-20; Richmond. 
27 28-20: EnozrUle, 12-13; AabevtUe. N. 
C, 14-16. 

Hav-A-Laf Co. (J. M. Clinton, mgr.) — Ft 
Wayne, Ind., indef. 

Klein Bros, and Ilengler Minstrels — Olean, 
N. Y . SepL 10 : Johnabnrg, Pa., 11 ; Jer- 
sey Shore, 12: Milton, 18; 8hamokln, 14; 
Bunbury. 15 : Mt. Carmel, 17. 

Vogel'a, John W. — Buckeye Lake, Mlllersport. 
6., indef. 

TABLOIDS 

Amlck'a, Jack, Pennant Winners — Folly, Okla- 
homa City, Okla.. Indef. 

American Musical Revue (Oscar Green, mgr.) 
— Leomlnister, Mass., week Sept. 10; 
Fltchbnrg, Mass., week- Sept. 17. 

Hart leu. Myrtle. A Dixie Girls; (Strand) Mo- 
bile. Ala., till Sept. 15. 

Bell Isle Beauties, Lew Goetx, mgr. ; Gamble, 
Pa. — Huntington 10-10. 

Bernard's, Al A Gertrude, Glrla & Boys From 
.Dixie; (Kempner) Little Rock, Ark., till 
-Bspt. 15. 

Delay's Dainty Dndlnes, Eddie Deloy, mgr. I 
(N. H.) Cheyenne, Wy., Indef. 

Lord and Vernon — Henryetta, Okla., indef. 

"Palm Beacb Girls" (Bob Schafer, mgr.) — 
Tent, Macon, Ga., indef. 

Tuckers, Les, Reno Girls — Lyric, Hopewell, 
Va., indef. 

ZBrrow's Zlg Zag Town Girls (Jack Fnquay, 
mgr.) — Palace, Grand Grafton, W. Va, »- 

Zarrow"s American Girl Co. — Altmeyer Mc- 

Keesport, Fa., Sept. 10-16. 
Zarrow's Little Bluebirds (Jack Grant, mgr.) 

— Alvln Mansfield, O., Sept. 10-16. 

CIRCUS AND WILD WEST 

Barnes, AI. G. — Brenham, Tex., Sept. 14 ; 

Houston, Tex.. 15 ; Galveston, Tex., 17 ; 

Livingston, Tex., IS;. Lufkln, Tex., 19; 

Nacocdocbes, Tex., 20 ; Tlmpaon, Tex.. 21 ; 

Henderson, Tex., 22. 
Barnnm A Bailey — Paris, I1L, Sept. 20. 
Cole Brothers Shows — Searcy, Ark.. Sept. 14 ; 

Brlnkley, 15 ; Marrlanna, 17 ; Dermott, 18 ; 

Warren, 19; Montlcello, 20; Hamburg;, 21; 

BoyrUIe, La., 22. 
La Tena— Centrevirie, Md., Sept. 10: Dover, 

Del., 11 ; BridgevUle, 12 : Denton, Md., 13 ; 

Lewes, Del.. 14 : Georgetown, 15 : Mllford. 

17 ; Sow Hill. Md., 18 ; Berlin, 19 ; Laurel, 

-DEL,. 20 : Federalsburg. Md., 21 ; Easton, 22. 

Singling Bros. — Los Angeles, Cal., Sept. 10- 

11-12: San Diego, 18: Santa Anna. 14.; 

San Bernardino. 15: Phoenix. Ariz., 17: 

Tucson, Ariz., 18; Douglas, 19; Ell Paso, 

Tex., 20; Albllene, 22. 
Sparks Circus — Braill, Ind. — Sept. 15. 
Sun Bros. Circus — Brazil, Ind., Sept. 19. 
Shipp A Feltus — En route through South 

America. Permanent address, Rlvartavla 

8S5, Buenos Aires. 
Willard, Jesa, A Buffalo BUI Show — Carrot. 

III., IS; Harrlsburcv 14 ; Cairo, 15; Poplar 

Bluff, 17; Batesville. 18; Little: Bock, 1»; 

Texarkana, 20; Sulphur Spring*,' Tex., 21; 

Dallas. 22. 



e L, I F» -P E R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding, one line in 
length will be published, properly classified; in 
this index, at the rate of $10 lor one- year <53 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement is running. 



CHEWING GUM— BALL— CANDY COATED. 
Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factories Bldg., 

Toledo, O. 

LAWYERS. 
F. L. Boyd. Attorney. 17 N. La Salle St, 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader, 10 Sooth La Salle St., Chicago, BL 
Joseph A. O'Brien, 1402 Broadway, New York 

uty. , 
Edward Doyle. Attorney, 421 Merchants Bank 

Bldg:, Indianapolis, Ind. 

musical glasses: 

A. Brauneiss, 1012 Napier Ave:,' Richmond 

Hiii. n: y. 

MUHC COMPOSED, ARRANGED. 

Chas. L Lewis, 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati. 

OWn. 

SCENEarY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 

Howard Tattle, 141 Burleigh St.. Milwaukee, 

Wis.' 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 



581 -5SS-5B5 South 



High St, , Columbus, O. 
* filstF- ANI* 3AJUE. 



Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

song books: 

Win. W. Delanejs 117 P ark Row. New York. 
STAGE LIGHT EFFECTS, LAMPS 

Newton- Art Wo. ks, JoAv. 15th St., New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goes Co., 10 Atwater St., Detroit, Mich. 

. . THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co., 3X7 Washington St., Boa- 
ton.. Mass. 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Grave* ' Hardware Co., 47" Eliot St., Boston, 
Mass. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 
E. Walker. 309 W. 39th St, New York. 

TRANSFERS. . . 

Walton, 4S5 W. 33d St.. N. Y: 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Bea Hobson. 910 Prospect Ave., N. Y. C 



Don't Miss It 

THE CUPPER 
RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

For SaaaoB 1916.1917 

It contains the names and addreoeee of Man* 
agers. Vaudeville and Dramatic Agenta in New 
York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia. Pitta 
burgh, San Francisco, Canada: Music Pub 
lishera; Theatrical Clubs and Societies; Mov- 
ing- Picture Firms, and other information. 

Sent only on receipt of 2c. st amp, accom- 
panied by a coupon cut from THE NEW 
YORK CLIPPER 



CUT OUT AND 

Send this Coupon and' 2c' stamp for a 
copy of 

THE CLIPPER RED BOOK 

AND DATE BOOK 

(For 1414- HID 

To THE NEW YORK CUPPER 
1444 Broadway. Now York 



MAGIC 



ACTS FOB SALX-tlSXAF. Ws 
Bay, Ball or Kaehanga aasd 
Apparatus, Professional Oata- 
Parlor Trick catalog FRBK. Write ar 
■agio 0a„ Bta. 1. 470 4th At.. H.T 



PLAYS 

ITS MAH080BIFT 



^^ sPlOsQO 

A TEA* 

New winners— Tried Successes. Special Pictorial 
Printing. Bend, stamp for catalog, 8TAOEL0K* 
FLAT CO., 1400 Broadway, N. Y., DawL C. 



SKETCHES 

Acts. Monologues, etc.. written to order. High- 
grade work only. Money' back guarantee. 
Write for terms. WM. DeROSE, 182 N. Michi- 
gan, S. Ei, Sooth. Bend, Ind. 

FRED PLATE 

Trunk and Baggagw Ravolr Shop 

3» Wast 4l»t StswwL New York 

14'yeinj 'with Tsyl ar Tr onic Sforta. , a IWslTe* Ittoej. 



September 12, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



37 




ANITA STEWART 

ENJOINED BY 

VTTAGRAPH 

FULFILL CONTRACT, SAYS COURT 



An injunction restraining Anita Stewart 
from doing any film work until she fulfills 
a contract she has . with the Greater Vi- 
tagraph Company has been issued by Su- 
preme Court Justice G. D. Mullen. This 
injunction was procured when an an- 
nouncement was made that Miss Stewart 
had formed ber own film producing com- 
pany, with Louis B. Mayer, of Boston, as 
president. 

The injunction issued by Justice Mullen 
reads : 

"Ordering that the defendant, Anita 
Stewart, is hereby enjoined from acting, 
appearing in or aiding in the making or 
furnishing to the defendant, Louis B. 
Mayer, or any other person or corporation 
other than the plaintiff any motion picture 
of any kind or character in which she is 
pictured or portrayed prior to the expira- 
tion of her contract with the plaintiff, and 
that the defendant, Louis B. Mayer, bis 
officers, agents and attorneys are enjoined 
from enticing, inducing or causing the de- 
fendant, Anita Stewart, to fail or refuse 
to work in the employ of the plaintiff, 
and from employing the defendant, Anita! 
Stewart, to act or appear in, make or 
furnish, to said defendant motion pictures 
of any kind or character in which she is 
portrayed or pictured, and from in any 
other manner causing or inducing the de- 
fendant, Anita Stewart, to violate her 
contract of employment with the plaintiff." 

The order of Justice Mullen also stipu- 
lates that the defendants are enjoined from 
announcing publicly or authorizing or 
permitting public announcement that Anita 
Stewart' is no longer employed by Vita- 
graph and that she is or is about to be 
engaged by the defendant or any other cor- 
poration. 

The restraining order is one of the 
broadest ever issued on an employment 
contract. It not only forces Miss Stewart 
to keep her contract with Greater Vita- 
graph by preventing her from working for 
any other company, but it also orders her, 
and the persons associated with her, to 
refrain in any manner from doing Greater 
Vitagraph financial Injury by announcing 
that she is no longer in the employ of that 
company, or is in the employ of some other 
company. 

President Smith, in behalf of Greater 
Vitagraph, started the injunction proceed- 
ings immediately upon learning that Miss 
Stewart had signed a contract with Louis 
B. Mayer of Boston to appear for him in 
motion pictures. 

Justice Mullen's order serves notice on 
every individual that the service of Anita 
Stewart belongs exclusively to Greater 
Vitagraph during the length of her con- 
tract, and she must not be Interfered with. 
It is alleged that Greater Vitagraph had 
spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to 
make a motion picture star of Anita: 
Stewart. ^^^_^ 

SYDNEY ABEL JOINS SELECT 

Sydney F. Abel has resigned bis position 
as manager of the Chicago branch ex- 
change of Vitagraph, and has been ap- 
pointed special representative of the Select 
Pictures Corporation. He began work in 
his new position last Monday. 

CZAR INVITED TO FILM SHOWING 

Herbert Brenon several weeks ago sent 
a specially -engraved invitation - to the 
Czar and Czarina to attend the first show- 
ing of the feature picture "Tin Fall of the 
Romanoffs,? which was given last Thurs- 
day evening at the Bitz-Carlton, 



WANTS $25,000- FROM STRAND 

The Despatch Film Co., which distrib- 
utes a motion picture entitled "The 
Crisis," has ' brought an action to recover 
$25,000 from the Mitchell H. Mark Realty 
Corp., operating the Strand Theatre, for 
breach of contract. 

The complaint alleges that the defend- 
ants failed to show this picture at the 
Strand Theatre according to a contract 
they had made with them and, as a re- 
sult, the piature has lost the prestige it 
might have gained through this showing 
and the plaintiff has suffered to the ex- 
tent of $25,000. 

The complaint also states that the Des- 
patch company was to receive $1,000 rent 
and a percentage of the receipts over $16,- 
000 during the week the picture was 
scheduled to be shown. 



FILM SHOWS CHANGE MANAGERS 

Washington, D. C, Sept 9.— There 
was a change of motion picture managers 
here to-day which is of more than pass- 
ing moment as it affects two of our big- 
gest M. P. enterprises ; namely, Tom 
Moore's and Harry Crandall's. Arthur 
Robb, for five years identified with 
Moore's amusement enterprises has 
severed his connection with that organiza- 
tion to become general manager of the 
Crandall Circuit, assuming the duties of 
his new position to-day. George 
Schneider succeeds Robb as manager of 
Moore's garden and Strand Theatre. 



RITA JOLIVET FILM NAMED 
"Lest We Forget," is the title selected 
for the screen drama of international 
events in which Rita Jolivet is starred. 
This picture deals with occurrences in- 
volving the beginning of the war and 
especially the early German invasion of 
Belgium and Northern France, and the 
sinking of the Lusitania. 



CUMMINS BUYS TWO FILMS 

Samuel Cummins, film broker, has pur- 
chased for the Pfaax Pictures Co. a five- 
reel negative for $15,000 from the Trans- 
Oceanic Film Co., of New York, which 
will be released at an early date. . Cum- 
mins also closed another deal for the sale 
of a six-reeler, which involved $20,000. 
This picture was bought from the Coronet 
Film Co.. for one of his clients, whose 
name will be disclosed later. 



CUMMINGS BACK WITH WORLD 

Irving Cummings, after a short experi- 
ence as a producing manager, is again 
back in -the fold of the World Film Corp. 
He begins work on his first picture with 
this organization this week. He is also 
appearing in a vaudeville offering at the 
Hamilton Theatre the first half of this 
week. 

LESSER BUYS MORE FILM 

Sol. L. Lesser has added to his list of 
features, the new seven-reel production en- 
titled "To-Day," featuring Florence Reed, 
and the six-reel feature "The Mad Lover," 
with Robert Warwick, for exploitation in 
California, Nevada and Arizona. The deal 
was consummated through his associate, 
Leon D. Netter during Leaser's illness. 



IRWIN IS BACK FROM WEST 

Walter W. Irwin, general manager of 
Greater Vitagraph, is back at his desk after 
a thirty-day trip which took him as far 
West as Denver, and during which he 
talked with hundreds of exhibitors and 
visited every Greater Vitagraph branch be- 
tween New York City and the Rockies. 



WILL FEATURE TYRONE POWER 

Spokane, Wash., Sept 1L — The 
Washington Motion Picture Corporation, 
capitalized at $500,000 will open a studio 
here and produce films featuring Tyrone 
Power, who is interested in the corpora- 
tion. ........... 



BRADY RELEASES 

COVER NEXT 

5 MONTHS 

WORLD POUCY IS UNIQUE 



Following out the policy established by 
Director General W. A. Brady, the World 
Pictures Brady-Made are programmed for 
the next twenty-one weeks. Tbis was 
brought about by increasing the number of 
plays in production instead of speeding 
np the production of plays, as is done by 
many companies. Six World companies 
are now working at the same time in the 
studios at Fort Lee, N. J. 

The line of films that are to be released 
np to and concluding the week of Feb- 
ruary 11 of next year are: 

September 24, Ethel Clayton in "The 
Woman Beneath" ; October 1, Lew Fields 
and Madge Evans in "The Corner Grocer" ; 
October 8, all star cast, headed by Mon- 
tagu Love, June Elvidge, Arthur Ashley, 
Julia Dean, Henry Hull, Irving Cummings 
and Hubert Wilke in "Rasputin, the Black 
Monk"; October 15, Carlyle Blackwell, 
Madge Evans and Evelyn Greeley in "The 
Burglar"; October 22, Alice Brady in 
"The Maid of Belgium" ; October 20, Jnne 
Elvidge and Arthur Ashley in "Shall We 
Forgive Her" ; November 5, Ethel Clayton 
in "The Dormant Power" ; November 12, 
Madge Evans in "The Little Patriot" ; No- 
vember 19, Carlyle Blackwell and Evelyn 
Greeley in "The Good for Nothing"; No- 
vember 26, Kitty Gordon in "Her Hour"; 
December 3, June Elvidge and Arthur Ash- 
ley in "A Creole's Revenge" ; December 10; 
Mentagu Love la "The Beast"; December 
17, Ethel Clayton in "Easy Money": De- 
cember 24, Carlyle Blackwell and Evelyn 
Greeley in "The Ladder of Fame"'; De 1 
cember 31, Kitty Gordon in "The Divine 
Sacrifice" ; January T, June Elvidge in 
"The Way of the Strong"; January 14, 
Alice Brady in "The Spurs of Sybil"; 
January 21, Madge Evans In "True Blue" : 
January 28, Ethel Clayton in "Stolen 
Hours"; February 4, Carlyle Blackwell 
and Evelyn Greeley In "Almost a King"; 
February 11, Kitty Gordon in "Making 
a Man Pay." 



PERKINS BUYS CANADA RIGHTS 

A contract was closed last week between 
Arthur F. Beck, general manager of Art 
Dramas. Inc., and George F. Perkins, by 
which the latter Recured the distribution 
rights of Art Dramas pictures for Canada. 
Perkins is a veteran film man. He owns 
the Independent Film and Theatre Supply 
Co., which handles a vast amount of busi- 
ness throughout Canada, and has exchanges 
in Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg. 



VITAGRAPH TO FIGHT CENSOR 

Chicago, Sept. 11. — Claiming that their 
picture version of "Within the Law," is not 
injurious to public morals, and that the lo- 
cal censors have acted unfairly and Im- 
properly in suppressing it, the Vitagraph 
Company today appealed to the courts here 
asking for an injunction restraining Chief 
Schuttler and Major FunkbauBer from in- 
terfering with tbe presentation of the pic- 
ture. They claimed through their counsel 
that, as the original stage play bad its 
presentation here in 1912, and the authori- 
ties found nothing wrong with it, or did 
not try to suppress it, there is no reason 
why the picture version should be barred. 
A decision is expected in the case during 
the week. 



FILMS FIND RUNAWAY GIRL 

Philadelphia, Sept. 9. — Recognized 
by a policeman who had seen her picture 
on a motion picture screen, Marjorie 
Thompson, sixteen years old, who bad run 
away from her home in Washington, D. C, 
was taken into custody here. Her folks 
were immediately notified and, upon her 
refusal to accompany them borne, she was 
committed to the bouse of detention. 



FILM MEN RE-ELECT JAMES 

The Associated Motion Picture Advertis- 
ers held their annual meeting last Friday 
at Keene's Chop House and re-elected 
Arthur James, president; P. A. Parsons, 
vice-president ; Paul Gulick, treasurer, and 
Bernard Fineman, secretary, Tbe new 
directors elected are: Nat G. Strong, 
Charles E. Moyer, Terry Ramsaye, Jacques 
Kopstein and Julian M. Solomon. 



EXHIBITORS MEET AT ASTOR 

The National Exhibitors' Circuit, of 
which S. L. Kothapfel Is president, held a 
meeting last Friday at the Hotel Astor, at 
which were discussed Important plans soon 
to be adopted by the organization. It 
was a closed meeting, but it is understood 
that several of the matters discussed will 
be given out for publication this week. 



PETROVA SELECTS PLAYERS 

Mme. Petrova has finally selected the 
principal members of her supporting cast 
for her first personally produced film at 
tbe Biograph Studios here. Tbey in- 
clude: Thomas Holding, Robert Broderick, 
Anders Randolf, Henri Leone, Richard 
Garrick, Warren Cook, Carl Dietz and 
Anita Allen. 



"EMPTY POCKETS" NEARLY READY 

The filming of Rupert Hughes' popular 
novel,' "Empty Pockets," is now pro- 
gressing rapidly at Herbert Brenon's Hud- 
son Heights Studios, "Empty Pockets" 
will be the Brenon production to Immedi- 
ately follow "The Fall of the Romanoffs." 




WILLIAM A. BRADY, 
Director-General. 

WORLD-PICTURES 



Present 



ALICE BRADY 



tt 



99 



Story by Henry A. Da SoueHet 

Directed by Trmvers Vale and G«rro Cowl 



38 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 12, 1917 



CONDENSED FILM NEWS 



D. W. Griffith, who baa finished hia work 
in Europe, where he has been since last 
March, is to retain to America the last 
week of this month. 



The last scenes have been "snof tor 
Pauline Frederick's next Paramount pic- 
ture following "Double Crossed," which 
will be released September 17. 



Tom Meigban's eyes were badly burned 
by Kleiglight rays daring the filming of 
the final scenes in "Arms and the Girl," 
BHlie Burke's new Paramount picture. 



One of the most active members of the 
Stage Women's War Relief is Florence 
Short, whose work in Apollo-Art Dramas 
pictures has wen her a host of admirers. 

J. Warren Kerrigan has left the Cottage 
Hospital at Santa Barbara, Cal., where 
he was taken when bis right leg was 
broken below the knee by the fall of his 
horse four weeks ago. 



William Farnum. tbe William Fox star, 
who has the leading role in "When a Man 
Sees Bed," a coming drama, intends to 
write a book. It's to be called "My 
Friend's little Daughter." 



George Ridgwell, formerly scenario editor 
and director for the Vitagraph Company, 
has returned to the feld and has been as- 
signed to direct Bobby Connelly in the 
continuation of the child actor's series. 

Bobert G. Vignola, baring completed 
"The Hungry Heart," in which Pauline 
Frederick will appear for Paramount,, has 
hied himself to Lake George, Atlantic 
City, and other well known and perenially 
popular resorts. 

Sir Gilbert Parker, a number of whose 
works are being made into photo-plays 
by J. Stuart Blackton for the Paramount 
Corporation, has been . the guest of the 
producer at Oyster Bay, the visit being a 
combination of business and pleasure. 



Yorke Film Corporation, releasing pic- 
tures through Metro, has removed its pro- 
ducing centre from Hollywood, Cal., to New 
York City, and will resume operations at 
once on the production of feature films iiS 
New York, starring Harold lockwood. 



Ben Wilson is the featured player of 
"The Spindle of Life," the Butterfly pic- 
ture scheduled for release September 17. 
He will be capably supported by Neva 
Gerber, Richard La Reno and Hsyward 
Mack, who have prominent parts in a well- 
selected cast. 

Mne. Lina Cavalieri, the operatic star, 
will be directed in her first Paramount" 
picture, "The Eternal TemptresB," by 
Emile Chautard. Work has begun upon 
the production, which is an original play, 
written expressly for Mme. Cavalieri, by 
Mme. Fred de Grisac 



Edward Cecil, Colin Chase and Bert 
Grassby. . 



Bessie Barriscale's first Paralta release 
will not be Grace Miller White's "Rase o* 
Paradise," as at first announced. Instead, 
Harold MacGrath's "Madam Who," Miss 
Barriscale's second Paralta production, 
will be presented in October and will be 
followed by "Bose o* Paradise." 

Ann Pennington has begun work on her 
New Paramouat picture, entitled "The 
Antics of Ann." Edward Dillon is direct- 
ing the production and a number of the in- 
terior scenes already have been made. It 
offers the young star an opportunity of 
proving that she is a comedienne and, in 
addition, permits of her wearing many 
fetching costumes. 

One of the best companies of motion 
picture players that has been seen this 
year in a feature production is that which 
has been gathered together under 'the di- 
rection of Bertram Bracken -for Gladys 
BrockweH'8 new William Fox drama. In 
the cast are Eugenie Forde, Manorie 
Daw, Harry Lonsdale. Douglass Gerrard, 



George Walsh has started another Will- 
iam Fox production an tbe West Coast. 
It will be his thirteenth photoplay. 



"The Time of Her Life" is tbe alluring 
title of the first of the new Lois Weber 
productions, now completed and ready for 

release. 



Montagu Love has been re-engaged by 
the World Picture Corporation under a 
contract covering his services for the next 
two years. 



Albert E. Smith, president of the Vita- 
graph Company, has decided to continue 
the production of one-reel Bobby Connelly 
subjects indefinitely. 



Director Allen J. Holubar's next produc- 
tion will be entitled : "The Twisted Soul," 
the story of which is by J. Grubb Alex- 
ander and Fred Myton. 



Eugene Forde and Marjorie Daw have 
begun work under the William Fox 
standard in Hollywood, Cal., in a new pic- 
ture starring Gladys BrockwelL 



Niles Welch is playing as leading man 
for Norma Talmadge in her new picture, 
"The Secret of the Storm Country," now 
being made in the Talmadge studio in East 
Forty-eighth Street 



Tbe family of Charles Miller, who is 
directing Norma Talmadge in New York, 
will shortly leave Los Angeles, making the 
trip by machine. Young Miss Miller, 17 
years of age, will do the driving. 



Dongas Fairbanks, with hia playing 
company and technical staff, arrived in 
New York last week for the purpose of 
spending several days in the taking of 
pictures in and about Manhattan. 



Jewel Carmen has been transferred by 
William Fox from his Hollywood, Cal., 
studios to his plant in Fort Lee, N. J., 
where she will at once take up the role 
of Fantine in the Fox version of Hugo's 
"Les Miserables." 



• Clara Williams has begun work on her 
first production to be made for the Paralta. 
The name has not yet been announced, 
but it will afford Clara an excellent op- 
portunity to display her remarkable 
ability to characterize. 



Julian Johnson, until recently editor of 
the Photoplay Magazine, and a former 
Los Angeles dramatic critic, has been ap- 
pointed editor-in-chief of tbe Triangle 
Film Corporation, and is . about to get 
under way for Culver City, 



Reginald Barker has completed his first 
Paralta production, a picturized version 
of "Madam Who," from the book by Har- 
old McGrath. Bessie Barriscale is the 
featured star. This will be the first pic- 
ture released under the Paralta banner. 



Mary Garden sailed from France last 
week for this country fbr the purpose of 
making her reappearance in pictures. She 
has abandoned her intention of returning 
to the Grand Opera stage, but win appear 
in s cr een versions of several operas in 
which she has sung, the first of which will 
be "Thais." 



Clara Kimball Young entertained 
friends at a birthday party at the Knick- 
erbocker Hotel last week. A huge cake, 
containing twenty-seven candles, adorned 
the center of the table and attracted much 
attention from many curious and interested 
onlookers. Coincident with her birthday. 
Miss Young celebrated the first release of 
"Magda," by her own organization, under 
the management of Harry I. G arson, which 
was completed just in time for the double 
celebration. 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

( Con M a n ual from Page* S and 34) 



OAxTXABT), CAX, 

Hippodrome (Sept. 10-18)— Le Dean SIsteL 
Tbe Arleyi — Eddie Viae — Five Emigrants * Jin- 
■en — Lee & Lawrence. (Sept. 1S-22) — Banrard 
Sisters — Mary Blllabury — Doyle A Wright— Gilbert 
4 Ueber — Morning, Noon 4 Night— Wella-Gllbert 
A Co. 

PEOHIA, ILL. 

Orpheaxn (First Half) — Tbe Van Camps — Espe * 
DnttoD— Finders Keepers — Adrian. (Last Hall) — 
Valentine 4 Bell— Tabor & Green— Billy "Swede" 
Hall 4 Co. — Berate 4 Baker. 

FOSTLAJTO, ORE. 

Hippodrome (Sept. 16-18) — Flying Howards — 
Washington Trio— Dora Hilton — Davett 4 Duval) — 
Eaddon 4 Norman — Joggling Normans. (Sept. 20- 
22) — Millie Dubois' Pets— Stewart 4 Earl— Two 
Pearsons — Marie Dufonr — Ebner 4 Reuica — Blanche 
Alfred 4 Co. 

aUINCT, ILL. 

Orphean (First Half) — Lonzo Cos— The Black 
A White Berne— Archie Nicholson Trio — Arco 
Bros. (Lest Half)— Locale A Tost— "Back to 
Elmlra" — Frank Ward — Page. Hack 4 Mack. 

ST. LOUIS, XO. 

Majestic (8Wt Half)— Vanity Fair. (Last 
Half) — Delton, Mareeno 4 Delton — Kenny 4 La 
France — Baron Llchter — Prince Harmi. 
- Grand — Andre. Suiters — Billy Morae-r-ChiTO 4 
Chltao — Prlncean Veronca — "Through the Mirror" 
— Detxell 4 Carroll— Gordon & BIcca — The Fashion 
Shop. 

Colombia— Brooks ft Lorella — Amedlo — Dale ft 
Weber — Bnrlette's Manikins — Cook 4 Oatmsn — 
Camp In the Bookies — Won. Armstrong 4 Co. — 
Zertno's Norelty — Four Kings. 

SUPEKIOB, WIS. 
Palace (First Half) — King Bros. — Gardner 4 
Berere — Craig 4 Wade — Bora! Eight. (Last 

Half) — Foot Sontbern Girls — "'What Every Man 
Needs" — Jere Sanford — Kant Kidder 4 Co. 

ST. PAUL, muss. 
Hew Palace (First Half)— Aerial Bartletts— 
Grace Linden — "What Every Han Needs" — Amer- 
ican Comedy Four — "On the Beach at Walklti." 
(Last Half)— Tasmanian Trio— Carle A Ices— Fire 
Young Americans — "Temptation." 

SPOKAHE, WASH. 
Hippodrome (Sept. 16-18)— Matilda 4 Corpse— 
Hughes Sisters — Eldredge Barlow 4 Eldredge — 
Sam K. Otto — RienT 4 Murray — Nola's Dogs. (Sept. 
18-22) — "The Salesman and the Model" — Prloce* 
Crest — Prick 4 AdnSr — Tom Llndsey 4 Lady Bugs 
— Wells 4 Rone — Three Melrins. 

800 FALLS, 6, D. 
Orphenm (First Half) — Carl 4 Inex — Walter S. 
Howe 4 Co. — Ogden A Benson — Will Stanton 4 
Co. (Last Half) — Gainer 4 Warde — Denoyer 4 
Dante — Rae. Brnge 4 Fay — Fonr Musical Lands. 

SEATTLE, 'WASH. 
Palace Hipp (Sept. 16-19)— Millie Dubois' Pets- 
Stewart 4 Earl — Two Pearsons — Marie Dufonr — 
Elmer 4 Benscn — Blanche Alfred 4 Co. — (Sept. 
20-22) — Frank Wilbur 4 Co. — Keeler 4 Belmont — 
Two Specks — Princeton Fire — Austin 4 Dalley — 
"Girl in tbe Moon." 

8ACEAXENT0, CAL. 
Empress (Sept. 16-1E) — Dave Van Field 4 Co. — 
Margaret Ryan — Morton 4 Wells — Venetian Four 
— Irving A Ward— Tetnan Arabs. (Sept. 20-22) — 
Tbe Beaudions — Miller & Leondar — D'Amtco— 'To 
Save One Girl" — Tennessee Trio — The sVst— 

SAH JOSE. CAL. 
Victory (Sept. 16-18)— Banrard Sisters — Mary 
Blllsbory— Doyle & Wright — Gilbert 4 Usher— 
Morning. Noon 4 Night— Wills-Gilbert 4 Co. 
(Sept. 19-22)— Dave Van Field & Co.— Margaret 
Ryan — Morton 4 Wells — Venetian Four — Irving 4 
Ward — Tetuan Arabs. 

SAH FRANCISCO, CAL, 
Hippodrome — Posbay 4 White — Hobeon 4 Beatty 
— Tom Brown's Blackfsce Bene — Merkit 4 Bond- 
nil] — Moustro 4 Co. — Two Edwards — Wolgast 4 
Girlie — Simons 4 Warfleld— Harry Dixon — Gibson 
Girls — Christie ft Griffin — Herbert 4 Dare. 

TACOefA, WASH. 
Regent (Sept. 16-19) — Frank Wilbur 4' Co. — 
Keeler & Belmont — Two Specks — Princeton Five — 
Austin 4 Dalley — "Girl In the Moon." (Sept. 20- 
22)— Mllo Vagge 4 Co. — Kruger 4 King— Watson 
4 Little — Borglara' Union — Belgium Four — Fair- 
man 4 Patrick. 

VTHOIBTA, HTHH. 
Lyric (Sept. 21-23)— King Brothers— Gardner ft 
Revere — Craig ft Wade — Rural Eight. 

WALLACE. IDAHO. 

Grand (Sept. 21) — Van Horn ft Ameer — Krone 
4 La Salle— -J. Edmnnd Davis — Lyceum roar— 
Robinson Dno and the Martians. 
W1NSTPEG, our. 

Btraad (First Half)— Mabel Fonda Trio — Vernon 
4' Co. — Mahoner A Rogers— The Selamboa. (Last 
Half) — Wellington Trio— Omega Trio— Sam Hood 
— Herbert's Seals. 

WALLA WALLA, WASH. 

Liberty (Sept. 16-17) — Deveenz, Bell ft Joe — 
Virgil 4 La Blanche — Jennings 4 Barlow— Eugene 
Page Ptayera — La Petit* Bra — "When We Grow 
Up." {Sept. 21-22) — Matilda ft Corpos — Hughes 
Buttl e Eldredge, Barlow ft Eldredge— Sean K. 
Otto— Bieff ft Murray— Nola's Dogs. 

w. u. a. o. 

73ATTL£ aaWsaBsi aOUH. 
" BUou (First Half)— Bertie Ford— Wilson ft WU- 
son— Old Soldier Fiddlers— Bessie La Count. (Lest 
Half) — "Merry Go Round," 



BAY CITY, SUCH. 
Bijou (First Half) — Dan Abeam — Borne ft 
Wager — Orr ft Hagen — Cooper 4 Boblnson — "1S1T 
Winter Garden Bevne." (Last Half) — The See- 
backs— Ed 4 Jack Smith— McConnelL Simpson 4 
Co.— Bobble ft Nelson— Six Musical Mosses. 

DASVTT.T.F, ILL. 

Palace (First Half) — Alexander Bros, ft Evelyn 
— Vardon 4 Perry — Great Howard — Daisy Hareourt 
— "Smart Shop." (Last Half) — Fred Zobedie * 
Co. — Thornton 4 Thornton — Channcey Monro* 4 
Co. — Yates, Reed ft Co. 

FOHT WAYNE, ISD. 

Palace (First Half)— Mildred Bayward— Morley 
4 McCarthy Sisters — Hippodrome Fonr— Kajtyama 
— Fred Zobedie ft Co. (Last Half)— Rosalie 
Ascher— Lincoln of U. S. A. — Marie Rossell. 



Wanted At Once 

Competent and Reliable Repertoire. People in 
all lines: these with specialties preferred, 
Week stands. A long season lor right people. 
R. W. THOMPSON, Hotel Pontine, Broadway 
and M St, New York City. 

A. D. MINNICK 

of West Haven. Coon., U tbe writer and publisher 
of a wonderful new patriotic song, which should be 
in everv American home, entitled 

"Stick By Your Uncle Sammy" 

In widen be Illustrates the post, present sod futon, de- 
rated to the United States. Ererrtt J. grass, of Nee 
York, composed the music, ehlch Is wry inspiring and of 
the patriotic spirit Mr. Minnie*- has recelnd many eon- 
rramliUota and also orders for many cot&as. 

CLOTH BANNERS 

(TYfE WtIK (ILT) One Tee 

Color. Colon. 

100 18x43 cloth Banners. flat or aprirEt.JL5.00 117.50 
Aiknisaal hoadndi sssst form, per 100. . 12.50 15.00 
100 21x38 doth Batmen. Sat or sprkhl. 10.00 12.50 
- Uonal handteds same form, per 100. . 8.00 10.00 

(All doth hennas are est tots rood gnis sf 
trued aap, <jotb whits. ) 

CARD HERALDS 



5.000 3*4x9% Card Hsralds 19.50 

10.000 SVjxDVj Card Smirk 17.50 



o ajuHlratfcm 
sndsbneT) 



QUO 

20.00 
(Prices sa ether i 

q s auUti i 

Send lOe for roots book, ssmples, proof abatis, stock ests, 
once lln. ate. Oetsa to market nsHrUW i a all srieas sub- 
ject to ebaats witaoat aoCka. 

GAZETTE SHOW PRINTING CO. 

Terms: Cash with order. Msttoon, UL, TJ. 8. A. 




Moving Picture 
Cameras 

We manufacture them and make 
them tip to date at a low price of 
$125. Catalogue of Moving Pic- 
tare Supplies. 

L. HETZ 

3t2 E. 23rd St. New York City 



"■"MS 




n ■ m\ \ M r -*■» Lie of Prof sedans] and ua- 
§•» |_*sa Y S ltOT '!»»«. Vsad-rfUi 
■ ■■*»"» ■ «sw sketches, atonolop, MlnstnJ 
Material. Eedtattxa, Diaaap, Kake-sp Goo*, sts. 

CATALOG TOES. 

fitzgeuld roi. cairi, 

to Dick 4 Fltapnud, 30 Abb 8L, Mew Tors. 



NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Foil Dress, Taxed o *w Princ e AJfe ert S«it» 

LOCY GOODMAN, Z31S S. State St., Outage 

tlllST TOUPEES, GREASE 
WIIA PAINTS, ETC 
It 1\JvJ a. m. buch & co. 

U> N. NsaSfc SU W1 i tl ■ I 

a m b w ^^ .^bw crassae swar. answ, i^aaa* a^w. '^ 

WIGStgragt 



K.. K. T. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 







m 



FRED and ADELE 

ASTAIRE 

"The Brother and Sister With Their 
Own Songs and Dances" 

Closing a successful vaudeville tour this week at 

B. F. Keith's Royal Theatre 



OPENING IN OCTOBER WITH 

"OH, JUSTINE!" 




MANAGEMENT: MESSRS. SHUBERT 



THE TECHNICAL PRESS, SZV YOHK 



Consolidation of the {Two FAMOUS "JAMES" BOYS 



ora Bayes'Big Hit. Introduced by Her at the 

Palace Thektre, N. Y. 



UlMllMHlMIM 



FOR 
YOU" 



A Riotous Hit for Van and Schenck, Successor to Our Famous 

"Gome Out of The Kitchen" 



I. 



Some Compare it to •■Mammy's Goal Black Rose 
Others to " Mighty iLak A Rose" 



I 



" JES' 
THE 

SAME" 



Funnier Character Song Than Our Celebrated " Nathan 



Your Father Deserves a Medal 



A Ballad In a Class With " Dear Old Girl 



WHEN 





ih m iih m 



WAS IN 
BLOOM 



In the Atmosphere of "You Made Me Love You 



I 



Y STOLE MY HEART 



Wonderful Double Great Single; By the Writer of "Ballin the Jack 1 



KENDIS-BROGKMAN MUSIC CO., Inc. 



145 W. 45th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 



rr n\ in rt, m id in m ill in cm m> mi in iy> ill no ID -p 



NEW YORK 





THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



m 1 1 1 mi m in in m m " ' <*»■ m no "i n» '>> mm i« I I 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 




Copyright, 1917, by the dipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 18iJ. 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 19, 1917 



VOLUME LXV-No. 31 
Price, Ten Cent* 



PALACEOPENS 

WARFARE ON 

SCALPERS 

REFUSES TO ADMIT PATRONS 



Drastic measures adopted by the man- 
agement of the Palace Theatre -within the 
past few days have cost ticket "scalpers" 
who deal in admissions to that house more 
than $1,000. All of the tickets being sold 
by sidewalk -vendors and at a ticket office 
a few doors from tbe theatre, have, been 
refused at the door. 

For almost a year ticket scalpers have 
been getting choice seats to the theatre for 
all performances many days in advance 
and, as a result, when patrons applied for 
seats they had to be turned away. The 
vendors -meantime finding they could reap a 
harvest with the tickets, were selling them 
at prices from 100 to 500 per cent- » 
excess of the box office price. The latter 
fee, or charge, was generally exacted for 
the Sunday night performance. 

As a result, complaint after complaint 
piled in on the management of the Palace, 
and they immediately devised a scheme to 
put a stop to the nuisance. 

Last Sunday they hired several private 
detectives, who kept track of a number of 
persons who were purchasing seats for the 
speculators at the ticket window, and had 
the treasurer check off the seats sold to 
them. They also followed all persons who 
entered tbe ticket office or purchased 
them from sidewalk vendors, into the the- 
atre lobby. When those whose tickets bad 
been checked off at the box-office, or those 
who bad - just purchased them, presented 
the tickets to James McBride, the door- 
man, he, upon a signal from the detective, 
refused to grant them admission to the 
house. The ticket holders then returned to 
the speculators and had their money re- 
funded. The tickets were then sold over 
again in many instances by tbe vendors, 
but again the holders were refused ad- 
mission. 

Through this procedure over 5500 worth 
of tickets were refused at the door Sun- 
day evening. Monday afternoon, being a 
Jewish holiday, the speculators again cut 
loose with a load of tickets- They dis- 
posed of more than $300 worth prior to 
the time the house opened lor the matinee. 
The -persons who had these tickets found, 
however, that they were of no value at 
the door, and immediately returned them to 
the scalpers, demanding their money back. 
Several of the latter at first refused to re- 
fund the money, but, when the patrons 
threatened to call the police, they immedi- 
ately complied. This put a damper to their 
business; and tbe sale of tickets through 
-this medium was very light for the after- 
noon performance. 

The same course was followed at the 
evening performance, with the same re- 
sult, 7 the speculators having about $400 in 
tickets returned to them. 

Besides several house employees, the 
'management of the theatre ' bad eight 
private detectives watching the vendors, 
who have worked from improvised offices in 
the hallways of adjacent buildings. There 
were -also several detectives from In- 
{Continued on page 4V) 



SCHOENBACH TO BUILD THEATRE 

His lease on tbe Grand Opera House, 
where he is giving vaudeville at the present 
time, expiring on Oct. 1 of next year, Her- 
man Schoenbach, in association with Beck, 
the shoe manufacturer, will build a new, 
modern house directly across tbe street and 
running from Twenty-third to Twenty- 
fourth streets on Eighth Avenue. Vaude- 
ville and feature pictures will be the policy. 

The plans for the house, which have al- 
ready been drawn, call for a seating capac- 
ity of 2,500 modern up-to-date furnishings 
and a stage that will allow for tbe presenta- 
tion of the biggest acts. Work is to be 
started shortly after tbe new year so that 
the house will be ready for occupancy at 
the expiration of tbe Grand Opera House 
lease. 

Many persons have concluded that the 
Twenty-third street section of the city 
has passed the days when it would be 
profitable as a theatre site, but Schoenbach, 
who has been operating the Grand for two 
years, must have found it otherwise or he 
would not be willing to put up a new 
house. 



MARDO GOES WITH SHF.EDY 
M. R. Sbeedy has engaged Fred Mardo, 
of Boston, to replace Benny Piermont as 
booking manager of tbe Sheedy Agency 
in the New York offices, beginning October 
1. Piermont is compelled to resign then 
on account of being called for duty , in 
the National Army at Yaphank. Mardo, 
until two months ago, represented the 
liOew Circuit in the Boston territory, and 
then established the Boston Booking 
Offices, representing a number of New 
England theatres. He will book these 
houses in the future through Sheedy. 



MUSICIANS IN TWO P0LI 

HOUSES GO OU T ON STRIKE 

Trouble, Starting in Mid- West, Extends Eastward — J. J. Murdock 

Settles Dayton Disagreement — Cleveland 

and Cincinnati Still Out 

The unrest and strike threats which manifested themselves among theatre 
musicians and stage hands in the Middle West recently extended, during the past 
week, to the men of those unions throughout the Poli Circuit, Bridgeport and New 
Haven being the cities most affected. In both these towns the men walked out after 
a demand for an increase of "wages and a change of working conditions. - 

The theatres affected in Bridgeport were the Plaza and Poll's, which play vaude- 
ville and feature pictures, and the Lyric, which houses a stock company. In Now 
Haven they abandoned Poli's Bijou, which hag a vaudeville and picture policy, and the 
Hyperion, which has dramatic stock. Also, in this city they walked out of the 
Olympia Theatre, a vaudeville house conducted by Gordon Brothers. 

Throughout the Middle West the ruffled sea is by no means smoothed out. although 
the trouble which has. been on for more than a week at Keith's Theatre, Dayton, 
Ohio, was settled Sunday, when the stage hands and J. J. Murdock, who went from 
New York to take the matter in hand, held a conference and came to terms. . 

The situation regarding the musicians in Cincinnati remains unchanged, although 
it is believed that the men are about to concede some of their demands. 

In Cleveland, where the musicians, sup- 

ported by the stage bands, walked out of 
the Hippodrome more than a week ago, the 
men are still out. It is more than likely 
that during the course of the week both 
of the locals in that city will appeal to 
their internationals in New York for aid. 
unless a settlement is reached. 

These were the main points at which 
trouble arose, but union officials expect to 
find disagreements cropping up in a num- 
ber of other places for several weeks to 
come. . 



ROCK WANTS FAY EXAMINED 

William Rock, through his attorney, 
Leo Brilles, of House, Grossman and 
Vorhaus, will apply to Justice GoS in the 
Supreme Court to-day for permission to 
examine Frankie Fay before trial as to 
his cause of action in the suit he has 
brought against the dancer for alienation 
of Frances White's affections. In his com- 
plaint, Fay wants $100,000 from Rock. 
Cook and Donlan have replaced Sam 
Golding as attorneys for Fay. 



MRS. GEO. BELFRAGE DIES 

Denver. CoL, Sept. 15. — Maybelle 
Mahlum, wife of George Belfrage, owner 
of the "Hip, Hip, Hooray Girls," died at 
the home of her mother in this city to- 
day of rheumatism of the heart. Miss 
Mahlum was sonbrette of Mr. Belfrage's 
company last season, but was compelled 
to return to her former home in the 
Spring on account of ill health. 



SUES ANNA CHANDLER 

Claiming that Anna Chandler has failed 
to pay a portion of a bill for gowns sup- 
plied her, C. C. Rosenwasser, a theatrical 
costumer, obtained a judgment against 
her for $136.17 in the Municipal Court 
last week, which was later filed in the 
County Clerk*» office by Attorney L. Kron- 
feld. After the' judgment was entered Miss 
Chandler paid $50 on account. 

MOBILE HAS NEW MANAGER 

Mobile, Ala., Sept 14. — Edward Walsh, 
who last season directed the Southern tour 
of one of "The Daughter of the Gods" com- 
panies, a motion picture featuring Annette 
Kellennann, will manage the Lyric The- 
atre -this season, succeeding M. A. Mc- 
Dermott. •' - • ' 



POLI HIRES WOMEN PLAYERS 

New Haven, Conn., Sept. 18. — With the 
walking out of the musicians in the Poli 
theatres here and in Bridgeport, and their 
places being taken by women musicians, 
an acute situation is liable' to develope 
wherein the men may ask the aid of the 
International as well as tbe stage hands in 
an effort to gain the demands they have 
made on S. Z. Poll. It is said that, if 
necessary, they will request the Interna- 
tionals of both unions to call a strike in 
tbe remainder of the Poli theatres, of 
which there are twenty-six, to help them 
win their demands. 

Two weeks ago the men presented a new 
scale of wages to Mr. Poll for his theatres 
in New Haven and Bridgeport. He was 
willing to grant the increase in salary, but 
told the men he would not consent to -their 
working time schedule. Tbe men then, in- 
formed him that he would have to accept 
their terms or they would walk out. 

Poli is said to have then told the men 
that if they were willing to work the same 
length of time the musicians do in Loew 
theatres he would pay them tbe same scale 
of wages paid tbe men in those houses, 
which is more than he would pay them 
under the new scale. But the men did not 
wish to do that either. 

According to the working plan of the 
musicians they are to play only five hours 
a day, while Poli requested that they stay 
in tbe pit six and a. half hours. This tbe 
men refused to do. Mr. Poli then. informed 
them that those were bis terms, bat they 
refused to consider them and served notice 
on him that they would walk out. This 
they did and their places were immediately 
taken by women, with the exception of the 
leader, in whose stead a man was plaeed. 

According to Poli. under the conditions 
the men desired to work, .the . full effect of 
his performance was lost, especially the 



second evening show, as the men would 
only play for the vaudeville portion and 
not be in the pit for the feature picture. 
Should the men feel like arbitrating tbe 
matter Poli will be glad to take it up with 
them, he says. 

R. C. Miller, Poli's representative, re- 
fused to discuss tbe situation when ap- 
proached. He said that Mr. Poli had tbe 
whole matter in hand and would handle it 
himself. 

A meeting of all the managers of Poli 
theatres in the New England district was 
held here on Sunday night when the ques- 
tion of tbe extension of the strike was dis- 
cussed. It is said that they all returned 
to their home towns with instructions to 
fight should tbe musicians make any de- 
mands they considered unreasonable. 

MURDOCK SETTLES TROUBLE 

Dayton, O., Sept. 16.— The strike of 
the stage hands at the B. F. Keith theatre 
which has been going on for the last ten 
days was settled today when J. J. Murdock 
arrived bere from New York and held a 
conference with the stage hands representa- 
tives. The men will return to work in the 
house tomorrow. 

The exact terms of the settlement were 
not ascertainable. It was learned, how- 
ever, that the men requested an increase 
of $3 a week in their pay while the Keith 
people were only willing to give them, an 
advance of $2 a week. Their present scale 
of salary is $25 a week. 

The wrangle between the men and the 
management of tbe Keith bouses has been 
going on for six weeks, at tbe beginning of 
which time tbe men presented their de- 
mands to tbe local manager. He informed 
them that he wooM have to-take tbe matter 
up with New York. The men became 
rather impatient with the delay that fol- 
lowed and asked International President 
Chas. C. Shay to take the matter in hand. 
It being purely a local affair, he advised 
the men to wait a few weeks until Mur- 
dock could come to Dayton and settle tbe 
matter. 

When Murdock failed to arrive shortly 
before Labor Day, which was the opening 

for the house, the men again', got into 
touch with Shay, who told them to go to 
work and Murdock wonld come to 
straighten the matter out with them. This 
they did but when Murdock failed to arrive 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



again and their demands were not acceded 
to by the manager, they walked out of the 
theatre. Their places were taken by house 
employees until non-union help could be 
procured the next day. These men will be 
let go as soon as the union men return to 
their posts tomorrow. 

CINCINNATI UNIONS GIVE POINT 

Cincinnati, O., Sept 13.— Another 
point has been granted by the union mu- 
sicians in their fight with Cincinnati the- 
atre managers, and it is now believed 
that the former are ready to concede the 
injustice of their demands for a thirty- 
week contract. This leaves one big point 
of controversy, which, at this time, prom- 
ises a strike. 

The managers insist that the union has 
no right to name the number of men to 
be employed. Demands on B. F. Keith's 
Theatre include those for extra men, 
which Manager Ned Hastings has refused. 
It is said the other theatres will stand 
firmly with Hastings. 

The one-week truce between the fac- 
tions, to permit the opening of the Grand 
Opera House, has been extended to apply 
mlan to the Lyric Theatre, and it is un- 
derstood that Keith's will also be sup- 
plied with musicians for its opening. It 
is whispered that if the union musicians 
strike, the managers already have outside 
players in town to fill the vacant orches- 
tra pits at once. The managers say they 
are willing to have their contention re- 
ferred to Samuel Gompers himself. It 
is understood, however, that the local 
union men admit their charters give them 
no union right to dictate the size of or- 
chestras. 



BOOKS OF WHITE 

RATS TO BE 

PROBED 

COURT GRANTS PEMBERTON PLEA 



UNION HILL HAS STRIKE 

Union Hill, N. J., Sept- 14.— The trouble 
between the stage hands and the man- 
agement of the U. S. Temple, this city, 
has been settled. The hands went out 
on a strike last Monday, because they 
were refused more help. The manage- 
ment granted the claim of the stage- 
workers at the end of three days. 

MUSICIANS STRIKE IN HARTFORD 

Hartford, Conn., Sept. 15. — The mem- 
bers of the Strand Theatre orchestra went 
on strike here today. Their demand is for 
payment for overtime when they rehearse 
to "time" the music with the film. The 
Strand Theatre hus a picture policy and is 
controlled and managed by W. A. True. 

HIPPODROME SUED FOR $5,000 

Florence A. Curran, who was a member 
of the Kellerman Water Ballet at the 
Hippodrome, last season, has brought an 
action for $5,000 in the Supreme Court 
against the management of the house, on 
account of injuries she alleges "she sus- 
tained through foiling from the top of the 
tank to the floor of the stage on April 
24 last. In her complaint, Miss Curran 
alleges that throngh neglect of the Hippo- 
drome management in failing to supply a 
ladder to ascend to and from the top of 
the water tank in which she performed as 
a mermaid, she fell and sustained serious 
injuries which caused her to remain at 
home for a considerable period. She also 
says she was compelled to get treatment 
for her injuries at a hospital. 

In their answer, the Hippodrome man- 
agement says that if Miss Curran sus- 
tained any injuries they were through her 
own neglect and carelessness. 

A motion on behalf of the Hippodrome 
to have Miss Curran furnish a bill of par- 
ticulars as to the exact manner in which 
she sustained her injuries will be argued 
in the Supreme Court to-day. 

"FOLLIES" MAKES 930,000 

Flo Ziegfeld's "Follies of 1917" con- 
cluded its engagement at the New Amster- 
dam Theatre last Saturday night after one 
of the most successful runs since the or- 
ganization's inception. It is reported that 
the gross receipts for the run at the New 
Amsterdam will exceed $30,000. which, in 
view of the fact that the show has been 
running only since June 12, marks a new 
epoch for returns for a Broadway, musical 
show. Immediately after the final curtain 
the entire company left for Boston where 
it opened Monday night. 



Beginning to-morrow, the books, financial 
records and directors of the White Rats 
Actors' Union will receive the close 
scrutiny of Lewis Scbuldenfrei, who has 
been appointed a referee for this purpose 
by Justice Mitchell in the Supreme Court 
on the application of Goldie Pemberton. 
The first witnesses who will be called for 
examination by Alvin T. Sapinsky, at- 
torney for Miss Pemberton, will be Harry 
Monntford and W. J. Fitzpatrick. 

The application of Miss Pemberton has 
been pending in the Supreme Court for 
more than four months and, when it was 
argued before Justice Mitchell two weeks 
ago, it was anticipated that it would prob- 
ably be a month before he rendered his 
decision, on account of the mass of docu- 
ments and affidavits submitted in support 
of the application. In appointing the ref- 
eree, Justice Mitchell said : 

"The facts set forth in the affidavits 
submitted clearly make out a case author- 
izing and requiring a visitation and in- 
spection of the books and vouchers of the 
White Rats Actors' Union. Also the filing 
of an inventory and account of the prop- 
erty and effects and liabilities of this cor- 
poration is directed." 

The proceedings will probably . take 
about ten weeks, as Mr. Sapinsky claims 
that, besides Mountford and Fitzpatrick, 
he will examine all persons who have 
been officers and directors of the White 
Rats Actors' Union and the White Rats 
Realty Corp., since the formation of the 
latter. Besides these witnesses, there will 
be called a number of other persons who 
have been members of the organization in 
the past ten years, and some of whom had 
made affidavits in support of Miss Pember- 
ton's application. 

In her plea to the Court to appoint a 
referee. Miss Pemberton charged that the 
funds of the White Rats Actors' Union 
had been misappropriated and squandered 
by the directors and officials of the organ- 
ization. She alleged that the members were 
deceived with respect to the White Rats 
Realty Corp., so far as the obligations of 
that corporation were concerned, and that 
moneys paid to the Actors' Union for dues 
and assessments were turned over to the 
Realty Corp. to help meet its obligations, 
as well as in payment of rent to that cor- 
poration for the use of the clubhouse in 
Forty-sixth Street 

Another charge made in her application 
was that money was spent for tile hiring 
of "hoodlums," "gangsters" and "gunmen" 
during the recent White Rats strike, as 
well as for the support, through extrav- 
agant means of traveling, of the officers of 
the union during that period. She alleged 
that when efforts were made by her to 
obtain a statement regarding the finances of 
the organization, daring the strike, she 
could get no information from the officers 
and directors. Many other charges along 
these lines were made by persons who 
made affidavits in support of Miss Pem- 
berton's application. 

The examination into the affairs of the 
White Rats will be general, and it will 
divulge the list of members as well as show 
who paid assessments and levies during 
the recent strike, as Justice Mitchell, in 
his orders, makes no limitation as to the 
scope of the inquiry. 

Among some of those to be examined, 
besides Mountford and Fitzpatrick, are 
Frank Fogarty, Alf Grant, Fred Niblo, 
Frank North, Sam Morton, Ernest Carr, 
Junie McCree, Johnny Ben, George E. 
Delmore, Frank Herbert, G. L. Whalen, 
J. F. Dolan. Otto Steinert, Barry Connors. 
Jim Marco, Theo. Babcock, Robert H. 
Hodge, W. P. Conley, Edw. Archer, Jos. 
Birnes, Jos. Greenfield, W. C. Smith and 
Arthur Williams, all of whom have been 
directors of the White Bats during the 
period specified in the application. 



OPERA CO. HIT CREDITORS HARD 

- Hamilton M. Dawes, receiver for the 
Boston National Grand Opera Company, 
against whom an involuntary petition in 
bankruptcy was filed on July 3, last, filed 
a schedule of the liabilities of the corpora- 
tion amounting to $123,380.18, in the 
United States District Court last Friday. 

There were one hundred and twenty- 
five creditors, which included fifty-four 
chorps people, to whom amounts ranging 
from $22 to $60 -were due. Among the 
larger creditors and the amounts due them 
were: E. A. and B. S. Bachelder, $500; 
Elliott Foreman, $111.71; Harry W. Bell, 
$302.98; Victor Kiralfy, $1,205; George 
Baklanoff, $5,66*3.56: Jose Mardores, $2,- 
750; Bicardo Martin, $6,300; Tamoku 
Miura, $6,025 ; Roberto Moranzoni, $2,200 ; 
Mabel Reigelman, $1,200; Maggie Teyte, 
$5,050; Luisa Villani, $4,050; G. Zena- 
tello and Marie Gay, $15,215; A. Ruberti, 
$4,345.88; United States Government, 
$889.09 ; H. Robert Law, $273.65 ; Musical 
Courier, $1,256.39; Musical America, $1,- 
200; Maison Jaqueline, $823; J. G. Mc- 
Narry, of the First National Bank, El 
Paso, Texas, $10,000; G. Ricordi & Co., 
$4,300; Max Rabinoff, $3,956.36; A. Rab- 
inoff, $2,000 ; Siegman and Weil, $80 ; Van 
Buren New Tork Posting Co., $1,000.63; 
Equitable Trust Co., of New York, $2,- 
022.75 ; Musical Art Association of Cleve- 
land, $29,000, for moneys loaned, and N. D. 
Goldberger, their attorney, $1,500. 

The only asset recorded is a deed of 
trust executed to the Columbia Trust Co., 
of New Tork, for $150,000, covering all 
the properties of the corporation. The 
negotiable value of the trust deed is un- 
known. 



NEW ACTOR ASS*N PLANNED 

An effort to form a new actors organiza- 
tion was put into motion during the past 
week by a number of performers, of whom 
Oscar Loraine was generally considered to 
be one of the leaders. The name of Billy 
Gould was also mentioned in connection 
with the effort which was said to have the 
support of many former members of the 
White Rats Actors' Union. 

The plan, as near as could be learned, 
was to make each member of the new body 
deposit a certain amount when he was 
initiated and his credit at the clubrooms of 
the organization would be always kept with- 
in its bounds. This, it was stated, would 
enable the dub to always keep out of debt. 
The amount discussed most generally was 
$200 for each member. 

The project provided for a benefit to 
aged performers and, it is said, the backers 
figured that, if they could align 200 stand- 
ard acts, an organization could be formed 
which could not be broken np. 

When questioned, Loraine refused to say 
anything about the matter and Gould could 
not be reached. 



EXECUTE CIRCUS ELEPHANT 

East St. Louis, Sept. 11. — Judy, an 
elephant attached to a large circus for 
many years, was killed here last Monday 
to relieve its sufferings from lockjaw. The 
animal was put in a car and a rope was 
fastened around its head, the other end 
being attached to a locomotive. The en- 
gine pulled, and the rope broke. A chain 
then was substituted. Again the engine 
pulled, and in thirty minutes the elephant 
was pronounced dead by strangulation. 
The carcass was skinned and the hide will 

be preserved by the circus. 



THEATRE MANAGERS ARE FINED 

• Hamilton, Ohio, Sept. 14. — The en- 
forcement of the "bine laws" here brought 
a number of theatre men into the courts. 
Judge Shank, of the Municipal court, fined 
John H. Broombal, of the Jefferson The- 
atre ; ; John Goodwin, of the Grand ; Adam 
Hammerly, of, the Lyric ; Peter Jackson, 
of the Royal, and William Schalk, of the 
Eagle Theatre, $25 and costs, each, on 
charges of having their theatres open on 
Sunday. 



VAUDE. AGENTS 

ASS'N NEAR 

SPLIT 

MEMBERS ARE DISSATISFIED 



' There is much dissension, it was learned 
last week, in the ranks of the members of 
the Vaudeville Artists' Representatives 
organization, of which Irving Cooper is 
president, as a result of the association 
not upholding the principles it advocated 
at its inception. As a result of this feel- 
ing, it is said that the resignation of sev- 
eral members have been forwarded to the 
secretary for acceptance at the next meet- 
ing. It is even stated that the association 
may break up. 

When the organization started, one of 
the principal benefits promised was that 
no member of the organization would in 
any way interfere with or try to book 
acts handled by another member of the 
association. As the organization was com- 
posed of agents booking in the Loew of- 
fices, it was figured that if any member 
violated this rule, measures could be 
taken to restrict his endeavors in the fu- 
ture. At this time it was agreed that 
each man who represented an act would 
procure a written authorization from the 
act that he was the sole representative 
for them so far as the Loew or its as- 
sociated circuits were concerned. . 

It appears, however, that a number of 
the agents neglected to get these authori- 
zations from acts or even to recognize au- 
thorizations given to other representatives 
and proceeded to offer acts for booking on 
the Loew floor. This condition, it was 
said, was brought to the attention of the 
Association at several meetings recently, 
but those who complained declare they 
could get no redress or protection. 

When a number of the representatives 
found that they could get no satisfaction 
from the organization they immediately 
decided that it was useless to continue 
their membership in the association under 
such conditions and forwarded their resigna- 
tions. 

It is asserted that one of the men who 
handed in his resignation had five acts 
taken away from him and booked by an- 
other agent, despite the fact that he In- 
formed the "act he was their accredited 
representative. 



OHIO BANS THEATRE SMOKING 

Cincinnati, Sept 16. — Smoking in bur- 
lesque and other Ohio theatres is forbidden 
in a new order sent ont by the State Fire 
Inspector's office. Manager Hedges of the 
Olympic does not think the order will hurt 
business. It is sure to help the attendance 
of women, he states. 



HALE HAMILTON IS SUED 
Hale Hamilton will have to pay C. P. 
Grey 573.35 according to a verdict ren- 
dered against him in the Municipal Court 
last week. The judgment for this amount 
was entered in the County Clerk's office 
on Monday by McLean & Hay ward attor- 
neys for Grey. 

NEW THEATRE TO OPEN 

Washington, D. C, Sept. 18. — The 
Knickerbocker Theatre, situated at 18th 
Street and Columbus Road, will open late 
this month. 



RAISE SUNDAY PRICES 

When the Sunday concert season begins 
at the Star and Gayety theatres, Brooklyn, 
under the direction of B. S. Moss next 
Sunday, the admission fee for the orchestra 
will be increased from 35 to 50 cents. 



PALACE FIGHTS SPECULATORS 

(Continued from page 3.) 
spector Daly's staff and a uniformed 
policeman observing the work of the 
scalpers. If any of them had left the 
doorway, or ticket office, to offer a seat 
for sale, they would have arrested them 
for a violation of the city ordinance against 
such. 

Manager E. F. Rogers, of the Palace 
Theatre, stated that they were determined 
to get rid of the scalper evil for good, and 
that they would keep up their relentless 
campaign against these men until they 
were driven out of business. 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 




WILMA WALTON 

now playing the role of Dora in "Rambler 

Rose" at the Empire. 

OPENING DATES AHEAD 

New York City. 

"The Family Exit" — Comedy — Sept, 19. 

"Lombardi Ltd" — Morosco — Sept. 24. 

"The Riviera Girl" — New Amsterdam — Sept. 

24. 
"Here Comes the Bride" — Cohan Theatre — 

Sept 25. „ 

"Tiger Rose" — Lyceum — Oct. 2. 
Theatre Do Vieux- — Columbia — Nov. 20. 
Out of Town. 

"Saturday to Monday" — Baltimore — Sept. 24. 
"The Judge of Zalamea" — Milwaukee — Sept. 

27. _. ■ 

"Seven Days Leave" — Boston — Oct. 1. 
Shows Closing. 

"The Inner Man"- — Cort — Sept. 22. 
"This Way Out" — Coban — Sept. 22. 



S AMY A SUES WINTER GARDEN 

Marcelle Samya, the dancer, has insti- 
tuted an action for breach of contract 
against the Wintergarden Co., of which. 
J. J. Shubert is president, in the City 
Court. The amount she seeks to recover 
is $1,812.50. 

In her complaint, Miss Samya alleges 
that on April 15, 1016, Lee Shubert, 
while seated in the Montmarte Restaurant, 
verbally agreed to hire her for the "Pass- 
ing Show of 1916," at a salary of $125 
per week, beginning June 15, 1916. She 
alleges that at that time she was pre- 
pared to go to work, but no place bad 
been provided for her in the show. She 
says that she -was employed for the show 
for a period to extend until September 23, 
1916, and, during all that time, she was 
prepared to enter the show and fulfill her 
part of the contract. 

3. 3. Shubert, in bis answer for the 
Wintergarden Company, alleged that he 
knew of no contract with Miss Samya on 
the part of his corporation, and that no 
one had any authority to make either a 
written or verbal agreement • with her to 
appear in the show. 



"THE LASSO" MUST MOVE 

It was definitely decided Monday of this 
week- that Victor Maple's successful 
comedy, "The Lasso," would leave the 
Lyceum. This action became necessary 
because David Belasco booked the house 
for the production of "The Tiger Rose" 
for October 1, and is naturally unwilling 
to have his plans interfered with. "The 
Lasso'' has been one of the season's big- 
gest successes, and negotiations are under 
way to transfer the piece to another thea- 
tre. 



MANAGER CANCELS SHOW 

Racine, Wis., Sept 16. — The Savage 
Company, which was playing at the Or- 
pheum Theatre here had its engagement 
cancelled yesterday by Ted Whitehorn, 
manager of the theatre. There had been 
considerable dissatisfaction over the shows 
that the- company presented, it is said, and 
it is supposed to be for this reason that 
the manager curtailed the engagement. 



HITCHCOCK AND 

CENTURY CASE 

SETTLED 

ARRANGE 1918 LONDON SHOW 

What for a time -indicated a legal con- 
troversy between Raymond Hitchcock 
and Dillingham and Ziegfeld, through the 
actor's going into the producing field with 
E. Ray Goetz, while a contract to appear 
in the Century show was pending, has 
been avoided through the three getting to- 
gether with their counsel, patching up their 
differences and agreeing to present a big 
musical production next season in Eng- 
land, with Hitchcock as the star. The 
actor-manager is to have a fifty per cent, 
interest in' the show, with the balance going 
to. the producers. 

According to Hitchcock, when be was 
appearing in "Betty" last season, he made 
a verbal agreement with Dillingham to ap- 
pear in the Century show this season. 
When the question of salary cnme up, 
Hitchcock says that Dillingham informed 
him that, if he would appear in the theatre 
and on the Century roof he wauld pay 
him the salary be desired. Hi'cbcook, 
later, confirmed this talk with a letter to 
the manager. 

Some time afterward, Hitchcock says 
that he was informeJ by Dillingham that, 
on account of trouble with the excise de- 
partment, the roof would not be open tills 
season, but that he would pay him a 
proportionate salary to play in the the- 
atre. He let the matter lay in abeyance 
until he met Goetz, and they began talk- 
ing of the possibility of producing their 
own show. Then he consulted bis attor- 
neys, O'Brien, Malvensky and Driscoll, 
and they told him that the contract or 
agreement witb Dillingham for the Cen- 
tury was void, if the latter did not wish 
to pay him the stipulated amount for the 
theatre, as the roof was not to be oper- 
ated. Then, on the advice of his counsel, 
Hitchcock says he served notice of the 
cancellation of his agreement on the Cen- 
tury management. 

When his show "Hitchy-Koo" first 
opened at the Candler Theatre, however, 
there was much talk about tbe action that 
Dillingham and Ziegfeld would take against 
the actor if he tailed to fulfill his con- 
tract. Hitchcock remained silent all of 
this time and refused to discuss the matter, 
dismissing all inquiries by saying, "Dilling- 
ham and Ziegfeld are good pals of mine, 
and I hardly think we will have to go to 
court about the matter." 

Shortly after his show went into the 
Liberty Theatre, Hitchcock met Dilling- 
ham on the street and, at his request, 
made an appointment to meet the producer 
at the office of Delancey Nicoll, the lawyer. 
He went there, accompanied by Mr. 
O'Brien, and they talked tbe matter over 
fully with Mri Nicoll. According to 
Hitchcock, Mr. Nicoll coincided with him. 
and this caused Mr. Dillingham to say 
to the attorney : 

"Didn't I tell you not to listen to him 
or he would talk yon into what be 
wanted 7" 

This settled the controversy aa far as 
the lawyers were concerned, with all par- 
ticipants parting the best of friends. 

Last week Ziegfeld called on Hitchcock 
at the theatre and, after a long talk, they 
d cided that it would be a good idea of they 
all got together and put out a show next 
season, with tbe actor-manager as the star. 
They then got in to::ch with Dillingham, 
who thought it was a capital idea, and 
said they should make all preliminary ar- 
rangements at once. This was done and, 
efter Hitchcock finishes his engsgement 
in "Hitchy-Koo," at his 44th Street The- 
atre, late in the Spring, he will commence 
work on the production to be pnt on in 
London in the late Summer. 



LAUDER RAISING BIG WAR FUND 

London, Eng., Sept 12.— Harry Lauder 
has started to raise a fund of £1.000,000 
for the general benefit of the Scottish regi- 
ments, or Scotsmen who serve in other 
units of military and naval forces during 
this war. The object of tbe fund is to aid 
in the rehabilitation of all Scotsmen who 
have made business and financial sacrifices 
to fight for their country. 

OGDENSBURG THEATRE LEASED 

Ocdensbubg, N. Y., Sept 18.— The City 
Opera House, of this city, has been leased 
by Gerald Fitzgerald and William Hand. 
The managers are already arranging for 
the presentation of some of the best road 
attractions. At present tbe city is in a 
very flourishing condition and promises big 
returns for companies playing here. 

SOLOMON GETS MARVIN THEATRE 

Finolat, O., Sept. 12. — H. B. Solomon 
has taken over the Marvin Theatre here 
and announces that he will present a good 
line of attractions including dramatic 
shows, musical comedies and burlesque. 
His opening attraction will be the "Auto 
Girls," a wheel burlesque show which 
comes next Wednesday. 



MAY TRANSPORT 

SHOWS BY 

MOTOR 

MANAGERS CONSIDER PROBLEM 



"DAD" FOWLER BUYS THEATRES 

Farco, N. D., Sept 18.— "Dad" Fowler, 
manager of the Grand and Orpbeum The- 
atres in this city, has purchased the stock 
of the Fargo Theatre Company, and is now 
sole owner of the properties. The Grand 
Theatre, which has tbe distinction of never 
having been closed since it was first opened 
ten years ago, plays Orpbeum vaudeville. 



CLARK SELLS AGENCY INTEREST 

Ross Clark bas disposed of his interest 
in the Clark-Reiners Agency to Chris 
Gray. Tbe agency will be known as the 
Gray-Reiners agency hereafter. Louis 
Gordon has been engaged to take charge 
of tbe motion picture casting department 
of the concern. 



COWBOY ACTOR DISAPPEARS 
Akron, O., Sept 13. — Buck Bailey, an 
old-time cowboy, bas been missing for 
twenty-one days, and is being anxiously 
sought by his wife. His last date was 
Toledo, Ohio, after which he bas not been 
seen. 



FRIARS TO DINE CREEL 

The Friars Club will banquet George 
Creel, husband of Blanch Bates, and mem- 
ber of tbe Committee on Public Informa- 
tion on the War at Washington. Tbe date 
of the banquet will be announced later. 



TO INCREASE RIALTO ORCHESTRA 

The size of the orchestra at the Rialto 
Theatre will be increased to a full sym- 
phony strength of SO pieces on Oct. 1. A 
more pretentious musical program will be 
given hereafter. 



"PARADISE VALLEY" TRIES OUT 

Ractrx, Wis., Sept. 16. — "Paradise 
Valley," a new Boyle-Woolfolk musical 
comedy, tabloid, under the managership of 
Morris and Thurston, was tried out at tbe 
Orpheum Theatre, here, today.. 




RICCS AND WITCHIE SAIL 
Ralph Biggs and Katherine Witchie 
sailed for England yesterday on the St 
Louis. They have been engaged by Albert 
De Courville for a London production. 



HARRY LA PEARL 
The Famous Clown 

Being- Featured with Jules Larvett's Vaude- 
ville Circus. 



New York's theatrical managers are 
making inquiries about the feasibility of 
carrying their shows this Reason over a 
motor truck circuit to include Hartford, 
Springfield, Providence, Boston, Trenton, 
Philadelphia, Wilmington, Baltimore, 
Washington and many smaller stands. 
This inquiry ia brought about by the fact 
that it is very likely that the railroads 
will find it difficult and maybe impossible 
to carry shows before the present season 
is over, owing to war conditions, which 
might make it necessary for the roads to 
utilize all available rolling stock for the 
transportation of troops, food supplies, 
ammunition and the like. 

The managers are preparing to meet 
this emergency, should it arise, and it may 
be that some of them will not wait for 
the emergency to arise, but will use mo- 
tor trucks as soon as their shows are 
ready to take to the road. 

Carrying a big show by motor truck 
has been tried and has been proved prac- 
tical. "The Chatterbox" was moved in 
this manner from the Fulton Theatre, 
Kew York, to Stamford, and from Stam- 
ford to Long Branch. It was found that 
for short hauls, the motor truck method 
is no more expensive than the old system 
of show transportation, for, while motor 
trucking entails more expense than train 
hauling, tbe extra amount on short hauls 
is mitigated by the fact that there ie no 
loading and unloading charges, the haul 
being made direct from one place to the 
other. 

The managers of "The Burlesque Re- 
view" have decided to try out the motor 
truck method of hauling, and are utilizing 
trucks to carry their show from here to 
Perth Amboy. 

Theatrical managers admit that they 
are seriously considering the matter, and, 
in the event of railroad congestion, it will 
be the only way in which shows can move. 
In any case, it seems certain that some 
managers will adopt the motor truck sys- 
tem of moving their ahowa when they take 
to the road this season. 

FAY SETTLES JUDGMENT 

Frankie Fay has settled a $770.41 Judg- 
ment held against bim by Sam Golding fof 
$450. Golding, who acted as Fay's at- 
torney during his legal difficulties with his 
wife, Frances White, obtained the judg- 
ment for professional services in the Mu- 
nicipal Court He secured an order to 
examine Fay in supplementary proceed- 
ings in the City Court last Wednesday. 
However, in the meantime. Fay bad settled 
the matter, and Golding, through his at- 
torney, made a request of Judge Schmuck 
to withdraw the proceedings, which was 
granted Friday. 

BREAKS LEGS IN LIFE SLIDE 

Decatub, 111., Sept 12. — Jerry Marsh, 
who did a "slide for life" with a carnival 
exhibiting last week at Kincaid, this State, 
fell forty feet on Wednesday night from 
the wire down which he slides. Both legs 
and one of bis arms were broken. His 
safety belt failed to work. He is twenty- 
three years old and his home is at Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

"NERVO" DIVORCES WIFE 

"Nervo," the high diver, known in private 
life as Albert Gorman Steinbnrg. »u 
granted a divorce from his wife last Friday 
by Justice Callagban in the Supreme Court 
of Kings County. "Nervo" is given permis- 
sion to marry again. 

STORK VISITS MALLE HOME 

Columbia, O., Sept 11.— A baby girl 
was born today to Mr. and Mr*. Eddie 
Malle. Mother and baby are doing welL 
Mrs. MaTle is one of tbe Jeannette Sisters. 



Trf# N&W YO*tfK ^CillPPElt 



September 19, 1917 




N. V. A. TO PUT 

CARL STATZER 

ON TRIAL 

MUST EXPLAIN ALLEGED AFFRONT 



Desiring to make a thorough investiga- 
tion of rumors to the effect that Carl 
Statzer, a vaudeville performer, has been 
discriminating against brother members of 
the National Vaudeville Artists, Inc., who 
ire of the Jewish faith, the directors of 
(bat organization have called Statzer to 
account and have demanded an explanation. 

Statzer has been fathering the idea of 
presenting a large, silk American flag to 
the National Vaudeville Artists. In carry- 
ing out his plan he decided to have forty 
members contribute ten dollars each, the 
flag to be purchased with the proceeds. It 
is alleged that in proceeding to collect this 
flag fund, he discriminated against brother 
members in that he would allow no per- 
former of Jewish faith to contribute to the 
fund to purchase the gift for the club. 

It is estimated that three-fifths of the 
N. V. A members are of the Jewish faith, 
and therefore such action as Statzer is 
alleged to have taken would be considered 
an affront to the greater part of the mem- 
bership. 

If SUtser is found guilty of the charge, 
suspension is possible. 

MAY PLAY VAUDE. AT LINCOLN SQ. 

Although no definite plans have yet been 
decided upon, it is likely that Herman 
Scboenbacb, who leased the Lincoln Square 
Theatre when Marcus Loew allowed his 
option on the property to lapse, will play 
vaudeville in the house. Since he gained 
control of the property, several offers have 
been made to him by persons who stated 
they only represented a client, for the pur- 
chase of the lease. He has not parted with 
it, however, and, with James Thorns, his 
general manager, is planning the future of 
the house. 

It is possible that, not being a member 
of the Vaudeville Managers' Protective 
Association, Shoenbach may have some dif- 
ficulty in booking the house in as much as 
Loew is one of its members. 



REGAL AND BENDER NOT SLACKERS 

Detroit, Mich., Sept. 13. — While play- 
ing the Temple Theatre here Regal and 
Bender were asked by the Federal authori- 
ties to show their registration cards, owing 
to a report from New York that the mem- 
bers of the team were "slackers." The 
boys, however, had no difficulty in refuting 
the imputation as their cards were found 
to be O. K. in every particular. 

CORNELL LEAVES PANTAGES 

Oakland, Cal., Sept. 14. — Harry B. 
Cornell has resigned as manager of the 
1'antaees Theatre to engage in mercantile 
business. Charles Niemeyer, for several 
years assistant manager at the Oakland 
house, has been named successor to Cornell. 



REVIVE CHARLES VAN'S ACT 

Chaa. T. Lewis is working with Chas. 
Stine and Fannie Van, producing "A Case 
of Emergency," an act written and form- 
erly played by the late Charles Van. 



MANAGER SAVES DROWNING GIRL 

Billy Sheehy, manager of Loew's DeKalb 
Theatre, while at Far Rockaway last week 
jumped into the water and saved a girl 
from drowning. 



SUIT OVER ACT UP AGAIN 

Once again the case of Jane Kennedy 
against the vaudeville team of Kenny and 
Lusby will come up before the courts. 
The case is set for hearing on Friday when 
the court will hear a motion for a rear- 
gument on the previous order to enjoin 
Kenny and Lusby from doing their danc- 
ing act on the ground that it is copy- 
righted by Maxwell Miller Kennedy. The 
reargument is baaed on the ground that 
Kenny and Lusby played the Hamilton 
Theatre, billing their act as "Danse Fan- 
tasies," which is alleged to be the title 
of the copyrighted act. The previous or- 
der was denied. Harry Sales "Hechheimer 
represents the plaintiff. 

SUES ACTRESS FOR ROYALTY 

Marion Vantine, known on the stage as 
Madge Voe, has been served with a sum- 
mons in a suit instituted against her by 
Jerome M. Wilson, a playwright, who 
claims that she owes him $175 as royalty 
due to him under a contract. Wilson al- 
leges that Miss Voe accepted his playlet, 
"Dum Duma," for production several 
years ago but never produced it. He al- 
leges that, through her neglect, the offer- 
ing has by now lost its timeliness. Miss 
Voe is playing in "Over the Phone" at the 
Forty-Eighth Street Theatre. Wilson 
brought suit through S. Edward Ginsburg, 
his attorney. 

AMY EVANS' MOTHER IS ILL 

Auburn, Neb., Sept. 17. — Amy Evans, 
who was playing a vaudeville engagement 
in Boston, was suddenly summoned here 
to the bedside of her mother, who is very 
ill and in a serious condition. Mrs. Evans 
waa on her way from- Southern California 
to her home in Boston when stricken ill 
and was forced to break her journey and 
stay at the home of relatives. Her con- 
dition became so bad last week that it 
was deemed advisable to have Miss Evans 
and her three sisters immediately come 
here from the East. They arrived here 
yesterday. 

REOPENS AS VAUDE. HOUSE 

Union Hnx, N. J., Sept 17.— The Hud- 
son Theatre, long identified as a stock 
hoose, returns to vaudeville tonight and 
opens with Fred. Ardath and company, pre- 
senting the skit "The Decorators"; James 
Watts and company, Sylvia Clark, Santo, 
Oriental dancer; Goldsmith and Lewis, 
John It- Gordon and company, in "It's a 
Great Life," and the Gypsy Songsters. 

PREPARE SATIRE FOR VAUDE 

A satirical playlet entitled, '"The Love 
of Thy Neighbor," is now being rehearsed 
under the direction of Lewis and Gordon. 
The playlet carries a cast of eleven per- 
sons and was originally produced by the 
Washington Square Players at the Com- 
edy Theatre, at which time it was en- 
titled "Altruism." 



RAYS RETURNING TO VAUDE 

John and Emma Ray, after an absence 
of several years from vaudeville, will 
again return to that field shortly in a 
new act by Aaron Hofman, which will be 
routed over U. B. O. time by Jack Iievy. 



GRANVILLE HAS THREE PLAYS 

Taylor Granville will present three 
vaudeville offerings this season. They 
are. "The Star Bout," "The Holdup" and 
"The Eyes of Buddah." 

EDDIE FOYER GETS 40 WEEKS 

Eddie Foyer, "the man of a thousand 
poems," has been booked to play forty 
weeks of Loew time, headlining all bills on 
which he appears. 



DIXIE AND DUEL BOOKED SOLID 

Racint, Wis-. Sept. 12.— Dixie and Duel 
started their season in Racine last week, 
being booked solid on the Inter-State Time. 



BETH BELLAIR HAS NEW ACT 
Beth Bellair will shortly make her vaude- 
ville debut in a single song and dance act. 
.for which Jean Haves will compose the 
music 



ROYAL TO GET 

BETTER GRADE 

OF JiCTS 

NEW POLICY STARTS OCT. I 



With the opening of the Bronx Theatre 
art a vaudeville house, the Royal Theatre 
is about to inaugurate a new vaudeville 
policy. Starting October 1, the Royal will 
become a big time variety house in every 
sense of the word and will present bills 
on a par with the Colonial, Riverside, Al- 
hambra and other uptown Keith big time 
houses. 

This change in policy is necessitated no 
that the business interests of the Royal 
and of the Bronx, both operated by the 
same interests, will not conflict. Ihe 
Bronx is running what might be termed 
small big time vaudeville, and the present 
grade of vaudeville at the Royal is too 
much along these lines to make it good 
business to operate the two houses with 
a continuance of the old Royal policy. 

With the first of the month, the Royal 
will go into big time vaudeville and pres- 
ent a high grade, nine-act bill, changing 
onco a week. The initial bill under the 
new policy will be headed by the Dolly 
Sisters. On the same bill will be Morton 
and Glass,, and Olive Briscoe. 

Under the new policy, the Royal will 
raise its schedule of prices. Matinee prices 
will run from 15 to 35 cents while at night 
SO cents will be the top price. _ The or- 
chestra will be enlarged from six to ten 
pieces. 

The same bouse staff will continue under 
the new arrangement, Chris Egan remain- 
ing as manager. 

KEITH'S BRONX STARTS VAUDE 

Keith's Bronx Theatre inaugurated a 
split week vaudeville policy on Monday 
afternoon, when the following bill was 
presented: The Three Misses Stewart; 
Hendricks and Padula; Nine Little Ru- 
bens; Cant. well and Walker; Jack Marley; 
Seven American Minstrels and the feature 
picture, "The Retreat of the Germans." 
The bill changes tomorrow (Thursday), 
and the program for the last half of the 
week will be comprised of: Rialto, Mc- 
Intyre and Company; Haynes and the 
Ward Girls, Ed Lee Rothe and Company; 
Man Off the Ice Wagon; "I Love the 
Ladies"; and a feature film. Pat Woods 
is booking the house. Ned Alvord is house 
manager. 

OLDFIELD ENTERS VAUDEVILLE 

Barney Oldfield, the driver of racing 
automobiles, will shortly appear in vaude- 
ville. He is now rehearsing a new act, . 
written for him by Herbert Moore and: 
booked by Harry Weber. 



"JOLLY TARS" IS READY 

Harry Sauber's "Jolly Tars" will make 
its vaudeville debut at Wheeling, W. Va., 
Monday and will then tour the Gun Sun 
Circuit. There are six persons in the act. 

LOEW "GHOST" WALKS SATURDAY 

The employees of the Loew Booking 
Offices are receiving their salaries on 
Saturday now instead of Monday. This 
change went into effect last Saturday. 

NEW ACT IS READY 

Ned Nye and Eb telle Colbert will break 
in a new singing, talking and dancing act 
in Jersey this week. It will be entitled, 
"Bright Bits of Musical Comedy." 

MRS. WHIFFEN REHEARSING ACT 

Mrs. Thomas Whiffen is rehearsing in 
a new Ralph Dunbar act which will soon 
reach the vaudeville boards under the di- 
rection of Harry Weber. 



COLD STOPS BAYES CONCERTS 

Owing to a severe cold, Nora Bayes was 
obliged to bring to an abrupt close her 
tour of the training camps, at which she 
purposed entertaining the soldiers. Miss 
Bayes had planned to give an entertain- 
ment at each of six big cantonments, but 
the cold weather, which .came on so un- 
expectedly, proved too strenuous for her 
voice and she was obliged to quit, after 
appearing at Yaphank and Fort Totten. 

"MILITARY MAIDS" MAKE DEBUT 

Fabso, N. D., Sept 1L— Leo Kendall 
and his "Military Maids," with Jack 
Brickly, Helen Hehman and Evelyn Slater, 
assisted by a chorus of six, made their 
debut at the Grand Theatre here this week. 
The act is booked solid on the A. B. C. and 
W. L. time. 



EBEY TO STAR STELLA MAYHEW 

Stella Mayhew signed a contract last 
week with George Ebey, by the terms of 
which she is to star under Ebey's man- 
agement in "A Mix-Up." She will open 
her season October 9 at the Alcazar The- 
atre, San Francisco. 

HAS NEW WOLF SKETCH 

Miss Percy Haswell will shortly be seen 
in a new playlet by Edgar Allen Wolf. 
The sketch, as yet unnamed, is said to 
be a comedy. Edward Longman will be 
in Miss Haswell's support. 

AMANDA GRAY GETS ROUTE 

Amanda Gray and boys received a route 
over the Keith and Orpheum Circuit for 
the coming season after their showing last 
week at the Fifth Avenue Theatre. 



Mclaughlin loses father 

Bob McLaughlin, 'of the team of Mc- 
Laughlin and Stuart, mourns the loss of 
his father, who died at the Hotel Drcin, 
Kingston, Ontario. He was well known 
among theatrical people. 

WARD GIRLS JOIN HAYNES 

The two Ward Girls, having returned 
from their Summer vacation, formed a 
new act with "Big Bill" Haynes and 
opened last week for a tour of the Loew 
Circuit. 



EDESON HAS INDIAN PLAYLET 

Robert Edeaon has secured an Indian 
playlet called "Flying Arrow," in which 
he will appear on the Keith time shortly. 
It was written by an Arizona Indian. 

WHITE TO STAGE FOR U. B. O. 

George White, dancer, has been engaged 
by the Keith Vaudeville Circuit to con- 
ceive and stage two elaborate dancing acts 
yearly to play over U. B. 0. time. 

OCT. 1st IS LAST BAYES WEEK 

Nora Bayes plays her final week in 
vaudeville at the Palace Theatre the week 
of Oct. 1. She then starts rehearsals for 
the new George M. Cohan Revue. 



GET FORTY-WEEK ROUTE 

Ward and Pryer started last week on 
a forty weeks' tour of the Loew and Pan- 
tages Circuit. Ben Bard has written two 
new numbers for the act. 



MRS FOY IN HOSPITAL 

Mrs. Eddie Foy was taken ill while en 
tour over the Orpheum Circuit and was 
taken to Colorado City, Colo., where she 
is now under treatment. 



FILM STAR TRIES VAUDEVILLE 

Los Angeles, Sept. 12. — Ruth Roland, 
movie star, is going Into vaudeville for ten 
weeks and will be seen over Pantages time. 



"COLD COFFEE" GETS 40 WEEKS 

"Cold Coffee," a vaudeville playlet fea- 
turing Hana Roberts, has been given a 
forty weeks' booking over the W. V. M. 

A Circuit. 



September 19, 1917 



fHEcjflfcW ^ORK v ^iIP§ER 




PALACE 

The Gaudschmidts have now changed 
their billing from "European novelty acro- 
bats" to "Netherlands' premier clowns." 
They offered a new bit in one at the finish, 
with a prop wine bottle, which slowed 
things up entirely. 

Rudinoff speaks French and English to 
his audience while dressed in evening ap- 
parel and sporting a beard. He first ex- 
plains that he will draw smoke pictures 
on an enameled piece of metal, and then 
smokes np the enamel. He then draws a 
picture of a liner entering the lower bay, 
and shows it to the audience framed. He 
next explains that he is going to offer 
a whistling specialty, assisted by a me- 
chanical appliance to make the sound load. 
However, Rudinoff is a parlor entertainer, 
and should rearrange his matter, opening 
with the whistling and finishing with the 
pictures. 

Harriet Rempel and company offered an 
act entitled "Just Around the Corner," by 
Tom Barry, which is more folly reviewed 
under "New Acts." 

The Three Dooleys developed into four 
at this performance, as Ray Dooley in- 
sisted on pulling Johnny Dooley out of 
the wings to take a bow, after the act had 
literally cleaned np. The act is the same 
as was offered last week, with the excep- 
tion of Ray Dooley's kid impersonation 
bit, in which ahe does some acrobatics on 
a brass bed, while singing a comedy num- 
ber. The falls of Bill and Gordon Dooley 
were well appreciated, and the cabaret 
finish put a big punch into the act. 

Lucille Cavaungh, Paul Frawley and 
Ted Doner closed the first part with their 
well known dance production, in which 
Miss Cavanagh has a new song based 

on a military subject and wears the cos- 
tume, or at least one like she used to 
wear when appearing in vaudeville with 
George White. The act is in its fourth and 
final week at this bouse. 

After intermission, Privates Bernard 
Granville, Earle Carroll, Arthur Fields, 
Leon Flato and Stanley McAvoy offered 
a singing and talking act, which was en- 
tertaining from start to finish. During 
the running of the act, Granville Informed 
the audience that the remainder of the turn 
originally billed, bad been ordered to report 
to camp by the War Department, and that 
he had received orders from Washington 
to stop the recruiting propaganda in the- 
atres. He explained that he would never- 
theless tell the folks a few stories of camp 
life, which he did. The stories, furnished 
by Granville, especially the one about 
spending four months* pay at Long Beach 
in fifteen minutes, brought laughs. The 
act closed in one, with the rendition of 
two popular numbers for a hit of big pro- 
portions. Carroll sang one new song 
about married men, and Granville recited 
a poem entitled "The Fool," which aroused 
the enthusiasm of all. 

Joan Sawyer danced with George Har- 
court, billed as "The Peerless Queen of 
the Modern Dance," and was assisted by 
a violinist and pianist. The act is more 
fully reviewed under "New Acts." 

Billy Montgomery and George Perry 
returned with several new songs and 
stories, interpolating several good bits of 
comedy business. The act did not seem to 
be able to hold the crowd. 

The closing feature was the first show- 
ing of "The Retreat of 'the Germans at 
the Battle of Arras" pictures at this the- 
atre, which are to be shown in three in- 
stallments. The pictures are a vivid pic- 
turization of the trials and tribulations of 
our Allies on the other side, as they swept 
forward in their pursuit of the Germans at 
Arras. The photography is splendid, and 
the pictures are not alone a liberal educa- 
tion as to actual war. conditions on the 
other side, but are also entertaining and a 
diverting feature on a vaudeville program. 

Judging by the first installment, the pic- 
tures should prove a big attraction at the 
box office and also add to the enthu- 
siasm of any vaudeville program. 

S. L. H. 



SHOW REVIEWS 

(Continued on Pages I and 27) 



RIVERSIDE 

The Four Bightons opened the bill with 
their statuesque acrobatic novelty. The 
turn is well presented and found much 
favor. 

Rae Eleanor Ball, the violiniste, fol- 
lowed and rendered several classical selec- 
tions with a popular number as an en- 
core. While vaudeville has heard violin- 
ists with a better technique than that 
possessed by Miss Ball, few can rival her 
in tone, which Is so smooth and flowing 
as to make her playing a delight to the 
ear. 

Jessie Busley & Co. have in "Pansy's 
Particular Punch," a sketch by Willard 
Mack, a vaudeville offering which although 
clever is rather far fetched as to plot. 
The story tells of 'Tansy," a cashier in 
a restaurant, who has been inveigled by a 
confidence man and his wife, into posing 
as the lost child of a millionaire. She is 
carefully coached by the schemers who 
hope to win a large reward offered by 
the millionaire. She calls at the home of 
the couple and learning .that they are to 
receive a large sum of money for finding 
her insists that she get a share and finally 
forces the pair to give her $1,000. The 
millionaire arrives, and immediately iden- 
tifies the girl as his lost child. He gives 
the couple who had found her a. check 
for $10,000, and as they leave to get it 
cashed Pansy and the supposed millionaire 
burst into laughter for they are crooks 
themselves and have exchanged a worth- 
less check for a thousand dollars in real 
money. Miss Busley as the wise restau- 
rant cashier was exceptionally good and 
her supporting cast adequate. 

Gus van and Joe Schenck, with the best 
song repertoire they have rendered since 
they entered vaudeville, had things all 
their own way. Their songs were ap- 
plauded to the echo and they could have 
prolonged their act almost indefinitely. 

George McKay and Ottie Ardine, with 
some of tho best bits of their old act 
and some new and clever material, scored 
one of the real hits of the bill. The act, 
constructed solely for the provocation of 
laughter, succeeds admirably. 

Collins and Hart, the burlesque strong 
men, opened intermission, and although 
this act has been appearing in vaudeville 
for many years, never fails to amuse. 
There is always someone in the audience 
who believes their feats of strength are 
genuine. 

Frank Fay was next and following so 
many good acts found the spot a hard one. 
Mr. Fay has a pleasing personality but 
needs new material. Be is using Savoy 
and Brennan's joke "I'm Glad You Asked 
Me" as well as one or two others heard 
before. He also renders the chorus of a 
sentimental ballad, which would be more 
effective if he did not sing through his 
nose. The portions of his act which got 
the most applause were references to his 
recent marital troubles. Whether or not 
these are in good taste must be decided by 
Mr. Fay. 

Blossom Seeley and her Syncopated Stu- 
dio stopped the show completely. Miss 
Seeley has, with her clever assistants, the 
best act she has ever presented. Not only 
is it a big flash, but has loads of talent 
to back it up. It shows Miss Seeley at 
her best, who has not only built a clever 
vaudeville production but is doing the best 
work of her career as well. 

With the "Retreat of the Germans at 
the Battle of Arras," the great official war 
film, the Keith circuit has solved the ques- 
tion of a closing act.' Not a person left 
his seat during the showing of the first 
episode of the picture. This film, photo- 
graphed in the midst of the battle lines, 
is wonderfully realistic, striking in action 
and detail; ' W. V. 



BUSHWICK 

On Monday afternoon the standees 
were lined up four and five deep. Yet, 
peculiarly, this big audience was not a 
particularly warm one, and although 
every act pleased, no turn exhibited show- 
stopping proclivities. 

The Kanazawa Boys started the show 
off in good shape with their skillfully 
executed risley work. Although mucn 
along the lines of other acts of this 
type, the turn is certainly a winner and 
goes nicely in the initial spot. The 
boys get a lot of comedy into their work 
which, naturally, enhances the value of 
the act. 

Ann Suter followed, billed as "The Girl 
from Virginia." Miss Suter has a like- 
able personality and an entertaining song 
routine. Her costumes are very unusual 
and attractive. The house liked her 
whimsical way and her turn was appre- 
ciated for its full worth. 

Flo Irwin and company have a rather 
weak offering in Edgar Allan Woolfs 
playlet, "Looks." The vehicle gives Miss 
Irwin a good chance to portray a role 
that suits her peculiar style and some 
of her lines are bright. But the playlet 
itself has a plot that is entirely too crude 
and carelessly worked out. Nowhere, ex- 
cept on the stage, would one find such an 
asinine character as "Jimmy," and proba- 
bly the poor role accounts for the inade- 
quate acting of Reginald Fife in that 
part. The others act their roles pass- 
ably. 

Ann Suter was not the only Virginian 
on the bill, for Alexander, 0*Neil and 
Sexton are also "from Virginia," accord- 
ing to the program. This trio, working 
in blackface, will receive a more detailed 
review under New Acts. 

The first half of the bill was closed 
by Winston's Water Lions and Diving 
Water Nymphs, living up to the super- 
lative billing .which characterizes them as 
"The Aquatic Marvels of the Twentieth 
Century." This act is so utterly differ- 
ent from other animal turns that it 
would be hardly fair to the others to 
indulge in o. comparison. Winston is a 
showman of the first water, . and, added 
to this attribute, has a real feature act 
to offer. He changed his routine slightly 
at the Monday matinee requesting the 
audience, toward the end of the act, to 
order the seals to repeat any trick that 
had been performed earlier in the turn. 
This was done, the announcer explained, 
to prove that the seals do not work by 
a set routine. 

After intermission, Loney Haskell made 
his appearance and found a warm wel- 
come. He showed good show sense by 
meeting the audience on its own level 
and a lot of ad lib stuff ran through the 
routine. Haskell delivered several gags 
which this reviewer has not heard him 
use before and which seemed to improve 
the act's effectiveness. However, several 
very old ones are employed, such as the 
German going into a French restaurant 
end coming out a Russian. The gag 
about the Thousand Isles has been proba- 
bly pulled five times for every island in 
the group. 

Mabel and Dora Ford and Henry Mar- 
shall found the going very easy with 
their high-class dancing and singing turn. 
The old-fashioned waltz was particularly 
well done, and the end of the act took 
the trio off in great shape. The girls, as 
well as being excellent dancers, possess 
exceptional dash and style, while Mar- 
shall fits into the picture excellently and 
renders his part of the routine in a high- 
class manner. 

The first, episode of "The Retreat of 
the Germans at the Battle of Arras" 
closed the show and held in the audience. 

H. G. 



ROYAL 

The biggest crowd of the season at- 
tended the Royal on Monday night. The 
large attendance was probably due to a 
doable cause : the religious holiday and the 
fact that the Avon Comedy Fonr, bead- 
lining the bill, is probably the favorite 
act of the Royalites. Any one doubting this 
latter assertion should have been present 
on Monday evening when the quartette ap- 
peared. 

After a Hearst-rathe New Pictorial, the 
show was opened by Howard and Clayton, 
a man and a girl, in an acceptable skating 
act. The turn is put on nicely and the 
pair are adepts in their line. They went 
over nicely and received a flattering hand. 

An act as early as number two seldom 
stops a show. And it is even more seldom 
that a xylophone act will stop proceed- 
ings in this early spot. Yet, that is just 
what George and Lily Garden did. In a 
well selected routine of xylophone num- 
bers, this pair won their way into the 
hearts of the Bronx patrons, who have a 
decided leaning toward musical acts. Their 
medley of popular songs brought down the 
house, and they could have responded for 
several encores had tbey cared to do so. 

It was surprising that "Mrs. Rltter Ap- 
pears," a talky comedy by George Kelly, 
went over as successfully as it did, for 
the patrons of this theatre do not, as a 
rule, care for this style of act. The play- 
let, however, more tban passed muster, 
and got a good share of laughs, although 
its success would be bigger in vaudeville 
houses catering to a higher class of audi- 
ence. The playlet will be further re- 
viewed under "New Acts." 

It was smooth sailing for Homer Dick- 
inson and Grade Deagon, in their "paprika 
of chatter song." Their turn is a unique 
one, and seems to please equally In all 
neighborhoods where it plsys. Grade 
Deagon, as an eight-year-old kiddie, has 
created a "kid" character that entertains 
every one. The latter part of the set la 
just one laugh after another. Homer Dick- 
inson plays a straight role well, and he and 
Miss Deagon work excellently together. 
Probably no one In vaudeville can get as 
many laughs out of a cute little H«p in can 
Miss Deagon. 

Sylvia Loyal and her Pierrot — not to 
forget the seventy pigeons— closed the first 
half of the bill. Working in an extremely 
attractive set, Miss Loyal shows remark- 
able versatility, doing everything from 
tight-rope walking to exhibiting trained 
pigeons and doing each thing well. How- 
ever, the act seems more suited to an open- 
ing or dosing position than being placed 
in a feature spot, as in the present in- 
stance. 

After intermission, Tvette and Saranoff 
introduced a new act, which will be re- 
viewed accordingly. It was written by 
Herman Timberg. The act is rather novel, 
presenting something new in violin acts, 
and found a warm welcome on this bill. 

But the house was waiting for tbe Avon 
Comedy Four. Immediately upon its an- 
nouncement by the cardboys, there was ap- 
plause from all parts of the house. 

Presenting their "Hungarian Rhapsody," 
they scored laugh upon laugh, and some 
of the audience are probably so laughed- 
out as a result that tbey will not be able 
to gi-" vent to a whole hearted guffaw 
again fnr a month. Practically every line 
was t ! a occasion for a new laugh, and not 
one gag missed fire. 

The quartette was in excellent voice, and 
all of the song numbers scored in the big- 
gest possible way. 

The acrobatic ending to the act proved 
to be a comedy piece de resistance, and, 
if the day should ever come when these 
boys run out of songs and gags, we are 
sure they could make a success as acrobats, 
as long as the handkerchiefs hold ont. 

Following the vaudeville bill, the first 
episode of the moving picture, "The Re- 
treat of the Germans at the Battle of 
Arras," was shown, and practically the 
entire audience stayed to see the film. 

H. G. 



THft NEJW YORK CUPPER 



September 19, 1917 




FIFTH AVENUE 

The Fifth Avenue was too small to ac- 
commodate the crowds on Monday, the 
Jewish New Year. Every seat was filled 
at the first afternoon performance, with 
standees four deep and the lobby roped 
off with a crowd waiting to get in for the 
second show. 

Evelyn and Dolly, two girls, opened the 
bill, making their first appearance on 
roller skates on which they do some 
dancing steps. One of the girls then does 
heel and toe dance on skates and her 
partner follows with a toe dance, without 
skates. Next, the smaller member of the 
team, dressed as a Chinese girl, sings and 
is joined by her partner in similar cos- 
tume. For a finish, they do a double rid- 
ing bicycle act, using one machine. They 
are a pair of clever girls. They dance 
well, on and off the roller skats, and do 
some crackerjack stunts on the bicycle. 
They make a good appearance and well 
deserved the hearty applause accorded 
them. 

Saul Powder and Burt Chapman, with 
comedy talking, singing and dancing, 'were 
well received. (See New Acts.) 

"Almost Married," a skit presented by 
Keene and Williams, man and woman, 
drew forth much laughter. The sketch 
opens in two, showing Miss Williams as a 
country girl who falls asleep over her 
work. The scene then changes to one and 
what the girl dreams is acted. 

She meets a young man who makes love 
to her and asks her to marry him. She 
leaves him saving she will return in five 
minutes. The scene then changes back 
to two and discloses the girl still asleep. 
She awakes and remarks, "Gee! if I'd 
slept five minutes longer I'd 'a been mar- 
ried." 

Miss Williams is really the whole act, 
being a very capable eccentric comedienne. 
She knows how to be funny and gets 
laugh after laugh for her work. Her 
partner is little more than a feeder for 
her work. 

Grace De Winters, a ventriloquist, was 
called upon to respond to an encore, a dis- 
tinction rarely accorded to a performer 
in her particular line. (See New Acta.) 

The Washington Square Flayers were 
seen in a playlet entitled "Overtones," 
presented last season by this organization. 
It is played by four women, two of whom 
play two characters, and the other two 
portray the dual personalities of these 
characters. The sketch tells of one 
woman married to a rich man, while lov- 
ing a poor artist, and envious of the 
woman who becomes the artist's wife. 
The two women meet, and with each is 
her dual personality. While each woman 
is uttering lies to the other her donble 
is talking truths. The playlet tries to 
convey that the usages of society gives 
each of us a dual personality and that, 
while our "outer self" indulges in sophis- 
try our "inner self" cries out. the truth. 

The work is cleverly written and well 
acted, but seems ill suited for vaudeville 
or, in fact, for any form of stage enter- 
tainment. 

Mabel Burke sang an illustrated song 
and received hearty applause for her work. 

Bert Fitzgibbon, assisted by his wife, 
scored the great big laughing hit of the 
bill. He was forced to respond to two en- 
cores and even then the audience wanted 
more of his work. Bert presented his 
patter and songs in his well-known "nut" 
style, making his start alone. Finally he 
renders a travesty on a popular song and 
his wife, seated in an upper box, sings it 
as it should be sung. He then invites 
her to come on the stage, which she does 
to sing and dance a couple of numbers 
while Bert accompanies her on the piano. 

An aerial act, presented by the Four 
LukenB. in closing position held the audi- 
ence till the finish. It is one of the few 
high bar acts now playing vaudeville, and 
consists of single and twisting somer- 
saults and return work, ranking with the 
best of its class. E. W. 



JEFFERSON 

A cold snap in the air. a Jewish holiday 
and several other earmarks known to 
vaudeville managers as good business get- 
ters, failed to give the usual impetus to 
the box office at the Jefferson Monday 
afternoon. 

In spite of this, the bill ran smoothly 
from top to bottom. The real meat was 
found in three acts. Princess White Deer 
and company, Edmunds and Leedham, and 
Charles Horn and company. 

Princess White Deer, a dainty Indian 
girl, supported by a company of her race, 
offers a novel act of the song and dance 
variety. The turn opens with a full stage, 
showing a night scene outside an Indian 
camp. With this as a background, the 
Little Princess, who is about 90 per cent, 
of the act, although there are three other 
members, executes a dance to the weird 
music supplied by her company. 

The other members of the company, one 
of whom takes a place in the orchestra pit 
to direct the music for the act, are unim- 
portant to the turn's success, except to 
add to the picture. A great big fellow 
relieves himself of a much too long speech 
on how the Indian was the 'first to inhabit 
these United States, eta, with a great deal 
of gusto and affectation. This chap, how- 
ever, does sing a dramatic number with 
better than ordinary success, while the 
Princess make a costume change. The 
act was number six on the bill, and closed 
to appreciative applause. 

Edmunds and Leedham, number five, 
were the laugh-getters of the afternoon. 
This is a man and woman act, the former 
doing a good Italian character and the 
girl doing the Fanny Brice type of nut 
comedy. They did excellently in the spot 
they had. Particularly is the girl good in 
a baseball bit, which she does with a vim 
and dash that would do justice to the most 
rabid baseball nut, coming as it does right 
on the eve of the world series. They 
work in one and finish with a bang, taking 
several bows. Edmunds then responded 
with a little curtain speech. 

Charles Horn and company added a 
novelty to the show by offering a playlet 
called "Old Bill Rogers." Being fourth 
on the bill, Horn's sketch came on at the 
right moment, breaking a sameness for 
several acts preceding him. The sketch is 
a comedy. It is well staged, well costumed 
and wen acted and, moreover, it is good, 
clean farce of the sort that pleases any 

kind of an audience. 

The bill opened with the Gorgallis Trio, 
three expert gun and pistol' marksmen. 

This is a good act, if for no other reason 
than the fact that every one nowadays is 
hoping for the opportunity to see a man 
capable of shooting straight enough to 
pop a German. The reception they re- 
ceived demonstrated this. 

A song and dance team. Sherman and 
Reese, occupied number two. With very 
little incentive to do good work, they put 
their stuff over with an indifference that 
spoiled what otherwise might have been a 
successful appearance. 

A good musical act is always welcome on 
any MIL Conrad and Paganna furnished 
this type of turn and did it well, except 
that Conrad, at the piano, by a lot of 
grotesque business, over-played his part- 
ner, an attractive girl, who is very accom- 
plished on the violin. The act would do 
50 per cent, better if the girl took the 
lead, because she is pretty, vivacious, and 
has all the means of winning an audience. 

Frank Mnllane, a single, offers a good 
act of souks and some stories. Not ill of 
both are of the highest order, but they are 
by no means the worst He has a fairly 
good singing voice. He also possesses a 
good Irish and Jewish dialect, and tells 
several very good stories in both. 

And, to close the show, the management 
offered the best animal act in vaudeville — 
White's Circus. Here is a troupe of dogs 
plus several donkeys and two young horses 
that do everything but talk. They an all 
any other act of the kind does, an. 1 then 
a lot others don't d». G. G. 



CITY 

This week's show at the City is, per- 
haps, as good as is possible to book from 
the available material. 

Number seven on the program, Greene 
and Parker, offered what was doubtless 
the best bit of real vaudeville of the bill. 
They are a typical every day act, knowing 
just how far to carry the audience when 
they are going good and when to change 
their pace. 

The act opens in one in front of a drop 
representing a railroad station. Greene, 
in black face, is the ever prevalent porter, 
and in the performance of his duties, en- 
counters Miss Parker, the traveler. What 
happens from here on is the best comedy 
imaginable. It is neither obvious nor ob- 
jectionable. It is real fun and resembles 
the line of patter Bert Williams might in- 
dulge in under the circumstances. By no 
means is Mr. Greene on a par with Mr. 
Williams, but he has the same easy style 
in delivering his lines. The team finished 
amid a thunder of applause. 

The Great Lambert, billed. as the "Cele- 
brated Italian Protean Artist," preceded 
this act and was, as usual, very success- . 
f ul. He went through his imitations with 
the same grace and finesse that he did 
years ago, and with the same apprecia- 
tion from his audience. In this particular 
line of work Lambert is among the top- 
notchers. 

An act called The Red Cross Girls, seven 
girls and two men, stepped into the bill 
in the third position. This is, as its 
names implies, an act based on a phase 
of the war. Whether the material is in 
good taste or not is a matter of opinion, 
but the cold fact remains that some of 
the comedy, is far fetched when it is con- 
sidered that the whole world is ripped 
wide open with real war. However, the 
act is full of pep and comedy of a kind. 
And, at the opening show, it went with 
a rush from the beginning to the fiwi«V 
The act closes on full stage, showing a 
Red Cross Hospital. 

Here is where the act takes very broad 
liberties with its comedy. Whether this 
will prove obnoxious to patriotic persons 
remains to be seen when the act gets 
away from cosmopolitan New York. For 
a finish, the seven little dancers appear 
in costumes as the allies of the United 
States. This number simply stops the 
show, the audience greeting it with great 
appreciation. a 

Everett and Marquise, a dancing and 
singing act, occupied the number four 
spot. They opened in full stage, with 
a singing number which was lost because 
they tried to reach the audience from a 
position too far back in the stage. The 
number did not get over at that distance, 
whereas it might have fared very well had 
they opened in one and then gone to full 
stage for the dance number. a 

Miss Marquise then attempted a toe 
dance with little success. She is prob- 
ably a good ballroom dancer, but when 
she tries to emulate toe dancers she falls 
flat. The turn closed with a song for 
which the male member of the team 
dressed as a Red Cross doctor. This was 
a sad spectacle. Everett is undersized to 
begin with, and possesses a sort of nasal 
tenor voice, and to see him parading a 
soldier's uniform, when the streets are 
full of real fighting men, is asking too 
much even of a vaudeville audience. Yet 
the act was well received. 

Two cleancut boys, Worths and Mayne, 
got away with a semi-nut act that will 
carry them along on any bill, even on 
some of the lesser two-a-day programs. 
These boys are good, with a lot of stunts, 
among others a roller skating one, that 
was a "knockout" 

The Nellos, a comedy juggling act, and 
Ellen OT?ourke, a single singing act, were 
on in one and two, respectively. The 
former is one of the few remaining acts 
of this kind that has anything like the 
material of the acts of yesteryear. His 
act includes everything on the calendar. 

G. C. 



AMERICAN 

The roof and the theatre proper were 
packed to capacity and a well arranged 
bill was heartily approved Monday night. 
The audience was an easy one to please, 
and all of the turns received a good quota 
of applause. 

The Zanaras, man and woman, started 
the bill. They open with darkened stage, 
and on a small platform they do some artis- 
tic posing in a spotlight. They strike some 
very difficult positions, and the ease with 
which they bold them is proof of their well 
developed muscles. Then en a lighted 
stage the woman works on a trapeze 
strung from two poles fastened to the 
top of two ladders, which rest upon the 
stage. The ladders are steadied by the 
man, who stands between the two, with a 
foot on each of the bottom rungs and a 
hand on each of the top rungs. The wom- 
an does a good routine. For a finish the 
woman swings her partner around at full 
length, supporting him with a belt placed 
around her neck and around his neck. 
The man is swung around with such rapid- 
ity that his body is in a horizontal posi- 
tion. It is an A-l athletic act The 
woman is rather slight of build, and does 
not have the appearance of having the 
strength she possesses. They won well de- 
served approval. 

Walker and Blackburn, two colored 
comedians, presented a singing, talking 
and dancing act They open with a song 
and go to a dance. This is followed by 
some good comedy patter. Then tbey each 
sing and finish with a dance. Tbey were 
wen liked. 

Ray Conlon presented his clever ven- 
triloquial specialty and won a well earned 
success. Conlon is one of our best ven- 
triloquists. His articulation is remarkably 
distinct and he puts his material over in 
an entertaining style. 

Morgan and Armstrong, man and wom- 
an, with songs and comedy talk, held down 
number five position. They open with 
comedy patter, which is followed by several 
songs. Then they offer more funny talk 
and close with a song. An encore feU to 
their portion. They are clever entertainers, 
the woman being an especially capable' 
comedienne. Many laughs were scored by 
this turn. 

The College Quintette, four men and 
a woman, scored a big bit They open in 
two, with the men, one at piano, singing. 
They render two numbers, and the woman 
then joins them. A dnet by the woman 
and one of the men, a bass solo and two 
quintette numbers follow. They close in 
one, the men playing band instruments, 
and the woman, in a red pierrette costume, 
doing a dance. 

Betta, a violinist, was on right after the 
intermission, and pleased so well that she 
was called upon to respond to an encore. 
She played seven numbers and proved her- 
self to be a clever violin player. 

"A Night at the Club," presented by 
William Lytell and company, two men and 
a woman, is one of the best comedy sketches 
in vaudeville. It tells of a young married 
man, who has been playing poker all night 
and who, to "square" himself with his wife, 
tells her he has joined the Masons. She 
is happy, because she believes her father 
is a Mason. The old man appears, and 
his son-in-law soon learns that his Ma- 
sonic lodge is the same poker club. The 
sketch is weU acted. . 

Fenton and Green, two men, in a bur- 
lesque magic act, in one, won plenty of 
laughs. One of the men undertakes to do 
a number of tricks, but is interrupted at 
each attempt by his partner, and no trick 
is done. 

At the finish the partner, who makes 
the interruptions, does some very eccentric 
dancing steps. They finish with a dance- 
Jerome and Carson, man and woman, in 
closing position, start' with a song and 
dance. The man then does some cap-twist- 
ing somersaults. 

The act went wen and brought the show 
to a satisfactory close. E. W. 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORKVCLIPPER 



VMC/O 




HARRIET REMPEL AND CO. 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time—Turenty-ttDo minutes. - -- 

Setting — Special, full stage. 

Harriet Reropel, assisted by five men, 
offers a new act, entitled "Just Around 
the Corner," by Tom Barry, which just 
misses hitting the mark on account 
of lack of continuity of the story. It's 
the old yarn of the poor, downtrodden 
slavey, who has a dream of the fresh 
air, dreams about it, sees it acted, and 
then awakens to find herself in her old 
surroundings. Miss Rem pel has sur- 
rounded herself with a capable company 
of assistants, who play their parts well, 
although the boy who takes the part of 
the cripple could tone his voice down, 
and the man who plays the uncle could 
show more consistency in hia work. 
Tt>ere are a great many laugh lines in 
the act, including- two "hell*," but at 
best, the act is a pointless affair leading 
nowhere at the end of the twenty-two 
minutes. 

The story concerns a niece working for 
a cruel uncle, who beats her, and the 
pathetic appeal of a crippled boy who 
was run over by an automobile. The 
girl dreams that her father returns in 
the form of a Bilk-hatted-evening-clothed 
prince, and then the rude awakening. 

The act is on the allegorical line of 
things and quite slangy. The finish 
should be strengthened, and the acting 
of the boy could be brought within 
bounds, while a little chopping at the 
opening would also help to make the 
act run smoother. S. L- H. 



NEW ACTS 

(Continued ob Pace II) 



JANET OF FRANCE 

Theatre — Fifth Avenue. 
Style — Singing. 
Time— Fifteen minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

Janet of France is an attractive 
French woman, reminding one more or 
less of Irene Bordoni. She is aided by 
a very competent pianist, whose name 
is not on the card, although he contrib- 
utes more than his share to the act's 
success. 

A Farisienne song starts the routine, 
after which Janet renders a number in 
Apache costume. Instead of rendering 
a piano solo, the pianist introduces a 
"singing chicken," a mythical bird. 
Pretending that the chicken is con- 
cealed in the piano, the pianist gives a 
clever impersonation of a singing chick- 
en, if there could possibly be such a 
creature. Janet then gives her impres- 
sion of an American singing a popular 
song, after which she concludes her rou- 
tine with an appropriate ballad num- 
ber. 

The act is well presented. Janet is 
costumed prettily and has a fair 
amount of talent. The pianist contrib- 
utes a good deal of comedy to the act 
and is an adept accompanist. The act 
should have no difficulty in securing big 
time bookings. H. G. 



MAUD DURAND & CO. 

Theatre— Proctor's 1251* Street. 
Style— Playlet. 
Tims— Eighteen minutes. 
Setting — Living room. 

This playlet deals with a religious 
argument, from a lighter point of view. 
The husband is a Jew and the wife is a 
Catholic. They have quarreled, an] the 
wife desires a separation. Hia father 
and her mother arrive on the scene just 
in time and, through them, the quarrel 
is patched up, and everything ends hap- 
pily, and we may presume that they live 
in happiness ever after. 

A playlet of this nature treads on 
rather delicate ground, and we question 
whether it is entitled to vaudeville book- 
ings. H. G. 



YVETTE & SARANOFF 

Theatre— Royal. 
Style— Novelty violinists. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

Yvette and Saranoff have landed 
upon a new idea for a violin and song 
act, for all of which they must thank 
Herman Timberg, who furnished the 
idea. 

Saranoff, after playing an introduc- 
tory number upon his violin, discovers 
Yvette. In song, he explains that she 
is under his hypnotic spell, and she 
plays the violin at his command. He 
then leaves the stage, and the girl ren- 
ders a solo. All of this has been done 
in one, in front of an attractive black 
and gold drop. 

For the next number, a futuristic 
drop is used, also in one. Upon his vio- 
lin, Saranoff imitates different well- 
known voices, making his violin "say" 
such sentences as Warfield'a "If you 
don't want her, I want her," and Ethel 
Hurry in ore's "That's all there is; there 
isn't any more." He follows this num- 
ber up with a rag. 

Yvette then sings a ballad. 

The third drop in the act represents 
a country garden. Saranoff is dressed 
as a rooster and Yvette as a chicken 
(not the Broadway kind). After a 
"down on the farm" number, they con- 
clude with a snappy- ragtime selection. 

Talent is there, but even without this 
asset, the act could probably get over 
on account of its attractive settings 
and novel costtimings. Yvette is a real 
picture, particularly in the "chicken" 
number. H. G. 



"MRS. RITTER APPEARS" 

Theatre — Royal. 

Style— Playlet. 

Time — Ticenty-three minutes. 

Setting — Living room. 

"Mrs. Bitter Appears" is from the 
pen of George Kelly and is presented 
by May Tully. It is a high-olass com- 
edy, depending almost entirely upon its 
dialogue for its bid to success. It stays 
out of the usual rut of vaudeville play- 
lets and seems to be more or less of a 
variety experiment. It is the opinion 
of this reviewer that such offerings will 
find a ready welcome in the better 
grade of vaudeville houses, where en- 
tirely too many trashy playlets have 
been seen and too few well written ones. 

"Mrs. Fatter Appears" is by no means 
a noisy offering. It will never stop a 
Bhow. We do not think it is intended 
for this purpose. But it will amuse a 
thinking audience and offer a striking 
contrast to the ordinary run of vaude- 
ville playlets. 

The plot, such as there is, is very sim- 
ple. Mrs. Bitter has taken the leading 
role in a Society Amateur Flay. Her 
friends fill her with flattery, flowers 
and falsehoods after the performance 
is through, but her husband sees the 
thing through different colored glasses 
and tells ber in plain, cruel English 
that her acting was terrible. She re- 
sents his frankness and continues to en- 
joy the false flattery of her friends un- 
til her husband, through a clever ruse, 
shows her the light. She thereupon 
gives up the ideas she had formed for 
a stage career and decides to become 
domesticated once again. 

The acting is good, with particular 
praise due to Charles Wingate as Mr. 
Ritter. The running time of the play- 
let is rather long, and three or four 
minutes could be cut out to advantage. 

H. of 



ALEXANDER, O'NEIL AND 
SEXTON 

Theatre — Bushtcick. 
Style — Blackface novelty. 
Time — Fourteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Alexander, O'Neil and Sexton work 
in blackface, but go away from the 
usual routine of blackface acts. 

The act starts with O'Neil and Sex- 
ton singing a duet. Alexander, former- 
ly of the team of Alexander and Scott, 
joins them in the chorus, dressed in 
female garb. Throughout the act, he 
endeavors to conceal the fact that he 
is a man and his female make-up helps 
in this deception, although the falsetto 
voice is not so perfect but that it gives 
away the surprise to many of the au- 
dience. The opening song is followed 
up with some fancy stepping, executed 
by the two men. The "Girl" then sings* 
a solo. A burlesque love scene by the 
other two members of the team follows, 
after which the trio finish with a song. 

At the conclusion of the routine, 
Alexander takes off his female head- 
dress, and the audience is "let in" on 
the "secret." 

The act is a passable one of its kind. 

H. G. 



SAWYER AND HARCOURT 

Theatre — Palace. 

Style — Dancing. 

Time — Twenty minutes. 

Setting — Special full stage. 

Joan Sawyer, assisted by George Har- 
eourt, is offering an old style ballroom 
dancing act with nothing to recommend 
it on the dancing end. The setting is a 
special grotto effect, with a piano . and 
lamp placed upon the stage. ■ Three 
dances are offered and an eucore of a fox 
trot. The first is a dreamy waltz affair, 
in which Miss Sawyer shows good taste 
in dressing. Then comes a violin solo 
by the special leader in the orchestra 
pit billed as S. E. Alberisser. Another 
slow dance is shown and then a piano 
solo by Joseph Ruben, who walks on 
and plays the piano, taking nway the 
honors of the act 

The finish is a fox trot to very lively 
music, in which Miss Sawyer shows some 
new wardrobe, and Harconrt displays an 
inclination to stoutness. The finish let 
the act off lightly, although a bunch of 
flowers was sent over the footlights. 

The act has not kept up to the 
present pace of dancing act. 

S. L. H. 



ROGER GRAY & CO. 

Theatre — Harlem Opera Hou*e. 
Style — Song and burlesque. 
Time — Sixteen minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Once more Boger Gray is trying ont a 
new act. This time he has discard*! 
May Francis and has engaged a support- 
ing company of two girls, whose names 
do not appear on the billing. 

The trio start off with a novelty song, 
after which Gray does his old "marriage 
song" specialty. A hokum song follows, 
concluded with a dance, in which Gray 
extracts a lot of laughs by means of his 
extreme awkwardness. As a closer, the 
trio burlesque the stage acrobat, the 
drug clerk, and the church choir, in turn, 
each of the characterizations being in- 
troduced through a verse of a topical 
song. 

The turn is only fair and, as it stands, 
can never hope for more than the small 
time. H. G. 



"I LOVE THE LADIES" 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style- itutiral comedietta. 
Time — Thirty-one minutes, , 
Setting — Special. 

This act is dressed in an attractive 
full stage special set representing the ex- 
terior of a Summer home. Five prin- 
cipals and a chorus of six girls comprise 
the company. 

The action centers around a young 
man's efforts to win the girl of his choice 
and his clever connivances to get her 
reluctant father to consent to the match. 
Most of the comedy is brought oat by 
the father, a Jewish type. His wife, 
also, has a number of laugh lines, but 
is not sufficiently in the action, in view 
of tbe excellent portrayal she gives. The 
young boy is a passable juvenile, and the 
girl who plays opposite him is pretty and 
talented. Another girl has the brunt of 
the musical numbers and puts over her 
songs most effectively. Tbe women are 
nicely gowned, and the act presents a 
big flash. 

With the exception of the opening 
number, all of the songs are published 
numbers. It would be a good idea to 
cut down some of tbe explanatory talk 
in the opening song, for the explanation 
is rather jumbled and is explained again 
in the action of tbe piece. II. G. 



PORTIA SISTERS 

Theatre — Columbia. 
Style — Acrobatic and contortion. 
Time — Twenty minutes. 
Setting — Full ttage. 

Four athletes, dressed in blue, appear 
after a rich plush drop bus been raised, 
three of them on pedestals, tbe other on 
a mat. After a routine of close bend- 
ing, the three descend to the stage for 
some ensemble work, and exhibit great 
flexibility of body and limb. 

They conclude with the trio doing an 
upward bend, supported only by a 
mouthpiece on the revolving upright, a 
stunt formerly introduced by Ena Ber- 
toldi. 

The act held the Snnday audience to 
tbe finish, and the incidental comedy 
was timely and appropriate. But the 
"Singing" could be eliminated. F. M. 



ALBERT AND JAMES 

Theatre— Dyckman. 

Style — Singing and dancing, 

Time — Eighteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

Albert and James, dressed in Tuxedo 
suits and straw bats, put over a comedy 
skit One of the boys is a corking good 
dancer while the other endeavors to use 
bis voice a la Al. Herman. Several of 
the wheezes in the act are very old and 
could be polished up, while others show 
some originality. 

The pair goes from song into dance, 
then into patter and back again into the 
same rontine. finishing with a recitation. 
Tbe boys make a good appearance, but 
an improvement in some of the material 
is needed. An eccentric soft-shoe dance 
is good. g. Xj. h. 



GRACE DE WINTERS 

Theatre— Fifth Avenue. 

Style — Vcntriloquial act. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

Miss De Winters has mastered the art 
of ventriloquism. She keeps ber lips 
slightly parted, but it is impossible to 
notice any movement of either ber lips 
or throat when she ventriloquizes. 

She makes her entrance dressed as a 
bell hop. and works as such until the 
close, when she makes a quick change 
to a knee-length pink dress. E. W. 



10 



tfll NEW tO^K CLIPPER / September 19, 1917 



gillllllllllilliilllllllM 



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At B. F. Keith's Palace Theatre 

NEXT WEEK, SEPTEMBER 24 



.. ; 



SAMMY 
WESTON 



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•■■ 



WM. B. FRIEDLANDER, INC., 
New Production 



a 



The Naughty Princess" 



iillillllllliliiiiiiiiiilliillllllllllllllM 



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September 19, 1917. 



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NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 19, 19T7~ 



Entered June 24, 1879, at tke Peat OSes at 
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THE CLIPPER ia iasoed every WEDNESDAY, 
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Tit Cur-ran cam bb ostaimkd WHOLESALE and 
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Stationery Co., 128 Eacolta Street, Sydney, 
N. S._W.._Auatralia. _ 

An Ill-Directed Move 

„ EffortB to organize a new vaudeville 
performer's club, of which mention is 
made elsewhere in this issue, seem rather 
Hi-directed. A new organization at this 
time, would more likely do harm than 
good, and, whether the efforts succeed or 
fail, there is no crying need at present 
for a new club. 

The better policy would be to leave 
well enough alone. If an organization is 
demanded by the vaudeville performer, the 
National Vaudeville Artists, Inc., meets 
this necessity. The latter organization 
can well be regarded as truly representa- 
tive of the rank and file of vaudeville, 
for today practically every recognized 
vaudeville artist is included in its roster 
of members. 

As well as fulfilling social and pro- 
tective functions for the vaudeville per- 
former, the N. V. A. has the unqualified 
support of the managers, and, through 
this organization, vaudeville has been run- 
ning along more harmonioua lines than 
ever before. 

We do not question the motives of the 
sponsors of the new organization, for they 
have probably acted in good faith, not 
realizing the dangers to vaudeville that 
would be brought about if the new 
project should meet with success. For, 
although the new organization, at its in- 
ception, might work In absolute harmony 
with the purposes and objects of the 
N. V. A., the day would be bound to come 
when the two organizations would take 
divergent views over some matter or 
other, in which case vaudeville would be- 
come divided against itself, and old scoreB 
would be given new life. 
■ The formation of a new club would 
mean that vaudeville history would ulti- 
mately repeat itself and that the long 
wished-for harmony which now exists in 
the variety world would be wiped out and 
replaced by the old-time friction which, in 
the past, proved both disagreeable and 
disastrous. 

The wiser and better course would be 
for the organizers of the new project to 
abandon their idea and devote their ef- 
forts and energies in a direction which 
would more closely solidify the vaudeville 
world, instead of disintegrating it. 

The National Vaudeville Artists is doing 
much for the performer and, therefore, is 
deserving of the unqualified support of the 
vaudeville artist. 



THEATRE SCHOOL REOPENS 

The Washington Square School of the 
Theatre, which is conducted in connection 
with the company, reopened Monday after 
a Summer vacation. The faculty is again 
headed by Mrs. Clara Tree Major. 



iii Answers to Queries 

H. S.— Pat Rooney died March 28, 1892. 

W. Delehanty died August 13, 1881. 

• .• • 

A. P. — You should address them in care" 

of Wm. Fox Studios, Fort Lee, N. J. 

« # • 

E. S. C. — Billy Sheehy is the manager 
of Loew's De Kalb Theatre, Brooklyn. 

• • • 

F. S.— Eddie Foy and Eddie Foyer are 
not related, as far as we can ascertain. 

• • • 

A. B. P. — Tony Pastor is commonly 
known as the "Father of Vaudeville" in 
America. 



I. S. — Louis Kraig is the manager of 
the Gayety, Brooklyn. You had better 
consult him. 

• • • 

R. H. — 1. We do not know where Lydia 
Barry Uvea. 2. We do not answer per- 
sonal questions. 

• • • 

S. E. — E. F. Albee is the head of the U. 
B. O. offices. B. F. Keith is dead. A. Paul 
Keith succeeds him. 



S. H.— Laurette Taylor starred in "Out 
There." Klaw & Erlanger and Geo. C. 

Tyler are her managers. 

• • • 

Y. K.— 1. "The Man Who Came Back" 
has been in New York for more than a 

year. 2. William A. Brady. 

• « • 

. P R. — "Some Little Bug Is Going to 
Get You Some Day" is published by T. B. 

Harms, Francis Day & Hunter. 

• • • 

B. S. — We cannot answer the questions 
you ask. Go to the United Booking Of- 
fices, Palace Theatre Building. 

e> -• • 

E. W.— "The Man Behind the Hammer 
and the Plow" is published by Harry Von 
Tilzer, 222 West Forty-sixth Street. 

• • • 

E. L. R— Look at The Clipper's week- 
ly "Route List" and you will find out 
where to reach Al. G. Fields' Minstrels. 

• « • 

S. C. — Mrs. Fiske is under the joint 
management of Klaw & Erlanger, Geo. O. 
Tyler and Arthur Hopkins. 2. More than 
twenty-five years. 

• a • 

S. S. — Such questions are not answered 
by this department. You had better write 
to her care "Some Babies" show If you 
want to find out. 

• * • 

E. H.— Emmet Corrigan, Fiske CHara 
and Chauncey Olcott are considered by 
many people to be the three premier Irish 
actors on the stage today. It is all a 
matter of choice. 

• a) • 

E. K. S— The song "Dolly Gray" was 
written by Will Cobb and Paul Barnes. 
If you can not purchase a copy in one 
ojf the music stores, you can get one by 
addressing- tile Maurice Richmond Music 
Co., 145 West Forty-fifth Street. 



W. R. : Sessue Hayakawa is a native 
Japanese. He is with Lasky. We do not 
know. 



G. H. : "I May Be Gone for a Long, 
Long Time" Is published by the Broad- 
way Music Co., of 145 West Forty-fifth 
Street. 



S. A. K. : Joseph Santley's act which you 
saw at the Palace was called "The Girl 
on the Magazine." 



J. P. : A wins. "Oh Boy" is a musical 
comedy, not a farce. It is at the Princess 
Theatre, New York. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 

Jas. J. Corbett opened his theatrical sea- 
son at Elizabeth', N. J. 

Wilbur M. Bates was advance agent for 
"The Devil's Auction." 

Cooke and Clinton were with "The Busy 
Bees." 

The Casino Theatre, New York, played 
vaudeville. 

Geo. W. Orrin died at London, England. 




THIS WEEK'S FOOLISH THOUGHT 

We would like to see Eddie Cantor 
starred in "Hamlet." 



A BIT PARADOXICAL 

The Shuberts, although very practical, 
are strong for Romance. 

AT THE COHAN THEATRE 

"This Way Out," Frank Craven, for 
"Here Cornea the Bride." 



ISN'T HE A DEVTL? 

"The Grass Widow" engages Victor 
Morley. Her name, please! 

DRY HUMOR 

The prohibitionists scored one more 
victory. Weingarten loses franchise. 

MARRIAGE BLUES 

Charles C. Blue has filed suit for divorce 
from Gertrude P. Blue. Life is too blue. 



CAN HE SEE THE JOKE? 

Max Gordon, who escaped the draft on 
account of defective eyesight, couldn't see 
why he should serve. ; 

UNION HILL, N. J. 

The "N. J." after Union Hill stands 
for New Junk. That's where all the New 
Acts break in, you know. 



PEACE IS NEARER 

Now that Hitchcock and Dillingham 
have settled their differences, we can turn 
our whole attention to world peace. 

SHORT ENGAGEMENT 

We read that Charles F. McCarthy has 
been engaged for "Saturday to Monday." 
That's worse than a split week. 



IT'S A FACT 

The first Monday in September is called 
Labor Day because that's the time the 
shows open and the actors start work. 



PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT 

lMr.nr and Dale will soon add a clarinet 
to their act, according to advices from a 
neighbor who lives on the same air-shaft. 



VERY FITTING 

George Welty, who has been out of the 
theatrical business, is returning to it in 
"The Man Who Came Back." Quite ap- 
propriate. . . 

MAKING RUSH TRIP SLOWLY 

Barney Reich is going on a trip' through 
the West for Ed. Rush. Although he will 
be gone quite a while, it is supposed to be 
a Rush trip. 

UNLIMITED, HE HOPES 

J. Barnes hastens to inform us that the 
title of the show, "Lombardi, Ltd.," has 
nothing whatever to do with the length 
of the engagement. 

A BIT 0* GOSSIP 

Although we don't know the name of 
the girl, Walter Kingsley exhibited a 
broad and happy grin when we congratu- 
lated him the other day. 

SOME CONTRACT 

"Twenty-seven members of Sousa's Band 
Get Contract for Century." (Newspapei 
headline.) That must be the longest-time 
theatrical contract ever issued. 



NO CIRCUS FOR GERMANS 

Frederick Sergeant has arrived in 
France with a contingent of Big Top men, 
all ready to fight for Uncle Sam. Then- 
training has been intense' (in tents). 



RHYMED INTERVIEW NO. 13 

What's her last name no one knows. 
Everybody calls' her Rose. At Chamber- 
lain Brown's she spends her days helping 
cast the Broadway plays. She gets jobs 
for an ingenue who is every bit of forty- 
two, and helps to place a juvenile who's 
not counted birthdays for quite a while. 
Each jobless actress tells her woes and 
puts her fate in the hands of Rose. 



BUT WHEN DOES THIS HAPPEN? " 

Gene Sullivan, over at the Spellman 
office, has a favorite indoor sport which 
consists in this declaration : "When the 
motor circus goes out it will be the greatest 
show on any lot 1" 



OUR FORMAL THANKS 

When Nick T Ian ley's boast about that 
Marion Weeks' newspaper story did not 
materialize, he was square enough to buy 
us the drinks. For all of which we thank 
him.' 

GOOD BUSINESS 

"This Way Out" gets its plot from a 
matrimonial advertisement. Outside of 
the theatre after the show we saw a man 
peddling the Matrimonial News. 



WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN 

In view of the fact that Ruth St. Denis 
made $72,000 in one season doing the light 
fantastic, it stands to reason that Terpsi- 
chore would have been a millionairess had 
there been vaudeville shows in her day. 

CAN HE GET HIM THE JOB? 

There's a. sign in the Fitzgerald Build- 
ing which reads: "Joseph E. Corrigan for 
District Attorney. One flight up." One 
Hight up is Chamberlain Brown. Perhaps 
he's acting as Corrigan's representative. 

HEARD ON THE RIALTO: 

"I don't go on until 5:45." 

"I wonder what that hoofer can do 
in the army." 

"I knew him when he was a supe." 

"Is that the Frank Fay who married 
Frances White t" 



FELLOWS WHOSE JOBS WE ENVY 
Joe Barnes, who is traveling with "Only 

Girls." 
Joe Lane, who is managing "The Beauty 

Shop." 
George France, who is associated with 

"Million Dollar Dolls." 



THINGS WORTH ACQUIRING 
Tanguay's salary. 
Chesterfield's glad band. 
Anna Held's eyes. 
Publicity a la Gaby Deslys. 
"Poor Butterfly" royalties. 
Money sunk in film companies. 



ROEDER, THE BRAVE 

Benjamin F. Rocder, David Belaaeo'a 
general manager, once wrote a play, whis- 
pers Ren Wolf, rattling the skeleton. 
For all of which Roeder is to be admired, 
for, having once written a play, he showed 
great strength of character in never writ- 
ing a second one. 

A GAG FOR YOUR ACT: 

Civilian: I saw you drinking beer the 
other day. 

Drafted Man: What's that to youT 

Civilian: Don't you know that a sol- 
dier is not allowed to touch liquor? 

Drafted Man: Oh, that's all right. I 
was drinking draft beer. 

PECULIAR FACTS 

No show has yet been advertised this 
Besson as "Broadway's greatest musical 
comedy." 

Harry B. Smith's name has been con- 
spicuous lately by its absence. 

We haven't heard a new war song all 
week. 

No film has yet been advertised this sea- 
son as "Greater Than 'Civill^ation. , " 



A PLUNGE INTO FREE VERSE 

She had a voice like Melba, 

A figure divine, 

And pretty as a picture. 

She only nodded at the manager. 

And got a part in the chorus. 

The other had a voice like Bert Fitzgib- 

bon, 
And not much of a figure. 
Nor was she pretty. 
Was it her wink at friend manager 
That put her name in electric lights t 



12 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



WESTERN OFFICE, 

Room 210 

35 SO. DEARBORN ST. 



C** If M %**q£m %m C# 



FOR ADVERTISING 
RATES 

Phone Randolph 5423 



FIRST RECEIPTS 

PROVE SHOWS 

PROSPEROUS 

ATTRACTIONS ARE GETTING MONEY 



As far as snows in and going oat of 
Chicago axe concerned, the new season is 
starting off very satisfactorily and aa 
though there was no war to throw a wet 
blanket over the theatrical, along with 
other business. In fact, the first return* 
that are commencing to come in show, in 
many instances, an increase in business 
over that done in the corresponding period 
of last year. 

For instance, the Gayety Theatre, at 
Louisville, was considered the bloomer of 
the International Circuit last season and 
several managers with shows on the some 
circuit this season were perturbed upon 
hearing that the stand was included in 
this season's route sheet. The season 
there, however, opened with Robert Sher- 
man's "The Girl Without a Chance" to 
over $700, which finished a good week. 
On Sept 9, Gazollo, Gatts and Clifford's 
"Katzenjammer Kids" set up figures of 
$1449 for the week, with Tuesday's re- 
ceipts reaching $558 and each succeed- 
ing day showing an increase, which waa 
remarkable for a popular priced attrac- 
tion. 

This firm's "Her Unborn Child" 
awakened them at Columbus, O., Sept. 10, 
getting but $145 for the day, bat hitting 
$529 on Tuesday and continuing around 
that figure the rest of the week. 

The local Star and Garter Theatre, 
again under the management of Billy 
Roche, is said to be in the neighborhood 
of $3,800 ahead of the best side of the 
ledger account of this time last season. 
It has been having as many as two and 
three $2,000 days a week with $1,000 ones 
becoming ordinary. 



REPRESENTS PANTAGES ONLY 

A Chicago court held last week that 
J. C. Matthews is the representative of 
Alex Pantages personally, instead of an 
agent of the corporation which controls 
the theatres and realty bearing his name. 

The decision came about through papers 
served on Matthews by a Cbicagoan in 
an action for $600. The complainant, it 
seems, backed an act recently by extend- 
ing a loan, for which he took an assign- 
ment calling for the payment to him of 
$25 weekly when the act started playing 
over Pantages time. The turn, however, 
broke up, and, it being $600 in his debt, 
the man had Matthews served with 
papers in an effort to get back his money. 
It was then that the court made the 
ruling. 



PARRY ENTERTAINS WHITE SOX 

The Chicago White Sox and local mem- 
bers of the Baseball Writers' Association 
were guests of House Manager Frank 
Parry at the Columbia one night last 
week. A supper at the Planters Hotel 
preceded the party. 

BUD SNYDER ATTACHED 

Bad Snyder was attached recently at 
the Temple Theatre, in Detroit, by Jake 
Sternad for commissions. The Lowentbal 
office handled the case. 



"NAPPANEES" ON PAN. TIME 

Jake Sternad's "The Nine Nappanees" 
is now touring the recently added South- 
west end of the Pantages Circuit. 

SPEARE PLAYING PAN TIME 

Fred Speare is making a tour of the 
Pantages time in his morality sketch, 
"Everyman's Sister." 



WILL HARRIS IS BUSY 

Will Harris has taken the quarters oc- 
cupied by. Earl & Yates in the Majestio 
Theatre Building, and is busy writing the 
material for several "girl acta" which he 
will also produce for Morris Silver to 
be booked by Harry Spingold. In the 
event that the anti-cabaret ordinance 
fails to go through, Mr. Silver will pnt on 
a thousand dollar revue at the Wood I awn 
Cafe, the plans for which are only held 
np awaiting a, decision in the matter. The 
Green Mill Gardens and the De Luxe Cafe 
have also come under Silver's booking con- 
trol. - 

NAMES THREE MORE IN SUIT 

Albert Carver, attorney, of Gary, Ind., 
has named three more defendants in his 
suit for $50,000 for the alienation of the 
affections of his wife, Bernardine, of the 
former Chicago Little Theatre Company. 
They are Col. Sol. L. Long, a lawyer of 
Kansas City, Mo., and Herman and Olga 
Beifeld, brother-in-law and sister of the 
estranged wife. 



SHERMAN PLAYS IN OWN CAST 

One of Robert Sherman's actors of "The 
Girl Without a Chance" company went to 
the wrong depot when the troupe pulled 
away from Louisville, last week, with the 
result that he did not show in time for 
the Imperial Theatre engagement in this 
city. Sherman, who has had several years 
of stage experience himself, played the 
part. 

SANTLEY TO DO BROTHER'S ACT 

Frederic Santley, who scored individ- 
ually in the short run of "Dew Drop Inn," 
is rehearsing "The Girl in the Magazine" 
for vaudeville under the direction of bis 
brother Joseph, who formerly used it in 
the two-a-day. He will be assisted by 
Florrie Millership. 



CLARA DE MAR MARRIED 

Clara De Mar, character actress, and 
Sergt. T. J. Fitzgerald were married- last 
week on the Municipal Pier, here. It waa 
a military affair. First Lieutenant E. 
Liffe was best man and the bride was 
given away by her uncle, Samuel H. 
Smith. 



SEEK ANOTHER LOOP HOUSE 

Jones, Linick and Scfaaefer are reported 
to be looking for another Loop house in 
which to put feature pictures, now that 
the Colonial has gone back to legitimate 
drama. No decision in the matter has 
been reached, however. 



SHERMAN OPENS ANOTHER SHOW 

Robert Sherman, who has two produc- 
tions out on the one-nighters playing 
Whitney Collin's "A Good-for-nothing 
Husband," opened a third at the Shubert 
in Milwaukee last Saturday, the 16th. 



INTERNATIONAL GETS NEW SHOW 

Primrose and McCillan will add a new 
show to the International Circuit on Sept. 
SO, for which O. H. Johnson has been 
busy engaging players. It will be called 
"One Girl's Experience." 



ACTRESS WEDS HOTEL MAN 

Helen Eddy, a youthful actress of the 
screen, and Melvin A. Sowle, a hotel 
owner of Denver, Colo., were married here 
last week. 



GUNSON MAY GO EAST 

Henry Gunson, the "Singing Fisher- 
man," from Washington, may go East for 
a tonr out of New York. 



POWELL ORGANIZING NEW SHOW 

Halton Powell is organizing a company 
of "Step Lively" for a berth on the In- 
ternational Circuit. 



"MAN WHO CAME BACK" HERE 

The "Man Who Came Back" is adver- 
tised to open at the Princess Theatre on 
Sept. 25. 



C0MST0CK MAY 
PRODUCE ALL 
SH0WSHERE 

ENCOURAGED BY "OH BOY" 



Encouraged by the box-office success of 
"Oh Boy," at the La Salle Theatre, Wil- 
liam Elliott and F. Bay Comstock, lessees 
of the house, may make it the production 
point for all of their new musical shows 
in the future. The reception of "Oh Boy" 
Bbows, according to the producers, that 
the patrons of this city want new musi- 
cal comedy productions and will support 
them. 

Chas. A. Bird, general manager for El- 
liott, Comstock & Gest, was on here from 
New York last week and, after looking 
conditions over, declared that Chicago 
looked good to him as a producing center, 
and that he felt that shows produced by 
his firm would probably have their pre- 
miere here to better advantage than they 
have in New York at present. 

It is quite likely that, after a show has 
had a run of a reasonable length of time 
here, it will then be taken to New York 
for its showing. Should this policy be 
carried out it is quite likely that, within 
the course of a season, about ten new 
musical offerings will be produced at the 
house. 

The original idea of running the La 
Salle was to simply make it a midweatern 
outlet for all of the firm's musical shows 
after their presentation in New York. 

ENGLISH OPERA REHEARSING 

The Strand Theatre took on a new lease 
of life last week when Joseph Sheehan and 
the Boston English Opera Company as- 
sembled to start rehearsals. The company, 
with but few exceptions, is the same as 
has been touring under Edward Beck's 
direction for the last five seasons, the ac- 
quisition of Hazel Eden, formerly of the 
Chicago Grand Opera Company, however, 
being one new face in the roster. Re- 
hearsals are nnder the supervision of Silli 
Simmonson, and it is announced that the 
first offering will be Verdi's "II Trova- 
tore." 



FRAZER GRANTED DIVORCE 

John Fitzpatrick, known in vaudeville 
as Jack Frazer, of the three-act Weber, 
Beck and Frazer, was granted a divorce by 
Judge Kavanaugh, of the Superior Court, 
bere, recently, from his wife, known as 
Helen Violette but who is Helen McDemus 
in private life. Leon Berezniak was the 
attorney for Frazer. 

ORCHESTRA AVOIDS PANIC 

The members of the orchestra employed 
at the Green Mill Gardens were responsible 
for the avoiding of a panic in the place 
last week by continuing to play while 
smoke from & minor kitchen fire filled the 
dining room. Tom Chamales, manager of 
the Gardens, emptied the place in orderly 
fashion. 



FORBES LEAVES GREAT NORTHERN 

After a number of years aa resident 
manager of the Great Northern Hippo- 
drome, William Forbes has resigned to 
become manager of the Palace Theatre, 
Detroit. Joe Bailey has replaced him fit 
the Qnincy Street Hippodrome. 

HI TOM WARD GETS 20 WEEKS 

Hi Tom Ward has been booked for 
twenty weeks over the Carrell and West- 
ern vaudeville circuits. He opens at the 
Hippodrome, Peoria, DX 



DOROTHY TOYE AFTER DIVORCE 

Through her local attorney, Leon Bere- 
zniak, Dorothy Toye is suing 
Emerson Stinson for divorce. 



PERFORMERS HELP SMOKE FUND 

Under the auspices of Drury Under- 
wood, of the Chicago Herald, assisted by 
James Duggan, advance man for the 
"Captain Kidd, Jr." show, a benefit to 
help swell the Herald fond with which to 
purchase tobacco for the Sammies, was 
staged at Cohan's Grand Opera House 
last night (Tuesday) with the volunteer 
acta headed by Otis Skinner, now at Pow- 
ers' .Theatre in "Mister Antonio," and 
Annie Runnel!, now playing a local en- 
gagement in "The 13th Chair" at the 
Garrick. 

Other features of the program included 
one act of "Catpain Kidd, Jr.," Florence 
Moore, from the Olympic's "Parlor, Bed- 
room and Bath" company; William 
Courteney and Tom Wise from the "Pais 
First" show; Joseph Santley, of "Oh, 
Boy"; Sophie Tucker, Josephine Harri- 
man, Dorothy Maynard, Lawrence Wheat, 
Donald Brian, Charles Dow Clark, Natalie 
Alt. Ivy Sawyer, Herbert Claribel Far- 
jeon, of the "Upstairs and Down" com- 
pany, and Handera and Millis, of the 
"Good Bye Boys" cast, while the Crown 
Theatre Players were represented by the 
offering of Edgar Murray, Jr. 

Jim Darling, stage manager of the "Oh, 
Boy" company, acted in that capacity for 
the occasion. 



SINGER HELD FOR MURDER 

Buby Dean, the cabaret performer who 
fatally shot Dr. Leon H. Quitman in her 
rooms in the Leasing Apartments here, 
smiled when the coroner's jury returned 
a verdict holding her to the Criminal 
Court for murder last week. 

The girl told a story of the events lead- 
ing up to the shooting, which she main- 
tained was accidental, despite the 'state- 
ment of her victim that she had threat- 
ened to kill him. When asked how a re- 
volver happened to be in her possession,. 
Miss Dean said that a man she bad never 
seen before had come up to her in a res- 
taurant and gave it to her, and that she 
had kept it for protection. When Dr. 
Quitman visited her apartment on the 
night of the shooting Miss Dean said the 
gun was concealed under a pillow on a 
chair. 

"He started to sit down on it. I was 
afraid it would be' discharged accidentally, 
so I sprang forward and snatched it from 
under the pillow. He seized me; we 
struggled, and it was discharged," she 
said. 



SHOWMEN HOLD CHARITY DAY 

Last week the Showman's League of 
America held a Charity Day, when a por- 
tion of the receipts of all circus, carnival 
and other outdoor attractions, the coun- 
try over, were donated to the organiza- 
tion's treasury. The sum was stated to 
have reached in the neighborhood of 
$10,000, to be used for the comfort of 
aged and crippled showmen. The 
League's rooms in the CrUly Building were 
crowded all week with members. Dur- 
ing the winter "Get Together Nights" will 
be held at which the -organization will en- 
tertain visiting showmen and performers. 



"ALL-GIRL REVUE" WINS PRAISE 

Pepple and Greenwald's latest edition 
of "The All-Girl Revue" has been winning 
high praise over the Michigan Circuit of 
the U. B. O. time, and is reported from 
several stands as being the best T. 
Dwight Pepple has as yet turned out. It 
consists of a minstrel first part, followed 
by an olio, and is concluded with "A Night 
at Maxim's." 



Lester 



BACHMAN REORGANIZING ACT 

Fred B ach m a n , who was very •successful 
last Beason with his act called "Bachman's 
Troublesome Kids," is engaging an en- 
tirely new cast, aside from himself and 
wife, Flo Betty, and will put the act into 
rehearsals next week. Mike Levy, who 
bas a fifty per cent, interest in the act, 
is arranging a route for H. 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



13 




JACK BROOKS CO. 

LOSES ALL 

IN_FJRE 

ALL BELONGINGS DESTROYED 



Dablington, Wis., Sept 15. — A fire in 
this city, which included the Rodham Opera 
House in its wake, completely destroyed the 
theatre and created havoc for the Jack 
Brooks' Stock Company, which was play- 
ing a fair date here. 

Everything that the stock company pos- 
sessed was destroyed by the flames, which 
mined the scenery, wardrobe and- electrical 
effects, leaving the company completely 
helpless. The catastrophe was marked by 
heroic efforts on the part of Jack Brooks, 
M. A. Fancillon and others of the players 
who joined the squad of local fire-fighters 
in an endeavor to check the blaze. Several 
of the players rushed into the burning the- 
atre in an effort to save scenery and per- 
sonal effects, but the fire was too well under 
way and their brave efforts proved fruitless. 

The stranded company then proceeded to 
Green Bay, Wis., where they managed to 
obtain enough credit to open for a two 
weeks' engagement at the Bijou Theatre 
there, borrowing enough wardrobe to get 
along with for the time being. 

Those who were in the company and suf- 
fered loss through the fire here included 
Jack Brooks, Maude To ml ins on, Frances 
Gregg, Virginia Lee, Truman De Roame, 
Stanley Andrews, Jack Robertson, Clifton 
Simpson and M. A. Fancillon. 

All of the company have stuck to their 
guns and are doing their bit to help Brooks 
put the company on its feet once more. 



BUHLER BEGINS STARRING TOUR 

LotnsvnXE, Sept 18. — Richard Buhler 
opened a starring tour under the man- 
agement of A. G. Delamater, in "Believe 
Me Xantippe" at Macauley's Theatre last 
week and was well received by a large 
audience. His supporting company in- 
cludes: Max Yon Mitzel, Howard Hall, 
John Prescott, Geo. Boesel, Chas. Canfield, 
Cart Norman, M. Tello Webb, Margaret 
Knight, Rose Mayo, Louise Orendorff, 
James McArthur and Frank Macquire. 
The tour is being booked by Klaw & 
Erlanger, in the principal cities of the 
South and West Mr. Buhler is consider- 
ing a new play by Frederick Ballard, en- 
titled "The Air Castle Man" which he ex- 
pects to produce later in the season with 
Broadway as the objective point. 



STOCK DIRECTOR IS ILL 

Tebre Haute, Ind., Sept 12. — C. L., 
known as "Bud" Braman, well known in 
stock circles, whose last engagement was 
with the Billy Clifford Musical Comedy 
Co. as stage director, is seriously ill at 
the home of his mother in this city with 
little hopes of recovery. 



DAINTY STOCK OPENS AT WACO 

Waco, Tex., Sept 14. — The Bessie 
Dainty Players opened their third annual 
season here last week to big attendance 
which has continued. This company 
closed on Labor Day a successful Summer 
season at Cycle Park, Dallas. 



HELEN LOWELL MAY HEAD CO. 

Helen Lowell may head a stock to open 
at the Castle Square Theatre, Boston, with 
"Mile-a-Minute Kendall" as the opening 
bill. She will follow it with a repertoire 
of her well-known successes if the deal 
goes through. 



BUNTING STOCK DOING WELL 

Sah Antonio, Tex., Sept 13. — The 
Emm a Bunting Stock Co. has begun their 
second week presenting "Little Peggy 
O'Moore." Business keeps up well. 



MUNICIPAL THEATRE TO OPEN 

Northampton, Mass., Sept 18. — The 
Municipal Theatre will open here on Mon- 
day next with a resident stock company 
under the management of Melville Burke. 
They will open in Cyril Harcourt's comedy, 
"Silk Stockings," after which the public 
will be given a list of about ISO plays 
from the English, American, French and 
Spanish schools from which they will be 
allowed to select those that they wish. most 
to see. The management is impressing the 
fact that it is to be a people's theatre and 
will always abide by the will of its patrons. 
New plays will be tried out at this theatre 
from time to time, with a view of judging 
their worth. The company will include: 
Frank Morgan, Aline ■MeDennott, Blanche 
Frederici, L'Estrange Millman, Corbett 
Morris, Jack Amory, Eugene Powers, Mar- 
garet Vale, Betty Daintry and Helen Dale- 
Frank Dawson will act as stage manager 
of the productions. 



POU GETS AJNSWORTH ARNOLD 

Ainsworth Arnold will make his debut 
next Monday as a Poli actor at the Lyric 
Theatre, Bridgeport, as the lead in "The 
Natural Law. He will then he seen in 
"The Cinderella Man," "The Heart of We- 
tona" and "The Red Petticoat." Warda 
Howard, Elise Bartlett, Edith Spencer, 
Carrie Lowe, Harold Kennedy, Howard 
Smith and Sam Godfrey are seen in his 
support. 



STOCK ACTORS WIN PRAISE 

Peoria, 111., Sept 14. — "A Daughter of 
the Sun," a melodrama by Lorin J. Howard 
and Ralph T. Kettering, was presented here 
under Rowland and Howard's management 
and received splendid notices. Blosser 
Jennings, formerly of the Hippodrome 
stock, and Jean Clarendon, formerly of the 
Wallace Stock, both of this city, were 
particularly mentioned for their good 
work. 



STANLEY RIDGES ENGAGED 

Stanley Ridges, who is now playing the 
juvenile at the Palais Royal, is leaving 
New York this week to play leading roles 
in the George Ebey Stock at the Alcazar 
Theatre, San Francisco, opening Oct 9 in 
"A Mix Up." He was seen last season in 
'The Princess Pat" and "The Blue Para- 
dise." 



ENGAGES NEW JUVENILE 

Rexford Burnett, who recently appeared 
in vaudeville in Colgate Baker's "Children 
of France," left on Saturday to join C. A. 
Niggemeyer's stock at the Shubert The- 
atre, Minneapolis, where he will assume 
the juvenile roles. He will play opposite 
Hazel Aldan, the leading woman. 

WILL TRY VAUDEVILLE 

Ann McDonald, a well-known leading 
stock actress, is about to make a try in 
vaudeville in a new sketch entitled "A 
Lock of Hair." One of her first engage- 
ments will be at the Hudson Theatre, 
Union BUI, N. J., at which house she was 
leading lady in the stock for gome time. 

BALDWIN GETS NEW PEOPLE 

DuttrrH, Minn., Sept. 17. — There have 
been several changes in the Walter Bald- 
win stock recently, H. K. Hack having 
joined for leads; Frank Morris, for 
juveniles; William Yule, for characters, 
and Kilroy Ward, for heavies. 



FILMS GET STOCK ACTRESS 

Nancy Winston, formerly with the Port- 
manteau players, has signed to appear in 
pictures with Selig in Chicago. 

ARNOLD JOINS POU STOCK 

Bhtdoepobt, Conn., Sept. 17. — Ainsworth 
Arnold has been secured for the Poli stock 
company in this city. 



DIXON & SIDMAN 

OPEN NEW 

COMPANY 

"LENA RIVERS" IS FIRST B in- 



completely renovated and remodeled, the 
Third Avenue Family Theatre, situated at 
Third Avenue and Thirty-first Street New 
York, opened its doors to a capacity house 
on Saturday night last when a permanent 
stock policy was inaugurated there under 
the joint management of Martin J. Dixon 
and Louis Sidman. 

The house has undergone such marked 
changes that it is practically an entirely 
new theatre. About $10,000 has been spent 
in redecorating, it is said. The stage has 
been considerably enlarged and completely 
refloored. The house has a seating capacity 
of 1,000. 

The initial production of the company is 
"Lena Rivers," from the pen of Marie 
Do ran, who will stage and supervise all of 
the productions at this theatre. Following 
"Lena Rivers" will be "Ishmael," also writ- 
ten by Miss Doran. 

According to Miss Doran, it will be the 
policy of this company to produce new plays 
from time to time, if the manuscripts show 
enough merit to make tbem worthy of pro- 
duction. 

The bill will be changed weekly. Prices 
at matinees will run from fifty cents (box 
seats) to ten cents. The scale of evening 
prices will be from seventy-five cents (box 
seats) to twenty-five cents. There will be 
matinees on Monday, Wednesday and 
Saturday. There will be a continuous pic- 
ture policy on Sunday. 

Frank Doran is manager of the Third 
Avenue Stock Company, and its roster in- 
cludes Edith Arnold, Ollie Minell, Nellie 
Kennedy, Georgia Fox, Royal C. Stout, 
Walter Boggs, Al Williams, Dan Davis, 
Ira Herring and Edouard D'Oize. 



■ DETROIT HAS YIDDISH DRAMA 

Detroit, Mich., Sept. 15. — This city is 
to have a season of Yiddish performances, 
Leon Krem, general director of the Krem 
Players, having leased the Detroit Opera 
House for every Sunday afternoon and 
evening during the season. The first per- 
formances will be given tomorrow, when 
"The Red District," a four-act drama 
which has proved exceedingly popular in 
Yiddish in New York, will be the bill. The 
company includes Leon Blank, Frieda Sibel 
and Ada Goldstein. 



HORNE STOCK CLOSES 

YouNGSTOwn, O., Sept. 12. — The Home 
Stock Co., under the direction of Basil 
McHenry, closed last week a very success- 
ful season at Idora Park, and the mem- 
bers of the company went their various 
ways. Alfred Webster, Pearl Lewis and 
James Swift have joined the Wills Stock 
Co. at Chester, Pa. Louis Lytton, Made- 
line Kent Margia Dow and Henry Gurvey 
go to Chicago. Alva Simms goes into 
vaudeville and Florence Arlington goes to 
Cleveland, O. 



NIGCEMEYER SIGNS BURNETT 

Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 17. — Rexford 
Burnett has been engaged by C. A, Nigge- 
meyer for juvenile roles with bis stock 
company in this city and opens next week 
in "The Silent Witness." 



JACK BOYLE STOCK CLOSES 

La Fayette, Ind., Sept. 17. — The Jack 
Boyle Stock closes at the Family Theatre, 
here, next Saturday. 



GLASER CO. DOES NEW PLAY 

Detroit, Mich., Sept 17. — The Vaughan 
Gloser stock company, which has opened 
at the Adams Theatre, liere,»last week put 
on a new play called "Bonnie," by Mara- 
vane Thompson. It is intimated that the 
production was made as a try-out for a 
New York producer, but, if so, hia name 
was not divulged. It is admitted, how- 
ever, that new scripts on -which Arthur 
Hopkins holds, the controlling rights will 
be given a showing before the season is 
over and, therefore, there is a possibility 
that "Bonnie" belongs to him. 



OREGON PLAYERS BEGIN SEASON 

Mxlfobd, Pa., Sept 14. — The Oregon 
Players, under the management of Dan 
Carlton, opened their season here last Mon- 
day to a large and enthusiastic audience and 
business has continued big. The company 
will play part of last season's territory, 
together with new bookings. The roster 
includes: Beatrice Earle, Johnny Baldwin, 
Charles MeineL Fred Buskirk and Louie 
Goddard. 



COLLINS CO. OPENS SEASON 

Eddie B. Collins recently opened his 
third season at the head of his own 
musical comedy company presenting a 
repertoire of ten musical plays. Florence 
Wilmot and her Dancing Bantams and 
Roy Beverly's Original Harmony Four are 
featured with the company, which num- 
bers twenty. 



PLAN NO. 2 COMPANY 

Jamestown, N. Y., Sept. 15. — Unless 
present plans are abandoned, the 'manage- 
ment of the Pauline MacLean Stock Co., 
now playing here will open a second com- 
pany at the Chester Playhouse, Chester, 
Pa., next Sunday, putting on "Within the 
Law," and following that with "The 
Rosary." The house, which was formerly 
known as the Family Theatre, has been 
bought by new interests. 

PROVIDENCE LIKES STOCK 
Providence, R. I., Sept. 15. — Stock is 
certainly popular in Providence, as Charles 
Lovenberg, manager of the Albee Stock 
Co., which just closed in order that the 
house may take up its Winter vaudeville 
policy, has sold one hundred seats for the 
opening performance next year. The 
amount received, together with a collec- 
tion, was turned over to the soldiers' 
tobacco fund. 



GET TUNIS DEAN AS MANAGER 

Dctroit, Mich., Sept. 18. — Tunis F. 
Dean, for many years with David Belasco 
and more recently connected with the 
Academy of Music in Baltimore, is now 
manager of the Vaughan G laser Stock Co., 
in this city, having taken up bis duties 
last week. The acquisition of Mr. Dean is 
looked upon as adding much strength to 
the company. 



JANE SALISBURY IS SIGNED 

Salem, Mass., Sept 15. — Jane Balis- 
bury has been engaged as leading woman 
with the stock company that is playing at 
the Empire Theatre, here. It is expected 
that her addition to the company will help 
it to put in the most prosperous season of 
its career. 



PERCY MELDON MADE DIRECTOR 

Wilkes-Babke, Pa., Sept. 16. — Percy 
Meldon has been made stage director of the 
stock company which the Krueger Brothers 
installed recently at the Nesbit Theatre, 
here. He has started a new policy of stock 
production that is expected to be of benefit 
to the organization. 



Stock and Repertoire Advertising on Pace 34 



WILL RUN ALL WINTER 

Bridgeport. Conn., Sept. 17. — Ainsworth 
has been so good and the outlook is so 
bright that the John Himmellein Stock 
Co. is to remain here all season, according 
to a decision reached last week. 



14 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



rmMZMj 




-•a 




SONGWRITER BACK 

FROM THE FRONT 

Lieutenant Gietx Rice, After Three Years 

in the Trenches, Tens of Song* 

the Soldiers Sins; 

Lieutenant Gietz Rice, of the first 
Canadian contingent, a pianist and song- 
writer 'Who has been in the trenches in 
France, and Belgium since August, 1014, 
is home on leave and is spending a few 
weeks in New York. 

The lieutenant, who left Canada a pri- 
vate, and won his promotion for bravery in 
one ef the daring charges made by the 
Canadian troops, is a fine musician, and 
only took np song-writing since the war 
in order to supply the boys at the front 
with cheering tunes which could be ren- 
dered in the entertainments given back 
of the fighting lines for the soldiers who 
bad just come out of the trenches. 

"The boys are singing a great variety 
of songs," he said, "ranging from the 
standard ballads to the lightest comedy 
songs, with the comedy numbers predomi- 
nating, and after a week in the trenches, 
covered with mud, continually under a 
raking fire, you can hardly blame the 
boys for wanting something amusing. 

"Of the published songs those sung the 
most are long. Long Trail,' 'Keep the 
Home fires Burning/ 'Mother Machree,' 
•What Do You Want to Make Those 
Eyes At Me Fort' and "Hawaiian But- 
terfly.' The clever recruiting songs I 
have heard in New York had not reached 
the front when I left," he continued, "but 
their lilting melodies will make them 
great favorites as soon as they are car- 
ried over. 

"We have fourteen minstrel showB ap- 
pearing nightly along the Canadian line, 
and the many actors and singers who are 
among the soldiers furnish an entertain- 
ment which compares favorably with some 
of the theatrical performances at home. 

"We have motion picture shows, and 
the next time you see Chaplin jumping up 
and down on the screen in one of your 
New York theatres, you can know that 
back of the fighting line in France, the 
soldier boys are enjoying the same pic- 
ture." 

Mr. Bice is author and composer of "I 
Wanna Go Home," "The Issue of Rum," 
"A Conscientious Objector's Lament," and 
many other numbers popular among the 
soldiers. 

The "Conscientious Objector" is one of 
the big hits in the revue at the Alham- 
bra, London. 



NEW FIRM HAS GOOD NUMBER 

The new music firm, the Frances-Clif- 
ford Music Publishing Company, which 
will establish headquarters at 36 West 
Randolph Street, Chicago, has put a 
march-song number on the market called 
"Do Your Little Bitty Bit Right Now" 
that is fast getting a hold with the sing- 
ers and public in the Middle West. 

The words are by F. Belohlavek and 
C. C Perkins, and the music by Edmund 
Braham, who has written many successes. 
The firm is also publishing a dainty little 
number in "When It's Rosebud Time in 
Red Bud I'm Coming Back to You," while 
another, which is now on the press, is 
"To You, Dear, to You," a semi-classical 
ballad. 



SONG AD. COSTS $5,000 
In the Sept. 27 issue of the Saturday 
Evening Pott, Leo Feist has contracted 
for a full page advertisement in which 
to announce four popular publications. 

The songs to be featured in the display 
are "Good-Bye, Broadway; Hello, France," 
"Where Do We Go From Here?" "Mother 
Dixie and You," and "There's Something 
in the Name of Ireland." The cost of 
this advertisement is $5,000, which estab- 
lishes a record in popular music exploita- 
tion. 



WITMARK SONGS IN CHICAGO 

Monday night in Chicago was a great 
night for at least four people, and in- 
cidentally for two" good songs and for the 
firm of M. Witmark & Sons who publish 
them. At the Majestic, Joe Howard got 
the biggest reception even he has ever en- 
joyed in the Windy City when he sang his 
new song "Somewhere In France Is the 
Lily." At the same theatre, on the same 
bill, the Bowman Bros, sang "Then 111 
Come Back To TCqu," that, novel and clever 
song that the war has suggested — the best 
thing of its kind ever written, bar none. 
The Majestic audience rose and cheered 
and laughed at this song; and it was the 
same at the Palace, where Ed. Morton, 
who was the first to introduce "Then 111 
Come Back To You," sang it until there 
were no more of its punch lines left to sing. 

Telegrams of enthusiastic corroboration 
of these facts poured in on Julius P. Wit- 
mark Tuesday morning. Here are some of 
them: 

"Then 111 Come Back To You' meets 
with same success here at the Palace The- 
atre as in other engagements. Julie, the 
song is a winner — Ed. Morton." 

"Then 111 Come Back To Yon' a 
tremendous hit with us at the Majestic 
today. Biggest song we've had in yean — 
Bowman Brothers." 

"Act met with ovation at Majestic The- 
atre here. 'Somewhere in France Is the 
Lily* a veritable sensation. Absolutely the 
biggest song hit I ever had. Good Inch and 
best wishes — Joe Howard." • 

Another telegram from Russell and 
Mack, who are playing over the Orpheum 
Circuit and are at present on the coast, 
read: "*Your Country Needs You Now* 
going fine. Put in Then III Come Back 
To You' today. It is the biggest applause- 
getter we ever heard. Write more 
choruses. It is an act in itself." 



COURTS TO DECIDE 

INTERPOLATION CASE 



"OVER THERE" AT THE STRAND 

Herbert Waterous, the concert basso, 
was the feature soloist at the Strand The- 
atre last week and with full orchestral 
accompaniment rendered the George M. 
Cohan song hit "Over There." 

At every performance the song was re- 
ceived with the greatest enthusiasm, and 
nearly all the daily newspapers commented 
upon it. The Globe in particular, in 
addition to reviewing it in its news 
columns, gave it an extended editorial. 



VON TBLZER WRITES A FOX-TROT 

Harry Von Tilzer, although best known 
as a song writer, occasionally turns his 
attention to the composition of an in- 
strumental number. During his twenty- 
five years' experience as a writer he has 
to his credit a number of successful in- 
strumental compositions. His latest, one 
in which he places much confidence, is a 
clever fox-trot and is called "The Old 
Town Pump." 



LARGER OFFICES WANTED 

The AL Piantadosi Music Co. have out- 
grown their quarters in the Astor The- 
atre building and are on the lookout for 
larger offices. 

Negotiations for a large space in a 
prominent Broadway office building are 
under way. 



WITMARKS SIGN UDA WALDROP 
M. Witmark & Sons have signed a con- 
tract with Uda Waldrop, by the terms of 
which the talented western composer win 
write exclusively for this house for a term 

of years. 

O'HARA WRITES "OVER THE TOP" 
Geoffrey CHara, supervisor of training 
camp music, stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, 
has written a march song entitled "Over 
the Top." Chappell & Co. will publish it. 



Music Publishers Looking Forward With 

Much Interest to Ruling in Long 

Disputed Question 

The actual damage in dollars and cents 
which a music publisher suffers by the in- 
terpolation of outside songs in a musical 
production will for the first time be de- 
cided when the case of the Karczag Pub- 
lishing Co. against the Shuberts comes 
up for trial this fall. 

While the value of the interpolated 
number" in a musical comedy or light 
opera production has for years been dis- 
cussed, this is the first instance where 
the courts have been called upon to make 
a decision. 

The publisher of a score, who at the 
last moment finds the musical honors of 
the piece carried off by some outside 
number often chums that it has worked a 
great financial damage to him, while the 
writer of the song is equally strong in 
his claims that the entire production was 
saved by his interpolation. 

The matter, however, promises to be 
definitely settled by the Karczag ease 
which was brought by the publishers 
against the Shuberts for introducing in- 
terpolations in the light opera "Her Sol- 
dier Boy." This piece had a prosperous 
run at the Astor hut season. 
_ The Karczag Co., which owns the pub- 
lishing rights of the piece, which is an 
American adaptation .of "Gold Gab Ich 
Fuer Eisen ," claims that the production 
rights of the piece were given to the Shu- 
berts with the understanding that if any 
interpolations were necessary, the plaintiff 
was to supply them. The plaintiff alleges 
that without its knowledge or consent a 
number of interpolations were introduced 
in the production furnished by another 
publishing house. 

The Karczag company, by reason of 
these interpolations, claim damages in the 
amount of $50,000. 



BDWY. SONG HEARD AT COLUMBIA 

At the Columbia Theatre on Sunday 
night Jimmy Lucas successfully intro- 
duced the Broadway Music Corporation's 
song, "I May Be Gone for a Long, Long 
Time." He was assisted by an elderly 
gentleman who, garbed in the uniform of 
the Grand Army of the Republic, effective- 
ly rendered the chorus from a box. 



HOLIDAY CLOSES MUSIC HOUSES 

Monday found 90 per cent, of the popu- 
lar music publishing houses closed, while 
the staffs of those remaining open were 
greatly reduced. 

The occasion was the celebration of the 
Jewish New Year. 



"OVER THERE" REPRODUCED 

By permission of the William Jerome 
Co., the New York World in the magazine 
section of last Sunday's edition repro- 
duced the words and music of the George 
M. Cohan song hit "Over There." 



BERLIN HAS NEW MUSICAL PLAY 

"All Night Long," a new musical com- 
edy by Avery Hopwood, with music by 
Irving Berlin, is scheduled for early pro- 
duction by Selwyn & Co. 



BROADHURST PLAY SET TO MUSIC 
"What Happened to Jones," set to 

music and rechristened "Joyous Jones," is 
now running under the latter title in 
Auckland, New Zealand. 



NEW SONGS ARE IN DEMAND 

Kendis and Brockman, the two "James 
Boys," as their friends in the music 
world call them, have an exceptionally 
fine collection of songs this season, and 
their offices are crowded daily with pro- 
fessional singers. 

The best numbers in their catalogue 
are "Youse Honey to Your Mammy Just 
the Same," "OUnen Is Looking for You," 
"Somebody Stole My Heart," "When the 
Last Rose of Summer Is in Bloom" and 
"You Are a Wonderful Baby." 



REGIMENT ADOPTS MARCH SONG 

To the tune of "Good-Bye Broadway; 
Hello, France," the Third Iowa, or, as it 
is now called, the 168th Regiment, U. 8. 
Infantry, will embark for France. 

CoL E. R. Bennett, who heard the song 
in one of the local theatres, exclaimed 
after its rendition "That is the song for 
me," and immediately took steps to ob- 
tain a copy. The regiment bave learned 
the song and have adopted it as their 
marching song. 

B'WAY HAS PATRIOTIC SONG HIT 

A record of the patriotic song hits of 
the season would not be complete with- 
out mention of the Broadway Music Cor- 
poration's T May Be Gone for a Long, 
Long Time," a song which is gaining in 
popularity each day. 

First introduced by Grace La Rue in 
"Hitchy Koo" it has been taken up by 
scores of the leading vaudeville singers, 
and scarcely a bill is presented without it. 



STERN SONG SCORES QUICKLY 

The new Gilbert and Friedland song, 
"Set Aside Your Tears for Laughter," in- 
troduced by these clever writers in vaude- 
ville, has scored one of the quickest suc- 
cesses on record. 

Although less than three weeks old it 
is being featured by scores of the best 
known singing acts, and the trade demand 
is exceptional. 

Jos. W. Stern & Co. are the publishers. 

. HARRIS SONG REVIVED 

"Break the News to Mother," the old 
Chas. K. Harris song hit, was introduced 
by Belle Baker at the Riverside Theatre 
last week, where it was received with an 
enthusiasm equal to any aroused by the 
famous Harris song during the Spanish- 
American War. 

This number is enjoying a popularity 
which promises to surpass its great vogue 
of twenty years ago. 

MULLANE SENDS A WIRE 

Frank Mullane, one of the first singers 
to introduce the new George Meyers' song 
'Homeward Bound," tried it out in New 
London, and after the first performance 
sent the following telegram to the Feist 
house: "Just a line to inform you that 
Homeward Bound' proved the best ap- 
plause getter I ever used. It even stopped 
the supper show." 

BALLAD PRICE IS LOWERED 

Tor Yon a Rose," the Cobb & Ed- 
wards ballad originally listed by the 
Remick Company as a standard or high- 
priced publication, has been transferred 
to the popular catalogue. 

The song can now be purchased on the 
ten-cent counters. 



HARRY ROGERS JOINS BDWY. CO. 

Harry Rogers has joined the professional 
staff of the Broadway Music Corp. He 
win be connected with the Philadelphia 
office of the company. 



NORA BAYES SINGS "LADDIE BOY" 

Nora Bayes has returned to vaudeville, 
and in a new act is making a feature of 
Gus Edwards' new song "Laddie." It has 
gone very well whenever she. has used it. 



HOLMES SINGS BRANEN SONG 

Earl Holmes, with Neil O'Brien's Min- 
strels, is successfully singing the new 
Jeff Branen song, "AH That I Want Is in 
Ireland." This number is the leading 
seller in the Branen catalogue. 

BLOOM BUILDING THEATRES 

Sol Bloom, who was one of the big 
music publishers a few years ago, is 
building three theatres on West Forty- 
second Street. All will be operated by 
the Selwyns. 



September 19j 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



15 




IRWIN SUES THE 

COLUMBIA OVER 

ADVERTISING 

ASKS RETURN OF $880 



After more than a year discussion over 
the return of moneys which he claims were 
withheld from him without his consent 
during the season of 1915-18, when he pro- 
duced the "Majesties" on the Columbia Cir- 
cuit, Fred* Irwin has brought suit in the 
Municipal Court against the Columbia 
Amusement Co. for $880. 

Irwin claims that when he returned to 
the circuit with his show that season, after 
an absence of several years, the manager 
of eTery house withheld a certain sum of 
money for extra newspaper and other ad- 
vertising that was contracted for without 
his consent. In some instances, be was also 
charged with the rent for theatres which 
were kept closed in certain cities so that 
there would not be any opposition, he 
charges. 

He alleges that when he or his repre- 
sentative went into a theatre either with 
or in advance of the show that season the 
house manager would state that he had a 
certain amount of extra advertising that 
week for the show. He would not ask 
Irwin or his emissary whether or not they 
were inclined to share in the expense, he 
says, but took it for granted and at the 
end of the week simply held ont the amount 
used for the purpose from the money turned 
over to the show as its share of the receipts. 
He also claims that in Boston he was 
compelled to pay $54 toward the rent of 
the Grand Opera House, so that no opposi- 
tion would be there to play against his 
show. In Cleveland, he says, he had to 
contribute $15 toward the rent of the 
Lyceum Theatre for the same purpose. 
Twenty-four was taken out in Philadelphia 
for the rent of the Empire Theatre there, 
he says, and in Rochester, N. T., be was 
compelled to pay a toll of $20, he charges. 
The complaint then states that in various 
cities along the Circuit amounts from $15 
to $125 were taken out for newspaper ad- 
vertising which the complainant was forced 
to share without his consent. 

When Irwin returned from the road that 
season he placed the matter in the hands 
of his attorney, Abe. Berman, who asked 
the Columbia Amusement Co. to return the 
amount alleged to have been withheld from 
his client. Leon Laski, attorney for the 
Columbia people, took the matter in hand 
and negotiations looking toward a settle- 
ment were carried along for a considerable 
length of time. However, no settlement 
could be reached, so papers in the suit were 
served on the Columbia officials last week 
and the case was placed on the Municipal 
Court calendar to be tried tomorrow. 

Should Irwin prove successful in this 
suit it is expected that he will bring an 
action against the Circuit for the amounts 
he spent last season and this season as well 
for his "Big Show," and "Majesties," now 
operating on the Circuit. 

Last Saturday he sent out a circular 
letter to all theatre managers on the 
Columbia Circuit, stating that the "Big 
Show" this season had passed the censor- 
ship of the public and press and was con- 
ceded to be one of the best burlesque shows 
ever produced. 

In order to make it so he states that it 
costs him $300 a week more to run this 
show than it does the average show on the 
wheel. Feeling that he haa done his share 
to please the patrons of the theatres his 
show is playing he asks the managers to 
assume one-half of this amount the week 
the show plays their houses. He says that 
he does not expect them to do so, bnt that 
it will prove the inconsistency of their ask- 
ing him to participate in the advertising 
expense. 



EMPIRE, CLEVELAND, HAS FIRE 

Cleveland. O., Sept 12. — A slight fire 
occurred early this morning in the Empire 
Theatre which was extinguished before any 
material damage was done. In fact, it 
was so slight that the "Army and Navy 
Girls," the current attraction, gave the 
matinee performance as though nothing out 
of the ordinary had happened. About four 
years ago the stage of the house was com- 
pletely gutted by fire, and the Charlie 
Robinson Show, which was playing there 
at the time lost all of its scenery and much 
of its wardrobe. 



KEEP HOLDER OF 

NEW FRANCHISE 

A SECRET 



SOUBRETTE JUMPS SHOW 
Cleveland, O., Sept. 13. — Pearl Mit- 
chell, soubrette of the "Army and Navy 
Girls," suddenly jumped the show after 
last night's performance and left the city. 
Jenny Ross has been engaged in her place 
and arrived from New York today. She 
will open tomorrow. 



SHOW HAS $9,000 WEEK 

The "Whirlie Girlie Girls" have the dis- 
tinction of doing the greatest week's busi- 
ness ever done in burlesque. 

During the week of Sept. 2 at the 
Gayety Theatre, Minneapolis, this show 
did a gross business of over $9,000. 



KOSTER REMAINS WITH 'TOLLIES" 

PrrrsBUBQH, Pa., Sept. 18. — Charles 

"Kid" Koster, in advance of "The Follies 
of Pleasure" Company, denies the report 
that he has tendered his resignation to the 
management of the show. He says he has 
no idea of leaving the company. 



GIVE PARTY FOR CAIN 

Maurice Cain, manager of "Hello Amer- 
ica" company, was tendered a birthday in 
Baltimore last week at the Hotel Kernan. 
Among the many presents he received was 
a large silver loving cup from the girls 
in the chorus. 



leo Mcdonald made manager 

Leo. McDonald has been appointed man- 
ager of the Fred Irwin Big Show. Mc- 
Donald is responsible for the book of the 
show this season, which was staged under 
the personal direction of Fred Irwin. 



DOLLY WEBB QUITS 

Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 13. — Dolly 
Webb, prima donna of the "Darlings of 
Paris" company, handed her notice to the 
manager while playing here to take effect 
in Scranton, Saturday, Sept. 15. 

QUITMAN MADE MANAGER 

Max D. Quitman, for the last three years 
private secretary to Max Speigel, has been 
appointed assistant manager and director 
of publicity of the "Social Follies" com- 
pany. 



CHARLES BARTON BACK 

Chas. Barton returned to New York last 
Friday from a trip to Boston, Buffalo and 
Philadelphia. He left again Monday for 
another trip around the country. 



MAY BE CBXCUIT PRODUCTION 



Much curiosity is being manifested in 
burlesque circles regarding' the ownership 
of "The Gay Morning Glories," which is 
to take up the route of the "September 
Morning Glories," on the American Bur- 
lesque Circuit Oct 1, many persons 
familiar with burlesque inclining to the 
belief that Chas. M. Baker, who is as- 
sembling the show, is acting as a "dummy" 
for persons who will take over the com- 
pany later. These persons, it is hinted, 
are high in the councils of the American 
Circuit. They will assume control after 
the farce starts, it is believed by many. 

Little could be learned as to what dis- 
position Izzy Weingarden would make of 
his equipment and principals when hia 
show closes on Sept 29. His piece is a 
Chicago production as it was rehearsed 
there and the scenery and equipment 
brought East from that point 

Baker has already engaged the prin- 
cipals and members of the chorus for the 
new show and they have been rehearsing at 
a local hall all week, under his direction. 
Rehearsals are proceeding rapidly and 
Baker claims that the show will be is tip- 
top shape to take its place on the wheel a 
week from Monday. ■"• 

The principals whom Baker has engaged 
are: Mark Lea, who will be featured; 
Joe Cunningham, Bernie Clark, Mabel Le- 
Monaire, Jessie Howard, O. F. Cale, 
Monica Raymond and Hattie Beall and 
Aug. Glaig, who were in the "September 
Morning Glories" show at the beginning 
of the season. The book is by Mark Lea. 
Sam Robinson is to be manager, John 
Dow, advance agent, and George Bragg, 
leader. 

The piece will take its regular place on 
the wheel at the Gayety Theatre, Phila- 
delphia, Oct. 1, but, prior to that time, will 
have a few days seasoning on the one night 
stands. 



AKRON HAS STOCK BURLESQUE 

Akron-, Ohio, Sept. 13. — The Music Hall 
Theatre now bouses stock burlesque. It 
has been renamed the Folly. J. A. James, 
formerly of the Folly, Detroit is the man- 
ager. The company roster includes, Carl 
Mills, George Bartlett Palmer nines, Al 
Findlay. Dick Griffen, Harry Ackerman, 
Irene Hardy, Ethel Bartlett Libby Blon- 
deU, Marie Baker, Louise Wolf. Babe Mills, 
Nancy Wesley, Claudia Hewlette,', Dora 
Maison, Peggy Connelly, Jerry Blossom, 
Vellama Parsons, Bessie Collins, Stella 
Gordon, Florence Tfllie, Flo Adair, June 
Selby, Tessie Baker, Jerry Devere, Inter- 
national Four, Bennet and Davis. 



GRACE FLETCHER HAS PARTY 

Grace Fletcher, co-star with Tom Coyne 
in the "Some Babies" Company, was given 
a theatre party at the Gayety, Brooklyn, 
last Wednesday night. 

BURLESQUERS ENTER LEGITIMATE 

The Wood Sisters, several seasons ago 
with the "Million Dollar Dolls," are re- 
hearsing with "Little Springtime," for 
Klaw and Erlangcr. 

LOUIE DACRE OPERATED ON 

Louie Dacre is recovering from the ef- 
fects of a serious operation at the Lakeside 
Hospital, Cleveland, O. 



"MAIDS OF AMERICA" IMPROVING 

Boston, Mass., Sept 15. — The "Maids 
of America" playing the- Gayety this 
city is rounding into great shape. With 
Weston and Symouds and Calvert Shane 
and Bisland in the cast and the new mate- 
rial written by Billy K. Wells, it is sec- 
ond to none on the Columbia Circuit 

Of the original cast that started the 
season Al. K. Hall, Bobby Barry and 
Florence Rother are the only ones with 
the sbow : they, with the new members, are 
putting plenty of speed and comedy in tbe 
show. 



TO UNDERSTUDY KJTT1E GLASCO 
Washington, D. C, Sept 15. — Maurice 
Cain, manager of tbe "Hello America" 
company, made Jean Fleming the under- 
study to Kittle Glasco, ingenue of tbe 
company today. 



"AVIATORS" DOING WELL 

Buffalo, N. Y., Sept 17. — The Aviators 
have been doing great business at the 
Garden Theatre this week. The principals 
are the same as when the show opened its 
season, not one change being made. 



TO PLAY STAMFORD WEDNESDAY 

Stamford, Conn., Sept. 17. — The Colum- 
bia Amusement Attractions are playing tbe 
Stamford Theatre, this city, Wednesday, 
before opening at Bridgeport This fills in 
the one day open on the week after the 
Empire, Brooklyn. 

The shows now play Plainfield, Monday ; 
Perth Amboy, Tuesday : Stamford, Wednes- 
day and Bridgeport the last three days of 
the week. It is optional with the show 
whether it books Stamford or not. 



ELKS DINE "MONTE CARLO GIRLS" 

Coatsviixe, Fa., Sept. 13. — The local 
Elks gave the "Monte Carlo Girls" a the- 
atre party here tonight After the show 
a banquet was tendered the entire party at 
the club rooms. 



PECK COMPLIMENTS GUGGENHEIM 

Dan Guggenheim, manager Watson's 
"Orientals," received a letter last week 
while playing the Olympic, from Genera] 
Manager Geo. Peck of tbe American Bur- 
lesque Circuit, complimenting him for. the 
show he is offering. He said "it's a credit 
to the circuit.'* 



DIXON STARTS SMOKE FUND 

Henry P. Dixon has started a soldiers' 
tobacco fund to be raised each week by 
principals of his Big Revue contributing 
25 cents each and tbe members of the 
chorus 10 cents each. The amount raised 
will be sent to headquarters at regular 
intervals. 



REEVES SHOW HELPS FUND 

Baltimore, Sept. IS. — The Al Reeves 
Show scored exceptionally well at the 
Palace last week. Maybelle Gibson, of the 
show, collected $275 for the Transport 
Tobacco Fund on Thursday night 



MATT KOLB IS A DADDY 

Word has been received from Matt Kolb, 
featured with the "Darlings of Paris" 
company, that he has an heir, born at the 
St. Bernard Hospital, Chicago, Sept. 10 
The boy is an eight-pounder. 

GIBSON TO QUIT "BOWERYS" 

Herman Gibson, juvenile, will close with 
tbe "Bowery Bfirlesquers" at the Empire, 
Brooklyn, Saturday night. He has been 
engaged to play the juvenile role with a 
musical production. 

BURLESQUERS ENTER VAUDE. 

Swartz and Clifford opened on the Loew 
time last week, with the Pantages to fol- 
low. They were with "Blutch" Cooper's 
"Globe Trotters" last season. 



NAD1NE GREY IS SIGNED 

Nadine Grey has been engaged as sou- 
brette by Ike Rose for his "Only Girl" 
company. Sam Reider will do the ad- 
vance work. 



IRWIN DOES BIG BUSINESS 

Fred Irwin did the largest Mardi Graa 
week's business at the Casino, Brooklyn, 
last week ever done since the house opened. 



BANKS GOES WITH RED> 

Charlie Banks started this week at 
Yonkers to do the advance work for Jack 
Reid's "Record Breakers." 



Burlesque News Continued on Page* 31 and 33 



NIBLO WITH SIDMAN SHOW 
Frankie Niblo, formerly of Niblo and 
Spencer, is doing the soubrette role with 
tbe Sim Sidman Show. 



16 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Septemler 19, 1917 



r 



t8 



*\ 



ANN 
SUTER 



W 



"The Chic 

Comedienne" 

Just From Dixie 



THIS WEEK (SEPT. 17) 

B. F. KEITH'S BUSHWICK TBEATRE 

NEXT WEEK (SEPT. 24) 
B. F. KEITH'S ALHAMBRA THEATRE 

DIRECTION— NORMAN JEFFRIES 



— 5» 



\}%J 



At B.F.Keith's 

Royal Theatre 

This Week 

ON SECOND AND 
STOPPING THE SHOW 

GEORGE and LILY 

GARDEN 

PREMIER XYLOPHONISTS 



Direction 
Gordon and Lewis 



AT B. F. KEITH'S 

ORPHEUM THEATRE. BROOKLYH 

NEXT WEEK. SEPT. 24 



September 19, 1917 . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



17 



FRANK COTTEB, the clown, has enlist- 
od in the Navy. 



Welter White haa joined the Maple 
Leaf Quartette. . 

Jack Murphy haa quit his job aa clerk 
at the Normandie HoteL 



Carol Buchanan is a patient in the 
American Hospital, Chicago. 

Andrew Tombes haa quit vaudeville to 
appear in the Century Show. 

Violet de Vorne has left the American 
Hospital, Chicago, much improved. 

Dorothy Gaffes ia doing the press work 
for- the Adolf Bohm Ballet Intuae. 

, Robb. and Robertao-i at*.- booked solid 

for tin; season on . tbie Loew Circuit. 

Griff Williams will manage Gua Hill's 
"Bringing Up Father" Co.; to open Oct. 8. 

Law Kelly haa gone to London, Eng., 
under engagement to Albert De Courville. 

William Chamberlain has been made 
manager of the Indiana Theatre in Chi- 
cago. 

Sandy Dingwall and Charles Buckley 
have returned to town from the Jersey 
coast. 



John E. Langabee is in hia thirtieth 
year as stage manager for Frank E. Hen- 
derson. 



Fergus McCnsker has been appointed 
treasurer of the Nixon Theatre, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

E. B. Jack has been appointed manager 
for .Daniel Frohman'a production, "Seven 
Days,' Leave." 

' -J, ; " 

Samuel M. Sidman has invested his sur- 
plus, cash in a fine home on St. Andrew's 
Place. Yoakers. 



W. It Brown has been made general 
agent of Her^ajcfa Greater Minstrels, and 
is headed, south. 

The Morette Sisters are, now doing their 
specialty with Pepple and; Greenw-dd'e 
"All Girl Revue." 



Louis Redelahimer is booking for the 
Chun. Parks' Dramatic Company which ia. 
playing through the south. 

Beatrice Beckley has withdrawn from 
the cast of "The Knife," in order to re- 
hearse for a new production. 

Lester Lonergan arrived in this city 
last Saturday to direct rehearsals of "The 
Torches," which began this week. 

Bollin Grimes, of the "Love o' Mike" 
Co., has been drafted for the National 
Army. He was married about a year ago. 

Billy Sheehy, manager of Loew's De- 
Kalb Theatre, celebrated the third anni- 
versary of his marriage on September 14. 

Alice Burns, of the "Oh Girl" Co., who 
underwent a sut-gical operation in the 
American Hospital, Chicago, is doing well. 

Mark Gates, of Indianapolis, has leased 
the Valentine Theatre, Toledo, 0., and 
will convert it into a motion picture 
house. 



E. D. Price, who has been out ahead of 
"Here Comes the Bride," will go out ahead 
of "Miss Springtime" for Klaw and Er- 
langer. 



Paul Dickey, while at his summer home 
in Fisher's Island, N. Y., completed a new 
play, the title of which has not been se- 
lected. 



William Tower, who has been a patient 
in the American Hospital, Chicago, for a 
few weeks, has been discharged, much im- 
proved. *._ 




E. A. Weil, recently press representative 
for Weber and Anderson, is to produce 
vaudeville sketches with legitimate stars 
in the cast. 



Mark Monroe will handle the acts of 
Abslam Shariff, during the war, as the 
latter has been accepted for service in the 
U. S. Army. 

Charles Lahr is now the manager of the 
Lakeside Park Casino, succeeding Harry 
A. Hawn, who was killed in an automo- 
bile accident. 



Jesse Weil has sold his interest In 
"Ragtime a la Carte" to Harry Cordlan, 
the St. Louis producer. The conscript 
caught Weil. 

Dave Rosenthal, formerly assistant 

manager of Loew's Bijou Theatre, has 

been transferred to the DeKalb in the 
same capacity. 

Anna Cunningham has left the offices 
of the International Circuit to become 
assistant treasurer of the Majestic Thea- 
tre, Brooklyn. 



Sam Harris and Irving Ackerman, the 
Pacific Coast vaudeville managers, are 
expected to arrive in New York this week 
from Chicago. 

Allene Durano, formerly playing a lead 
in "It Pays to Advertise," is now support- 
ing Hans Roberts in the vaudeville play- 
let, "Cold Coffee." 

Charles Burkhardt and William Gross 
are- doing a double, having given up their 
plan for a girl act because they could not 
get chorus girls. 

Harry J. Martin, treasurer and press 
agent of Macauley's Theatre, Louisville, 
for several years, has been appointed man- 
ager of that house. 

John Pinkies, bouse superintendent of 
the Hudson Theatre, Union Hill, has been 
busy this Summer supervising the reno- 
vation of that house. 



Allan Doone, the Australian actor-man* 
agar, is negotiating for the Australian 
right* to "Maytime," "Over the 'Phone" 
and "Hex Soldier Boy." 

. Ed Rose, author of "Turn. Back the 
Hours," in which Mabel Estell will be 
starred this season, came over from Chi- 
cago to rehearse the piece. 

Tom -Clark, who did a boxing act with 
the Henry Burlesque Co. twenty -eight 
years ago, has opened a bowling alley on 
Washington Street, Brooklyn. 

James Decker will be advance agent 
and George Welty, manager, of "The Man 
Who Came Back" Co., which William A. 
Brady will soon send on the road. 

Albert Spalding, the violinist, has passed 
up $30,000 worth of concert contracts to 
join the Aviation Corps of the Signal 
Service as a military interpreter. 

' Joe H. Lee has just finished his second 
season with Pawnee Bill's "Pioneer Days" 
Wild West Show, and is now at the 
Pawnee Bill Ranch, Pawnee, Okla. 

Jane Houston returned from her vaca- 
tion at Byrdcliffe, N. Y., last Friday, to 
begin rehearsals' this week with William 
Faversham in "The Old Country." 

Olive Saylor, dramatic critic for the 
. Indianapolis Newt, has sailed for Rnssia 
to make a tour of that country. She is to 
write a book on the Russian Theatre. 



Charles Diringer, associated with the 
theatrical law firm of O'Brien, Malevinsky 
and Driscoll, is being congratulated upon 
his engagement to Miss Mollis Kaplan. 

Joe Vion has been engaged by Nor- 
worth and Shannon to manage their 
"Odds and Ends" company, which opens 
at the Northworth Theatre on Oct. 16. 



girl 
^Out 



Eddie Small and Harrington Reynolds 
have formed a partnership to produce 
rl acta. Their fisat offering will be 
ut There,*' with a oast of ten people. 

Sam Bernstein ia booking Ihe Sunday 
vaudeville shows at the Olympic Theatre, 
Fourteenth Street, this season. Ten acts 
and a feature film are shown twice on 
that day. 

Maclyn Arbuckle last week sold a piece 
of farm property in St. Louis which he 
has owned for ten years. He received 
$8,000 for it, which ia $1,500 less than he 
paid for it. 

Jane Houston, leading woman for Will- 
iam Faversham in "The Old Country," got 
a small piece of steel in one of her eyes 
last Saturday and is suffering with a 
swollen optic. 

The Morin Sisters have returned from 
their vacation at Atlantic City and start- 
ed their vaudeville engagements on the 
U. B. O., opening at Proctor's, Newark, 
N. J., last week. 

Bessie Royal last week received routes 
of fifteen weeks for five acta over the Gua 
Sun Circuit. She also placed three acts 
with Walter Plimmer for engagements of 
five weeks each. 



Oscar Reges, private secretary to Oliver 
Morosco, has joined the United States 
Signal Corps and haa been made a serg- 
eant. He expects to go into active duty 
the last of this month. 



James Feniznore Lee, an old-timer, la to 
act again. He will return to the stage 
in "Rice's 1492," the piece he originally 
played in, when it is done again for the 
benefit of its producer. 

Frank Hale, of Hale and Paterson, has 
signed a contract with the Ritz Hotel and 
Restaurant Company, of Buffalo, to put 
on a revue there late in October, to cost 
several thousand dollars. 



Walter Keefe, the New York repre- 
sentative of the Pantages Circuit, left 'Fri- 
day for a hurried business trip to Chi- 
cago. He is expected back to-morrow. 



Alfred A. Grasso, for years the Good- 
man Friday in the Henry W. Savage of- 
fice, left the organization this week. 
Grasso acted in practically every capacity 
in the office during his service. 

Fred Sarr, manager of the Holyoke 
Theatre, Holyoke, Mass., presented his 
wife with a new automobile and the 
couple motored to New York with Mrs. 
Sarr at the wheel, last Saturday. 

Mike Slote, of the Mandel and Rose of- 
fices, is supplying vaudeville talent for 
the entertainment at the Martinique Ho- 
tel. The first production under his direc- 
tion is a revue staged by Julian Alfred. 

Mrs. N. W. Derr, wife of the manager 
of the Riverside Theatre, who has been 
treasurer of the Keith interests in Phila- 
delphia, has been transferred to the staff 
of J. J. Maloney in the New York offices. 

Morris Winthrop: Your brother, Philip, 
who leaves for France in a few days, is 
desirous of communicating with you, and 
wishes you to address him at "Provisional 
Department of Infantry Machine Gun Co., 
Syracuse, N. T." * 

Charles F. McCarthy, old-time Irish 
character comedian, who was a great fa- 
vorite with the companies of the late Ed- 
ward Harrington, and a partner of Sam 
Rickey, is to return to the stage in "Sat- 
urday to Monday." 



Treasurer William Goldhardt, of the 
Hudson Theatre,— Union Hill, N. J., and 
his assistant, Byron Randall, visited 
Camp Dix, Wrigbtstown, N. J., last Sun- 
day. Goldhardt will be in the next quota 
called for the Army. 

Billy Grace has enlisted as a sergeant 
in the Quartermaster's Corps of the Army, 
and, as he sails in a few days, requests 
that all friends wishing to write him, 
address him at "220 West Thirty-eighth 
Street," New York City. 

Sergeant Thompson Buchanan, of Com- 
pany s, 159th U. S. Infantry, was granted 
a two weeks' leave of absence from Camp 
Zachary Taylor, in Kentucky, to go to 
Pittsburgh, Pa., to witness the production 
of his play, "A Woman's Way* 

Sammie Spears, the energetic door- 
tender at the Automat, between Forty- 
sixth and Forty-seventh Streets, on 
Broadway, has been recruited by bur- 
lesque. Leo Cahn discovered Spear and 
he is already showing signs of stardom. 

Ted Hoffman, for the last sixteen years 
at Henderson's Music Hall, Coney Island, 
and Sydney Jacobson, for the last two 
and a half years at Loew's Fulton, Brook- 
lyn, are now working together on the 
stage of the Grand Opera House, Brook* 
lyn, for the Cecil Spooner Stock Co. 

Katharine Murray, the singing come- 
dienne, haa received an offer from Oliver 
Morosco to appear in one of his forth- 
coming musical productions. Miaa Mur- 
ray, through her representative, Edgar 
Allen, declined the offer because of a>.prior 
contract to tour the Orpheum vaudeville 
circuit. 



Mike Connolly, assistant to "Zit" of the 
Journal, haa acquired a theatre. The 
house is called "The American" and ia a 
picture house, with a large seating ca- 
pacity, in New Rochelle. Harry Hirsb- 
fleld, the artist, will contribute his serv- 
ices some night this week to help him 
put the proposition over. 

A. J. Rochell is the manager of the 
Akron, 0., Grand Opera House, playing 
burlesque. He will have for his assistants 
E. Hubbard, treasurer; S. L. McClelan, 
assistant treasurer; Dan McGown, stage 
carpenter; Ivan Brown, property man; 
Earl Fife, electrician; Perri Knett, door- 
man; Milton Baker, advertising agent. 

Frank Simons has been made bandmas- 
ter of the Aviation Corps, at Fairfield, O.; 
Frederick W. Sutherland has the same 
position with the Engineer Corps, New 
York, and has J. J. Cheney as assistant. 
Ernest Gentile is assistant bandmaster of 
the United States Marine Corps. All of 
the above are members of John Philip 
Sousa's Band. ' 

Conn Little, for the last twelve years 
treasurer of the Nixon Theatre, Pitts- 
burgh, will be in charge of the box office 
ef the Hitchcock Theatre, formerly the 
Forty-fourth Street Theatre, when it 
opens with "Hitcby-Koo" next Monday. 
Little was in the employ of Nixon and 
Zimmerman for the last twenty years as 
treasurer of a number of their theatres. 



Frank White, for a number' of years 
connected with the press department of 
the Orpheum vaudeville circuit in New 
York City, has resigned his position to 
return to his home town, Denver. White 
will succeed his father as the dramatic 
editor of the Denver Pott. His father, 
who died some time ago, is well remem- 
bered by all the theatrical world as "F. 
W. W." 



Claude L. "Duke" Boyd, who enlisted 
in the army, May 25, finished the season 
SB treasurer of the Valentine Theatre, 
Toledo, O. He was mustered into serv- 
ice July 15 and was stationed at the 
armory in Toledo until Sept. 9, when he 
left for Camp Sheridan. Ala., where he 

is now located with the Thirty -seventh 
Division of the Seventy-fourth Infantry 
Brigade. 



18 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



There Never Were Two Songs 



introduced to Chicago audiences under more favorable conditions than last week, when for the first time in that city, at the Majestic Theatre 



assisted by 

his clever 

partner 

and their big. Revue, sang hia latest and what looks like his greatest success 




CLAR K 




The melody is a wonderful 
march tune 



while the lyric, by PHILANDER 
JOHNSON, is an inspiration. 



Julius P. Witmark, N. Y.: Chicago, Sept. 11, 1917. 

Act met with ovation at Majestic Theatre here. Somewhere in France Is the Lily a veritable sensation. Absolutely 
the biggest song hit I ever had. Good lack and best wishes. JOE HOWARD. 



The other was JOHiN \A/. 



Great Novelty Song 




AND WAS SUNG BY 



THIS A DOUBLE-HEADER 



ED. MORTON 



AT f^ j± s *K *r^ &" nmmmm AT 

THE I ^-% msm sW^. ^m* IS. THE 

and from reports received, neither act had extra choruses enough with which to satisfy their audiences. There'are six of them, each a sensation. 



BOWMAN BROS. 



J E 



Chicago, 111., Sept. 10, 1917 
Julius P. Witmark, N. Y.: 

Then I'll Come Back To You meets with same success here 
at the Palace Theatre as in other 'engagements. Julie the 
song is a winner. ED. MORTON. 



Chicago, 111., Sept. 10,1317 
Julius P. Witmark, N. Y.: 

Then I'll Come Back To You a tremendous hit with urn at 
the Majestic today. Biggest song we've had in years, 

BOWMAN BROTHERS. 



PROFESSIONAL COPIES (OF BOTH SONGS) AND ORCHESTRATIONS IN ALL KEYS NOW READY 



CHICAGO 
Schillj* Building 
TOM. QUIGLEY 



BOSTON 

218 Trtmont St. 

JACK LAHEY 



PROVIDENCE, R 
16 Belknap St. 
J. CROWLEY 



PHILADELPHIA 



ED. EDWARDS 



Uptown Prof. Rooms, AL. COOK, Manager 

1562 Broadway. NEXT TO PALACE THEATRE 
BALTIMORE I SAN FRANCISCO | LOS ANGELES 

New Reilly Hotel I Pantages Building I Continental Hotei 



HARRISON 



BROWNE 



GEO. 
CHOPS 

[Presents 



EDDIE VOGT "TheBrideShop 



SONNIE 



JUSTIN 



BILLY 



DINKINS, MCCARTHY & EVERETT 



In "HOW IT HAPPENED" 

Direction IRVING COOPER 
(Formerly Dmkins-Everett & Co.) 



"BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER" 



September 19, 1917 . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



19 



FRED J. ARDATH CO. 

Theafre^Proctor'i Fiftf-eightK Street. 

Hb- Comedy ■&. aVr" 'I 

Time — Fourteen nljnutes. ™ ' 

Setting— ^'«« stopo special. - • 

' Fred J. Ardath has four men and %t 
woman presenting hie old "hokum" 
vehicle, "The Decorators." - 

There is just a thread of a story to 
start with, which is again picked up at 
the finale so as to give the sketch a 
semblance of meaning. Still, the other 
business which is interpolated to occupy 
the balance of the time is so well' pre- 
sented that the turn is bound to be a 
desirable one. in the three-a-day bouses. 
The splattering up with paste of the 
four men in the act and the manner in 
which it is done keeps, the' audience on 
. edge throughout the offering. • The man 
playing the "drunk," which is the original 
Ardath role, is a very capital performer. 
The other two, who act as foils for him, 
give a creditable performance and the 
woman's role, even though of very little 
consequence in the tnrn, outside of being 
the ; basic principal of the story, is well 
acted.- The minister who comes in at 
the end furnishes a number of laughs. 

The turn is a sure fire laugh producer 
and : will undoubtedly find plenty of work 
in the three-a-day bouses. A. U. 




NEW YORK COMEDY FOUR 

Theatre— .Proctor's 12&th Street. 

Style— Comedy quartette. 

Time — Seventeen minutes. 

Setting— In one. 

This quartette would do well to look 
up the meaning of originality in the dic- 
tionary, for it would profit thereby. The 
New York Comedy Four work exactly 
along the lines of the American Comedy 
Four and the Monarch Comedy Four 
and, for that matter, all other so-called 
"Comedy Fours," that we have seen. 
This particular quartette, however, is 
weaker, vocally, than most of their pre- 
decessors, and bare comedy of the lowest 
sort. 

The quartette consists of a straight, 
an Italian, a tragedian, and a fourth 
member who might be anything from a 
Jew to an Irish character. 

They sing several songs, and, sand- 
wiched between their numbers, is con- 
siderable slapstick and hokum comedy. 
At best, this style of act does not get 
very far in modern vaudeville, the book- 
ing policy being seemingly set against 
slapstick quartette acts. These four 
boys should seek something new in the 
quartette field, if the act is looking for 
long booking. H. G. 



CLAIRE HARRISON & CO. 

Theatre— Proctor's 125th Street. 

Style— Singing and dancing. 

Time — Fifteen minutes. 

Setting — Special in one. 

Ben Harrison has been careless in the 
assemblage of this act, inasmuch as he 
has delved into the ever-handy domain 
of burlesque and uses one of its bits for 
the opening. 

The bit is that of a very much per- 
turbed woman. A man comes along and 
inquires what has happened, and she 
says she has lost $5. He then takes a 
bill from his pocket and she recognizes 
it as the one. lost. 

Not sufficiently satisfied with ending 
tbe bit here, Harrison goes further by 
having the woman beg him for a kiss, 
which he gives' her and she in turn hands 
him the money. 

This bit is getting shop worn in bur- 
lesque already and Harrison should leave 
it alone. As a matter of fact, with the 
exception of the dance done by the other 
man and the novelty song and dance fin- 
ish of the act, the tnrn is nothing bnt 
an assemblage of crude bits and will 
hardly ever be recognized as a sui table 
vaudeville vehicle by those who are seek- 
ing wholesome and entertaining material 
for their audiences. 

It would be most advisable for Harri- 
son and his support to cut or drop all 
of the business np to the finale from the 
act, and scour about and get real mate- 
rial, providing, of course, they desire to 
play vaudeville dates. A.' C. 



EARLE AND CURTIS 

Theatre — Harlem Opera House. 

Style— Skit. 

Time — Thirteen minutes. 

Setting — Special. 

The setting for this act represents the 
exterior of a railroad station (in one). 

Due to tbe tardiness of her husband, 
the girl in the act has missed her train. 
This starts a cross fire dialogue between 
her and her husband concerning tardi- 
ness, time-tables, and kindred subjects. 
After the dialogue, which is rather 
bright and snappy, the pair close with a 
novelty song. 

A negro porter is also employed for a 
minute or two in the act to bring, out a 
comedy point. The turn is a good one 
of its. style. H. G. 



WEBER AND REDFORD . 

Theatre— Proctor's 125fft Street. 

Style — Juggling. 

Time — Sixteen minutes. 

Setting—Fun stage. 

The team of Weber and Redford 
consists of a straight man and an ec- 
centric. Their routine is made up of 
juggling and balancing various articles, 
such as balls, plates, sticks and bats. 
Tbe eccentric's work is mostly on the 
hokum order, done only to get laughs. 
Most of the difficult feats are performed 
by the straight, who is an adept in this 
line of work. 

The turn is very entertaining, bnt its 
running time should be considerably 
shortened. H. G. 



THE FUTURIST EAST LYNN 

Theatre— Proctor's T25tfc Street. 

Style — -Comedy playlet. 

Time — Fourteen minutes. 

Setting — Special in one. 

This travesty is so far overdrawn that 
it appears brutal in its grotesqneness. 

The story is that of a women of the 
future, who attempts to take away a 
home drudge man from his neglectful and 
false wife. The protestations of love, 
even though taken in a humorous sense, 
are carried too far, and simply become 
repugnant to those who are compelled to 
sit through the turn and Bee the man, 
garbed in a house apron, trying to get 
the woman to desist in her protestations. 
Then, when she sees that he still has con- 
fidence in his wife, she tells him she will 
prove the latter has been false to him. 

The screen is then lowered, showing 
the wife escorting her stenographer from 
the office into an automobile bound for 
a Summer park, where she makes violent 
love to him amid the attempts of other 
woman to take him away from her. This 
decides the man that the wife is untrue 
and he is willing to run away with the 
other woman. A. TJ. 



MASON AND VIDOCQ 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Street. 
Style — Song and talk skit. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting — Special. 

Mason and Vidocq, two men, work in 
one on what is supposed to be the roof 
of an apartment houses One of the men 
is made up as a crook, while the other 
plays a crook role in blackface. 

Tbe pair is supposed to be trying to 
make their get-a-way. Considerable 
cross-fire is indulged in and some hokum 
comedy, after which the pair finish with 
a song about the stars in the sky and 
the stars onte earth, the latter being rep- 
: resented by such men as Charlie Chap- 
lin, President' Wilson and others, whose 
pictures are flashed on the screen during 
the progress. of the number. 

A nonsensical plea for enlistment and 
the stuff about "I'm going to enlist" is 
very much out of place at this time when 
tbe subject, of war and enlistments should 
be treated, with sincere respect on the 
stage. 

The act, as a whole, is of a very medi- 
ocre type. H. G. 



CAROLL AND GUSSAY 

Theatre — Dyckman. 

Style — Comedians. 

Time — Nineteen minutes. 

Setting — In one. 

These two men, dressed at the open- 
ing in Tommy Atkins uniforms and 
singing a typically English song, have 
little to recommend them outside of their 
nerve. They Interpolate several bits of 
German talk in their opening song which 
seems a dangerous experiment these 
days. The bits employed are time worn 
also. 

They follow their opening with a 
sailor song in which they interpolate 
such old material as "the catfish has 
kittens" and then do a hornpipe made 
up as Jews by wearing low-crowned 
derbies. Tbe line that one of them 
"would like to squeeze a lemon over a 
synagogue to see the Jews run out" is a 
direct insult and should be immediately 
withdrawn. A toreador song means 
little and the walk off at the finish is 
bad. All in all, this pair had better 
volunteer and go to war, for their act 
is poor. .S. L. H. 



DICK WILLIAMS 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Street. 
Style — Guitar and singing. 
Time — Nine minutes. 
Setting — In one. 

Dick Williams starts his routine with 
a patriotic song, passably rendered. He 
then makes an exit, returning with a 
guitar, and the rest of his numbers, all 
of a popular sort, are rendered with a 
guitar accompaniment. 

Williams should be more careful of his 
appearance, his poorly hanging suit be- 
ing particularly noticeable in his open- 
ing number, when he should be striving 
to make the best nflssibje impression. 

As to the routine of the act, it is en- 
tertaining, although a guitar and orches- 
tra combination is rather weak. Wil- 
liams plays his guitar accompaniments 
well. If the act had a little patter with 
it to break the sameness of the routine, 
things would be greatly improved. 

H. G. 



DANIELS AND MOORE 

Theatre — Dyckman. 
Style — Piano and songs. 
Time — Fifteen minutes. 
Setting — Special in ttoo. , 

Bert Daniels, formerly of Daniels and 
Conard, and a chap named Moore, are 
breaking in a new act which shows 
much promise. Opening with an old 
semi-popular number, Daniels, seated at 
the piano, plays tbe introduction in an 
affected manner. Moore sings nicely in 
a good tenor voice without any gestures. 
The second number is a well rendered 
Irish song, and the third a piano solo by 
Daniels ..brought big applause. 

Daniels is dressed in an Eton outfit 
and Moore in conventional tuxedo. Tbe 
special set bas a blue silk back drop. 
With a little more pep, the act should 
be right in line for the big time. 

S. L. H. 



PAT BARRETT 

Theatre— Proctor's 23rd Street. 
Style — Singing comedian. 
Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

Barrett is a singing character come- 
dian who depends mostly upon his per- 
sonality to carry him over. This proves 
to be successful,, as he holds tbe atten- 
tion of his audience throughout the turn. 

The act consists of four character 
songs, mostly of the English type which 
are true delineations of actual happen- 
ings in life. His third number is the 
most impressive of his routine, and 
should be used as the closing number of 
tbe act instead of in its present position. 

The act is one that win always get 
a feature spot on small time theatre 
bills. ■ A. V. 



JOE GREEN WALD AND CO. 

Theatre — Bij o*, Brooklyn. 
Style— Playlet. 
"^e—TtoiRHhfour minutes^ 

Stting— SpJeutL 4 . * 

The title of this playlet is "Lots' and 
Lots." It is well acted and baa a, very 
entertaining plot that holds Interest 
throughout and furnishes an abundance 
of laughs. The turn is tar above the 
ordinary found at the smaller houses, 
and, in fact, could play the bigger houses 
with success. 

The scene represents the office of 
Simon . Mutterzolb and Son, who have 
purchased a tract of land in the coun- 
try. Tbe plot deals with a scheme to 
get the land away from the Mutterzolbs 
by means of a fake expert opinion that 
declares it of little value. 

A girl, to whom Simon objects aa a 
future daughter-in-law, saves the day. 
So, of course, everything ends happily 
for the heroes, while the villain gets his 
just punishment, as is the case in all 
well regulated plots. 

- : In the hands of a less capable author, 
the playlet might have been very ordi- 
nary, bnt whoever wrote "Lots and Lost" 
has developed his situations excellently 
and has adorned his offering with plenty 
of laugh lines and funny situations. 

The man who acts the role of Simon, 
a lovable old Jew with all the business 
instincts of his people, does it excel- 
lently, while the rest of the company 
-gives good support. H. G. 



THREE TWINS 

Theatre — Hamilton. 
Style— Singing and musical. 
Time — Eleven minutes. 
Setting— Full stage. 

Whether or not these three pretty little 
girls are twins or triplets is a matter 
for conjecture, for, as far as their work 
at tbe piano is concerned, there cer- 
tainly is some resemblance. Tbe trio 
with their piano and violin specialty, 
have an unusual act, bnt when it comes 
to voices, all of the good impression made 
by their instrumental endeavors is lost. 
It seems to be very trying on their vocal 
chords for them to render the numbers 
they use through the turn. This part of 
the act should be eliminated altogether. 

The opening, with two girls seated at 
an upright piano and one at a grand. 
starts off like a big time act, with the 
rendition of a popular medley. Then, 
however, the mistake is made of letting 
two of the girls come forward to offer 
a ballad. There is no blending of voices 
and the good impression made at the be- 
ginning is lost sight of. Then the other 
girl offers a sentimental ballad which 
also proves to be ont of place, as her 
voice is raspy and just about andible. 
However, if they desire to retain the 
songs, they might finish their act with 
the singing of "the ballad as at present, 
for it is a novelty finish. Outside of 
this, they should confine their work in 
its entirety to the pianos and violins. 

A. D. 



SCOTT AND CARROLL 

Theatre — Proctor's B&tK Street. 
Style — Comedy skit. 
Time — Ttcelve minutes. 
Setting— In one. 

"The Raw Recruit," is the title of a 
comedy skit presented by a black face 
comedian and a military girl. 

The entire routine is baaed upon mili- 
tary topics, beginning with a man who 
is reluctant to answer the call of his 
country and continuing right through to 
where he is a finished soldier, with vari- 
ous burlesque bits interpolated such as 
taking the pedigree of tbe recruit and 
other minor pieces of business. 

The pedigree bit is very much over- 
drawn and some of the answers border 
on suggestiveness. The bits of this char- 
acter that might be eliminated are the 
"dependent women" and "I have not been 
borne since day before yesterday.'* 

The act is well presented and, being 
on a topic of tbe day, is an acceptable 
one for an early spot in the three-a-day 
houses. A. U. 



20 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



You can't gognjgng wHJ^any *Fe 



■ •?:• 



•*iei^,i>. 



The Four Big Song Hits! 

You'll want them for your piano, talking machine, or player piano— why not set diem now ? They are sweep- 
ing the country. Everybody wants to hear them, to sing them, and to dance them. They've caught- on strong. 




. Broadway, Hello France! 

When yoc play and sing this song, you'll know 

why the regiments on their way to France 

adopted it as their own. In the language of 

the boys — "It's got everything." The big hit of the New 

York Winter Garden and positively the biggest song hit of the 



. year. A wonderful fox-trot or one-step, 
and Baskette. 



By Retsner, Davis 




Mother, Dude and You 
A song of Dixieland. A beautiful melody 
wedded to words that are sure to take you back 
home. And not a sadly, sentimental song, either, 
but one that has life and spirit. Flayed quickly, it is an 
irresistible fox-trot. By Johnson and Santly. 



Just try over the 
choruses printed below 
and then you'll know 
why song experts con- 
sider these four songs 
in a class by them- 
selves. 

You've simply got to have 
them if you wart to play and 
sing the latest and most pop- 
ular tunes — the four really 
big hits of the year. 

Vaudeville performers aire 
singing them in hundreds of 
cities to thousands and thousands 
of people who applaud vigor- 
ously, thus showing their appro- 
val. 

If you haven't heard them in 
your city as yet be sure to tell 
your Theatre Manager you 
would like to hear them sung. 
He will be glad to accommodate 
you. Arid get all four of them 
for yourself, today. 

On Sale Today 

At all music and department 
Stores, or at any Wool worth, 
Kresge, Kress, McCrory, Kraft,' 
Grant or Metropolitan store. 




'Feist' 



Other Popular 

Songs 

These songs are printed in 
the new "Feist" easy-to-read 
style. Complete song at a 
glance. No leaves to turn. 

Hawaiian Butterfly. 

At tie «Tukn" Mmiur Ball. 

CMsnl We Owe a Lot to You. 

novelty song.' 
Hong Konr. The Oriental melody you 

hear everywhere. 
Our Own Beloved land. A broad refrain 
- that stirs the blood. See Victor Record 

No. is 33 7. 
If I Bad a Son for Each Star in "Old 

Glory." 
Stingy Baby. 
SiDy Sonnets. Goldberg's famous car. 

toons set to music. 
Father Was Right. Another of Goldberg's 

"Cartoons in Tunes." 
Bockaway. Sophie Tucker's great "Jazz" 

song. 
The Garden of Allah. Feature sons of 

Selig Polyscope Film of same name. 
aaagMwy Blossom's "Possum Party." 
Throw No Stones in the Well That Ghres 

Ton Water. Another "Don't Bite the 

Hand." 
I Called Ton "My Sweetheart." The 

K-ill-.^ supreme 

I Know 1 Got More Than My Share- 
Keep Tour Eye on the Girlie You Lots. 
Ireland Must Be Heaven, for Mr Mother 

Came from There. 
T>on*t Bite the Hand That's Feedlnc Too. 

Better than ever. 



■ Where Do We Go From Here 7 

_ Another song that our soldier boys are 
singing everywhere — and most everybody else, 
too. The Phila. North American says: "The 
"T'PPerary' of 1917." It started out to be a funny song about 
Paddy Mack, who drove a hack" — but Paddy enlisted and bis 
song struck the fancy of the soldiers. When some one says, 
"Where do we go from here?" you'll get his meaning. By 
Johnson and Wenricb. 





RJLOilTrnco 



Practically every music dealer in the United States 
and Canada will display these songs and reproductions 
of this advertisement in his window, so that you will 
know just where you can buy copies. 

If you have any difficulty locating a dealer, however, 
you may order direct from us at 15c. each, or any 
seven for one dollar. Sent postpaid to any address 
in the world. A set of 5 attractive post cards FREE 



There's Something in the Name of Ireland 

That the Whole World Seems to Love 

To some Ireland means home, to others it 
means love, to others it means a race of 

fighting men. But get this song and you'll get an idea why the 
world loves Ireland. A more beautiful melody hasn't been written 
in years. By Howard Johnson and Milton Ager. 

or 



with all mail orders of $1.00 or over. Band 
orchestra, 25c. each. Male quartette, 10c. each. 

Your regular dealer can supply you 'with these songs 
for your talking machine or player-piano and any or- 
chestra or band leader will be glad to play any of 
them for you H requested. 

Be sure to hear them and don't miss the pleasure of 
dancing to these tuneful, fascinating melodies. 




LEO. FEIST Inc 



240 W 40^ Sf., (FeiVf Bldrf.) 



NEW YORK 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



21 



ADV. 



$5000.00 ! ! ! 



ie Full 

age In 



S&TUIip/LY On Sale 

EVENING POST Everywhere Sept. 27 



fl We spent it because we believe it will do artists singing " Feist " songs a 
lot of good! 

It is the most daring and, at the same time, the most logical advertising 
campaign ever attempted, because never before, at any one time, have there been 
four better songs on the market. Two of the songs are positive hits and big 
ones, too/ even before this advertisement was written* and by September 27th, 
the date on which it appears, we feel safe in saying that the other two songs 
will be equally popular. 

Note the paragraph in the advertisement concerning singing artists and 
theatre managers. Will the public notice it? You bet they will and respond 
too! 

. It means that when you sing ** Feist ** songs there will be many in 
your audience who will recognize them as the great songs which were adver- 
tised in the SATURDAY EVENING POST. They will be watching 
and waiting to hear them professionally rendered by you. 



"Hook Up With the Hits! 



» 



a 



Remember, — These four songs are all winners! At least we think so, 
otherwise we would hardly be willing to spend FIVE THOUSAND 
DOLLARS on this one advertisement! 

You Can't Go Wrong With a 'FEIST* Song" 



22 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



■tt—h 



=— 



AN OLD HORSE 
THAT KNOWS Hl^ 

way HOME 



Common Online MORSE SENSE is all >ou need 
to faihom. the secret of many an acts success. 



MISSOURI WALTZ 



nciuwent (.luitrgor, 
h/trt fo/cfted 'up t/tzt 
bufw/tea he hai/c 

GidAp! Whoal 

Nothing will stop htrnj 

!lut!F sufficient ^luantec. 



(HUSHABYEMA.BABY) ,, 

Which bear? the undisputed stamp ©/melodious individiialiiy.and is in itself 
a tcrri/ic success jor singles -doubles- trios or quartetteS 

^2nS. Perhaps they 1 sin£> 



confidential Secnet no. 2. 
DADDY FOUND 

you DOWN 

BESIDES 
"GARDEN 
i WALL 



Sfill 3 baby and ^rowinf 
but what a brauJi Shell be 
Have a lilllc patience 
will tell vouwhc:> you 
may sec. hen.. ....:.. 




NEWTOI 
OFFICE 



SHE NEVER KISSED ANYTHING ELSE ^BLARNEY STONE 

A penuiuc applause sQnp and. the best liniment for slift elbows. 

3££U Then A#ain_ • ■ **■ 

"ALL I NEED IS JUST A GIRL LIKE YOU 

\Yill£ive you some ideas in novelty double construction thai will make even, you sit up. ^^ 

^Ui Or maybe ilS the myrfcrioiis song AnmWniii vniumonn 

. SOME SWEET DAY ^SAN FRANCISCO ; 



WOW 45£STR. 
MAURICE kixter: mgk. 



By ROSE^ra OLMAN #"Oh.Johnny!" 5oys 

■ii" Something New- Different- Or-ig>inal -^ 

c lever -Wonderful . 



OFFICE 



<S 



PANTAGES THEATRE BLDG 
ARE OI.MAN, MQiK. 



. jICago 

cohan's grand opera house. tom payton. mgr. 



FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER INC. 



FOOXLIGHX 



F A V O R. I IT 



America's Representative 
Dancers 

ADELAIDE 

and 

HUGHES 



GEORGE 

SKIPPER 

and MYRTLE 

KASTRUP 

Singers tf Songs 
that are different 

MIX. ALF T. WILTON 



NAN 
HALPERIN 



Management 
E. F. Albte 



BILLY 
B.VAN 

♦ 

Management 
KLAW & ERLANGBR 



CHARLIE 
HOWARD 



Management 
Max Hart 






ELIZABETH 

M. 

MURRAY 



Dir. Alf. T. Wiltan 



HAKRT 

WARD 

mud 

IOE 

VAN 

in "OFF KEY" 

CLAUDE AMD GORDON 

BOSTOCK. 


SYLVESTER 

AND 

VANCE 

in a skit by WiUard Mack 
DIR. PBTB MACK 



ROBERT 

dor£ 

Direction Ed. B. Perkins 
1482 Broadway, N. Y. C. 



CHAS. McCARRON 

presents 

BETTY 
BOND 

In Fife Flights ef Musical 

Comedy. Captured By 

Arthur Klein. 



EDYTHE 
& EDDIE 
ADAIR 

m 

"At the Shoe Shop" 

STOKER » UBMBAUBR. 



WILLIAM 

H ALLEN 

mmd 

ETHEL 

HUNTER 

Directum— Pete Mack 



AMANDA 
GREY 

AND BOYS 



Direction 
ROSE AND CURTIS 



BERT 
BAKER&CO. 

in 

1 'Prevarication** 

Dir. HARRY FITZGERALD 



FLORENCE 

RAYFIELD 

In Vaudeville 



Dir. LOUIS PINCUS 



THE 

FAYNES 

THE ARTISTS WITH A 
SUPREME OFFERING 

Dir. JACK FLYNN 



PAUL 
PEREIRA 

And his famous 
String Quartette 



Dir. MAX E. HAYES 



SOPHIE 
TUCKER 

and her 5 Kings ef 
Syncopation 

M'g't Max Hart 



FREDWEBER&CO. 



Ventriloquial Novelty 
At the Stage Door 

Direction LEW LESLIE 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



23 



U. B. O. . . „r ~ay#JK 

NV i **% v°*K ftW ' - «!£W ' 

' Pslace — Robert -^deeon and Co.— ■Wellington 
cross— "The Naughty Princess" — Jama tad 
Bonney Thornton — Browning and Denny— German 
War Pictures. 
Royal — Jo». E. Bernard A Co. — Brlce A King. 
Riverside— Hd A Lew Miller— Bert WiUlams— 
Ijocllle Kavsnsugh Co. — Diamond ft Brennnn— ■ 
Four Meyakos — Futuristic Review — Swor ft Avery 
—Moore 4 Whitehead. 

Alhambra — Morris 4 Campbell— Annie Sntor — 
Wlnston'a Water Lions — "Race ef Man" — Belle 
Baker — CoUlna 4 Bart— Saabs Plato* 4 Co. 
BROOKLYN, N. T. • 
Orphenm — Sam Mann 4 Co. — Merlan'a Dogs— 
Dolly Sisters — Gilbert * Frledland. 

Buahwiek— Bert Leslie * Co.— Frank Crnmlt — 
Avon Comedy Four — Sylvia Loyal 4 Co. — Msrtelle 
— Wataon Slaters— Bloasom, Seeley 4 Co. 
BUFFALO, N. Y. 
shea's — Paol Dickey 4 Co. — Alexander MeFsd- 
•len — Seabury & Shaw— Margaret Farrell— Garcen- 
nettt Broa.— Gene Green— Palfrey, Hall 4 Brown. 
BOBTOK. MASS. 
Keith's— Brltt Wood— Bernle Haawell * Co.— 
Gsutler's Toy Shop — Earl Kavanaugh A Co. — Com- 
fort ft King— Mme. Chilson Ohrman— The Geralds 
—Ford Sisters 4 Marshall. 

BALTIMORE, MS. 
Maryland — Hans Kronold — The Gaudamldts — 
Cartmell 4 Harris — Smith 4 Anstln — Harry Green 
4 Co. — Harry Fox 4 Co. — Arnold 4 Taylor— Atnoi 

4 Bead. . 

CINCINNATI, OHIO* 
• Keith's — "Cranberries" — G. Aldo Bandegger — 
Kantaala — Juno SaLmo — Bailey : 4 Cowan — Lew 
Dockatader— Van 4 Bell— Herbert Lloyd 4 Co. — 
Wayne. Marshall 4 Candy. 

COLUMBUS. OHIO. 
Keith's — LeBoy Talma 4 Boseo— Alfred Bergen 
— BL Hoi man 4 Co. — Three Daring Slaters — Al 

LyteH 4 Co. ' 

CHATTANOOGA, Hssass 

. Keith's (First Half)— Water LlUles. (Last Half) 
- Pis t el 4 Gushing— Jennie Mlddleton — Eadle 4 
Ramaden. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

. Keith's — Frances Kennedy — Emmet DeVoy 4 Co. 

— McCormack 4 Wallace— Whitfield 4 Ireland— 

Hanlon 4 Clifton — Booney 4 Bent — Miller 4 Lyle. 

DAYTON, OHIO. 

Keith's— athel Hopkins— "Dream Fantasies." 

DETROIT, MICH. 
Miles — Lydell 4 Hlgglns — Herman 4 Shirley — 
Aaaki 4 Girlie — Conroy 4 LeMalre — Lambert 4 
Ball— Bondinl Bros. — Great Lester— Marie Fitagib- 
bon. 

TTBTB, PA. 
' Keith's— Momtambo 4 Wells— "Street Orchln" 
—Bert Fttssibbon— "The Care" — Allan 4 Francis 
r— The Paynes. 

ORAXD HAPIDS, MICH. 
Empress — Violet McMillan — Lew Hawkins — Four 
Jansleys — Bessie Rempel 4 Co. 

HAMILTON, CAS. 

Temple— Bennett 4 Richards — Venlta Gould — 
Lyons 4 Xoeco — Hoxord'e Ponies — El Bey Sisters. 

Indianapolis, nro. 
Grand — Dooley 4 Spies— J. Clark 4 Co. — Doree's 
Celebrlties-^Joe Browning — Geo. Kelly Co. — Kay 4 
Bell— Later ft Dale. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 
Orpbeum (First Half)— Dan Burke 4 Girls — 
Orbasaany'a Birds. (Last Half) — Hlrscbott'a 
Gypsies. 

KHOXVUXE, TENS. 
Keith's (First Bait)— riatel 4 Coablng — Jen- 
nie Mlddleton— Eadle 4 Bamsden. (Last Half)— 

Water miles. 

LOUlttVlLXX, KT. 

Keith's.— Edna Sbowalter— Lunette Sisters — Hill 
& SyWany. 

MONTREAL, CAN. 

Orphenm— Kenny ft HoUla— "Color Gems"— 
Missel Campbell. 

NORFOLK, VA. 

Keith's (Last Half)— Alexander Broa. 4 Evelyn 
— Harry LeVall 4 8Ister) — Maud Byan — Bert 4 
Harry Gordon. 

PROVIDEHCE, B. I. 

Keith's — Jack Alfred 4 Co. — Eddie Leonard 4 
Co. — Mabel Rossel 4 Co. — Lee Kohlmar 4 Co. — 
Cecil Cunningham — Arnaot Bros. — Conrad ft Con- 
rad — The Randalls. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Keith's— Walter C. Kelly— Helen Trlx 4 Jose- 
phine — Rudinolf— Jessie Bosley 4 Co. — Pererla 
Sextette — The Yaltos — Four Lokens — Leavitt 4 
Lock-wood — Klmberly 4 Arnold. 

PITTSBURGH. PA. 

Davis — Gygl 4 Vadle — Nolan ft Nolan— Prim- 
rose Four — Jas. J. Morton — Ellnore 4 Williams — 
'Peacock Alley" — Bostock's Riding School— Stan 
Stanley Trio. 

RICHMOND, VA. 

Richmond (First Half) — Alexander Broa. ft 
Erelyn— Harry La Vail ft Slater— Mand Byan — 
Bert 4 Harry Gordon. 

ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Temple— Sallie Fisher ft Co.— Ed Morton — 
J. ft M. Harkins— Emily 4 C. Barry— Bissett ft 
Bestir — Allen ft Howard— Five Mexertis — Akl 
Knma 4 Co. 

SAVANNAH, OA. 

Savannah (First Half) — Hlrschoff'a Gypsies. 
(Last Half) — Dan Bnrke) ft Girls — Orbassany's 
Birds. 

TORONTO, CAN. 

Shea's — Lewis 4 White — Klama 4 Brown — 
Manxtcbi Troupe — Mr. 4 Mrs. Connelly — Lew 
Madden 4 Co. — Will Oakland 4 Co. — Dancing 
LaVars— Nooette. 

TOLEDO, OHIO. 

Keith's — "Corner Store" — Dave Roth — Slg Ptans 
4 Co. — Three Eanlllls — Gsylord ft Laneton— Jones 
4 Lorraine — The DeBara— Norton 4 Melnotte. 



vmmEW&LEwmis 



WILMINGTON, DEL. 
Keith's— Dickinson 4 Deagon — Wheeler ft Dolan. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Keith's — Morgan Dancers — Bae R. Ball — Al ft 
Fannie Steadman — Four Mortons — Bordella Pat- 
terson — Walter Weems. 

Y0UNG6T0WN, O. 

Keith's— Miller's Birds— Onokl— Ashley ft All- 
man— Sam Hears — Strength Bros. 

ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

Majestlo — "Four Husbands" — N. ft S. Kouns — 
Leipzig — Mirano Bros.— Arthur Sullivan ft Co.— 
Lockett ft Brown — Medlln Watts 4 Townee. 

Palace — Howard 4 Clark Bevue — WlUlama 4 
Wolfus— Herbert Clifton— Hufford 4 Chain — Young 
4 Waldron — Hardy Bros. 

O ALG AS. Y, CAN. 
Orphenm — Eddie Foy 4 ' Family — r »»■« Fits- 
gerald 4 Co.— Libonati— Kltner. Hawkaley ft Mc- 
Clay — Gonne 4 Alberts — Fern. Blgelow 4 Mohan — 
Saunter's Birds. 

DENVER, COLO. 
Orphenm — Lew Brlce ft Barr Twins — Harry 
Glrard ft Co. — "The Headllnera" — Rita Boland — 
Darto ft Blalto— Edwin House. 

/ DULUTH, MINN. 
Orphenm — Wood 4 Wyde — Arthur Navel ft Co. ' 
—Roland Travers— Betty Bond— Juggling Nelson— 
Aveling ft Lloyd. 

DES MOINES. IA. 
Orphenm — Hugh Herbert ft Co.— Harry Carroll 
— Clifford 4 Wills — Aaani Troupe — Vera Berliner — 
"Motorboatlng." 

KANSAS CTFT, MO. 
Orphenm — Kathleen Clifford — "BubevlUe" — 
Patrlcola 4 Myers — De Leon 4 Davlea — The Flem- 
ings — Australian McLeans — "Hit the Trail." 
LINCOLN, NEB. 
Orphenm— "America First" — Chun Gbwa Four — 
Norton 4 Nicholson — Hamilton 4 Barnes — Ben 
Heeley 4 Co. — El Cleve.ft O'Connor— Bert Melrose. 
LOS ANGELES, CA1. 
Orphenm — Elsie Jania — Joe Towle — Three Bobs — 
Spencer 4 Williams — Lovenberg, Sister 4 Co.— 
, Kathryn Murray — Leona La Mar — Eva Taylor ft 

Co. 

MEMPHIS, TENN. 
Orphenm — Alan Brooks ft Co. — Beaumont 4 
Arnold — Oolet, Harris 4 Moray — "Fire of Clubs." 
MILWAUKEE, WIS, 
Orphenm — Heroine Shone ft Co. — Willie Weston 
— "Vacuum Cleaners" — Maurice Bnrkhart — Bert 
Hughes Co. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Orphenm — Dan Halperiu — Delro — McCaxty ft 
Faye — Randall ft Myers — Collate Conant — "Act 
Beautiful" — Jean Adair ft Co. 

MEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Orphenm — Karl Jorn — Margaret Young — Jimmy 
Hussey 4. Co. — Bernard ft Jania— Clown Seal — 
McMshon. Diamond 4 Chapman. 

OMAHA, NEB. 

Orphenm — Mclntyre 4 Heath — Johnston 4 Harty 
— Santos 4 Hayes — Else Ruegger ft Co. — Ray 
Snow — Three Vagrants — Orvtlle Stame. 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Orphenm — Sophie Tucker ft Co. — Edwin Arden 
ft Co. — Fred Santley ft Co. — Bernle 4 Baker — 
Jack ft Cora Williams— Prank WestphaL 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAX. 

Orphenm — Tneo. Kosloff ft Ballet— Mrs. Gene 
Hughes ft Co. — Bensee ft Balrd— Five Nelsons — 
D'Avignean'e Chinese Duo — Billy Reeves 4 Co. — 
Clara Howard — Frits 4 Lncy Brucb. 
ST. PAUL, MINN. 

Orphenm — Julia Arthur— Senor Westony — Gould 
4 Lewis — Long 4 Ward — Marie Stoddard — Hasel 
Morns — La Zuer Worth Co. 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

NEW YORK CITY. 

American (First Half) — Parshleys — Great San- 
tell — Nelson 4 Castle — Raymond ft Carerly — 
Ethel Costello— "When Women Rule" — Smith ft 
Troy. (Last Half) — Teddy Osborne's Pets — Bud 
ft Nellie Helm — Bell ft Graxer — Dale Wilson — 
w 11 lard Hutchinson 4 Co. — Raymond ft Caverly 
— Jolly Johnny Jones. 

Boulevard (First Half) — Mary Donahue — For- 
rest ft Church — Wniard Hutchinson ft Co. — The 
Leightons— Rose 4 Bills. (Last Half) — Pero 4 
Wilson — Helen Morati — Manning 4 Hall — Clar- 
ence Wilbur— Klnkald Kilties. 

Avenue B (First Half) — Raymond — "Do Your 
Bit"— Henry Cllve. (Last Half)— Belle Rutland 
— Adelaide Lowe ft Co. 

Greeley Sonar* (First Half) — The Sbattucks — 
Manning ft Hall — Adele Oswald — "The Neglect" 
—Bud 4 Nellie Helm— BeUew 4 Benhoff. (Last 
Half) — Helen Jackley — Rae ft Wynn — Mabel Page 
4 Co.— Savannah 4 Georgia — Pbunphlends. 

Delancey Street (First Half) — Zansros — Rae ft 
Wynn — Savannah ft Georgia — Maud Leona ft Co. 
—Geo. . M. Rosener — Raaklns's Russians. (Last 
Half) — Parshleys — Lewis 4 Hurst — Great Santell 
— Sadie Sherman — "Heir for a Night" — Frank 
Ferron — Bellew 4 Benhoff. 

Lincoln Square (First Half) — Breakaway -Bar- 
Iowa — - Sadie Sherman — Frescott — Sampson 4 
Douglss — Eddie Foyer. (Last Half) — Mary Don- 
shne — Leonard ft Dempsey — Forest . ft Chur ch' 
"The Neglect"— Tom ft Statu Moore — Ham Tree 
Mule. 



National (First Hair)— White ft White— ChaUs 
4 Lambert — Duffy '4 Montague — "The Greater 
Doty" — Lander Bros. (Last Hslf) — Breakaway 
Barlows — Nelson 4 Castle— Townsend, Wilbur ft 
Co. — The Leljrhtons — College Quintette. 

Orpheum (First .Hslf)— SeUg ft Norman — Leon- 
ard ft Dempsey — Amoros ft Obey — Peggy Brooks 
—Lloyd 4 Whltehome — Exposition Jubilee Four 
— Jolly Johnny -Jones. (Last Half) — Kate 4 
Wiley — Challa 4 Lambert— Barry ft Lelghton — 
Duffy ft Montague — Raskin's Russians — Geo. 
Rosener. 

Seventh Avenue (First Half)— Nada Keaser— 
Clark ft Frauds — George Armstrong — "Heir for 
a Night." (Last Half)— Oakes ft DeLure— Ward 
4 Payne — Zelaas — Lloyd 4 Wnltebouse — Peggy 
Brooks — Rose 4 Ellis. ' 

BROOKLYN. 

Bijou (First Half)— Helen! Jackley— Lewis ft 
Hurst — Jenks ft Allen — Arcadia Trio — Clarence 
Wilbur— Klnkald Kilties. '(Last Half)— Three 
Gorrell Bros. — Louise Mayo — "When Women 
Rule" — Lander Bos. - 

DeXalb (First * Half) — Burns 4 Forsn— Helen 
Morati— Hooper ft Burkbardt — Townsend 4 Wil- 
bur — Tom - 4 . Stasia Moore — Three Gorrell Broa. 
(Last Half) — The Shattueka — Grace Hanson — 
Jenks 4 Allen — "Greater Duty" — Exposition Ju- 
bilee Four" — Weber 4 Wilson. 

Warwick (First Half) — Shirley Sisters — "AD 
Wrong"— Bob Carlin — Adelaide Loew A CO. (Last 
Half)— The Pershteye— "Do Your Bit"— Craw- 
ford, Smith ft Martelie — Henry Cllve. 

Fulton (First' Half) — Oakes ft DeLure — Grace 
Hanson — College qolntettc — Jim Reynold* — Bam 
Tree Mole. (Last Half) — Burns ft Foran — 
Sampson 4 Douglas — Howard Chase ft Co. — Smith 
4 Tron — Adele Oswald. 

Palace (First Half)— The Parshleys— Mr. 4 
Mrs. Sidney Payne— Belle Rutland. (Last Hslf) 
—Raymond — Shirley Sisters. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Hippodrome— Will 4 Kemp — Three Crelgbtoa 
Girls — Miller, Parker 4 Slley — Edward . Lynch 4 
Co. — Lew Wilson — Hooaler Girls. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Orphenm (First Half)— Ruth Howell Trio— 
Conoors 4 Edna — Whitney's Dolls — Dunham, Ed- 
wards Trio— Six Stylish Steppers. (Last Half)— 
Howard Sisters — Guest 4 Newlln — La Petite Cab- 
aret—Gordon. Eldred ft Co. — Harry ft M. Gilbert. 

St. James (First Hslf) — Gordon ft Gordon — 
Curry ft Graham — Well, Well, Well— Lano. Plant 
4 Tlmmons— Golden Troupe. (Last Halt) — Musi- 
cal Christies — Lee ft Bennett — Edw. Farrell ft 
Co.— Bnrke ft Harris— Gardner's Maniacs. 
FALL RIVER. MASS. 

Bijou (Mrat Half) — Howard Slaters — Guest ft 
NewUn— Gordon. Eldred ft Co.— Harry ft M. Gil- 
bert — La Petite Cabaret. (Last Hslf) — Connors 
ft Edna — Whitney's Dolls — Dunham. Edwards 
Trio— Both Howell Trio. 

HOBOKEN, N. J. 

Lyric (First Half) — Ward ft Curran — Alice 
Hanson — The Arrens. (Last Half) — White Step- 
pers — Ludu's Friend. 

NEWARK. N. J. 

Pero ft Wilson — Louise ' Mayo— Ward ft 
Payne — Howard Chase ft Co. — Barry ft Lelghton 
—Weber 4 Wilson. (Last Half)— Arrens— Selig 4 
Norman — Ethel Costello — Prescott — Geo. Arm- 
strong — Dawson. Lanlgan ft Covert. 
PROVIDENCE, E. I. 

Emery (First Halt) — Musical Christ!.:*— Lee 4 
Bennett — Edward Farrell ft Co. — Burke ft Harris 
— Gardner's Maniacs. (Last Half) — Gordon ft 
Gordon — Curry ft Graham — Well, Well, Well— 
Lane, Plant ft Tlmmons — Golden Troupe. 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Broadway (First Hslf)— Kate ft Wiley— Dolce 
Sisters— Teddy Osborne ft Pets— Frank Farron— 
Phuuphiends. (Last Half)— Ctlli Opera Co.— 
Eddie Foyer — Six Stylish Steppers. 
TORONTO, CAN. 

Yonge Street — Dix ft Dixey — Three Rosellas — 
Beatrice McKenzle — Plottl — Brnce Duffett ft Co. 
— Columbia City Four — Jos. Teddy 4 Co. 

POLI CIRCUIT 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Poll (First Half)— Three Herbert Sisters- 
Fisher Hawley 4 Co. — Manning. Feeles 4 Knolls 
— Red ft Blondy. (Last Half) — Lawton — Greenly 
ft Drayton — Cameron Devltt 4 Co — Wells Nor- 
wortn ft Nelson — "Tango Shoes." 

Plaxa, OTirst Half)— Duval Slaters — Gray ft 
Graham — Steppe 4 Cooper — James Grady 'ft Co. 
(Last Half) — Olive Green ft Co.— Rice ft Francis — 
Kitty Flynn — Howard ft Fields. 

HARTFORD. CONN. 

PeU (First Half)— Van Atta ft Gerabon— Martha 
Hamilton ft Co.— Greenly 4 Drayton — "Courting 
Days." (Last Hslf) — Blnns 4 Bert — Three 
Mortality Girls — Evans 4 Lloyd Co. — Steppe 4 
Cooper — Great Leon 4 Co. 

Palace (First Hslf) — The Ferraros — Kitty Flynn 
— Canerob Devltt 4 Co. — "Volunteers" — Ralph 
Bahly 4 Co. (Last Half)— Hayden ft Cardownie— 
Wood ft Halpln— Fisher Hawley ft Co.— O'Nell ft 
Walmsley — Kitsro Japs. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Bijou (First Half )— Olive Green ft Co. — Rome 
ft Cox— Wood. MelvlUe 4 Phillips— Great Leon 
4 Co. (Last Half)— Three Herbert Slaters— Mr. 
ft " Mrs. Norman Phillips — Manning Feelea ft 
Knolls — "Courting Days." 

BCRAHTON, PA. 

Poll (First Half)— Elliott ft West— Octavo- 
Win Ward ft Girls — Scot Gibson— Gladys Taylor 
ft Co. . (Last Half)— Clayton. Conrad— Seigle ft 
Need — Botan'a Song Birds— Conrad 4 Conrad — 
"Dsiry Maids." 



an- i Jfwvwns-iWT^ Mastal 

■" r Palace mrat Half)— The rPelots— Ben Jft Monte 
—Six American Dancers— Haward ft fields)*— Knter, 
Clair ft Kuter— Pi pi Tax 4'Panlo. (Last, Halt)— 
Dalbeanle ft Co. — Mahoney Bros, ft Delay— Adria 
Alnslee ft Co. — "Volunteers"— Brendell ft Bert- 
Red ft Blondy. 

, WATIBBURT, CONN. 

- PeU (First Half)— Dalbeanle ft Co.— Wood ft 
Halpln— Wells. Norworth 4 Nelson— Mr. ft Mrs. 
Norman Phillips— O'Nell ft Wslmaley— "Foolish 
Factory." (Last Hslf )— The Perots— Bell ft Monte 
— James Grady ft Co. — Gray 4 Graham — Wood. 

• Melville 4 Phillips — Six American Dancers. 

WORCESTER, MASS. 

Poll (First Half)— Hayden ft Cardownie— Law 
Holts— Adrta Alnslee ft Co. — Brendell , ft Bert — 
"Tango Shoes." < (Last Half) — The Femroa) — 
Duval Sisters — Martha . Hamilton ft Co. — Kuter, 
Clair ft Kuter — Duffln Redeay Tronpa. 

Plaxa (First Half)— Svengall— Three Moriarlty 
Olrls — Evans ft IJoyd Co.— Mahoney Bros, ft 
Daisy— Kltaro Japs. (Last Half)— Van Atta ft 
Gcrsbon — Swan 4 O'Dca — Dooley 4 Nelson — Boms 
ft Cox— Ralph Bahly ft Co. 

WTXKES-BARBE, PA. 
Poll (First Half)— Clayton Conrad— Seigle ft 
Naal — Rntan'a Song Birds — Conrad ft Conrad— 
"Dairy Maids." (Last Half)— Elliott ft West- 
Octavo— Will Ward ft Girls— Scot Gibson— Gladys 
Taylor ft Co. 

PA NTAGE S CIRCUIT 

BUTTE, MONT, 
Fantages (Five Days) — Goldberg ft Wayne — 
Von Cello — Mercedes — Cook 4 Lorena — Four Hollo- 
ways — Jndla Curtis. > 

CALGARY , CAN. 
Fantages — Parsons 4. Irwin— Lord & Fuller — 
"Fireside Reverie" — Wilson's Riding Lion— Wil- 
son Brothers. '*• ■ * ' 
DENVER, COLO. 
Paatscas— Howard Klbel - ft Herbert— "Miss 
Hamlet"— Leila Shaw ft Co.— Klnts ft Nash. 

EDMONTON, CAN. 

rilltllll Mnnln ft Beaaley — Ash ft Shaw — Six 

Serenaders— Blgoletto Brothers— Larson A Wilson. 

GREAT PALLS, MONT. 

Psatages — Claudia Coleman — Six Piano Girls — 

Willard — Claude Younger — "Dream of the Orient" 

— Wlllard. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 
Pantages— Gillespie Girls— Ed BlondsD— Miller 
ft Lyle— Gerard's .Monks. 

LOS ANGELES, OAL. 
Pantages— Kane ft Herman — Nelson ft -Nelson — 
"Birth of a Rose." — Anearn Troupe — Godfrey ft 
Henderson— Guilianl Trio. 

OGDEN. UTAH. 
Pantages (Three Days)— Julian Hall— The Oas- 
colgnes — "Women" — "Wanted, a WH»" — Lucy 
Lucler Trio— Rhelngold ft Kanffmsu. 
OAKLAND, OAL. 
Pantages Masses, 4 Welser — DeVlne ft Wil- 
liams — Harry Coleman — "New Producer"— Reed 4 
Armstrong. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 
Fantages — Four Roses — Octsvla Handworth 4 
Co. — Swor 4 McCormlck — Harry Breen — "Little 
Miss Dp-to-Date." 

SPOKANE, WASH. 
Pantages Four Earls— Tom Edwards ft Co. — 
Sllber 4 North — Alleen Stanley — "Count and the 
Maid." 

BAN FRANCISCO, OAL. 
Fantasies— Claire 4 Atwood— Venetian Gypsies — 
Frank Morrell — Edna Keeley ft Co. — Dixon 4 
O'Connor. 

SALT LAKE OTTY, UTAH. 
Pantages — Bob Albright — Burr ft Lea — Bomles 
Trio— The Movie Girls— -a Breath of Old Vir- 
ginia"'— Holmes ft La Vere. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 
Pantages Jessie ft Dolly Miller — The Crom- 
. wells — Brady 4 Msboney — "Saint and Sinner" — 
"Bon Voyage." 

BAN DIEGO. CAL. 
Pantages — The Lampints — Smith ft McGnire — 
Joe Roberts— "The Mimic World"— Abrams ft 
Johns. 

TACOMA, WASH. 
Pantages — "Girl from Star land" — Cheater am- 
ber — DeMlchelle Bros.— "Everyman's Sister" — 
"Miss America." 

VICTORIA, CAB. 
Pantages— Dumltrescn Dunham Troupe— Lane ft 
Harper— "A Friendly Call"— Neil McKinley— "Oh. 
Yon Dertl." 

VANCOUVER, CAB. 
Pantages — Three Mori Bros. — Five Sullya — 
Norlne Coffey — Winter Garden Revue — WIS la 

Solar. 

WINNIPEG, CAB. 
Fantages— Doris Lester Trio— Four Casters — 
Strand Trio— Winifred Gllfrain Dancers — Harry 
Jolson — Pedrinls Monk. 

Vs. V. M- A. 
AURORA, ILL. 
Fox (Last Half) — Great Howard — Sherman, Van 
ft Hymen— Velds Dedle Trio. 

ALTON, ILL. 
Hippodrome (First Half)*— Princess Verona — 
Basil ft Allen. (Last Half)— Chiyo ft Chlyo— 
Clinton ft Besney. 

BELOIT, WIS. 
New Wilson (Sept. 29-30)— Gibson ft Price — 
Kane McDnffy — Three- Theodores. 

BLOOMIBOTON, ILL. 
Majestlo (First Half)— Lonzo Cox— Black ft 
White Bevue — Demareat ft Collette — Page, Hack 
ft Hack. (Last Half)— FA Reynard— BasU ft 
Allen— Mile Bland. 

(Continued on page 35.) 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



GUS EDWARDS OFFERS 

(GOOD-BYE AND GOOD LUCK BE WITH YOU) 



| W ± % . 1 .1 






T»-.<- V.as':c hy GUS EDWARDS, the lyric Iw WILL D CQS3 T.S- ui.lv M.-.rcl, R.-illad wiih the HEART INTEREST publ.".|« J 
.■e« l.y MISS NORA EAYCS. 

WE HAVE JUST PURCHASED FROM BILLY GASTON 

WHAT WILL BECOME OF YOUR LITTLE DOLL GIRL 

!~»i<2 you sing COBB -arid -EDV/AR05" "F^r You a Rose" .' Th'-n yoii will sinq their newest one 

"ROMANCE" 

This si? fig wtli fit Soprano, Alto, Tenor or Baritone 



FOR SI.NCLNG SOUBRETTES FOR 5NGENUES 

1 LIKE TO KEEP WY EYES OH YOU l,ttle W boy ™lls r around- 



FOR CHARACTER SINGERS. 

"RIO JANEIRO" 



1531 BROADWAY, Astor Theatre 
Building . . NEW YORK 



MAXWELL SiLVEK— GENERAL MANAGER 



DOLLY 



BERT 



GREYand BYRON 

Presenting "A Girl's Wash," by Harry L, N.wton 

DIKECTION TOM JONES 



Nora and Sidney Kellogg 

"Tlie Music Room" 

Direction SAMUEL BAERWiTZ 



JOHNSON & DEAN REVUE 



IN VAUDEVILLE BOOKED SOLE) 


WELLS »«FISHER 

? WHAT IS IT ? 


TECHOW'S CATS 

IN VAUDEVILLE 


BURNS & JOSE 

Booked U. I. O.— Direction, Bernard Burke 


JOSEPHINE DUNFEE 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



. «J. 



THE JOYFUL SONCOLOG1ST 



DHL, MASK LEVY 



FREDRIKS AJVD F»ALM12R 

Lon Clrcnlt Now " T 

AumcAi WQJMosI 

asruuaTATiTX unnnrrAmrs 

LOUIS l'INCUS WILLIE EDELSTEN 



KENNEDY and KRAMER 

In DANCING ITEMS 

Featuring MAUDE KRAMER (Erer See Her Daaee7> Dir. CHAS. FITZPATRICK 



RYAN -JULIETTE 



Songs, Novelty Dan c es B ooked Solid. 



D iroc tio n SAMUEL BAERWITZ 



I 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



Direction, ROSE dc CURTIS 



CHAS. REILLY 

SINGING COMEDIAN 



MAXINE 



THE ONLY BLACKFACE VENTRILO- 
QUIST. Thli act la copyrighted In Ita en- 
tirety, also In the Restricted Material 
Depta. of all theatrical Journals. 



DENNY MULLEN 

In THE NEW JANITOR The Riot of Every BM 

FLO & OLLIE WALTER 

Direction — stark Levey 



"BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER" 



September 19, 1917 . 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



25 



Routes Miut Reach Thi»fi^e*Not LUfJfgT-' 



SarurSwy 
. - DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL * 

Beauty Shop" — Montank, Brooklyn, Sept. 17- 

•Broadway After Dark" — (Western) (Wood- 
ball Amnae Co.), Spring Valley, Minn., 
Sept. 20, LeBoy 21, Nashua. Iowa, 22. 

"Business Before Pleasure" — Eltinge Theatre, 
lndef. 

"Cheer Up" — Hippodrome, lndef. 

"Captain Kidd. Jr." — Grand, Chicago, till 
Sept. 28. 

"Country Cousin" — Gaiety, N. Y., lndef. 

-De Luxe Annie" — Booth. N. Y.. lndef. 

"Daybreak" — Harris Theatre, lndef. 

"Everywoman" — Boston, Mass.. Sept. 10-20. 

"Experience"— -Manhattan Opera House, N. 
X.. lndef. 

"Eyes of Youth" — Haxlne Elliott's Theatre, 
lndef. 

••Flame, The" — Gladmar Theatre, I ^»"T<"g, 
Mich., Sept. 10. Oliver Theatre, South Bend, 
Mich., 20 : Orpheum Theatre, Baclne. Wis., 
21 : Colonial Theatre. Waukesha. Wis.. 22 ; 
Davidson Theatre, Milwaukee. Wis., 23-26. 

"Freckles" — Western (Broadway Amusement 
Co.'s) — Lemmon, 22; Bowman, 25; Iemay, 
Mont., 26. 

"Freckles" — Northern (Broadway Amusement 
Co.'s) — Lawton, 20 ; Sarles, 22 ; Munich, 
25 ; Rocklake. 27 ; Cando, 20. 

"Good for Nothing Husband" (Kout. Sher- 
man, .mgr.) — Butler, 20 ; Salem. Ohio. 21 : 
Canton. 22 : Ashtabula. 24 : Mercer. Pa., 
25 ; Erie. 26 ; Jamestown, N. Y., 27 ; Corry, 
Pa.. 28; Oil City. 20. 

"Good Night. Paul"— Hudson Theatre, tadef. 

"Good for Nothing Husband" (West) — Lake 
Lark. 20; Armstrong, 21; Sibley, 22; 
Cherokee, 24 ; Aurella, 25 ; Rolfe, 26 ; For- 
rest City, 27 ; Soutberland, 28 ; Iowa Falls. 
20. - • 

"A Good for Nothing Husband" (City) Shn- 
bert Theatre, Milwaukee, Sept. 16 and week 

"Good-bye Boys" — Princess Theatre, Chicago, 
last week. 

"Good Gracious Annabelle" — Park So.. Thea- 
tre. Boston, till' Sept. 20. 

"Htfvc a Heart" — Eastern Co. — Lyric Thea- 
tre. Allentown, Pa., Sept. 1J-22 ; Trent 
Theatre, Trenton, N. J., 24-28. 

"Have a Heart" (H. W. Savage, mgr.) — Court 
Square, Springfield, Sept. 20-22; Poll's, 
Merlden, Conn.. 24 ; Park. Bridgeport. 25- 
26 : Shubert. New Haven. 27-20. 

Hamilton — Knickerbocker. N. Y., lndef. 

"Her Soldier Boy" — Standard. N. Y., Sept. 
17-22. 

"Here Comes the Bride" — Hollls. Boston, till 

Sept 22. 
"Hltchy-Koo" (Hitchcock & Goetz. nigra.) — 
Liberty, New Haven, till Sept- 22. 

"Henpecked Henry" (Caskell ft MacVltty, 
Inc., Merle H. Norton, gen'l mgr.) — 
Sudbury, Sept. 21 : Cobalt, 22 ; North Bay, 
24: Orlllla, 25; Midland, 26; Sarrle. 27: 
Hamilton, 28-29. 

"Inner Man. The" — Cort, N. Y„ Sept. 17-22. 

"Jack O'Lantern" — Forrest, Phlla., Sept. 25- 
lndef. 

"Knife, The" — Majestic Theatre. Brooklyn, 
week Sept. 17 ; Shubert, Brooklyn, week 
Sept. 24 ; Boston, lndef. 

"Lassoo. The" — Lyceum Theatre, indef. 

"Love-O-Mike"— Casino, till Sept 20. 

"Leave It to Jane" — Longacre Theatre, indef. 

"Lucky O'Shea — 30th 8treet New York, lndef. 

"Maytime" (The Shubert's mgmt) — Shubert 
Theatre, lndef. 

"Man Who Came Back" (Wm. A. Brady, 
mgr.) — Playhouse, New York, lndef. 

"Mary's Ankle" (A. H. Woods, mgr.) — Bijou, 
N. Y.. lndef. 

"Masquerader, The (B. W. Tully) — Lyric. N. 
Y.. indef. 

"Million Dollar Doll, The" (Western, NortoD 
ft Bunnell. Inc. owners) — Winnlneg. Man.. 
Sept 17-22: Begina, Sask.. 24-26: Saa- 
katoon. 27-28. 

"The Million Dollar Doll" (Eastern)— Har- 
vey D. Orr, owner: Carl Zoellner, mgr. — 
Birmingham, Ala.. 20-22. 

Mantell, Robt B. — Shubert Boston. 2 weeks. 

"Mother -Carey's Chickens" — Cort. N. Y.. Sept 
24. indef. 

"Nothing But the Truth" (with Max Flgman) 
— Hastings, Neb., Sept. 20: McCook, Neb.. 
21 : Colorado Spring?. 22 : Denver, 23. and 

"Nothing But the Truth (Anderson and 
Weber) — Southern — Sumter, Sept 10 ; 
Columbia, 20 ; Orangeburg. 21 ; Asbeville, 
22; Anderson, 24: Augusta. 25 : Savannah. 
26 : Brunswick, 27 : Jacksonville. 28-28. 

"Nothing But the Truth (Anderson and 
Weber) — Eastern — Glens Falls. N. Y., Sept. 
20 : Johnston, 21 : Watertown. 22 ; Oswego, 
24: Little Falls, 25: Herkimer, 26: Nor- 
wich, 27 : Oneonta, 28 : BInghnmton. 29. 

"Nothing Bnt the Truth (with William 
Collier) — Pittsburg. Sept. 16-22. 

"Over the 'Phone — 48th street Indef. 
"Other Man's Wife" (L A. Edwards, mgr.) 
— Du Bols. Sent. 17 : St. Marys. 18 : John- 
sonburg, 18 : Olean, N. Y.. 21 : Jamestown. 
22 ; Cattarangus, N. Y„ 23 : Galeton. Pn.. 
25 ; Wellsboro. 26 : Blnghamton. N. Y.. 27 : 
Ser>enpctarv. 28-29. 

"Old Lady 31" — Plymouth. Boston. 

"Our Betters" — Broad. Philadelphia. 

"Oh Hoy" — Wllbnr, Boston, lndef. 

"Oh Boy" — LaSalle. Chicago. Indef. 

"Oh Bov" — Princess. New York, lndef. 

"Pals First"— Illinois. Chlcaeo. Indef. 

"Parlor Bedroom and Bath" — Olvmplc. Chl- 
cacn. lndef. 

"Passlne Show of 1917"— Winter Gnrden. 
New York. Indef. 

"Peter Tbbetson" — Rennbllc. New York, lndef. 

"Pawn" — Fulton. N. Y. 

"Polly with a Past" — Pelasco. N. Y.. lndef. 




BURLESQUE 

Columbia "Whoal 



17-: 



"Pom-Pom" with Mltzi Hajos (H. W. Sav- 
age) — Academy of Music, Richmond. Va., 
Sept. 20-22: Academy of -Music, Petersburg. 
Va.. 24 : Majestic Theatre, Danville, Va.. 
25; Colonial Theatre. Salisbury, N. C 
26; Municipal Theatre, Greensboro. N. C, 
27 ; Academy of Music, Raleigh. N. C 28 ; 
Academy of Music, Wilmington, N. C, 20. 

•'Riveria Girl" — New Amsterdam, N. Y., 
Sept. 24-lndef. 

"Rambler Rose" (Chas. Frobman, mgr.) — Em- 
pire Theatre. New York City, lndef. 

"Rescuing Girl, The"— Broad, Philadelphia, 
Sept. 24-Oct 6. 

Skinner. Otis (Chas. Frobman, mgr.) — 
Powers, Chicago, lndef. 

San Carlo— Grand Opera Co., 44th St.. Sept. 
17-22. 

"Scrap of Paper, A" — Criterion, N. Y., lndef. 

"Seventeen" — Stuart Walker Co".— Lima, O., 
Sept. 20 ;■ Dayton, O., 22; Anderson, Ind., 
24 ; Marlon, SS ; Fort Wayne, 26-27 ; South 
Bend. 28-20. 

"This Way Out" — Geo. M. Cohan's Theatre. 
17-22. 

"Tailor Made Man" — Cohan ft Harris, lndef. 

"13th Chair"— Adelphl, Philadelphia. 

"13th Chair" — Garrick, Chicago. 

"There She Goes" (Harvey D. Orr, mgr.) — 
Wellston, Ohio, 20 ; Huntington, W. Va., 
21 ; Charleston. W. Va., 22 : Elklns. W. 
Va.. 24: Grafton. W. Va.. 25; Clarksburg.. 
W. Va.. 20: Fairmont W. Va., 27: Wheel- 
ing, W. Va- 28-28. 

•Turn to the Right" — Tremont Theatre, Bos- 
ton, Indef. 

"Custalrs and Down" — Cort Chicago, indef. 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin" (Wm. Kibble, mgr.) — 
McKeesport, Sept. 20; Washington, 21; 
Wheeling. ~ W. Va., 22 ,- Coshocton. Ohio. 
24 ; Cambridge, 25 : Zanesville, 26 : McCon- 
neltoville, 27 ; Marietta. 28 ; Parkersburg. 
29 ; Athena. Oct 1 : Galllpolis. 2 : Wellston, 
3. 

"Uncle Tom's Cabin" Co. (Browning-Ander- 
son-Lewis) — Lanesboro, Sept. 20 : Hall- 
stead, 21 : Montrose, 22 ; Wyalusing. 24 ; 
Towanda, 25. 

"Very Idea. The" Astor (Messrs. Shubert 
mgrs.) — New York, City, lndef. 

"Wanderer, The" — Metropolitan Opera House. 
Philadelphia, Sept 20, indef. 

Washington Sq. Players — Comedv. indef. 

Wilson Al H. (S. R. Ellis)— New Phlladel- 
pMa, Ohio. Sept. 20 : Cambridge. Ohio. 21 : 
Wheeling. W. Va.. 22. 

"Wise Boob, A"— Boscobel, Wis., Sept 20: 
Postvllle. la., 21 : Oaslan, 22 ; Klma. 23 : 
Clarltsvllle. 24 : Hampton. 25 ; Northwood. 
26: New Richland. 27: Waseca. 28: St 
Peter. 20. 

Zlegfeld Follies — Colonial, Boston, lndef. 

STOCK 

Auditorium Players — Maiden, Mass., lndef. 

Alcazar Players — San Franclsao, indef. 

Austin. Mildred. Musical Comedy (Star) — 
Louisville. Ky., indef. 

Angell Stock (Joe Angel!, mgr.) — Park. Pitts- 
burgh, lndef. 

Baker Stock Co. — Portland. Ore., lndef. 

Bunting, Emma. Stock Company — -Grand 
Opera House, San Antonio, Tex., Indef. 

Bennett Richard, Stock — San Francisco, ln- 
def. 

Bryant Marguerite, Players — Altoona. Pa., 
Indef. 

Buhler. Richard. Players (A. G. Delamater) 
Frankfort. Ky.. 19 : Lexington. 20-21 ! 
KnorvUle. Tenn., 22: Nashville. 24-5-6: 
New Decatur, Ala.. 27 ; Birmingham, 28-0 ; 
Memphis, Tenn.. 30-Oct 1. 

Benjamin. Jack. Stock Co. — Wakeeney, Kan., 
week 8ept 17; Hayes, Sept. 24-week: Rus- 
sell, week Oct 1. 

Bishop Players — Oakland. Cnl.. lndef. 

Boyer, Nancy. Stock — Detroit. Mich., lndef. 

Baldwin, Walter. Stock— Dulnth. Minn., lndef. 

Blaine's, James. Players — Saskatoon, Can 
indef. 

Chloaero Stock Co.— Seneca Falls. N. Y.. Sept. 
10-15. 

Cooper Baird Co. — Zanesville, Ohio, lndef. 

Colonial Stock. Cleveland, O.. lndef. 

Crown Theatre Stock Co. (E. W. Rowland. 
8r.) — Chlcaco. indef. 

Comstock, F. Roy, Stock Co. — Cleveland, O.. 
lndef. 

Cornell-Price Players— Wanseon. O.. lndef. ; 
Alma, Mich.. Sept 3-8: Allegan. Mich.. 10- 
15. 

Cutter Stock Co. — Perry, N. Y„ week Sept. 
17: Bath, N. Y„ week Sept 24. 

Dwl-:ht Albert. Players (G. A. Martin, mrr.) 
— K. and K. Opera House, Pittsburgh, Pa.. 
lndef. 

Dale. Katbryn Co. (Krug)— Omaha, Neb.. 
indef. 

Dainty, Bessie, Players (I. E. Earle, mgr.) — 
Orpheum Theatre, Waco, Texas, lndef. 

Enterprise Stock Company (Norman Hllyard. 
mgr.) — Chicago. Indef. 

Earl Stock (Larry Powers, mgr.) — Sharps- 
burg. Pa., Indef. 

Emerson Players — Lowell. Mass- lndef. 

Elltch Stock Co. (Elltch Gardens) — Denver. 
Col., indet 

Felber ft Shea Stock — Akron. O.. lndef. 

Fifth Ave. Stock — Fifth Ave.. Brooklyn, ln- 
def. 

Florence Players — Bryan, Ohio, Sept. 16-22. 

Franklyn. Maurice. Stock Co. — Worcester. 
Mass.. lndef. 

Garrick Theatre Stock Co. — Garrick. Detroit. 
Mich., lndef. 

Garden City Stock Co. — Kansas City. Mo.. 
lndef. 

Glass. Joseph D.. Stock Co. — Denver. Colo.. 
lndef. 

Gordinler Bros.. Stock — Ft Dodge, la., indef. 

Grand Theatre Stock Co. — Tulsa. Okla., lndef. 

Graham Stock Co. (Oscar Graham, mgr.) — 



Hydro. Sept 19 ; Carnegie. 20 : Granite. 
21 : Comanche. - 22 : Graham. Tex., 24 ; 
Jneksboro. 25 : Ryan, Okla.. 26 ; Nocoua. 
Tex.. 27: Electra, 28; Harrold. 29, 

Globe Dramatic Stock Co. — Philadelphia, ln- 
def. 

Uamllton-Lealey Stock Co. — Greenfield. Tenn.. 
Sept 17-22. 

Hippodrome Stock Co. — Hippodrome. Oak- 
land, Cat, Indef. 

Incomparable Grand Stock Co. — Tulsa. Okla.. 
lndef. 

Jewett Henry, Players— Copley, Boston, ln- 
def. 

Keith Stock — Portland. Me., lndef. 

Kenyon Stock Co. (Forry L Brott, mgr.) — 
Kenyon, Pittsburgh, lndef. 

Knickerbocker Players — Philadelphia, lndef. 

Lexington Park Players — Lexington Park, 
Boston, lndef. 

Lakeside Mus. Comedy Co. — Denver, Colo., 
lndef. 

Lando. Albert, Stock Co. — Fltchburg, Mass., 
lndef. 

Lawrence. Del., Stock — San Francisco, lndef. 

Liberty Stock Co. — Strand, San Diego, CaL. 
lndef. 

Lawrence Players — Celeron Park. Jamestown, 
N. Y., lndef. 

Lleb, Harris, Stock Co. — Wilson, Chicago, ln- 
def. 

Lewis. Jack X„ Stock (W. W. Richards, mgr.) 
— Chester. Pa., lndef. 

Lone-Jane Players (Carl F. Hallaway, mgr.) 
— Warburton, Yonkers, Indef. 

Liberty Players — Norumbega Park, Auburn- 
dale. Mass., lndef. 

MacLean. Pauline. Stock (W. W. Richards, 
mgr.) — Samuel's Theatre. Jamestown. N. 
Y.. Indet 

Modern Players — Pabst Milwaukee, Wis., ln- 
def. 

Mnrcns Musical Stock Co. — New Bedford, 
Mass., lndef. 

Morosco Stock — Los Angeles, Indet 

Manhattan Players — Rochester. N. Y., lndef. 

Nesttlle Stock Co. (week Sept 17) — Atchison. 
Kan. 

Opera Players — Hartford. Conn., lndef. 

Orpheum Players (Geo. Ebey, mgr.) — Oak- 
land. CaL. Indef. ■• -• 

Oliver. Otis. Players — El Paso. Tex.. Indef. 

Oregon Plavere (Dan Carlton, mgr.) — 
Calllcoon, N. Y., Sept. 17-24 ; Narrowsbnrg. 
N. Y.. Sept 24-28. 

Orpheum Players — Clark Brown, mgr.) — 
Montreal, Can- lndef. 

Packard. Jay. Stock Co. — Newark. N. J.. In- 
def. 

Poll Stock Co. — Springfield, Mass.. lndef. 

People's Stock Co. — Oklahoma City, Okla., ln- 
def. 

Perry. Tex.. PInvers — Zanesville. O.. lndef. 

Poll Stock Co. — Wllkes-Barre. Pa.. Indef. 

Poll Players — Worcester. Mass.. lndef. 

Poll Stock Co. — Waterbury. Conn., lndef. 

Powell. Halton. Stock Co. — Lanslns. Mich., 
lndef. . 

Price. Stanley. Players — Grand Rapids. Mich., 
indef. 

Robins. Edward. Stock — Toronto. Can., lndef. 
- Shubert Plavers — Milwaukee. WK. Indef. 

Shubert Stock — St. Paul. Minn.. Indef. 

Somerville Theatre Players — Somcrvllle. 
Mass.. lndef. 

Sherman Kellv Stock Co. (Mock-Sadl-AHI. 
manager). Grand Rnplds. Wis., week Sept. 

10: Baraboo. Wis., week Sept 17: Beaver 

Dam. Wis., week Sept 24. 

Shanon Stock Co. (Harry Shsnon) BucyrUR. 
O.. week Sept 10 : Wapakonetn. 17 : Xenla. 
27-29. 

Spooner. Cecil. Stock — Grand Opera House. 
Brooklyn, lndef. 

Toler. Sydney. Stock — Portland. Me., lndef. 

Temple Stock — Hamilton. Can., lndef. 

Van Dvke * Baton Stock (F. Mack, mar.) — 
.Toplln. Mo., lndef. 

Vees. Albert. Stock — wheellnc. W. v a .. Indef. 

Wlewam Stock Co. — Wigwam. San Francisco. 
Indet 

Williams. Ed.. Stock — Elkhn-t. Ind.. lndef. 

Walker. Stuart. Plavers— Indianapolis. Indef. 

Williams. Ed., Stork— Ouln<-v. m. Indef. 

Wilkes' Players — Senttle. Wa«h.. Indef. 

Wallace. Chester. Players — Wllllamsport. Pa.. 
Indef. 

Whitney, Lou, Co. — St Johns. Mich. Sept. 
17-22. 

Yale Stock Co. — River Perk. Concord. N. n.. 
Indef. 

INTERNATIONAL CIRCUIT 

"After Office Hours" — Puffnlo. Sept. 17-22. 

"Come Back to Erin" — Utlca. Sept. 17-18-18 : 
Syracuse. 20-21-2''. 

"Common Clay" — WnsMncton. 

•'Daughter of the Sun" — Omaha. SeDt. 10-17- 
18-19: Lincoln. 20: St. Joe. 21-22. 

"C-olnir Straight" — Peoria. Sent. lR-'7-18-10. 

"Girl Wlthont a Chance" — c n in>eo (National) 

"Heart of Wetona" — nttsbui—b. 

"Hang nnd Fritz" — Trenton. Sept. 21-22. 

"Katzenlnmmer Kids" — Nas h vil1i\ 

"Little Girl In a Ble Cltv"— Cleveland. 

"Leave It to Me" — Worcester. 

"TJtt'e Ml«« Innocence" — Cnlomlins. 

"Little Girl God Forent" — Indianapolis. 

"Mntt ft Jeff" — HoboVcn. 

"Millionaire's Son and the Shop Girl" — St 
Louis. 

"One Girl's ETuerience" — Milwaukee. 

"Pec o' Mv Heart" — Omhenm. Philadelphia. 

"Sten Llvelv" — Kansas City. 

"Safety First" — Memphis. 

"Shore Acres" — Lexincton. New York. 

"Trail of the Lonesome Pine" — Providence. 

"Unborn Child"— Louisville. 

"Which One Shall I Marry" — Imperial. Chi- 
cago. 

-wv|t e stave. The" — Detroit 

"White Feaf-er. The" — Baltimore. 



Al Reeves — Gaiety. Washington. 
■ Gaiety. Pittsburgh. 24-29. 
.Ban Welch — Lyric. . Day ton. O.. 17-22: Olym- 

• pic. Cincinnati. 24-20. 

Best Snow in Town — Gaiety, Omaha, 15-21 ; 
Gaiety, Kansas City, 24-29. 

Bowerys — Empire, Brooklyn, 17-22 ; Park, 
Bridgeport. Ct. 27-28. 

Burlesque Revue — Park. Bridgeport. Ct. 20- 
22: Colonial. Providence. 24-20. 

Burlesque Wonder Show — Colonial. Provi- 
dence. R, I.. 17-22 ; Gaiety. Boston. 24-29. 

Bon Tons — Casino. Philadelphia. 17-22: 
Miner's. Bronx. New York. 24-20. 

Herman Shows — Gaiety. Buffalo. 17-22; Cor- 
inthian, Rochester, N. Y., 24-29. 

Broadway Frolics — Peoples, Philadelphia. 17- 
22; Palace, Baltimore, 24-20. 

Bostonlana — Gaiety, St. Louis, 17-22 ; Star 
and Garter. • Chicago, 24-20. 

Follies of the Day — Empire. Albany. N. Y., 
17-22: Casino. Boston. 24-20. 

Golden Crooks— Gaiety, Omaha, 22-28. 

Hello America— Gaiety. Pittsburgh. 17-22: 
Star, Cleveland. 24-20. 

Harry Hastings — Columbia, New York. 
17-22; Casino, Brooklyn. 24-29, 

Hip, Hip, Hoorab — Columbia. Chicago, 17-22; 
Gaiety. Detroit 24-29. 

Howe. Sam — Bastable. Syracuse. 17-19: 
Lumberg, Utica. 20-22: Gayety. Montreal. 
24-20. 

Irwin's Big Show — Empire. Newark. 17-22 ; 
Casino. Philadelphia, 24-20. 

Liberty Girls — Gaiety. Boston. 17-22 : Co- 
lumbia. New York. 24-29. 

Majesties — Layoff. 17-22: Orpheum, Pater- 
son, 24-29. 

Merry Rounders — Cohen's, Kewburgb. N. Y„ 
17-19 : Poughkeepsie. 20-22 : Hurtle ft Sea- 
man's. New York. 24-29. 

Million ft Dolls— Majestic. Jersey City. 17- 
22: People's. Philadelphia. 24-20. 

Mollle Williams— Casino. Brooklyn. 17-22: 
Empire, Newark. N. J., 24-20. 

Marions, Dave — Miners', Bronx. New York. 
17-22: layoff 24-20: Orpheum, Pateraon, 
31-Oct. 6. 

Maids of America — Grand. Hartford. Ct. 17- 
22 : Jacques. Waterbury. 24-20. 

Ob. Girl— Gaiety. Detroit 17-22; Gaiety. To- 
ronto. 24-79. 

Puss Puss— Empire. Toledo. O.. 17-22 : Lyric. 
Dayton. 0„ 24-20. 

Rowland Girls — Omhenm. Pateraon, 17-22 : 
Majestic, Jersey City. N. J., 24-29. 

Rose Sydell's — Star and Garter, Chicago. 17- 
22; Bercbell. Des Moines, la., 23-29: 
Gaiety. Omaha. 81-Oct. 6. 

Step Llvelv — Galetv. Toronto. Ont.. 17-22-: 
Gaiety. Buffalo. N. Y.. 24-29. 

Star and Garter — Gaiety. Montreal. Can., 17- 
22: Empire. Albany. N. Y.. 24-29. 

Sporting Widows — Hurtle ft Seamons. New 
York. 17-22: Empire. Brooklyn. 24-20. 

Social Maids — Jacnues, Watcrborv. Conn., 
17-22: Cohen's. Newbnrgb, 24-26; Cohen's, 
l'onvhkeepste. 27-29. 

Sleht Seem — Star. Cleveland. O., 17-22; Em- 
pire.- Toledo. 0_ 24-20. 

Sara Sldmnn — Palace. Baltimore. 17-22: 
Gaiety. Washington. D. C. 24-29. 

Spiegel's Revue — Casino. Boston. 17-22 ; 
Grand. Hartford. Ct, 24-29. 

Some Show — Corinthian. Rochester. N. Y„ 
17-22 : Bastable. Syracuse. 24-26 : Lum- 
bers. UHea. 27-29. 

Twentieth Century Maids — Olympic. Cincin- 
nati. 17-22: Colombia. Chicago. 24-20. 

Watson's Beef Trust — Gaiety. Kansas City. 
Mo.. 17-22: Gaiety, St Louis. 24-29. 

AMERICAN WHEEL 

American — Howard. Boston, 17-22 ; New 

Bedford. Mass.. 24-26; Worcester, 27-2». 
Army and Navv Girls — Ashtabula, O., 19 ; 

Park. Youngstown, 20-22 : Victoria, Pitts- 
burgh. Pa.. 24-20. 
Aviators — Star. Toronto. Ont. 17-22: Savoy, 

Hnmllton. 24-20. 
Auto Girls — Open, 17-22: Lyceum. Columbus, 

24-20 : Grand. Akron. O.. 24-20. 
Brnadwav Belles — Galetv. Baltimore. 17-22 : 

Trocadero. Phlla.. 24-29. 
Blf. Blng. Bang — Gaiety. Minneapolis. 17-22 : 

Star. St Paul. Minn.. 24-29. 
Cabaret Girls — Penn Circuit, 17-22: Grand, 

Trenton. N. J.. 24-29. 
Charming Widows — Grand. Akron. O.. 20-22: 

Empire. Cleveland. 24-29. 
Darlings of Paris — Oswego. 19: Niagara 

Falls, 20-22: Garden. Buffalo. 24-29. 
Follies of Pleasure — Victoria. Plttshurgh, 

17-22: Penn Circuit. 24-29. 
Forty Thieves — Century. Kansas City. 17-22: 

Standard. 8t Lonls, 24-29.' 
French Frolics — Grand. Trenton, N. J.. 20- 

22 : Galetv. Baltimore. 24-29. 
Grown Up Babies — '"adlllac. Detroit 17-22: 

Gayety. Chleaco. 24-20. 
Girls from Follies — Olympic, New York. 17- 

22: Gavetv. Philadelphia. 24-29. 
Girls from Jovland — vtolvokp, Ma«s.. 17-10: 

SnrlnHleld. *0-°2 : Howard. Boston. 24-20. 
Hello Girls— Empire. Cleveland. 17-22 : Park. 

Erie. 24-25: »«htabnla. O.. 26: Park. 

Vouneatown. 27-20. 
Innocent Maids — Empire. Hoboken. N. J„ 17- 

">2: Star. Brooklvn. 24-*9. 
JoTiv Glris — Englewood, Cblcac". 17-22 : En- 

nlre. Chlcaen. 24-20. 
Lid Lifters — Savor. Hamilton. Ont. 17-22: 

Cadillac. Detroit 24-20. 
Lady Buccaneers — Star. Ft. Paul. Minn.. 17- 

?2: layoff, 24-29: Century. Kansas City. 

31-Oct. 6. 
Mischief Makers — F«»ton. tf*-19: Wl'kesharre. 

?0-22: Emn!re. Wnboken. N. J.. 24-29. 
Mllltarv Maids — <~-"ier» Milwaukee. 17-22: 

Galetv. Minneapolis! 24-29. 
Monte Carlo Olrls — Trnoadero. Philadelphia. 

17-23: South RXMebem. 24: East on. 25: 

Wllkesnarre. 26-20. 

(Comtmmed on pagr 35.1 



26 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



SAM HARRIS CO. 



"His Night Out" 



Working 



In Vaudeville 



NICK VERGA 

The Young Caruso 



I» VanoWl. 



Direction JACK LEWD 



AMINA 

The Spanish Violinist 

Solid Playing Loew Tim* MmMi«mtnl F. Waldcn Thank You! 



HOOPER & BURKHART 



Vl/aC 1 

ftev Act a— "At tfce Fax Chaee," br M> r. Mulrraw (Folly CopyrUhtad) 
Direction IRVING COOPER 



FRANK E. 



JANE 



llio-t-t a "clVI 



N a d a Ke s e r 

The Belgian Nightingale 

Marine th. Loew Circuit Direction Tom loam 




HARRY WEBER 



FLYING MISSILE EXPERTS 
AND BOOMERANG THROWIRS 

Booked Solid 
U. B. O— BJG TIME 



A Mirthful Pair in a Comedy Skit 
By LEA D. FREEMAN. IN VAUDEVILLE 



BOBBY HENSHAW 

The Human Ukulele 
A REAL NOVELTY BOOKED SOLID Dir., HARRY SHEA 



AERIAL BARTLETTS 

LIGHTNING GYMNAST BOOKED SOLID 

18 MINUTES OF MERRIMENT ' 

PELTIER and VALERIO 

DIRECTION ABE THALHEIMER, PUTNAM BLDO. 

TASMANIAN TRIO 

Verutiln Entertainers anal Arabian Tumbler. 

IRENE LATOUR and ZAZA 

Direction Jaa J. Armstrong In Vaudeville 

IN/1 IN/1 A 

NOVELTY EQUILIBRISTS IN VAUDEVILLE 

— WINTER & HANLEY -«. 

In "ON THE CORNER'* Singm*. Talking, P MataR 

al SHAW & LEE sam 

In Naval Eccentric iliai fa Vaadormlo 

— ~ JESSON & JESSON ■.«— 

VAUDEVILLE MARK LEVY 



™«* FRANCETTI SISTERS ™»* 

Play in, Loew ana Fox Tim. . Booked by Ma n ae l and Rene 

WALTER ~ SOR1A 

MANTHEY*BARABAN 

M t- wh&to Aw-r th. Tn» at vAW-wtLt-E 

REFINED COMEDY 
NOVELTY OFFERING 

. Direction Coma. Fitxpetriok 



THE HENNINGS 



EARL M. PINGREE & CO. 



U "MISS THANKS01V1NG- 



Irene 

Of Original Carbrey Broabare, 



Douglas 

Diractio a. Irvine M. Cooper 



BRUCE and FORSTER 



A NOVELTY IN ONE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



lew CARLE A INEZ dolly 

Something in One. Oat of the Ordinary. Dir. Sana Baarwita. 

BONIGER AND LESTER 

In vaudeville Come dy, Singing and Violin 

The "Nut" Magician 

IN VAUDEVILLE 

MIMIIR N.V.A. 



"SYLVESTER" 



MAUDE IDUNN "SLIVY- 

Lady Ankara — Qnaon Bonypart. Direction Mark Lav*. 



LOUISE MAYO 

IN VAUDEVILLE 



KENNETH GRATTAN & CO. 

In THE END OF A PERFECT DAY" - ... IN VAUDEVILLE 



IN STUDIES OF LIFE 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



TANEAN BROS. 



PLAYING U B O TIME 

September 17-18-19 OrpLenm, Altoona, Pa. 

September 20-21-22 Majeatie, Harriikurr, Pa. 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



27 



r$>r 



VAUDEVILLE REVIEWS 

(Continued {mm P««e* 7 and 1) 'J < 



HAMILTON 

(Lart Half) 

When Dan Simmons laid out the bill 
for this show, he must have had consid- 
eration for the stage hands, as four acts 
used the grand piano, three actually and 
one as a prop. 

The opening turn, the Three Twins, a 
novelty musical and singing act, is re- 
viewed under New Acts. 

In the second spot were Davenport and 
Rafferty, who presented a comedy skit 
entitled "Hitched," which is rather amus- 
ing and would be more entertaining if lit- 
tle suggestive bits were eliminated, espe- 
cially the one about the girl who poses in 
the_ "altogether." The woman might be 
a little more careful in her enunciation 
when singing, as her voice has a nasal 
twang and it is often quite hard for tfce 
audience to understand the words. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sydney Payne offered 
their comedy dramatic playlet, "The 
Drudge." This is one of the average three- 
a-day sketches that are a necessity on 
bills in these houses and can hardly be 
construed as more than an adjunct to a 
bill, especially with the poor work of 
Payne. 

William Dorian has a new accompanist 
at the piano and she proves to be mora 
in line with his style of work than waa 
her predecessor. The girl is rather young 
and inexperienced, as far as stage pres- 
ence is concerned, but her playing more 
than makes up for thia deficiency. Dorian, 
using the same numbers as in his previ- 
ous offering, stopped the show Thursday 
night with his rendition of Tosti's "Good- 
bye." 

Lew Pielson and Jack Goldie, reunited 
after a year, are presenting their old skit, 
"After the Dog Show." The act is still 
the same hit that it always was and 
should prove an acceptable one for the 
next to closing, spot. Six Imps and a 
Girl, the spectacular dancing and acro- 
batic tumbling turn, Hrlfte a good impres- 
sion in the closing spoTT A. V. 

HARLEM OPERA HOUSE 

(Last Half) 

Lamb and Morton, in their acrobatic 
novelty, opened the show. Their turn is 
presented in a rather unique way and the 
various feats are well performed, giving 
the show a good start. 

Northlanc and Ward found the going 
rather slow in the second spot and did not 
discover the audience until they went into 
the dancing part of their act. Some of 
the gags in the turn are a trifle far- 
fetched, the one about "Can't you see a 
joke?" having been used by more acts 
than this reviewer would care to count. 

Roger Gray and Company are presenting 
a New Act, which will be reviewed ac- 
cordingly. 

Goettler and Cox have a good introduc- 
tion to their act, after which they enter- 
tain the audience with a review of the 
song compositions they have written in 
the past. The boys have considerable 
personality and put over their songs well. 
They deserved a better reception than 
they received at Thursday's matinee. 

The act of Princess White-Deer and 
Company has been considerably improved 
since last seen by this reviewer. There is 
now more of an Indian and less of an 
Hawaiian atmosphere to the offering, much" 
to its advantage. The guitar has been 
discarded for the tom-tom and the dancing 
and atmosphere seemed more typically 
Indian than when presented at the Fifth 
Avenue Theatre several weeks ago. The 
recitation about America, rendered by 
Oskimon, went over very effectively, and 
the Princess' dancing stood out as a fea- 
ture of the act. The setting of the act is 
very attractive, being deserving of special 
mention. 

Goldsmith and Lewis closed the show 
with some talk and instrumental special- 
ties that just about got by. The "Sousa- 
linsky" specialty was well received. But, 
at best, this is a very weak act with which 
to close a show. H. G. 



WARWICK 

(Last Half) 

Whether or not it is because of the man- 
agement here giving its patrons five acts in- 
stead of four, as heretofore, the fact re- 
mains that there is an appreciable increase 
in attendance. Business last week was 
near the capacity mark every night. 

The bill for the last half was well liked. 
Gordon and Gordon, in number one position, 
started the bill with a big hit. They 
opened with a song and went into an ec- 
centric dance. Following thia, they In- 
dulged in a little comedy patter and finally 
settled down to tumbling and contortion. 
These boys are versatile. They sing well, 
dance with the best of them, are cracker- 
jack tumblers, and do some of the most 
remarkable feats of contortion ever shown 
in vaudeville. They are equally clever in 
all their work and are deserving of all the 
approval accorded them. 

Hunter, Chick and Hunter, a trio of 
singers and comedy talkers, in cowboy cos- 
tome, won applause for their work. They 
sang four songs. 

Bertha Snow and company, three women 
and a man, presented a sketch which has 
to do with an interrupted wedding. The 
several players do fairly good work, but 
the sketch never rises- above mediocrity. 

Leonore Simonson was well applauded 
for her singing and sang five numbers, in- 
cluding an encore. 

The Five Boys in Blue, a quintette of 
veterans, appeared on foil stage, the scene 
showing a soldiers' encampment. They 
play the old tunes that were popular with 
the boys of '61, and while, as their spokes- 
man said, they lay no claim to being 
musicians, they succeed in pleasing. A 
drum, a cornet and three violins are the 
instruments played. E. W. 



PROCTOR'S 125th ST. 

(Last Half) 

A rather well balanced bill started 
slowly with Bartello and Company. Bar- 
tello works along the standard lines of 
strong man turns. The assistant In the 
act is supposed to furnish the comedy, 
but gains laughs, which are few and far 
between. 

The New York Comedy Four, with noth- 
ing new to offer in comedy quartette work, 
were in the second spot, and will be more 
fully reviewed under New Acts. 

Maud Durand and Company presented a 
playlet which will be reviewed under New 
Acts. 

Up to this point the show had been pro- 
gressing slowly, but Dorothy, in the next 
spot, managed to liven things up and pre- 
sented a very acceptable accordeon act 
that was well received. She makes a 
very pretty stage appearance and puts her 
stuff over nicely. 

The Nine Little Rubens has a roster of 
ten persons. The act, a "kid" turn, is the 
kind that makes an appeal and the audi- 
ence liked the offering on Thursday night. 
The girl should sing her song without an- 
nouncing that she is giving an impersona- 
tion of Frances White, because the rendi- 
tion no more resembles Frances White 
than it does Eva Tanguay. The girl's 
voice is different, her manner of walking 
is different, her style of hair dress is dif- 
ferent and her delivery is different. The 
only point in common is that she sings 
the same song that Frances White made 
popular. Otherwise, the act is very ac- 
ceptable. 

The honors of the bill went to Haw- 
thorne and Anthony, a straight and an 
Italian, who have a brilliant line of pat- 
ter which easily gains laughs. 

The Three Misses Stewarts are present- 
ing a novelty in dancing acts and deserve 
credit for the originality of their offer- 
ing. All of their dance offerings are 
unique, and the posing dance is particu- 
larly original and well done. These girls 
are slated for the big time boards. 

H. G. ' 




New Victoria Hotel 

rN NEW YORK AT broadway and 

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145 to 155 West 47th Street 

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Every Modern Caav—lanra 



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Suite, parlor, I aoitrooiai aad bath B and ap 

The Best 50c. Dinner in New York 

C. A. HOLUNGSWORTH New York City 




CONVENIENT FOR THEATRICAL FOLK 

THE ANICO 

1696 Broadway— Corner 53rd Street 

Phone 1114 Circle 

2, 3, 5 ROOM FURNISHED APARTMENTS 

Complete for Housekeeping. All Large, Light Rooms 

All Night Elevator and Telephone Service 

LOW SUMMER RATES TO THE PROFESSION 

Apply Superintendent 



W. S. CLEVELAND 

WANTS BIG VODEVIL AGT8 



Suite 208, Ordway Bid*., 207 Market St., NEWARK, N. J. 



Phone, 65 Market 



ALLIANCE HOTEL 



— 258 West 44th St 
AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLAN. 

moTi.il people will finti here high class i 



re-ct. New York City 

45 Scrorcis from Broadway. Prof* 
Accommodations ant! service at reason. ill 
Tel. Bryant 60C.8, 



ST. REGIS RESTAURANT 

165 WEST 47th STREET, NEW YORK 

(OPPOSITE PALACE STAGE DOOa) 



1 



PLAYS 



FOR STOCK. REPERTOIRE, AMATEUR COMPANIES 

LARGEST ASSORTMENT IN THE WORLD. Book, for boa* 



Worka. 



Cetaloatu 
SAMUEL, 



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Drops and Curtains $12.50 

Painted to order, aor atze op to 14 by 80 ft., la 
either Diamond Dye, Oil or Water color.. All 
kind, of SCEN ERY at lowest price.. SC TT r TT . I . 
SCENIC STUDIO, Colombo., Ohio. 



WIGS 



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•a. OW. i ln <r ales'. Urea Wlc 
.1.00. 11.50: NCtTe. sit. ■«,., 
TJt : ntktk, tor. laataat aWteval 
Gataiaj fm. tag Belt. Bjjg 
Ifcm ltl ta. Fraoa. Dimt HTO-. 
M Coepar U.. R. T. 



28 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, .1917 



B.F. Keith's Qrenit of Theatres 

A. fAUL KEITH. Pruls-t. . C. V. ALBBB. Vfc»-Pr«. * C— . Ii«r. 

UNITED BOOKING 



YOU CAN BOOK DHUBCT BY 
ADDRESSING S. K. HODODON, 

•f fee IfflRD 



B. F. KmbVs Palace Tlacatre Bwridir* 



NKW Y«HK CITY 



FRANK WOIF VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 



303 Parkway Building 



Philadelphia 



WIRE, WRITE OR CALL 

Telephone, LOCUST 4387 



DOLLY &CALAME 

Nifty Little Pair 

In Songs and Dane* Direction Bessie Royal Always Working 



EDITH HOCKEKSON 



ELEONORE KOBUSCH 



FIVE MELODY MAIDS 



EVA BASCH 



BESSIE PECK 
N.V.A. 



FRANCES FISKE 



ELSIE GEO. 

HARVEY *N» ASHTON 



Crazy Movements 



Direction Lew Leslie 



LAIDLAW 



In Vaudeville 



Direction HUGHES and SMITH 



PERO and WILSON 

EUROPEAN NOVELTY ACT 

Joggling, Barrel Spinning and Jumping Playing Loew Circuit 



The Terpsichorean Artists Supreme 

STAFFORD $ IVY 

In Various Modes of Classical Dancing. Direction Sol linger. 



THE 



2-WHITE STEPPERS— 2 



LOkCW CIRCUIT 



DIKECTION, CHAS. FTTZPATRICK 



JTM 



BLANCHE 



Mclaughlin & evans 



"Courtship on the Bowery" 

Comedy, Singing, Talking and Dancing in Vanderille. 



N. V. A. 



;jiL 



^T^ 



WILLIAM fOX CIRCUIT 

OF THEATRES 
WILLIAM FOX, President 

Executive Offices, 130 West 46th St., New York 
JACK W. LOEB 

General Booking Manager 

EDGAR ALLEN 

Manager 
Personal interviews with artists from 12 to 6, or by appointment 



JOE 



COOPER & LACEY 



Singing and Dancing 



In Vaudeville 



Gallarini Sisters 

IN MUSIC 

Direction PAT CASEY and WM. MORRIS 



WILLIAM WAHLE 

MANAGER, OLYMPIC THEATRE, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



HELEN MORETTI 

in a Novelty Singing Specialty' 

Now on Loew Circuit Direction — Mandril &. Rose 



MARY DONOGHUE 

Sparkling (Single) Songstress 
Playing Loew Circuit — Thanks to Mandel and Rose 



E». F. REYNARD Presents 



BIANCA 

la a Series ef Draaaattc 



Ml IF BIANCA 
ED. F. 



REYNARD 

aa -BIFOU IMS COURT.- 



Minnie <" Bud "> Harrison 

'The Girl From Dixie" 

Direction Rose A. Curtis In Vaudeville Mgr. Max Window 



FREDERICKS SIMS 



IN SONGLAND 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



« ROBB - ROBERTSON tt 



In Their Original Offering, "Back to Schooldays" 

Direction of Thalhenner at Sofransld 



In VaaderUe 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



29 





avoid mistake, and to bum til* prompt da Uv ary of tha lattar* MFFOrtSMd 
POSTAL CARD moat be Mat rmil»**ts»« oa to forward you- lattar. It muat 
rour full umi and tha addras* to which th* lattar la to b* Wat, and tha 
fajlowad by to* tender should ba uj*niKauiu. 

tha data (or nmnbar) of tha CLIPPER as which tha lattar* Beat far 



GENTLEMEN 



. lldurf 

srl*™* Jean 



Pl.lr SwJfcrwy 

Bectcm. Harry 
.gr im . WOZnf 
lean. Jack W. 
Bailer. Ed. 

Beatile. Aubrey 
Bromley, Bra 
Barker. Eany L. 
BrakbarrS, W. C 
Bnkata, Qa. 



Btaroda. 
Dorothy 
Bine/. atn. Ed 

Bennett. VletOrlA 
Bennett, Miss 

Ml lie 
Brown , Marti* 
Bravo Jceenhlne 
CaasbtlL Dot 
MS. LOU 



Baisrd. Vletor B. 
Bertrand. Frank 
BlUlnrj, J. J. 



Conlbear 4 ) 
Coronets. Henry 
Cnrtli. Wo. 
Drooft. Robert 
FowIm. Joan H. 
Plyn, Jos 
Farntn, Ted 
OrtfBn. Qua. W. 
Grelorr. P. 8. 



J. P. 
Clifton. Kit. 
Dean!*, FetaT 
Donovan. Facade 

Dsnlels. Ham) 
Fndertrta. 
MadeHse 
Gwionup, Hssel 
GerUeh. Helen 
Hiram. Alia 



Granleaf. Bar 
Greares, W. B. 
Hawthorne. BUly 
Hurtle. John W. 
Holmes. W. 
Hedje 



Irwin. M 



Leonard. Seta* 
Lard. Jack 
Leroy, W. 
Lestro 
Lea. Hark 
Mathews. Al 
Martin. J. ?. 
Muni, Peter 
Mario**, I. 



Slat Tboa MeBhaney. *. J. 

Kofaler. Wild* P. Marshall. Jack 
Leahy, Cbo. Metes*. Ed 



Hone*. Dorothy 

Hanson. Leon* 
Ulna, Mr*, 

Palmer 
Irwin. THUe 
Jones, Baa 
Johnson, Flor- 

Jnnmn, Gene- 



. Mary 
Lyon. Trade 
MenCm, Mr*. 

Ralph 
Monroe. Beulsh 
Hannan. Lotus* 
Murry. Eran- 

celiue 
Martin, Hold* 
Murphy, Ague* 



Montgomery, N. 

B. 
Newhart, Cos*. 

E. 
Pollock. & M. 
Plunaett. Cr. 
Power. H. H. 
Blehard. Harry 
Botelrlrh. Jack 
■eon*]*, Harry 
Infers, wm 
Rlekteeker. P. K. 
Kepler, Joan 



Mlnton. Mar- 
garet 

Manning, Hallle 
Narratil. Mlaa 

Potter. Edith 
Qulnn, T.nii p 
Robs. Jennie 
Bae. Ida w. 
Robinson, Minnie 



Rafferty, Patrick 
Smith, P. a 
She*. J. W. 
Terrm, Frank 
Vaai, V. T. 
WonThen*. 



fTUaoo. Saa B. 

WUon, Hat 
Wlliard. Harry 



Bostelle, Maria 
Rtterl, ManeUe 
Bobtason, Ella 
SHrer. Erelrn 
Tnrner, Charlotte 
Worth, Mafflyn 
West. Helen 
Weston. Irma 



WINS FIGHT FOR ESTATE 

Gertrude Reynolds, who, prior to her 
marriage to the late James Pollack Mc- 
Quaide, was a well-known actress, has 
won the fight for his estate. She is to 
receive his entire English property and 
orje-half of the income from his National 
Conduit and Cable Co. stock. She is also 
the executrix of his will, and has been off 
the stage several years. 



HOPKINS GETS MRS. FISKE 

The plans made for the reappearance' of 
Minnie Maddern Fiske, under the man- 
agement of Klaw add Erlanger and Geo. 
C. Tyler have been abandoned. Instead, 
Mrs. Fiske will appear in a hew comedy 
by Philip Mueller, under the management 
of Arthur Hopkins. The piece is built 
around incidents in the lire "of George 
Sand, the novelist. 




Agnes Gildea, John Webster, Fanchon 
Campbell, Helen Hayes and George Allison 
for the western "Pollyanna" company. 

Vivienne Segal and Albertina Marlowe 
by Dillingham and Ziegfeld for the Century 
Theatre revue. V" 



Lillian Parrish by Dillingham and Zieg- 
feld for the Century Theatre revue. 



Emmet Corrigan and Pauline Lord by 
H. H. Frazee for "The Slacker." 



Henry E. Dixey by Elliott, Comstock 
and Gest for "Chu Chin Chow." 



Fred Niblo, Violet Hemming and Hilda 
Spong by Klaw and Erlanger for "Under 
Pressure." 



Joe Cook and Jack McClallen by Edward 
B. Perkins for the "Red Clock." 



Gordon, Ray and William Dooley by 
Hitchcock and Goetz for a new musical 

revue. 



Vivian and Dagmar Oakland by the 
Shuberts for "Oh! Justine!" 



Florence Martin by Ralph Hertz to re- 
place Louise Kelly in "Good Night, Paul." 



Anita Elson by the Palais Royal man- 
agement for its new revue. 



Harry Kelly by Dillingham and Ziegfeld 
for the Century revue. 



Alethea Luce and David Higgins by 
Edw. L. George for "The Family Exit." 



Diana Allen by Dillingham and Ziegfeld 
for the Century revue. 



T. Roy Barnes by the Shuberts for the 
leading comedy role in "Oh ! Justine !" 



Herman Timberg for the new Winter 
Garden Show. 



Helen Haynes by Klaw and Erlanger 
and George C. Tyler for "Pollyanna." 



Dolores Cassinelli by Madison Corey for 
the title role in The Grass Widow." 



Edith Day by Ralph Hertz for "Good 
Night, Paul." 

Sydney Jarvis by Joseph Weber for "Her 
Regiment" 



DEATHS OF THE WEEK 



WILLIAM REICHMAN, an actor, com- 
mitted suicide by inhaling gas In a room- . 
lng bouse on West Fifty-fifth St. last week. 
Be was despondent because he could not 
secure an engagement 

LEW WATERS, In private life Lewi* N. 
Da Larranagra. died last week at his home 
in ClarkavlUe, Ala., after an illness of sev- 
eral months. The deceased, who was sixty- 
three years of age, had made his home in 
Clarksrville for many years, when he and 
Us wife were not playing on the road. He 
had been in the profession since he was a 
young man. His widow survives him. 

HARRY TRANT 8TAFFORD died Sep- 
tember 8 at the home of his parents In New 
Rochelle, N. T., from cancer of 'the throat. 
The deceased was formerly well known on 
the dramatic stage, but had not appeared 
for several years, his last speaking part 
having been In "Wildfire" with Lillian Rus- 
sell For the past few years he wrote mo- 
tion picture scenarios. His widow, profes- 
fesslonally known as Blance Rice, survives 
him. 



EUGENE B. BONNER, dramatic booking 
agent of Chicago, died September 3 at his 
home In that city from cerebral congestion. 
Deceased had been In the booking branch 
of the business for about five years. Prior 
to this time he had played for over fifteen 
years in stock, repertoire and vaudeville. 
For about a year he was associated with 
the American Film Co. as a regular member 
of the stock company. He Is survived by 
his widow. Anna Bantz Bonner profession- 
ally known as Lois Meredith, and two sons. 

WILL L. QREENBAUM, for twenty years 
the best known concert Impresario In Cali- 
fornia, died In San Francisco September 4 
at the home of his sister, Mrs. A. Rosen- 
berg, 3222 Jackson St. Greenbaum was 
born in Sacramento, Cal. Among the latest 
of Greenbaum's musical offerings to San 
Francisco was the triple attraction of 
Walter Damrosch and the New Tork Sym- 
phony Orchestra, with Fritz Krelsler and 
Ef rem Zlmballst all on the same bllL Green- 
baum was unmarried. He leaves three 
sisters. 




SALES SCHEME 
OPERATORS 

CARNIVALS, FAIRS 

PREMIUM USERS 
ADVERTISERS 

Booit'Vour Businaaa 
with Our 

PHOTO-HANDLE KNIVES 

with •Tar-Van-' Steel Blade* 

OUR NEW No. 15 

ASSORTMENT IS A 

WINNER 

Knives furolsbed on Board* for 
Sales Scheme Operator*. Indi- 
vidual Names in Handle* for 

Premium Users. Photo* or jour 
Goods, your Ad., etc., for Adrer- 
1 1 sera. 

Write today for Special Prlcca. 
State bow yon wSat. to use them. 

Agents wanted to take Indi- 
vidual orders wltn name, emblems 
and personal photon. Also other 
Cutlery Specialties. 

The Canton Cutlery Co. 

D.pt.425 CANTON, OHIO 



PHILADELPHIA 

via New Jersey Central 

EVERY HOUR ON THE HOUR 

From Liberty St., 7 A. M. to II F. M. 

and «t Midnight with Slaapara 

It MINUTES OP THE HOUR 

From W. 2Sd St. 

YOUR WATCH IS YOUR TIME TABLE 

Consult P. W. HEROY, E, P., Agent 
Its* BROADWAY. NEW YORK. 



"The Theatrical 
Route" 

Comfortable steamers leave New 
York, Pier 32, N. R., foot Canal 
St. 6.00 P.M., West 132d St 6 JO 
P.M. daily, including Sunday; alto 
Sunday rooming at 9.30 for Al- 
bany, Troy and the North. 

Save money 
Travel in comfort 

HUDSON NAVIGATION COMPANY 




S. F. KEITH'S 

PALACE 

Broadway A 4Tth St. 

Mat. Delly at 2 P. M. 

28. SO and T5c. 

Every Nlfbt 

2S-an-T.t-n-t1.SO. 



JOAN SAWYER, BEE- 
NABD GRANVUCE, PIC- 
TURES OF RETEEAT OF 
THE GERMANS AT BAT- 
TLE OF ABBA8, LU- 
CILLE CAVANAGH, WEL- 
LINGTON CROSS, Mont- 
gomery & Perry, Harriet 
Hemplo A Co., other*. 



ELTINGE 



■West 42nd St., Ewe*. 
8. SO, Matinees Wed. A 
Bat. at S.tt. 
A. H. WOODS presents 

BUSINESS BEFtRE PLEASURE 

A new comedy by Maatasra* Glass aad Julu 

Eekert Ooodmaa. with BAJUJEY BrTBMABD 

and ALEXANDER CAKE. 

LYCEUM g^% y .. w - t ** 

Ere*. 8.1S, Mats Thura. i Bat. at 2.15. 

First presentation her* ef * modern seoietr 

a*m*dy entitled 

THE LASSO 

By VICTOR RAPES. Ce-Autnor of "Tha 
Boomeranf." 

^SSS^*..' The»tre. B'way A •Sri St. 

wTfllHAiV] Phone Bryant 892. »y». at 8.13. 
*'V»*''"»>rw. nut,. W( .,j. apfj g,^ j_ U- 

7. FHSD ZnrMT.BM»T present* 

This way out 

A Ht comedy by FRANK CRAVEN. 



»» 



'CHEER UP 

AT THE 



•'QtEATEST 

tt wr gta 

EVEB KNOWN" 



a. H. BTJE.N8IDE 



ll M remanent 

rrnnus 

DILLINGHAM 



MATINEE 

HIPPODROME 

Seat* 6 Weecs Akaea 



Wf*t -Mth St. Evening* at 

8.30, Uatin*** Thanday and 
Saturday it 2.30. 



BELASCO 

SAVED BKLABOO PTaaeata 

POLLY WITH A PAST 

A Comedy by Georr*. Mlddletan aad Guy Bolioa. 



Pmj|I>lDl? B™Uway A 40th St.. wee*. 
■LlwlR UUl 8.1S, Man. Wed. it Sat. 1.1*. 

CEAJtLES raOHHAK Pres.aU 

Julia Sanderson Joseph Cawtkern 

In the New Musical Ceaseay 

RAMBLER ROSE 

fZ AI1TTV Broadway A lata St. I.M. 
UAlJjl I S.1S. M*t*. Wed. A. Sat. 3.M. 
Direction Xlkw * Erlaaejsr. Gee. 0. Tyl**. 

THE COUNTRY COUSIN 

By Booth Tarkiacton * 7uUaa Street, with 

ArKTArTDBA c*»r.Tsrr.w. 

DfPiinifr WMt 43 * d st - ■»•». »-«. 

nErUDLIl, Mat*. Wad. At tat. *t 2.2t. 

Messrs. 8han*rt *r***nt 
JOHN BARRYMORE CONSTANCE COLLIER 

LIONEL BARRYMORE 

In tha Bramatie Tries. jk 

PETER 1BBETSON 

flTTaflCArVJ w - u * 8t - ■*" Braaaway. 

MlJlJiMJIN ErraJ^s st 8.H. Matlrseee 

Wedneaday ft Satanrtay 2.15. 
Ralph Hen offers a faro* with mule 

"GOOD NIGHT PAUL" 

With Visas* L«Jer. EU»b«th Xasxay. Amim? 

Mapia, Buxrstl B&rbaxetto, ZeOTiis* Kell-y, Xtsjph 
Hcrm. 

FULTON ZjnVSbSP ™ 

Henry B. Harris Estate, Mars. 



MR. WALKE1 WHITESIDE 1 
In THE PAWN 

INICKERBOCIER $X?££V£F8£* 

K3r,w A ErlaHefsr MinAtrn 

GEORGE ARLISS 

In a new play 

By Uary P. Hamlin 
and George Arils*. 



HAMILTON 



30 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



MOLLIE WILLIAMS GREATEST SHOW 



•:-»»>X'<~:K~>X"XK~>-:-<K><~>':'»fr<HC»«><»><~8~; t e»»>o>o>>ioo>oi»o>flia>flitioo i> ti»o>08toi 



<~>x-:«<-:-:-:~:~:-:~x-:-<-:-:-w~> 



l _ _ „ 



A REVELATION IN BURLESQUE 

MATT KOLB 

Principal Featured Comedian and P: oducer 
"DARLINGS OF PARIS" AMERICAN WHEEL 



ALTIE MASON 

HUGHY BERNARD'S AMERICANS 



PRIMA DONNA 



PERCIE JUDAH 

American Beauty of Burlesque Prima Donna. "Soma Babies" Still Leading as Usual 



BOB R A O I-f 1? O C ZAIDA 

ProJuc~ u a MJ IM. I\ II Mil MM. lJ prima 



DONNA 



BILLIE DAVIES 



PRIMA DONNA 



INNOCENT MAIDS 



Clad to b» featured with the creetset anew on tha American Burlesque Circuit, SIM WILLIAMS' 

Girls from Joyland, featured a* 



»- 



99 



illy Gilbert 



SIM WILLIAMS' "GIRLS FROM JOYLAND" 



JIM PEARL 

Eccentric Coaaaauam anal Dancer. Doing Irish in Army and NaTy Girls. 



KITTIE GLASCO 

Infan.ua af "HeBe America" 

DoIBe CLIFFORD and GALLAGHER Daisy 



Saedalty 



Witk Wataoa's Oriental* 



NEW TO BURLESQUE 



PRIMA DONNA, GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES 



DAINTY BONNIE LLOYD 

SOU1RETTE— GIRLS FROM THE FOLLIES Direction, ROEHM at RICHARDS 



BEAU BRUMMEL 



WITH SPORTING WIDOWS 



COMEDIAN 




SPORTING 
WIDOWS 



SAIVUVTV EVANS 

Hebrew Slide and Laugh With Aviators 



MAE EARLE 

Ragtime Whistling Jim Girl With Chas. Taylor*. "Darlings af Paris" 



HERMAN GIBSON 



Leafing Bowerys to better my condition. 



Big Surprise Next Season 



STRAIGHT 

MAN 

DE LUXE 



THAT 
TALL 
FELLOW 



Max Spiegel's Social Follies 



BEULAH KENNEDY 

SOUBRETTE SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 

DAN DEIHL 

DOC. QUICLEVS COUSIN 
THE RICHARD CARLE OF BURLESQUE Sim Williams' Girls From Joyland 

VIVIEN SOMERVILLE 

INGENUE HUGHY BERNARD'S AMERICANS 

IDA NICOLAI 



CHARACTERS 



SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 



BON 



IRENE CHESLEIGH 



DORIS CLAIRE 

' SOUBRETTE, WATSON'S ORIENTALS. 

MAE DIX 

SOUBRETTE WITH BILLY WATSON'S BURLESQUE WONDER SHOW 

TEDDY RUSSELL 

The Only Woman Producer in B ariesqu a Manaxamaa t Streaaa and Franklm 

PRIMROSE SEMON 



Tha American Girl 



Featured with "Hallo America" 



Maud 



Ina 



With Hurtig aV Saamon's "Hallo America'' 



Prima Donna 



"Darlings of Paris" 



CHAS 



AND 



RUTH 



JUVENILE SOME SOUBRETTE 

. . WITH FRED IRWIN'S MAJESTICS 



VERA RANSDALE 

Jack Singer's Versatile "Find" from the Coast With Broadway Frolics 



September 19, 1917 • 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



31 



HARRY HASTINGS' 
PUTS OVER A 

SMASHING HIT 

Harry Hastings' "Big Show," featuring 
Pan Coleman, offered no end of amuse- 
ment at the Columbia Monday afternoon. 

The show is about the best Mr. Hast- 
ings has ever given the public, and shows 
Coleman at his best. It has plenty of 
comedy, lots of pretty girls, and is a beau- 
tifully costumed production. The scenery 
is bright and well designed, the seventh 
scene in the first part standing out par- 
ticularly. 

The numbers are very, striking. Several 
sets of costumes are of a novel order, 
making them unique and praiseworthy. 

The offering is in two acts, seven scenes 
in the first and two in the burlesque. The 
book is called "MeNally's Flirtations," and 
tells a story of MeNally's (Coleman) 



BURLESQUE NEWS 

(Continued from Pace IS «nd on P»»o 33) 



numerous flirtations with various women. 

Coleman, a real "tad," with an East 
Boston brogue, gives an interpretation of 
the Celt in a most creditable and amusing 
way. In the burlesque, he changes to a 
female role, still sticking to his Irish 
character. 

Phil Peters, who does an eccentric 
"Dutch," is a good foil for Coleman, and 
his quiet manner of working is funny. He 
works np many situations with Cole- 
man. Frank Mallahan, a rather "hefty" 
straight, handles bis part nicely and suc- 
ceeds well with his several numbers. 

Frank O'Neil has a few bits and offers 
a singing specialty. Willie Matthews and 
Joe Dunn have small parts, and Alma 
Bauer, playing a "lead," proves a good 
woman for the part. She is clever and has 



a most pleasing personality. Her specialty 
with Coleman was well rendered. 

Easter Higbee-is the prima donna. She 
was handicapped Monday with & cold, 
which interfered with her singing, yet she 
received several encores with, "Take Me 
Home With You." She is an attractive 
blonde, and wears some pretty costumes. 
Babe Burnette is a lively soubrette, who 
sings decidedly well "Wonderful Girl" and 
"Down South Everybody's Happy," her 
only two numbers, gave her an opportunity 
to -demonstrate her worth. Hazel Lorraine 
is the ingenue. She is pretty and shows 
well in tights. . While her voice is not 
extra strong she excells in other ways. 

Teti offered several operatic selections. 
This young lady has a fine voice, but' was 
a little nervous at Monday's performance. 



MB**. Adel aid e 1 ' In a violra- specialty won 
several encores. Her act is neat and re- 
fined. The Run Way Four were a big hit 
near the close of the show. They offer 
several songs and finish with some good 
acrobatic and tumbling work. The chorus 
is a bright lot of young girls who sing 
and work with a vim. 

The drinking scene by Coleman and Miss 
Lorraine is very funny, while the golf bit 
by Coleman and Peters went. over nicely, 
and tbe sightseeing auto and train bit is 
a decidedly clever piece of business. This 
was done by Coleman, Peters, Mallahan 
and Misses Higbee and Burnette. 

Lots Of fun is created in the school room 
scene. Coleman's work as a "kid" was 
received with satisfaction. 

*'Iu Lilac Time," which Miss Bauer 
leads with tbe chorus, is a pretty number 
and won instant approval. 

Hastings' "Big Show" proved thoroughly 
enjoyable. 



.-:~:_:_:~:~:kk~>-:~:..x~:..;~:~:..x^ 

I STARS OE GURLESQUE J 

WOODS SISTERS 



JAC tj -w r a*-v *r-v »—%* a~i nwn mi iwfc art. olga 



BICKNELL 

The "MODEL BAKER" Dir., HUGHES & SMITH 

SID GOLD 

2n a Season with Ben Welsh. Bigger Hit Than Ever. Vaudeville Next Samson. 

GEO. LEON 

HAIR-LIP COMIC—SEASON IS17-UU WITH FRED IRWIN'S MAJESTICS. FRED IRWIN 

AND SAM LEWIS DID IT. 

FLORENCE ROTHER 



PRIMA DONNA 



MAIDS OF AMERICA 



iGEO. 

Notorious— Sensational 



MARTIN 

With September Morning Gloria* 




GEORGE BROWER 

DOING A NEW STRAIGHT SIM WILLIAMS' GIRLS FROM JOYLAND 

GLADYS SEARS 

FLORENCE TANNER 

The Girl With the Galdsn Votco, With atth Cantary MaMe Direction Boohm ana RJcaeras 

JULIETTE BELMONT 

"Juliette," Gypiy Violinist Ingenue 

Dtoectlan, JACOBS and JERMON «TH CENTURY MAIDS 

CHARLIE N. V. A. QUINN 

ROEHM A RICHARDS ECCENTRIC 

skating DAN MURPHY 

Direct*—. JACOBS end JERMON WITH BURLESQUE REVIEW 

JENNIE ROSS 

Soubrette 

"SMILING" NELLIE WATSON 

Ingenue Soabrette 

WITH DAVE MARION'S OWN SHOW— A REAL SHOW 



BLACK FACE ORIGINAL, Foatnred with "Bert Show in Town" 

to 01S KEMP SISTERS — 

TWO OF THE RECORD BREAKERS WITH JACK REID 1916-17 



With AL REEVES BEAUTY SHOW 



JOE 

MAIDS OF AMERICA 



WESTON— SYMONDS 



ALFARRETTA 
SECOND SEASON 



FRANKI 

INGENUE— SOUBRETTE 



IMI 



SAM S1DMAN SHOW 



-«r 



TINY" DORIS De LORIS 

Mitey Dancer Sim William. "Girl* from Joyland" 

EMMA KOHLER 

The Prima Denaa of Voice, Form and Class 
BON-TONS CO. Season If 17-U 

Well— TOM ROBINSON 

Is back with us once mar*, Dams; IrUK with Girls from tha Follies 

MAE SHERIDAN 



PRIMA DONNA 



Mollie Wulmm.' Own 3 haw 



Teresa V. Adams 

Prima Donna with Hnrtig and Sonmon's "Whirfie CaT— Garb" 

LUCILLE AMES 

Ingenue Sookretta. Gettin« Ale** Nicely With 

JACK REID'S RECORD BREAKERS SEASON OF 1917-1* 



«p rm SP EED — SPEED 



SPORTING WIDOWS 



TEDDY DUaPOISIX 

Tha Girl with Pleasing Peraenaiity with SOCIAL MAIDS. .__ 

GL'ADYS PARKER 

BOSTONIANNUT WITH $1,000,000 DOLLS 

HARRY MAN DEL 

Straight with Millie* Dollar Doll* — 2nd Season Direction Jacob* and Jarmon 

_____ 

SINGER 

HIP-HIP HOORAY GIRLS 



ETHEL RAY 



SOUBRETTE 



CHARLIE NEIL 



DOING IRISH 



AVIATORS 



32 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



"You Can Tell It's Time To Say Good-Bye" 

; By TRACEY, ROTH & B^EUER 

A Whale of <t Novelty Number with. Lots of Extra Verses, Choruses and Catch Lines 

Published by RICHMOND MUSIC PUB. CO., 145 West 45th Street, New York 



EDW. S. KELLER 

PRESENTS 

C ATHERINE M URRAY 

THE SINGING COMEDIENNE 

Now appealing on the Orpheum Tour 

ORPHEUM, LOS ANGELES, THIS WEEK 



"SAN FRANCISCO SPOTLIGHT" 



"Katherine Murroj, billing herself as 'Un- 
cle Sam's Girl/ is at the Orpheum theatre 
tliis week, scoring heavily in her novelty sing- 
ing act with the assistance of Murry Rubens 
at the Piano. One of the daintiest numbers 
that Miss Murray uses is an impression of 

Frances White singing 'I'd Love to Be a 
Monkey in the Zoo.' from the 'Hitchy Koo' 



show. Miss Murray uses this to close her act 
and responds to numerous encores. 

"At the piano Mr. Rubens features as a, 
selection a medley arrangement of 'Poor But- 
terfly/ and without exception it is the most 
finished rendition of the song witnessed at 
the local Orpheum this season.' 9 



Personal Direction, EDGAR ALLEN 



ROSE & CURTIS 

EASTERN RETT. 



BEEHLER & JACOBS 

WESTERN REPT. 



JOHN GEIGER and His Talking Violin 



BOOKED SOLID 



TOM 



NAOA 



KAY & BELLE 



A Vaudeville Confection 



WILSON & WHITMAN 

In Classy Songs and Pianologue 
Direction, MARK LEVY 



JACK MARLEY 

wi{cn He will play B. F. KEITH'S PALACE THEATRE for $200 a w«k 
mileis he breaks the record (or attendance at this theatre for the past tweniy 
Tears. If he docs, bit salary will be $3,500 weekly thereafter. If be doss Dot, 
he will tw satisfied with $200. Direction, SAM KENNEY. 



IRVING 



BILLY 



SELIG & NORMAN 

Two Versatile Entertainers in Patter and Song Direction Man del & Rose 



EDNA DREON 

BAND-BOX GIRL Dainty Song— Story— Oddity N. V. A. 



/ 






TCNNEY 



A live wire vaudeville writer. "Plant" a Tenney Act, and you'll 
"raise" a route. He can give you the seeds to success. Write, call, 
'phone, or wire: if you want an act, act now. 

ALLEN SPENCER TENNEY, 1493 Broadway, New York City 



THAT WHISTLING GIRL 



HENRY E. DIXEY JR. 



IN "THE SURGEON" 



IN VAUDEVILLE 



GERTRUDE ROSALIE 

TWO DOLCE SISTERS 

Somewhere cm Saarland 

MILLER, PACKER & SELZ 



THREE GROUCH KILLERS 



Direction MARK LEVY 



Mr. 



Mia 



BERT and LOTTIE WALTON 

CRETONNE DUO Direction PAT CASEY 



PERCY 



MI.I.F, 



In "The Antique Shop" — Dancing Novelty 



Direction, SAM BAERWITZ 



SID 



ARTHUR 



SCOTT & DOUGLAS 

"ISID0RE n -LOTS OF LAUGHS IN 15 MINUTES 



DO YOUR LITTLE BITTY BIT XJ T 

THE MARCH SONG THAT'S ELECTRIFYING THE NATION 
Full of "pep." Will make you stop. Mailed for six two-cent stamps, or FREE If you're known professionally. Orchestration and Band Arr. Ready. 

FRANCES-CLIFFORD MUSIC PUB. CO., 36 W. Randolph Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



"BREAK THE NEWS TO MOTHER' 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



33 



* 8BRLESQBE ,NE$$ 

{Continued from page 33). ) , 



, f 



JACK REID SHOW 

BOUND TO PLEASE ! 
BURLESQUE FANS 

Jack Keid and bis "Record Breakers" 
furnished the entertainment at the Star 
list week. The show is up to the usual 
Reid standard. 

The star offers his familiar Celtic char- 
acter in the first act. In this role Reid 
became famous many years ago, and he 
portrays it exceedingly well. His man; 
funny situations won. applause last Tues- 
day afternoon, as did those of Bob Startz- 
man, who also enacts an Irish part. 
i Startzmau does a black face in this act 
and makes an excellent foil for Rent, his 
work being bright and finished. 

Lucille Aims shares the female honors 
with Mildred Howell. Miss Aims is one 
of those soubrettes who is liked more 
every time she appears. Her personality, 
shapely form and handsome costumes are 
above the usual, and she wears a different 
dress every time she appears. Her num- 
bers are put over with vim and her work 
is excellent generally. 

Mildred Howell, evidently a newcomer 
to the burlesque field, is sure to be heard 
from before long, for she is a pretty, 
blonde girl, with a sweet voice, an at- 
tractive wardrobe, a very pleasing per- 
sonality and a figure that shows well in 
tights. In her specialty in one, she was 
a decided hit with her two offerings. Her 
several other numbers were well rendered. 
This girl has a bright^future and is wel- 
come to burlesque- 
Toots Kemp leads 
and will develop into 
genue ere long. Her 
went nicely, as well as "Oh, Papa." She 
and her sister, Marie, do a neat singing 
specialty. This act is highly entertaining. 

Ella Reid Gilbert looks well and han- 
dles her part with much ease. Her ap- 
pearance and work are as good as at any 
time in the past. Catherine Creed and 
Norma Jerome do" nicely. 

Jos. Barlett, Jr., proved himself a good 
"straight." He "feeds" well and can sing. 

Joe Dempsey hasn't much to do, outside 
of his boxing bit with Miss Aims and his 
dancing specialty 

A. Bonham Bell did his several numbers 
cleverly. 

The chorus works nicely and their cos- 
tumes are bright and pretty. 

Reid's wrestling bit, as well as -the air 
bullet and gasoline bits, during the action 
of the burlesque, while doing his "dope" 
character, are very funny. 

The "minstrel" number, headed by 
Startzmau, is excellently done. 

A novelty in union suits is offered in 
what they call "at the Fashion Show" by 
Misses Aims, Howell, Bell, Jerome and 
Medart and introduced by Barlett. The 
girls, walking about -the stage in union 
suits, display shapely curves and lines. 
The scene was well received. 

Seid has a good show and one that is 
bound to please burlesque patrons. 



s were 

lit^utr. 

8 ^ 

x "Ho; 



numbers well 

right little in- 

bnalooklia Boo" 




Bessie Baker, who has been featured 
with the "Candy Shop" and "Canary Cot- 
tage," is now with the "Broadway 
Frolics." 



Juliette Belmont, who is doing a violin 
specialty with the "Twentieth Century 
Maids," made a decided hit at the Lyric 
Theatre, Dayton, Ohio, last week. 



Lon Hascall, Wilbur Dobbs, Jim Ten- 
brooke and Jack Nichols are doing a great 
line of comedy with the "Broadway 
Frolics" this season. 



Word from Manager Chipman states that 
the "Twentieth Century Maids" is a great 
show and doing a wonderful business 
through the Middle West. 

Clide Bates is now- in his fifth year 
with the "Follies of Pleasure." In the 
Folly Quartette of which he is a member 
it is claimed that he is singing top tenor. 

Frankie Niblo, formerly of Niblo and 
Spencer, is doing a dandy soubrette role 
with the Sam Sidman Show this season. 
Her numbers are all going over with a 
snap. 



Roscoe Ails, one of the principal come- 
dians with Fred Irwin's Majesties, who 
won success at Hurtig and Seamons last 
week, is now in his second year of bur- 
lesque 



The "Hello America" Co. opened to 
capacity business at Washington. The 
show is a success and the Hay ward musi- 
cal act a big hit near the close of the 
performance. 



i While in Los Angeles last Winter Jack 
Singer signed Vera Randale- for one of his 
productions. Singer placed Miss Randale 
with the "Broadway Frolics" this season, 
which is her first with any burlesque 
company. 



Phil Wolf states that the "Bowery 
Burlesquers," featuring Billy Foster and 
Frank Harcourt, played to the largest 
Labor Day business at the Casino, Phila- 
delphia, of any company since the house 
started playing burlesque. 

Doe Dell and Ceo. Leon are doing some 
fine comedy work with Irwin's "Majesties" 
this season. Tyson and Barbour are doing 
good work with the show, but their spe- 
cialty is sadly missed. Florence Bennett 
handles the prima donna role . 



8— SKETCHES— 8 

time acta. ' Sure money ' wlnnera. Sacrifice. Tee. 
Jllars each. Corned?. Chanctir. or Dramatic Mart atU 
quickly. AOms CLIFFORD, 323 W. 481ft St., <n Tort. 



Doll! 



MEYERS and SELTZER. Prceile t ui a 

ZEISSE'S HOTEL 

PHILADELPHIA 



Where all Show People meet. 
Beat Home Cooking in Town. 
Music Every Evening. 
Pay Us a Visit. 



THERE'S A REASON 
Wh»n.Playl- B Philadelphia* Stop at 

THE MARGARET "i&BSPSBS&SSg* 1 



KENSINGTON'S POPULAR THEATRICAL. HOUSE 

MOTHER MATHERSON 



tttZ E. Cumberland St.. PMI-J-lpkl- 



Around tit* Corner from People* Thea tr e 



When Playing the People* Theatre, Philadelphia, 
STOP P| TpL 7- ! ■7*"V'C 1912-14E,C U mberl.nd 

*VT JfJ Iw ' V-e 1^. L, C X l!») Half Block from Tr. 

Hot and Cold Water In Et»tt Room European anal 



1 ULAMAC THEATftlCAT. HOTEL 



Pa a e a t i She New » i |i i l 



r . 

JOB, T. W CIS MAN. Piieililir. I|| 

Northwest Corner 14th & Chestnut St*., St Louis, Mo. 
Th— rriral Hoatairy. Caftt and Cabaret 

Union Hat* (Ma-aW N. V. A. aad Ba**tM«, M ClnW) Bee* Bat *a a* Circuit 



I STARS OF BURLESQUE I 

<-:-:.<^-:-:~:~x~x-x-:^xk~>:->^^^ 



MIDGIE MILLER 

AND THE 

chuck Callahan Brothers emmett 

Featured with Spiegel Revue 




MAYBELLE GIBSON 

LEADS . 

WITH AL REEVES' BEAUTY SHOW 



I rreaiatible IVI arveloua 

Radiant E ntertaining I 

aS ntrancing J\. gile 

N atural R efined 

fc-> verlaating /\. muting 

"SPORTING WIDOWS'" 



JEAN BEDINI'S 

ENTERPRISES! 



tt 



"Puss-Puss" 
Forty Thieves 



tf 



That LittU Fir* Fly 

FLOSSIE EVERETTE 

Burlesque Revue 



AFTER FIRST PERFORMANCE SIGNED WITH 
JOHN G. JERMON FOR A TERM OF FIVE YEARS 

CLIFF BRAG DON 

PRINCIPAL COMEDIAN $1,000,000 DOLLS. 
THEY SAY I'M THE SPEEDIEST IN BURLESQUE. 



ROSCOE AILS 



Principal Comedian 



Irwin's Majesties 



KATE RIJLLIVIAIM 



wiLonnzmtss- 



rcATUneo with kose swell's London belles 

EASTER HIGBEE 

First Seesoa ia Burieaqme Priasa Deena, Harry Hasting.' ■%' Shew 

HELEN ANDREWS 



SOUBRETTE 



FRED IRWIN'S BIG SHOW 



ADELE ANDERSON 



PRIMA DONNA 



FRED IRWIN'S BIG SHOW 



SOUBRETTE 



BROADWAY FROLICS 



VIDA 

PRIMA DONNA 



WITH WATSON'S ORIENTALS 



34 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 

t 



IF I CAN'T HAVE YOU ALL OF THE TIME '' iTH \lu D ™*l™ ANT 

By ROTH, TRACEY & BREUER 



Most 



Published by RICHMOND MUSIC PUB. CO., 14-5 West 45th Street, New York 



WANTED FOR THE GORDMER PLAYERS 

FORT DODGE, IOWA, 2nd SEASON 

Clever people (or stock. Two bills a week. Two matinees. Young good looking Leading Woman, 
Char. Woman. Comedian. Gen. Bus. Man, Scenic Artist to play bits. Specialty people given 
preference. You must have wardrobe, ability and learn lines. If you booze or make trouble you 
won't stay long. No fancy salary, but you get it. Send late photo and croirrams. Rehearsals 
itaxt Thursday, O ctober 11th. Ope" Sunday, 14th. Address S. O. GORPINIER, Abingdon, 111. 

WANTED FOR EDNA PARK STOCK COMPANY 

Clever general business man, with real specialties; stage carpenter, who can paint 
scenery; a one-boss canvasman, that can furnish references. Feature Vaudeville 
people to double some parts. State how long you can change. This is permanent 
stock. Two bills a week. Address JACK EDWARDS, Manager, Macon, Ga. 

WANTED QUICK FOR THE 

CUTTER STOCK CO. 

Woman for heavies and characters. Must have ability, appearance and wardrobe. Tell all by 
wire. Immediate engagement. Glad to hear from regular repertoire people. Comp any now 
upon the 53rd week. No Dogs allowed. May B. Hurst wire. WALLACE R. CUTTER, Week 
Sept. 17. Perry. N. Y.: week Sept. 24. Bath. ■' v 



N. Y. 



WANTED FOR MUSICAL STOCK 

Good looking Singing and Dancing INGENUE with wardrobe, good looking 
singing and dancing Straight Man with wardrobe; all other useful Musical Com- 
edy people write and send photos. State lowest salary. Address MUSICAL 
STOCK CO, Lyric Theatre, Jamestown, N. Y. 

WANTED IMMEDIATELY 



[ Comedy people in aU Unas, Sister act and Girl Musical act. Also a girl acrobatic dancer for an 

Apache dance. BIGHT Chorus Girls, salary twenty dollars. Tenor and Baritone Barmony singers, 
Musical Director Pianist that can arrange, transpose, and direct Union Orchestras; also Jazz Drnmmer. 
Clarinet and Saxophone players. Union* Carpenter and Wardrobe Mis tress. Al l the above people for big 
Eastern Mnslcal Comedy Tabloid playinc guaranteed time. Address MTTRPHT AND SHY, Hauls Dazzle 
Company. Sept. IT th and two weeks, Kempner Thsatn, Little Bock. Arkansas. 

WANTED-MUSICIANS 

A Leader Who Can Arrange. How many times have you read an *'a.d" like this? Can YOU 
arrange? If so, this will not interest yon; trat if not, send 2c stamp for trial lesson. Three 
trial f— fTmt fra*. If not then convinced you'll succeed, you ova u* nothing. TAUGHT BY 
MATT. SUCCESSFULLY, PRACTICALLY, RAPIDLY. You must know the rudiments of music 
and mean business, otherwise don't writ e. 

WILCOX SCHOOL OF COMPOSITION B „ c . ^Titi^^ S^o* at, 

CUNT and BESSIE ROBBINS Want Quick 

Yoong. Good l poking People with good wardrobe, as follows: Man and Women for General 
Buiineas; also Man for Lifbt Comedy; also small woman for ingenues; home emotion. People 
who can do fiialm n spec lain* a and fill in child for parts. Musicisni for Orchestra, only. Other 
useful people, wire. CUNT A. ROBBINS, Guthrie Contra, Iowa* Sept. 17 and week; Lenox, 
Iowa, Sept. 24 and week. 

Wanted for One Piece Attraction 

Leading woman, character woman and sonbrette with specialty. Man for lead, character and 
heavy man. Comedian with specialty. Leader for B. & O. musicians for band who double 
orchestra or stage. A live wire agent that can book and route if needed; acquainted with the 
South. Open Oct. I. FRANK l_ HADDOCKS, Gilbert Hotel. Richmond, Vs. 

Wanted at Once Rep. Stock People 

All lines open. Permanent stock. Got fifteen. Two bills a week. Send photos, 
programs. State lowest in first letter. GUY STOCK CO., Bluffton, Ind., Sept. 
17-22; Montpelier, Ind., week Sept. 24. 

Wanted for Henderson Stock Co. 

Man for heavies and juveniles. Woman for gen. bus., heavies and characters; woman doing 
specialties given preference. Wardrobe and ability- absolutely essentUl. Tell all first letter and 
enclose photos, which will be returned. Salary must be low: it is absolutely sure. A long, pleas* 
ant engagement to people who have had experience and can act. Will advance tickets to re- 
msible people. RICHARD HENDERSON, Hillsdale, Mich, Sept. Z+-ZS, care Henderson 

UNION CARPENTER or Property man who can 
play "bits." For Vaudeville act, working and 
rooted. Charlie Hunt write. GARDNER, 
VINCENT CO., Care Clipper Office, Chicago. 



WAN 



WOMAN for Characters and General Business. MAN for General Business. Those doing spe- 
cialties preferred. State all; age, weight, height. Pay own. Week stands. MANAGER SWAF- 
FORD'S PLAYERS, Granville. N. Y. 

WANTED-EXPERIENCED STOCK MAN 

For Lou Whitney Stock Co. To take full charge of putting on productions. No 
directing — bits if any. State lowest pay, own. WELSH & WALBOURN, Imlay 
City, Mich. 



WANTED 



At Liberty 

WM. GIBNEY 

Hustling advance agent, not afraid .to work, 
can book Route and Wild Cat. 25 years' 
experience. Address WM. GIBNEY. 
Del., Stamford, CV»m, 



THE CONIBEAR PLAYERS 

WANTED — Good Gen. Bos. people, 
including Ingenue to double piano. Lire 
advance agent write. Lowest and full 
particulars. 16 McGiu Street, Toronto, 
OnL, Canada. 

WANTED AT ONCE FOR 

HUMAN HEARTS 

Actors for JEM MASON (the tramp) and TOM 
LOGAN, to double in baud. Also musicians to 
doable band and orchestra. Address by mall only. 
C. H. BXNO, 1402 Broadway, New York. 



JUST OUT 

Gigantic collection of 144 pases of new, 

bright and original Comedy Material 
for vaudeville stage uic. . 

THE NEW 
McNALLY»S svj o 
BULLETIN 1NO. O 

PRICE. ONE DOLLAR PER COPY 

IT COKTAIKS THE F0LL0WIKQ SILT-EDGE UP- 
TO-DATE COMEDY aATEIUL: 
20 Sra.lgf .sss l s u si . each one a postrre hit. 
All Ucda. lnclmanr Hebrew, Irish, Dutch, Wop. 
Kid. Bsbe. Black sad Whit. Face. Female, Tramp 
and Stump Speech. 
14 Rsarisf Acts fsr T«s Males. Eich act aa 

applAlGe winner 

12 OritluJ Atti tar Hall ats Fees!.. Tbeyu 

nuke cood oq any MO. 

32 Sen-Fire rsraSIn on all or Broadway's latest 

toss hits. Each one- Is full ©' Pep. 

2 Rxf Uftlol TrM Arb, one for two mala and 

one female entitled "Tw. Is C — p an y." the other 

for three males entitled "Toe. Diet sis' Harry." 

Ttese sets are 24 karat, tare-fire bits. 

2 RarHln. Qiarhrtte Acts, one for four Bales 

entitled "Ferr sf s Kiss." the other for two 

males sod two females entitled 4 *Tb* Hfht Way." 

Both sets are allre with hnraor of the iib- 

rJckUng Mad. 

A Nee Cssaely SkrtaS entitled "A Csaatty stale." 

It's s. scream from start to finish 

A Out TUMI Csaery us IwlMtts, entitled 

"WsMlaf Mb." It's brtght, brway sod bobbles 

orer with wit. 

BtHillj'i Merry MlastrsHs, eo«ilrU«| sf 8 corkiei 

Irrt-nrti with slde-spUitinr. Jokes and hot-ibot 

cross Dp* pp 

Gracd Mlastrel Flaalt entitled "Utt an- Woe." 

It Keeps the audience rtllins tirougboat the entire 

act Btodrces of Oacszr Jack. Cross Fire Jokes sod 

Gass which no be used for sidewalk conrersatlM 

for two males and male and female. 

Baildea other comedy matrrial wfclcb is useful to 

the TaodeTHle perfortDer. 

Remato tat pries of MeRally'i Billetla Be. 3 

Is saty oaa dollar tar copy: or will «a. yaw 

N.lal.y't Biflctfn Ko. 2 and 3 far $1.50, with 

stwoey tack f nraatc*. 

WM. McNALLY 

81 EAST ISth STREET, NEW YORK 




AT LIBERTY— AFTER SEPT. 23 

DAVID TOPE 

Violin Leader 

Address Gen. Delivery, Brookville, Pa. 

GIRLS 

FOR NEW YORK REVUE 

K. B. H. Dramatic Agency 

Fitzgerald Bid*-. 1«S2 B'way 

L A D Y 

NOT OVER 40 YEARS 

that wants to go in Vaudeville, good piano 
playc willing to play other instruments. Ad- 
dress MUSIC, care of N. Y. dipper. 

Central Fibre Wardrobe 

IS x 21 i 15 

$35.00 

• ittaii 

$40.00 

Equal to the 
average {69.00 
trunk and guar- 
anteed. 

CENTRAL TRUNK 
FACTORY 

SIMONS et CO. 
7N Arch St, 
Phfla. 

CLYDE PHILLIPS 

Offers That Beautiful Act 

MABEL 

NAYNON'S 
BIRDS 

Talent tells. If you're 
from Missouri, we 

can show you. 

PUying Array Post. 
Chattanooga, Ten., 
2* -22; McVickers. 
Chicago, Z4- 2». 





Jack Housh 
Kathryn LaVelle 



WHEN THE WORM TURNS 



Westsn 
Eastern 



WAYNE CHJUSTY 
PETE MACK 



Who's th. Ftrwt N. V. A. WMr. ? MX I 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



35 



COMPANf R 



(Continued from Pass 2S) 




r (Pirat HUI|4Bi -— T 1 1 (wm~ 
Yiolln Bdaotles. (Last Ball)— Loney Mao 



FiriflSFlf)— Carl o^Kies— V 



Mlle-a-Minute Gltls-^Emplre. Chicago, 17-22 ; 

Majestic, Indianapolis, 24-29. 
Orientals — Gaiety. Philadelphia, 17-22; Ma- 
jestic. Scranton, Fa., 24-29. 
Pacemakers — Lyceum, Columbus, 17-22 ; 

Court. Wheeling, W. Va., 24-26; Grand. 

Akron. O.. 27-29. 
Pat Whites— Gaiety, Chicago, 17-22; Gaiety, 

Milwaukee. 24-29. 
Parisian Flirts — Standard. 8L Louis, 17-22 ; 

Knglewood, Chicago, 24-29. 
Review o! 1918 — Majestic, Indianapolis. .17- 

22: layoff, 24-29; Lyceum, Columbus, 0., 

31-Oct 6. 
Becord Breakers— Gaiety. Brooklyn. 17-22; 

yonkers, N. Y H 24-26; Schenectady, 27-29. 
Social Follies — Star, Brooklyn, 17-22 ; Gaiety, 

Brooklyn, 24-29. 
Some Babies — Hudson, Schenectady, N. T., 

20-22; Holyoke, Mass., 24-26; Springfield, 

27-29. 
September Morninjt Glories — New Bedford, 

Mass.. 17-19 : Worcester, 20-22 ; Olympic, 

New York, 24-29. 
Speedway Girls — Garden, Buffalo. N. T„ 17- 

22 ; Star, -Toronto, Ont, 24-29. 
Tempters — Majestic. Scranton, Pa.. 17-22 ; 

Blnghamton. N. T.. 24-25: Oswego. 26; 

Niagara Falls. 27-29. 
Whlrly Glrly Girls — Open, 17-22; Century. 

Kansas City, 24-29. 

PBNN CIBCTJIT. 
Monday — Newcastle. Pa. 
Tuesday — Johnstown. Pa. 
Wednesday — Altoona. Pa. 
Thursday, Harrtsborg, Pa. 
Friday — York, Pa. 
Saturday — Reading, Pa. 

TABLOIDS 

Amlck'B, Jack, Pennant Winners- — Folly, Okla- 
homa City, Okla., Indef. 
American Musical Revue (Oscar Green, mgr.) 

Fitchburg. Mass.. week Sept. 17. 
Deloy's Dainty Dudlnea, Eddie Deloy, mgr., 

N. H. — Cheyenne. Wy., Indef. 
Lord and Vernon — Pine Bluff, Ark., Sept. 16- 

23. 
Bazzle-Dazxle Co. — Little Bock, Ark„ Sept. 

17-29. 
Seaside Beauties — Durant, Okla., Sherman, 

Tex.. Sept. 24-29. 
Submarine Girls (Merserau Bros.) — Grafton, 

W. Va., Sept. 17-23: Martins Ferry. 24-9. 
Zarrow's American Girls — Victoria. Steuben- 

vllle, O., Sept. 17-19 ; Coliseum, New Castle, 

Pa., 20-22 ; Star, New Philadelphia, O. 24- 

29. 
Zarrow's Zlg Zag Town Girls (Jack Fnquay. 

mgr.) Grand, Morgantown, W. Va.. Sept. 

17-22 ; Hippodrome, Fairmont, W. Va., 

24-29. 
Zarrow's Little Bluebirds (Jack Grant, mgr.) 

— Grand. Masslllon, O- Sept 17-22 ; Lyric. 

Alliance, O- 24-29. 

CIRCUS AflfD WILD WEST 

Barnes, AL G. — Naftgdoches. Tex., Sept. 20 ; 
Tlmpson, Tex., tl ; Henderson, Tex., 22 ; 
Tyler, Tex_ 24 : Palestine. Tex.. 25 : Crock- 
ett, Tex.. 26: Jacksonville. Tex., 27; 
Athens, Tex., 28 ; Kaufman. Tex., 29. 

Cole Brothers Shows — Monticello, Ark., Sept 
20 : Hamburg, 21 ; Royville, La.. 22. 

La Tena — Laurel. Del. Sent 20: Federals- 
burg, Md., 21 ; Easton.- 22. 

Ringling Bros. — El Paso, Tex., Sept 20 ; 
Abilene, 22; Dallas. 24 ; Fort Worth, 25; 
Waco, 26 : Taylor, 27 ; Austin. 28 ; San 
Antonio, 29. 

Sparfes Circus — Mt Vernon, 111., Sept. 20 ; 
Benton, III., 21, 

Shipp & Feltus — En route through South 
America. Permanent address, Blvadavla 
835, Buenos Aires. 

WUlard. Jess, * Buffalo Bill Show — Texar- 
kana, 20 : Sulphur Springs. Tex.. 21 ; 
Dallas. 22. 

MINSTRELS 

Coburn's, J. A. — TJrbana. O., indef. 

Field's. AL G., Greater Minstrels — Durham. 

N. c, Sept 20; Greensboro, 21; Danville, 

Va.. 22; Lynchburg, 24; Norfolk, 25-26; 

Richmond, 27-8-9. .-••■•••- 

Fashion Plate Minstrels (J. C. Wodetaky, 

mgr.) — Columbus, O.. Sept. 17-22: Dayton, 

O., 24-29. 
Bav-A-Laf Co. (J. M. Clinton, max.) — Ft. 

Wayne. Ind., indef. 
Vogel's, John W. — Buckeye Lake. Millersport. 

O., indef. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Bragg & Bragg Shows (Geo. M. Bragg) — 

Union, N. H., Sept. 20-22. 
Thurston, the Magician — Lyceum Theatre, 
Paterson, N. J.'. Sept 24-29. 



VAUDEVILLE BILLS 

(Continued from Page S) 



CEDAR RAPIDS, IA. 

atajastia (Last Half) — Valerftlne & Bell— Dun- 
bar's Colleens— Adrian — Axard Bros. 
CHICAGO, tr.r. 

WUion (Pint Half) — Otto Koerner A Co. 

Weber Beck & Ftazer— Mme. Asorla & Co. 
(Last Bair) — Conntesa Verona — Stcrena A Hol- 
llster — Harris & Mannion — Upton's Monks. 

Eodzls (First Half) — Aerial Mitchells — Willing 
4 Jordan — Havilasd A Thornton Co. — Hilton 4 
Laxar— Velde Dedle Trio. Oast Halt)— Hayes ft 
Rives — Walsh ft Bentley — Saxo Five — Richards ft 
Kyle — Gordon ft Bicca. 

Arsons (First Half)— A medio— Janis A West- 
Richards ft Kyle — Gordon ft Bicca. (last Halt) — 
Willis* ft Jordan— Zeno ft Handel— Mate. Asorla 
ft Co. 



Hagsstne iltllrJa"— Detsel & Carroll— D*gnon.' : ft 
Clifton. '|"V 

:l||j" CAHTOH, ru, 
Frincss* (LairMHair)— JsMtBenribasra — Williams 
ft Culrer— Wagner ft Bruno. *W 
. . COUNCIL BLUFFS, IA, 

- Nicholas - (First Half)— Argo ft Virginia- 
Three Weston Slaters — Stanley Overton. (Last 
Half) — Carter ft Waters — Geo. McFadden. 
CR00KST0N. HTKN. . 
Grand ' (Sept. 23) — Vernon ft Co. — Maboney ft 
Rogers — The Salamboa. . 

CESAR RAPIDS, IOWA. 
Majeitio— Chief Little Elks ft Co.— "Finders 
Keepers" — Vine & Temple — Tbree Jabns — Dan- 
bar's Hnzxars. 



DTJ 

Hew^aHEd (Flrsffcsasttf)— Carl twines— Five 
Toong Americana — Angelas Trio— Ts.iiiaolan Trio. 
(Last Half) — Roger, ft Broekway— Royal Italian 
Sextette. 

DTTBUatTE, IA. 

atajeitio (First Half)— Geo. McFadden— Earl 
Ilngree ft Co. — Jane Mills ft Co. — Demon ft Clif- 
ton. (Last Half) — Panl Fetching ft Co.— Gran- 
vtlle ft Mack— Chief Little Elk ft Co.— Vine ft 
Temple — Arco Bros. 

EAST BT. LOT/IB, ILL. 

Erbers (First Half)— Chlyo ft Powers -Conk ft 
Catman— "Three Types." (Last Half)— "The 
Fashion Shop." 

FORT DODGE, IA. 

Princess (First Half) — Jolla Edwards — Crauvllle 
ft Mack — Link ft Robinson — Three Jabns. (Last 
Half)— McConnell ft Austin— Tbree Weston Sis- 



Rockies,' 

Orpheum (Sept. 24-23) — K(nl Bros. — Gas 
ft Revere — Slgmond ft Manning — Rural 
(Sept. 28-29)— Carl ft Incs— Ore Yoong AS 
cans— Angelus Trio — Tasmanlan Trio. 
FOND DU LAO, WIS. 
Idas (First Half)— The Hlllycrs. (Last Half) 
— O'U.oogbllu ft Williams— McCormnck ft Shsnnon. 
GRAND FORKS, N. D. 
Grand — Mahoney ft Rogers — Vernon ft Co. — The 
Salamboa. 

IOWA CITY. IOWA. 
Eaglert (Sept. 29-301— Aruedlo— Waller Howe ft 
Co.— Fred ft Albert. 

JOLIET, ILL. 
Orphsum (Last Half)— Aerial Mitchells— Mil- 
dred Hayward— Vernon Five, 




CHICAGO. Schiller Bu.ldu 

TOM QUIGLEY, Manager 

Trcmont Stre< 



M.WITMARK & SONS 



PHILADELPHIA. 35 So 9th St. 
I ED. EDWARDS, Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO. Pantages Build-no, 
AL BROWNE. Manager 



JACK LAHEY, Manager . AL. BROWNE. Manager 

PROVIDENCE7R.T; 18 Belknap Street * L " COOK ' Manager ^ ANGELES cX( _ Coot ; nentilt . Hc[5 , 

J. CROWLEY, Manager 1 562 Broadway, Next to PALACE THEATRE B HAGAN, Manager 



WANTED -Young Woman 

for general business. CLIFTON MALLORY, 
If Evans St, Auburn. N. Y. 



For immediate engagement, Single Girl with 
Vaudeville Experience, for Petticoat Minstrels, 
the classiest girl minstrel act vaudeville has! 
Must have class, good wardrobe and able to 
do singing, dancing or musical specialty. 
Salary sure — act playing U. B. O. time. Call 
on CHAS. W. BOYER— at New Victoria Hotel, 
Friday or Saturday, Sept. 21st or 22nd— be- 
tween hours of ten and twelve o'clock. 

"My Boy Was Not Intended 
for a Coward" 

The. song of Inspiration and latest hit. Sample 
copy 20e., money back if not pleated. PROF. A. 
J. COOK, stain St., westerlo, H. T. 



WANTED 

AN ATTRACTIVE Oriental appearing yoong lady 
to assist Magician. Illusionist, etc. Apply PROF. 
BRAGANZA, Waterbnry, Ct. 



ACTS 



PLAYS, SKETCHES WRITTEN 

Terms for a Stamp 

E. L. GAMBLE, Playwright 

East Liverpool, Ohio 



Sketches, Playlets, 

Monologs, Songs and 

Parodies written to or- 

Write for terms. 

WM. DEROSE 

102 N. Mien., N. E., South Bend, Ind. 



ACTS 

der at reasonable prices 



PLAYS 



TABLOIDS, Etc. 

ALICE HOWLAND 
172s Eddy St.. CHICAGO 



aVTTCMTIfsftl We bnT ud ■*" plats. 
HI ICHIIUfl 8ON08. aU kinds of good spe- 
cial material. ICaale composing and arranging. 
at. Y. PLAT.MTrsIO BTTBEAU. ITM Broad way. 
V. T. Brokers. 



THE BEST 
MADISON'S BUDGET 

1 nave ever iaaued la now In act ire preparation. 
Watch for it. Price ONE DOLLAR aa canal. 
Meanwhile, for $1.50. yon can secure the current 
iaaue (No. 16) at once, and an advance copy of 
No. 17 anon AS ready. 
JAMES MADISON, No. 1052 Third At*.. Sew York 



36 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 19, 1917 



MMGrnli 




NEW PICTURE 

PALACE WILL 

OPENDEC. 15 

MORE LAVISH THAN RIALTO 



Either the "Temple" or the "National" 
will be the name of the n<?w motion pic- 
ture theatre being erected on Broadway 
between Forty-ninth and Fiftieth Streets, 
when its doors are thrown open to the 
public on Dec. 15. It will be operated 
under the direction of S. L. Rothapfel, 
who will also be in charge of the Rialto 
Theatre. 

The new house, it is said, will be more 
lavish in its decorations and appoint- 
ments and will be more of a revelation 
than the Rialto. Its Broadway entrance 
will have a white marble colonnade de- 
signed on the Grecian type. The house 
will seat 2,500 persons. 

The policy of the house will be similar 
to that of the Rialto, with the addition 
of several new novelties recently con- 
ceived by RothapfeL The feature picture 
policy will prevail as in the other house, 
with the musical section of the program 
as a strong asset. There will be a sym- 
phony orchestra of fifty pieces, under the 
supervision of Hugo v Reisenf eld, who, 
however, will remain as conductor at the 
Rialto. A feature of the new house will 
be a weekly symphony concert given by 
the combined orchestras of the two thea- 
tres, under Rothapfel's direction. Mr. 
Reisenfeld will lead the orchestra of 100 
on these occasions. The purpose of these - 
concerts will be to encourage American 
composers, and each week Reisenfeld will 
endeavor to offer a new composition by 
an American composer. 

There are to be no stores on the prem- 
ises and with the exception of the execu- 
tive offices there will be no other offices 
in the building. 

The house was built by 6. M. Heck- 
scher, Jr., and will be conducted by Eahn 
and Livingston, who operate the Rialto. 

BRENON CUTS PASS LIST 

During the run of Herbert Brenon's 
film, "The Fall of the Romanoffs," which 
starts at the Broadway Theatre Sunday 
evening, no free list will be allowed, all 
persons, even those connected with the 
Brenon organization, who desire admis- 
sion to the theatre being compelled to have 
tickets. For the opening night, Brenon 
has purchased the tickets that will be dis- 
tributed to the press and those whom he 
desires to invite for the occasion. He 
says that, as long as he has rented the 
house for the engagement of his picture, it 
must hold money and not paper. 



FILM WRITERS ARE DINED 

Following the trade showing of the re- 
vised version of "The Warrior," last 
Wednesday, Messrs. A. H. Sawyer and 
Herbert Lubin acted the part of hosts at 
a "War Luncheon," tendered the press at 
Rector's. 

Among those present were Harry G. 
Kosch, attorney for the General Enter- 
prises, Inc. ; Harry Ennis, representing 
Harry Baver; Lawrence Beid, New York 
Review; Charles Condon, Motography; 
Mr. Kltonhead, Exhibitor's Trade Re- 
view; Charles Giegerich, ■ New Yobk-Clip- 
feb; Samuel Spedon, Moving Picture 
World; Frit* Tidden, Dromatfo Mirror; 
Miss Laura Hostetter, The Billboard; Mil- 
ton Lowenthal, Theatre Magazine; Mr. 
Gold. New York Star; James Beecrcft, 
Exhibitors' Herald; George Worts, Mo- 
tion Picture Newt; Jake Gerhardt, Dra- 
matio Mirror; Miss St. John Brenon, 
Morning Telegraph; Harold Rendall, New 
York Review; Joshua Lowe, Variety; 
Bert Ennis, press agent for "The War- 



GI VE DINNER TO LANGFELD 

Leo Langfeld, manager of the Broad- 
way Theatre, was tendered a dinner by 
friends at the Friars' Club last Sunday 
evening, upon his third anniveraay as 
manager of the house. A diamond in- 
' itinled watch fob was the token of esteem 
presented to him by "Doc" Victor Wilson, 
on behalf of his friends. Those who were 
present included Wilson, Carl Edouarde, 
Jay Kaufman, Al. Lichtman, Frank 
Monroe, Harry Kaufman. Edward Mos- 
cary, R. Alfred Jones, Charles Stewart 
and Hugo Reisenfeld. 



VAN LOAN GOES TO HONOLULU 

Herbert H. Van Loan, of the publicity 
firm of Shepard and Van Loan, accom- 
panied by his wife, professionally known 
as Gertrude Cameron, suddenly departed 
from New York last week for Honolulu. 
He goes there to succeed E. Richard 
Scheyer as the representative of the Peter 
Pan Film Corp. 



CANADA "WARRIOR" RIGHTS SOLD 

Sawyer and Lubin, of Genera] Enter- 
prises, Inc., announced last week the sale 
of the Canadian rights to their film spec- 
tacle "The Warrior." The purchaser is 
The Globe Films, Ltd., with headquarters 
in Toronto and branch offices in all the 
important Canadian cities. The sum re- 
ported to have changed hands is unusually 
large, even for a picture of the magnitude 
of "The Warrior." The company which by 
the deal acquires the Canadian rights to 
the spectacle starring Maciste, the giant 
Italian actor and soldier, is a new one. An 
imposing array of prominent exchange men 
and financial leaders form the official body 
of The Globe Films, Ltd., and the new firm 
bids fair to become one of the strongest 
purchasers of territorial rights in the 
Dominion. 



GOLDMAN WRITES PICTURE PLAY 

Mayer C. Goldman, the theatrical lawyer, 
and Frank V. Harris, of the New York 
bar, have written a scenario entitled "The 
Public Defender." which is being produced 
by Harry R. Raver. The cast includes 
Frank Keenan, Robert Edeson, Alma Han- 
Ion, John Sainpolis and Florence Short. 
The picture is being directed by Burton 
King. It win be a six reeler. 



COMMONWEALTH JOINS GEN'L FILM 
The Commonwealth Comedy Co., Inc., a 
comparatively new- concern which turns 
out slapstick comedies, after the conclu- 
sion of its fourth one-reel release has won 
a place on the General Film Company's 
program. This arrangement goes into ef- 
fect on Sept. 28, and calls for a succes- 
sion of fifty-two weekly releases. 



SCREEN CLUB PLANS SHOW 

The Screen Club is preparing an enter- 
tainment to be given at the Eighty-first 
Street Theatre in aid of the House Fnnd. 
It will consist of a vaudeville bill and the 
taking of a picture on the stage in full view 
of the audience. 



RIALTO HAS ELTTNGE FILM 

Julian FJtinge is making his bow in mo- 
tion pictures at the Rialto this week in 
"The Countess Charming," a comedy writ- 
ten by Gelett Burgess and Carolyn Wells. 



COURT DECIDES 

IN FAVOR OF 

VITAGRAPH 

CHICAGO CENSORSHIP DEFEATED 



BUY IVAN FILM STATE RIGHTS 

Dallas, Tex., Sept. lie— David Reed 
and True T. Thompson, of the True Film 
Co., of this city, have closed contracts with 
the Ivan Film Corporation to distribute 
"Babbling Tongues" in Oklahoma, Arkansas 
and Louisiana. 



LESSER HAS RECOVERED 

Sol L. Lesser, who has been confined to 
the hospital ever since his arrival in New 
York City with a severe case of typhoid, 
will have convalesced sufficiently to return 
to his work late this week, it is expected. 



Chicago, 111., Sept. IS. — After being in 
the courts of this city for more than four 
months, the Vitagraph's Blue Ribbon 
photoplay, "Within the Law," will now 
be shown in its original form here. It 
was announced today that Judge Crowe 
had issued a mandamus compelling Chief 
of Police Schuettler to grant a permit for 
the showing of the much-discussed produc- 
tion. 

The court action followed the fight which 
has been made from the day Major Funk- 
bouser denied its presentation, by Presi- 
dent Albert E. Smith and General Man- 
ager Walter W. Irwin, of the Vitagraph 
Company. From the very beginning, these 
officials have fought tooth and nail every 
step taken by the militant censor, who has 
been just as obstinate in his claims that 
the picture should not be exhibited in Chi- 
cago. The offering was rejected because 
the producers refused to make fifteen dele- 
tions from its original. 

After giving Major Fnnkhouser every op- 
portunity to change his mind, General 
Manager Walter W. Irwin engaged Lewis 
F. Jacobson, who had successfully at- 
tacked the rulings of Major Fnnkhouser on 
previous occasions. Attorney Jacobson 
immediately prepared a petition seeking 
a writ of mandamus to force the issuance 
of a permit, and it was upon this petition 
that Jndge Crowe ordered Chief of Police 
Schuettler to grant the permit. 

The petition was very voluminous and 
showed how extensively "Within the Law" 
as a legitimate play was shown over the 
entire civilized -world ; that it ran many 
times in Chicago, breaking all records and 
at prices ranging from 50 cents to $2.50. 
It also was shown that "Within the Law" 
had ita premier performance at the Prin- 
cess Theatre, Chicago, on April 27, 1912, 
when it was produced for the first time on 
any stage. 

When the case was called for trial Major 
Fnnkhouser was surrounded by the best 
legal talent in the employ of the City of 
Chicago. George Kandelik, an assistant 
corporation counsel, had direct charge of 
the case for the Major. 

Not only did Greater Vitagraph seek to 
force the complete showing of "Within 
the Law," b tit Attorney Jacobson also at- 
tacked the status of Major Funkhouser's 
position, alleging that he had no authority- 
to censor pictures owing to conflicting 
clauses in the charter of the City of Chi- 
cago and of subsequent city ordinances. 

With the question of the demurrer 
ruled upon the case went to active trial on 
Thursday morning with a court room 
crowded with promioent persons. 



DEFENDS WASHBURN EXEMPTION 

Chicago, Sept 13. — Thomas J. Dawson, 
chairman of the Exemption Board which 
exempted Bryant Washburn, defends the 
action of the Board by submitting affidavits 
from eight persons, including two physi- 
cians, to the effect that Mrs. Washburn is 
suffering from psoriasis, a skin disease, 
which the physicians aver, is incurable and 
which, if not given proper care and treat- 
ment might prove fatal. Because of her 
ailment they swore, it would be a .physical 
impossibility for her to engage in any 
pursuit In her affidavit Mrs. Washburn 
swore that she and their daughter are solely 
dependent upon Washburn for support 
Chairman Dawson asserted that the no- 
toriety given the case was both unfair to 
the actor and to the board members and 
to dispel any misgivings he had decided to 
make public the affidavits. 

NEW FILM CO. APPEARS 

The Motion Picture Bealty Company, 
with offices at 75 Montgomery Street, 
Jersey City, filed papers of incorporation 
in the county clerk's office last week. The 
new firm will engage in a general real es- 
tate and brokerage business. William Tur- 
ner is named as the agent in charge.- 

The capital stock of the company is 
$500,000 of which $1,000 baa been paid in 
by the following subscribers : Charles Drap- 
kin, 71 Broadway, four shares ; Jeremiah 
J. Collins, 120 Broadway, three shares, and 
Paul M. Hahn, 120 Broadway, New York, 
three shares. 



BLACKTON POSTPONES RELEASE 

Rather than be hastened in his produc- 
tions for Paramount and run the risk of 
impairing the artistic merit of his photo- 
plays, J. Stuart Blackton has determined 
to postpone his advent upon tbe screen as 
a producer. Accordingly, there will be no 
Blsckton production among tbe Paramount 
October releases contrary' to a former an- 
nouncement and the first Blsckton photo- 
play will not appear until November. 



NEW COMPANY FORMED 

The Burlington Amusement and Develop- 
ment Company was incorporated in New 
Jersey last week for $125,000. Tbe prin- 
cipal office of the company is given at 75 
Montgomery street, Jersey City, and Peter 
Bentley is named as the official agent in 
charge. The company is chartered to deal 
in real estate and amusement enterprises 
and has a paid in capital of $10,000. 



WILL SHOW "INTOLERANCE" 

By cable arrangements, completed last 
week, D. W. Griffith will present his "In- 
tolerance" this season in the representative 
picture theatres of America. Limited en- 
gagements will be booked in the representa- 
tive motion picture theatres of the country. 



STEWART STAY CONTINUED 

Last week in the local courts the tem- 
porary injunction, recently obtained by 
Greater Vitagraph, restraining Anita 
Stewart from leaving tbe company, was 
continued till September 28. 




WILLIAM A. BRADY, 

I Director-General 

WORLD-PICTURES 

Present 



ETHEL CLAYTON 



a 



The Woman Beneath' 9 



Story by WuLu-d Mack 
Directed by Trmvera Vale. 



September 19, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



37 



a"*"- 18 a REVIEW OE REVIEWS *•—»■■ 

FROM TRADE CRITICISMS COMPILED BY THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 

Cut Out This Chart, and Paste in Scrap Book for Ralortmc*. 


1 


Nunc of Film 


CLIPPER 


WORLD 


NEWS 


TELEGRAPH 


TRADE REVIEW 


'THE SPINDLE OF 
LIFE" 

Drama. Butterfly. 6 

Reels. Featuring Neva 
Gerber and Ben Wilson. 
Director: Geo. Cochrane. 


"Haa an irresistible 
appeal." 


"A rather slight bnt 
brightly pictured and gen- 
erally engaging story of 
the romantic type." 
(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"There is something 
lacking in this light story ; 
which places it in the 
ordinary class." 

(Issne Sept. 29.) 


"An interesting pic- 
ture." 

(Issue Sept 16.) 


"Not a particularly 
strong offering." 

(Issue Sept 22.) 


2 


THE HOSTAGE" 

Melodrama. I>asky. 5 
Reels. Featuring Wallace 
Reid. Director : Robert 
Thornby. 


"Is among the best fea- 
tures ever put on tbe mar- 
ket. Holds attention in 
a vice-like grip." 


"Few photoplays attain 
the degree of interest that 
is found in The Hostage.' 
Holds the spectators in- 
terest tightly captive." 
(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"One of the best little 
romances of war time 
tbat has ever been 
screened." 

(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"Is good entertainment 
Has no dull moments." 
(Issue Sept 16.) 


"An average Paramount 
program feature. The 
suspense is well pro- 
nounced." 

(Issue Sept. 22.) 


3 


. "FALL OF THE 
ROMANOFFS" 

Historical drama. Her- 
bert Brenon. S Reels. 
Featuring Iliodor. Direc- 
tor: Herbert Brenon.- 


"Is something more 
than an amusement at- 
traction. Will accumulate 
importance with the 
years. The strangest 
story ever flashed on the 
screen. 11 


"One attribute stands 
out in hold relief — that 
swift onrush of events." 
(Issue Sept. 22.) 


"The spectacular and 
thrilling is present in 
abundance." 

(Issue Sept. 22.) 


"Teems with action. 
Bids fair to take its place 
among the foremost pic- 
tures of the year." 
(Issue Sept. 9.) 


"A big picture in every 
sense of the word." 
(Issue Sept 15.) 


4 


"MOUNTAIN DEWS" 

Melodrama. Triangle. 
5 Reels. Featuring Mar- 
gery Wilson. Director : 
Thos. Heffron. 


"Is well constructed." 


"Many of its scenes 
have pronounced pictorial 
charm." 

(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"Quite lacking in sus- 
pense. Is merely a 
moderately interesting of- 
fering." 

(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"Will give many laughs 
and a number of thrills." 
(Issne Sept 16.) 


(Review not published 
to date.) 

(Issue Sept 22.) 


5 


"THE BOND OF FEAR" 

Melodrama. Triangle. 
5 Reels. Featuring Belle 
Bennett and Roy Stewart. 
Director: Jack Conway. 


"As improbable as a 
story can possibly be. In 
spite of good direction 
and capable acting the 
picture has no appeal." 


"Tbe dramatic value of 
the picture is consider- 
able." 

(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"Rather long drawn 
out. The unreal prin- 
ciple is its most formid- 
able fault" 

(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"Carries conviction and 
has been extremely well 
produced." 

(Issue Sept 16.) 


(Review not published 
to date.) 

(Issue Sept 22.) 


6 


"A MAN'S MAN" 
Melodrama. Paralta. 7 
Reels. Featuring J. 
Warren Kerrigan. Di- 
rector: Oscar Apfel. 


"Has an appeal , that 
no one with red blood in 
bis veins can resist." 


"Will entertain any hu- 
man being with red blood 
in his veins. Every de- 
tail is handled with skill." 
(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"Its many complica- 
tions work up an amount 
of suspense that is un- 
usual. Contains a de- 
lightful -touch of humor." 
(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"A sure-fire melo- 
dramatic feature. A 
splendid story." 

(Issue Sept 16.) 


"A virile story with 
untold interest" 
(Issue Sept 22.) 


7 


"FOR FRANCE" 

Drama. Vitagrapb. 5 
Reels. Featuring Edward 
Earle and Betty Howe. 
Director : Wesley Rnggles. 


" Thrilling story is car- 
ried throughout" 


"Has enough romance 
and vital action to hold 
the attention of the 
average spectator." • 
(Issue Sept. 29.) : 


"Contains a whole lot 
of good, thrilling action. 
Is most entertaining — not 
too heavy — in fact just 
right" 

(Issue Sept. 29.) 
< ■ 


"Corking good stuff. 
Plenty of thrills. A de- 
lightful romantic story." 
(Issue Sept 16.) 


"A dandy patriotic pic- 
ture that is packed full of 
good stuff." 

(Issue Sept. 22.) 

i 


8 


"RASPUTIN, THE 
BLACK MONK" 

Drama. Brady. 7 
Reels. Featuring Mon- 
tague Love. Director : 
Arthur Ashley. 


"A feature of unusual 
appeal and interest. Su- 
perbly acted and excel- 
lent set." 


"A subject suited to in- 
spire interest in the mind 
of the public. Is well and 
carefully made." 

(Issue Sept. 29.) ' 


"A timely and interest- 
ing piece of Actionized 
history." 

(Issue Sept. 29.) 


"Highly dramatic." 
(Issue Sept 16.) 


"Unquestionably i n - 
teresting. Should prove 
excellent box office at- 
traction." 

(Issue Sept 22.) 



FIRST TRIANGLE RELEASE OF A PARALTA PLAY 



A GREAT DRAMA 



SEE THIS BIG PRODUCTION BEFORE YOU BUY IT. 
NO* BOOKING ACCEPTED BEFORE EXHIBITOR SEES IT. 



A NOTABLE CAST 



J. WARREN KERRIGAN 



In tha> Thrilling 

Romantic Sensation 



"A MAN'S MAN" 



Written by PETER B. KYNE. Scenario by THOMAS G. GERAGHTY. Produced by OSCAR APFEL. 



ESSIE BARRISCALE 

In tha Military taunt Sarvloe Romano* 

••MADAM WHO" 

By HAROLD MACfiRATH 

ASK J 



MR. KERRIGAN'S SECOND PARALTA PLAY 

"TURN OF A CARD" 

NY TRIANGLE I 



BESSIE BARRISCALE 

In "THE OLD HOMESTEAD" of tha Soroan 

"ROSE O' PARADISE" 

By GRACE MILLER WHITE 



38 



THE NIW YORK C L I P P E R 



^eptembsr 19, 1917 



"FALL OF THE ROMANOFFS" 

Herbert JBrenon. Eight reel*. 
Cast 

Nioholas II Alfred Hickman 

Rasputin Edward Connelly 

IUodor B» Himself 

Prince Felix Conway Tearle 

Grand Duke Nicholas Charlei Craig 

Wilhelm II — Emperor of Germany, 

George Denueburg 

Baron Frederick S. Paten Gibbs 

Theofan William E. Shay 

The Infant Czarevitch, 

Matter Law. John tan 
Alexander Kerensky. . ,W. Francit Chapin 

General Korniloff Peter Barbierro 

Anna MUe. Ketty Oalanta 

Princess Irena .Paulina Curley 

Sonia Mile. MarceUa 

The Czarina . Nance O'Neil 

Story — An historical drama from the 
memoirs of Iliodor, the monk, formerly 
attached to the court of the Russian 
Empire. Scenario by Austin Strong 
and George Edwardes Hall. Produced 
under the personal direction of Herbert 
Brenon. 

"The Fail of the Romanoffs" is some- 
thing more than an amusement attrac- 
tion. It is a pictured story of historical 
value that will accumulate importance 
with the years. It is a visualized record 
of one of the greatest events in modern 1 
history. 

Herbert Brenon, in producing this pic- 
ture, has achieved a doable triumph. He 
has given to the screen an intense drama, 
clothed in perfect atmosphere, and an edu- 
cational subject that indelibly impresses 
its lesson. 

This picture is another proof that 
"Truth is stranger than fiction." It is 
the strangest story ever flashed on the 
screen. Were it not all true, it would be 
condemned as wild and improbable, that it 
is true — that these events did occur in 
real life — adds to the intensity of the 
story and classes the picture as a classic. 
As Alexander Dumas teaches French his- 
tory in his romances, so Herbert Brenon 
has given us the history of the fall of a 
mighty dynasty in the form of a screen 
drama. 

There is only .one complaint that can be 
made. The film has, apparently, been cut 
down too much. Throughout the entire 
eight reels, the events follow each other ill 
inch rapid succession that no time is given 
in leading up to any situation. If the 
footage is increased and those scenes put 
in that must have been taken ont to enhance 
the dramatic values, the production will be 
of even greater strength as an attraction. 
The. story tells of the marvelous power 
exercised by the illiterate and dissolute 
imposter Rasputin over the Russian royal 
family, and pictures his life from the time 
of peasant days in Siberia to his assassina- 
tion at the hands of masked noblemen of 
the Russian Court. The events, as they 
occur, are intensely interesting, at times 
almost wierd. 

Box Office Value. 
Full ran. 

"THE WARRIOR 1 ' 

General Enterprises. 

Btate Right*. Revised version. Seven 
Reels. 

The Warrior "MacUte." 

Remarks. 

Aa revised by the General Enterprises 
company, after its acquisition, "The War- 
rior" is even more interesting than in its 
original form. The action has been 
quickened by cutting the footage to seven 
reels, without the loss of any of the thrills 
or the comedy with which the production 
fairly teems. 

This rare combination of scenic beauty, 
marvelous feats of strength, thrilling 
stunts and irresistible comedy, is intensi- 
fied in its market form, and should prove 
to be an exceptional money-maker. It is 
an attraction that can safely be offered 
to any class of audience, anywhere, with 
the full assurance that it will give the 
utmost satisfaction. 

Box Office Value. 
Full run. 



FEATURE FILM REPORTS 



"A MAN'S MAN" 

Paralta. Seven Seels. 

Released Sept. 23 by Triangle. 

Cast. 

John Stuart Webster.. J. Warren Kerrigan 

Dolores Ruey Louis Wilson 

Billy Geary Kenneth Harlan 

John Cafferty Ed. Coxen 

Mother Jenks Ida Lewis 

Ricardo Ruey Harry Von Meter 

Captain Benevido Eugene PaUette 

President Sarros. ..... .Joseph J. Dotcling 

Story — Melodramatic. Scenario by Thom- 
as G. Geraghty, from story by Peter B. 
Kyne. Directed by Oscar Apfel. Fea- 
turing J. Warren Kerrigan. 
Action — Interesting. 
Continuity— Consistent. . 
Suspense — Well sustained. 
Photography — Excellent. 
Remarks. 
.Peter B. Kyne'g story has an appeal 
that no one with red blood in his veins 
can resist, for, while it may be classed 
as the wildest fiction, it still has many 
human touches. 

In his scenario, Geraghty has closely 
followed the story, with the result that 
its salient . points are visualized. In the 
direction of the picture Oscar Apfel has 
fairly outdone himself. Nothing which 
could make for the proper atmosphere of 
a scene seems to have been neglected by 
Mm. 

It is an admirable vehicle for J. Warren 
Kerrigan and gives him an auspicious 
start as an independent star. 

His leading lady, Lois Wilson, is a real 
find. She is a talented actress, is win- 
some, chic and pretty and possesses a re- 
markable personality. 

Box Office Value. 
Full run. 



. "MOUNTAIN DEW" 

Triangle. Five Seels. 
■Released Sept. id by Triangle. 

Cast. 

Roxie Bradley Margery Wilson 

J. Hamilton Vance. ........ Charles Guan 

Roosevelt Washington. Thomas Washington 

Squire Bradley .Al W. FUson 

Milt. Sears — Jack Richardson 

Lafe Grider. . ». Aaron Edwards 

Lily Bud Raines Mary Borland 

Story— Melodramatic. Written by Jo- 
sephson and Monte M. Katterjohn. Di- 
rected by Thomas Heffron. Featuring 
Margery Wilson. 
Action — Has interest. 
Continuity— Consistent. 
Suspense — Well sustained. 
Photography — Good. 

Remarks. 
This is a story of a magazine writer 
who goes to a moonshine district of Ken- 
tucky in search of local color for a- story. 
To further his aims, he becomes teacher 
of a country school, is suspected by the 
moonshiners of being a U. S. Revenue of- 
ficer and marked for death. He falls in 
love with a moonshiner's daughter, mar- 
ries her and convinces everyone that he 
is merely a writer. 

The scenario is well constructed and 
the characters well drawn, but there seems 
to be an unnecessarily frequent use of the 
word "Hell." The direction is especially 
good, and the acting throughout is capi- 
tal, Margery Wilson, Charles Dunn, AL 
W. Filson and Jack Richardson all doing 
good work. Thomas Washington acts the 
colored man to the new teacher with com- 
mendable naturalness. 

Box Office Value. 
Full run. 




RRIOR 



Featuring the exploits of 

MACUTE 

The Giant Hero of "CABIRIA" 



Madsle makes a club of one of Hi foes to, 
floor half-a-dozen otters. 

Breaks down a big tree with Austrian siiptf 
at its top. 

With one hand upsets horse and rider. 

Makes a 50-foot leap on horseback from a 
bridge when pursued by Austrian*. 

Carries massive pieces of artillery op the Alps 
on his head 

Captures three Austrian* single-handed and 
carries them into camp on his back. 

Dislodges huge boulders and wipes put a 
whole company of the enemy. 

"Nothing like it since Hie exploits of SamsejV. 



TATE RIGHU BUYERS* 

Get busy ifyou want the biggest sure-fire 8 
box-office success ever off ered.you. ift 



^ 5even reels filled with thrills, cheers, 
tears and explosions of laughter. 

STATE RIGHTS BUYERS:- Wri+e. wire or phone for open territory. 

EXHIBITORS:- Send for illustrated booklet descrifcinf; booking Plan 



GENERAL 

1600 BROADWAY. New York 

C*n«^i*«ri R t $K+s Sold +c 6lo£»c Pi 



Telephone BRYANT 5692 

ms. Li rr=i + ed. Toronto Ont 



^TtASPUTIN THE BLACK 
MONK" : 

Wm. A. Brady Special. Seven Seels. 
Released as a Special Feature by the- 
I World Film Corp. 

Cast. 

Rasputin Montagu Love- 

Paula Raff. .. June Elvidge 

Raff Arthur Ashley 

Alex. Kerensky - .Henry Hull 

Prince Yusupof Irving' Oummings 

Mine. Virubova • .Julia Dean 

Cxar Hubert WHke- 

Czarina .....;.:*..... Florence Beresford 

Ilda .... LilHan Cook 

Princess Susupof Pinna Nesbit 

Alexis Samaff .....Jos. Qranby 

Story— Based on the Russian revolution. 
Scenario by E. Rinhard fXlmyir. Di- 
rected by ASChur Ashley. 
ArrioB Intrnrr throughout. 
Continnity-^Somewhat broken. 
Suspense — Sustained. 
Detail— Good. 

Atmosphere — Within keeping. 
Photography — Good. 

Gregory, .an ignorant derelict, living in 
a small Russian village, disguises himself 
as a monk ' and calls himself Rasputin. 
With the aid of a. government spy, he is 
able to become the advisor of the Czar and, 
in that way, is able to impress the Russian 
ruler with- the belief that the health of ' his 
heir depends, cm his dose proximity to 
the youngster. Through this association 
be is able to use his influence over the 
Czar, and attempts to conduct the affairs 
of the government to his own liking, which 
carries the story . to the recent overthrow 
of the Czar and the establishment of the 
new republic by Kerensky and his fol- 
lowers. 

This picture is released at an opportune 
time, and undoubtedly will prove to be a 
winner as a box-office attraction. The 
work of Love, Cnmmings, Miss Elvidge and 
Miss Dean is exceptionally good. 
Box Office Value. 
Full run in all bouses. Smaller ones, 
two days. 

"LOST IN TRANSIT" 

Pallas. Five Reels. 

Released September 3 by Paramount. 

Cast. 

Niccolo Darini ' George Beban 

NUa Lopi ..Helen Eddy 

Lapi Pietro Sosso 

Mrs. Flint.... Vera Lewis 

Mr. Kendall Henry Barrows 

Paolo Marso Frank Bennett 

Baby Bob White 

Story — Dramatic. Written by Gardner 
Hunting from a story by Kathlyn Wil- 
liams. Directed by Donald Crisp. Fea- . 
turing George Beban. 
Action — Interesting. 
Continuity — Consistent. 
Suspense— -Sustained. 
Detail— Excellent. 
Atmosphere— Convincing. 
Photography — Good. 

Remarks. 
In the story of "Lost in Transit," a 
wealthy man, named Kendall, grief-stricken 
at the death of his wife in giving birth 
to a son, places the child in a foundling 
asylum. Two and a half years afterward, 
the father orders his child returned to 
him. The boy leaves the asylum, but is 
stolen by a mendicant. At the same 
time, a poor woman leaves a boy of the 
same age in the wagon of Nicelo Darini. 
an Italian junkman. He becomes attached 
to -the youngster, but it is taken from him 
and given to Kendall as his child. The 
mendicant is run over by an automobile 
shortly afterward and discloses that the 
boy with him is Kendall's. The court 
then restores the other boy to Niccolo. 

The film is a human story, full of heart 
throbs, well. told, well acted and capitally 
directed. Of course, George Beban does 
good work, but the star of the picture is 
little Bob White, who plays the boy. This 
youngster is probably three years old, a ad 
the work he does ranks among, the most re- 
markable of any kiddie work done before 
the camera. 

Box Office Value. 
Full run. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



Bal's Dreadnaught 




.ni.ii 

. Z1.S4 



AT SUBMARINE PRICES 

M bull I1I.H U Inch 

8 tech ll.NlM inch 

14 Inch. 3.1) « inch 

42 inch J22.SS 

WILLIAM BAL COMPANY 

145 W. 45th St., N.Y. 4 W. 22d St., N.Y. 

NEW CIRCULAR NOW READY 

Mail Order* Filled Same Day Received 

$S Deposit Required 



TIGHTS 

Silk Opera Hose and Stockings 

ABB ODS BPBOIAXTIBB 

■ sllJtlsTY tB* BEST and 

y U ALII I PRICES the LOWXST 

Sold ud surer Brocade*, BUks, Batlaa, 

Theatrical Jswslry. Spam-Is*, Etc. 

Oold and Sirrar Trlrnrnlnrs. 

Win, Beards and all floods Th aa trl amli 

Catalogue* and Samples span reque st . 

When ssilng toe Catalogue, please mentlaa 
what goods are wanted. 

SIEGMAN & WEIL 

B. W. Oar. STtk St. and Madison Ass. 
IBS THEATRICAL SOPPM EMPOBIUM 



CLOTH BANNERS 

(TYPE WORK OILY) One Tea 

Color. Colon. 

100 18x42 cloth Banners, flat or ngrltnt.S15.00 $17.50 

additional taandrtdi am ram. per 100.. 12.30 15.00 

100 21x28 cloth Bunas, Hat or uprtxut. 10.00 12.50 

t'HfV*"* 1 hundreds same form, per 100.. 6.00 10.00 

(All eletb bunas an eat frost (Sod trade at 

fllkd ntneloth suite.) 

CARD HERALDS 

One 



5.000 3%i9% Cud Heralds $9.50 *U-50 

10.000 3V3i9Vi Card Heralds 17.50 20.00 

(Prices on other sizes on tppllesUon. Please tuts 

quantity and sizes.) 

■and 10c for route book, samples, proof sheets, strtk eats, 

price Ust. etc Owing to market condltloos all prt ts sob- 

Jeet to chime without notice. 

GAZETTE SHOW PRINTING CO. 

Terms: Cssb with order. Kattoon, 111.. V. S. A. 




Otben Sneered. War Can't Tsat 

STAGE TRAINING 

Dream. C ss n s>, Vsasertlle, State Oaas- 
let sad Pbsta Mas TansM. Tteaesral 
and Practical Ceases. Celebrtuei ate 
stodled anoar Mr. Airless; Annette Cel- 
lermans, Nora Bafts, Basal Dawn, 
Joseph Santler, Barry Wleer, Mil-. 
Dssle, Maty Fuller, DoUr rasters. Tartar 
Solars, VtrUn Present!. Eleanor Painter 
and others. Write for ataktas asm- 
tioclai nodi desired. 

Alvieoe Tneatre Scat*, t* Actio* 

57th St, at Broadway 

Entrance 225 W. STta St.. New Tort. 



SECOND-HAND 

GOWN S 



ANDREWS. 506 S. Stmts St., CHICAGO 




ALBOLENE 



" Richard'a himtelf attain!" 
The curtain fall is the cue (or 
AIJJOI.ENE, the perfect make-up re- 
mover that really makes Richard him- 
self again. Richard In a few minutes 
with a smooth, clean, clear akin. 
emerges from the stage door. 

Albolene is put up Id 1 and 2 ounce tubes 
to flt the make-up box; alto In V> tnd 1 
lb. cans. Hay be had of most cfrutxlsts and 
dealers In make-up. Free samples on request. 
Write for it 

McKMiON (D, ROBBING 

Incorporated 

tl Fulton Street ... Naw York 



LlTUMg* 




TheatricaliProfession 

ATTENTION 



if yon are bothered with Sour Sick Stomach, 
Heartburn, Distress After Eating. Belching" of 

Wind, Bis Head la the morning or otber 
stomscb troubles, I want yon to hare a 
sample of Priest's Indigestion Powder. Sent 
tree to any address. Dealers carry the 25c. 
and $1.00 slses. but I wsnt you to try It first 
at my expense. 

H. K. PRIEST, Ph. O.. Bancor ate. 



TIGHTS 

Cotton Tlfhts, rtry food qoallty, 
a pair $1.00. Worsted Tadns. 

sxdlmn weuDM. 12.25 a pair. 
Wonted Tltsts. hear/ welxht. 
$8.00 a pair. Istported sOk 
platted Uthtt. ta brltht Bsd and 
aoidss Brows, only $2.50 a 
pair, 8Utatinu Turkta ta all 
colon. $2.50 a pair. Bssry T5 
per cent. Ixtportsd sua tlfhts. 
In brlsht Bsd only, iwdocsd from 
$6.00 to $4.00 a pair, roll 
sleen Shirts ta suae* tlthtt. 
■ame pries is mate, Orders 
oiled promptly, cupper Cstalof 




BERNARD MAN CI L 
SlO-Slt W. KAOISON SI. CHICAGO. ILL. 



9 VSCDBYTIwE v \ 



PHOf ESViOW 



*UjnK 



Send for 1917 Catalogue 

C A. TAYLOR TRUNK WORKS 

678 «. Haltttd St, Castas* 
210 W. 44tb St. Isa Vsrtt 



DR. JULIAN SIEGEL, the Theatrical Dentist 



Suits ZS4 PUTNAM BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY Puo 

EXCEPTIONAL RATES TO THE PROFESSION 



Bryant S4H 



SCENERY 

Theatres and productions 
YaadawlUa Acta Equipped 

MURRAY HILL SCENIC STUDIO: 

4SS Sth A**, bat. IS-SStk St*. 
SeL Mad. So.. MPS Tom Creamer, httr. 



Phone Bryant 1351 



GLOBE THEATRICAL 
TRANSFER 

Loiis-sud-Short-Hsuling, Motor- 
Truck Service 



TIGHTS, UNION SUITS 

SYMMETRICALS and 

THEATRICAL SUPPLIES 

Write for Catalogue Ho. i 



L WALTERS. BRETZFIELOCO. 

I INC. 

T 1367 BrUUDWaT, H.T. 

Cor. 37th St. 



Enlarged and Beautified 

MOUQUIN'S 

6th Awe., bet. 27th and 28th St*., N. Y. 

MOST POPULAR FRENCH RESTAURANT 
PARISIAN CAFE. MUSIC fJS P. M. to l A. M. 



WARDROBE PROP 
TRUNKS, $S.OO 



Big Bartraln. 
Second Band 



. Have boati msed. Also s lew 
d Innovation and Fibre Ward- 



robe Trunks, $1$ and $15. A fyw extra larg. 
Property Trunks. Also old Taylor Trunks 
and Bel Trtuxka. 
Parlor Floor, a W. Ust St, NSW York Oty 



THEATRICAL SUPPLIES 

Tights, Wigs, Supporters, 
Hosiery 

Send for Price List 

JOS. H. MASSEY 

lis No. 8th St, Near Arch St, Phils., Pa. 



a a t -O f jf> ACTS FOB SALE CHXAP. «•* 
[VIA I lit Boy. BeU <* Bxeban(e is-l 
A*/».^av^».»^» Apparatus, Profeaalonsl Cats 
log 10c. Parlor Trick catalog fBBK. Writs or 
rtalL Horamaa magic Co., Sta. 1. 470 Sth Aw.. H.Y. 



-*► 31S. 



PLAYS 

IN MANUSCRIPT A TEAS 

New winners — Tried Successes. Special Pictorial 
rrintinp. Send stamp for catalog. STAGET.OBE 
PUk? CO.. 1400 Broadway. N. Y-. Best. C. 



Ust of Professtonsl and am- 
ateur Plays. VsndrriUe 

Sketches. Monoltws. Hlnttni 
Dialogs, Make-up Goods, etc 



PLAYS 

Material. Bedtations. 
CATALOG FBEE. 

FITZGERALD PUB. CORP'N, 
Successor to Dick a- Fltzrerald, 20 Ann St, New York. 

NEARLY NEW 

Evening Gowns and Wraps 

Full Dress, Tuxedoes* Prince Albert Soils 

LUCY GOODMAN. 2315 S. State St.. Chics*- 



WIGS 



TOUPEES, GREASF 
PAINTS, ETC 

A. M. BUCH ft CO. 

11$ N. Ninth 3t, rtHsSSBjili 



C L I F» F» E *R 

BUSINESS INDEX 

Advertisements not exceeding one line In 
length will be published, properly classified, in 
this index, at the rate of $10 {or one year (51 
issues). A copy of The New York Clipper 
will be sent free to each advertiser while the 
advertisement ia running. ^ 
-«l | 

CHEWING GUM-BALL-CANDY COATS**. 

Toledo Chewing Gum Co., Factories Bids, 

Toledo, O. 

LAWYERS. 
F. L. Boyd, Attorney, 17 N. La Salle St. 

Chicago. 
E. J. Ader. 10 South La Salle St, Chicago, 111. 
Joseph A. O'Brien, 1+02 Broadway, New York 

City. 

Edward Doyle. Attorney, 431 Merchant* Bask 
Bide;, Indianapolis, Ind. 

MUSICAL «I ASSES. 
A. Brauneias, 1012 Napier Ave., Richmond 
HUI. N. Y. 

MUSIC COMPOSED. ARRANGED. 
Chaa. L. Lewis. 429 Richmond St., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

SCENERY AND SCENIC PAINTERS. 
Howard Tuttle, 141 Burleigh St.. Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

SCHELL'S SCENIC STUDIO 

581-583-585 South High St, Columbus. O. 
SCENERY FOR HIRE AND SALE. 

Amelia Grain, 819 Spring Garden St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa, 

SONG BOOKS. 

Wm. W. Delaney, 117 Park Row, New York. 

STACE LIGHT EFFECTS, LAMPS 

(Bought. Sold) 

Newton Art Works, 305 W. ISth St. New York. 

TENTS. 
J. C Goss Co., 10 Atwater St, Detroit, Mick. 

THEATRICAL GOODS. 
Boston Regalia Co, 387 Washington St, Bos- 
ton, Mass. ^J9 

THEATRICAL HARDWARE. 
Graves Hardware Co, 47 Eliot St, Boston. 
Mass. 

THEATRICAL PROPERTIES. 

E. Walker. 309 W. 39th St, New York. 

TRANSFERS. 
Walton, 45S W. 33d St, N. Y. 1179 Greeley. 

VENTRILOQUIST FIGURES. 
Ben Uobsoo. 910 Prospect Ave, N. Y. C 



Don't Miss It 

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PLAYS 



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Stamp for catalog. 



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Known All Over the World Where Entertainment Reigns 



JACK 




AND 



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Have an act 
Have a good act 

Have an act that has scored on the Keith 
and Orpheum Circuits for years 

Showing a New Line of Goods at B. S. 

Moss' Hamilton Theatre the 

Last Half of This Week 

OPEN FOR ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR THE COMING SEASON 

Who Wants This Act at Reasonable Terms ? 

SEE IT AT THE HAMILTON THEATRE NOW 



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£^e NEW YORK 




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THE OLDEST THEATRICAL PUBLICATION IN AMERICA 



H in m> mi mi in hi m- m m m m id m m »i nn /» n 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER September 26. 1917 



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lf==l l=— ^M 1" ~gn rg 1 Ml I l==?1 



ERNEST R. BALL 



AND 



J. KEIRN BRENNAN 

Take great pleasure in announcing 
J^> our newest composition entitled 



® U 



With All My Heart and Soul" 

which we consider one of the great- 
est songs we have ever written 

This being the first song we have placed with our new publishers we trust our 
many friends will show their interest by immediately sending for copies to 

LEO FEIST, i 

135 West 44th Street - - New York 




I 



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Hll=i » "i i ■ iP Ma ~' ■■' ■ t=^T 



Copyright. 1917, by the Clipper Corporation. 



Founded by 
FRANK QUEEN, 18S3. 



NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 26, 1917 



VOLUME LXV— No. J4 
Price. Ten Cent! 



KEITH'S WANT 
PATRIOTIC 
MUSICIANS 

ASK THEM TO DO THEIR BIT 



A committee representing E. F. Albee 
and the Keith interests will meet the di- 
rectors of the musicians' anion on Thurs- 
day morning, to file a protest against the 
musicians in their theatres sticking to the 
letter of their contracts since speakers 
have been appearing in vaudeville houses 
pleading for recruits. 

Since, the entrance of the United States 
into the world war, Keith theatres have 
been thrown wide open to everyone who 
bad any sort of propaganda that would 
benefit the State Department. The time 
consumed by these patriotic speakers, bow- 
ever, runs the regular show overtime and 
the musicians have been charging overtime. 
The Keith people think the musicians 
should contribute their overtime services, 
the same as everybody else. 

The musicians' contract calls for $35 per 
week for the men and $75 per week for 
the leader, and the Keith forces believe it 
a duty to the country to contribute this 
plight service to the country that is pro- 
tecting them. 

The protest is net on the legitimate over- 
time of the regular show, but against the 
overtime charged for the time taken up by 
public spirited men and women who are 
injected into the bill in the aid of the gov- 
ernment. It is thought an amicable ar- 
rangement will be effected at the meeting, 
but if it is not, nothing can be done about 
it and" the Keith interests will suffer the 
additional cost All the Keith theatres 
have and will continue to have one or more 
patriotic speakers every week. 

Win, draw or lose the entire Keith cir- 
cuit of theatres, including Philadelphia, 
Boston, Cleveland, Washington and a num- 
ber of other cities, will be affected by the 
result. The same co-operative policy has 
been offered in every city in which there 
is a Keith theatre. 

An official of the Keith interests also 
pointed ont that, on every bill in every 
Keith theatre there are always one or more 
acts that do not require music at all. 
During these intermissions, which some- 
times amount to many minutes, the men 
are at liberty to do as they like. At most 
of the Keith houses a very comfortable 
room is provided for them under the stage, 
and when an act is playing that does not 
use their services, the musicians leave the 
pit and busy themselves as they see fit. 

If the protest becomes involved it will 
be dropped, it is said, because, to carry it 
beyond a request, might precipitate a more 
serious trouble. It thus becomes a purely 
patriotic duty of the musicians and noth- 
ing more. Upon this point alone, the Keith 
representatives will enter their protest 

COMSTOCK GETS AUTO DAMAGES 

The action brought by F. Ray Comstock 
against Joseph Englander for damage done 
to Comstock's automobile, has been settled 
out of court and the case dismissed. 
Harry Saks Hechheimer and Milton M. 
Brooke were the attorneys in the action. 



"PROPS" GET RAISE 

At a meeting of the United Theatrical 
Managers Protective Association, held last 
week,- it was decided to increase the sal- 
aries of the carpenters, electricians and 
property men who are members of Local 
No. 1, I. A. T. S. E. of U. S. and Canada 
$5 a week. The men had asked for an 
increase of $10, but this the managers 
refused to grant. 

The new scale, paying carpenters $35 
a week and propertymen and electricians 
$30 a week, went into effect on Monday. 
In a great many of the local houses this 
rate of salary has been paid the men for 
some months, the managers granting, the 
raise without the application of the union. 

TO EXAMINE FRANKIE FAY 

House, Grossman and Vorhaus, attor- 
neys for Frances White, have obtained 
an order from Justice Tiemey, in the 
Supreme Court, to examine her husband, 
Frankie Fay, in supplementary proceed- 
ings. The attorneys are doing this to 
ascertain how they can collect a judg- 
ment procured by his wife against Fay 
for $2,500 for moneys which she is said 
to have advanced to him. The examina- 
tion takes place on Saturday morning. 

VALERIE BERGERE MARRIES 

Valerie Bergere was married last night 
to Herbert Warren, the scenario writer. 
The wedding occurred at the home of 
Winnifred De Witt in this city, Magis- 
trate Joseph E. Corrigan officiating. Fol- 
lowing the ceremony a dinner party was 
held at Miss De Witt's home and later a 
party at the Morosco Theatre, where "Lom- 
bardi, Ltd." is the attraction. Mr. and 
Mrs. Warren left last night for the Pacific 
Coast 



LOEW OPENS BOSTON HOUSE 

Boston, Sept. 24. — Marcus Loew's new 
Boston bouse, the Columbia Theatre, at 
Washington and Castle Streets, had its 
premiere performance this evening. Six 
acts of vaudeville and a feature picture 
were presented. Roscoe "Fatty" Arbuckle, 
the motion picture comedy star, made a 
personal appearance at the opening per- 
formance. The house will change its 
vaudeville on Monday and Thursday and 
play three shows daily. 



ACTOR TAKEN OFF BILL 

Utica, N. Y., Sept 24.— Morris Golden 
who bills himself as "The Yiddle with the 
Fiddle," was removed from the Avon The- 
atre here on Friday night and taken out 
of the current bill. According to Wm. 
Fait Jr.. manager of the theatre and mem- 
bers of four acts appearing on the bill with 
him, Golden became drunk between shows 
and it became necessary to have him re- 
moved from the theatre. 



VAN PAYS $25 FOR GALLERY SEAT 

Boston, September 24. — Billie Van, of 
the "Have a Heart" Company, wrote a 
pass for himself to attend a charity bene- 
fit at the Colonial Theatre last week, and 
when the proceeds were examined, it was 
found that he had paid $25 for a bench 
in the gallery. 



TRLXIE FRIGANZA REPLACED 

Tobonto, Can., Sept 22. — May Bronte 
replaced Trixie Friganza in Oliver Mor- 
osco's "Canary Cottage," at His Majesty 
Theatre tonight. She scored an instan- 
taneous hit on her initial appearance. 



JEAN HAVEZ 

SUED FOR 

DIVORCE 

SEPARATION SUIT IS DROPPED 



Co-incident with the discontinuance of 
bis suit for separation from bis wife, 
Cecil Cunningham, Jean Havez was 
served, Saturday, with papers in an ac- 
tion for absolute divorce brought by her 
in Kings County. 

In the complaint filed by Mrs. Havez' 
attorneys, Henry J. and Frederick E. 
Goldsmith, she alleges that on Sept 11th 
last at the hotel Beimore, Havez com- 
mitted the statutory offense with an un- 
known woman. 

Mrs. Haves states that they were mar- 
ried on Jan. 7, 1915, and that for the 
past few months, she and her husband 
have been living apart No request is 
made for counsel fees or alimony in the 
petition for the divorce- 
Much interest was manifested along 
Broadway in the announcement that the 
separation suit brought by Havez against 
his wife had been discontinued. Efforts 
were made to ascertain from counsel on 
both sides the reason for the action. Their 
reply was that it was done by mutual con- 
sent and neither of the lawyers were in- 
clined to discuss the matter further. 

In his complaint in the separation ac- 
tion, Havez alleged that bis wife bad re- 
pulsed him and also been cold toward him 
and for that reason he charged desertion 
and abandonment stating that she had 
left him July 1 last He alleged that he 
was responsible for her professional suc- 
cess and had brought her to the fore in 
the theatrical profession, causing her 
salary to be increased from $100 to $500 
a week. To assist her to accomplish this, 
Havez declared he made a great many 
personal and business sacrifices. 

In her answer to this action Mrs. Havez 
declared that he had only married her aa 
a convenience, as she had been forced to 
pay the rent for their home as well as its 
running expenses and that she was prac- 
tically a "meal-ticket" for him. 

She denied all of his allegations as to his 
"making" her in show business and ended 
by saying that she Should have left him 
long ago, but could not get rid of him, as 
it was bard for Mm to lose bis meal ticket. 
Continuing, she said: 

"He wanted to live hi ease and com- 
fort at my expense and I would not stand 
for it and told him so. But, he would 
not take the hint until one day, when he 
took my automobile and sold it and de- 
posited the money to his account It was 
high time then for me to declare myself 
and I forcibly did so, as I was tired of 
paying the rent and other necessities of 
the household." 

Later, a number of these accusations 
were withdrawn in the Supreme Court 



EDDIE LIVINGSTON LOSES CAR 

Eddie Livingston lost his Mercer car 
last Thursday night, the machine having 
been stolen while standing in front of the 
Fifth Avenue Theatre, where he was look- 
ing ovwr acts. 



ADGI'S LIONS CAUSE 2 SUITS 
In the Supreme Court next month the 
actions of Edward. Keabony and Daniel 
Glenn, two New York policemen, who are 
suing to recover $15,000 and $25,000, re- 
spectively, from the Eighty-sixth Street 
Amusement Co., will come to trial. These 
policemen were injured in trying to cap- 
ture one of Mme. Adgi's lions when they 
escaped from the Eighty-sixth Street 
Theatre and took refuge in an apartment 
house across the street two years ago. 
Glenn was shot in the spine through an 
explosion of Keabony's revolver when the 
lion attacked the latter. Keabony was 
badly injured about the face and body 
through the lion having attacked him. 
The benst was killed by another police- 
man. E. J. McCrossin appears as attorney 
for the policemen. 



CLOSE THEATRES ON SUNDAY 

Memphis, Tenn., Sept 23. — Judge Fen- 
tress has dissolved the injunction secured 
by the theatres and motion picture houses 
against the city, and all places of amuse- 
ment will be compelled to close on the 
Sabbath. Several weeks ago, the city au- 
thorities notified the managers of the dif- 
ferent theatres that they would not be al- 
lowed to open on Sunday, but the managers 
secured an injunction against the city, and 
it was declared lawful for the theatres to 
remain open if they donated their profits 
to charity, this was done for several weeks, 
but under a recent law upon which Judge 
Fentress based his decision, the injunction 
was dissolved, and no theatres will be al- 
lowed to open on Sunday. 



BELASCO GIVES "TIGER ROSE" 

Washington, D. C, Sept. 24. — David 
Belasco presented "Tiger Rose," a play of 
the great Northwest by Willard Mack, in 
the Belasco Theatre here tonight being 
here in person and directing the perform- 
ance. In the cast are Lenore Ulrica, Wil- 
liam Courtleigh, Willard Mack, Thomas 
Findlay, Pedro de Cordoba, Edwin Holt 
Calvin Thomas, Fuller Mellish, Arthur J. 
Wood, Edward Mack and Jean Ferrell. 
Following its week here "Tiger Rose" will 
open in the Lyceum Theatre, New York, 
on Wednesday evening October 3. 



TEXAS MANAGERS CANCEL SHOWS 

Galveston, Tex., September 23. — Owing 
to the fact that many of the house man- 
agers in this State have cancelled road 
show dates and put on vaudeville, many 
attractions are having a hard time down 
here. The Al. G. Field Minstrel Co. has 
been able to play its Texas route, however, 
as booked, the managers cancelling their, 
vaudeville in order to play the minstrel 
dates, as agreed. 



FOURTH "13TH CHAIR" OPENS 

Scbanton, Pa., Sept. 24. — The fourth of 
William Harris' road companies playing 
the "13th Chair" opened here to-night 
This company will tour the East and 
South. Blanche Hall is playing the part 
of the medium and Jos. Garry the role 
of the Police Inspector. 



"BEAUTY SHOP" GETS $9,000 

Herman Moss's production of "The 
Beauty Shop" played to over $9,000 at the 
Montauk Theatre, Brooklyn, last week, the 
last half of the week proving excep- 
tionally strong. 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



September 26, 1917 



RAT BOOKS GONE 

SAYS HARRY 

MOUNTFORD 

STOLEN FROM OFFICE, HE STATES 

When Referee Lewis Schuldenfrei be- 
gins H»flT<n|pi in the application of Goldie 
Pemberton, to have the books and vouch- 
ers of the White Rats Actors' Union ex- 
amined, at the direction of Supreme Court 
Justice Mitchell, next week, he will find 
that a number of books, vouchers and 
records of bank balances and canceled 
checks of the organization are missing, 
according to Barry Mountford, who says 
they were stolen from hia offices in East 
Fifty-fourth Street during the Summer, 
while he was away on his vacation. 

Much speculation has been manifested 
by parties concerned regarding the man- 
ner in which these documents disappeared, 
some persons stating that the disappear- 
ance may have been premeditated for the 
purpose of disposing of documents which 
might be damaging to White Bat organi- 
zation officials. 

T. Alvin Sapinsky, attorney for Miss 
Pemberton, stated that as soon as the 
order for' the hearing is signed by Justice 
Goff, this week, he will request Referee 
Schuldenfrei to issue subpoenas for 
Mountford and Fitzpatrick to appear with 
the books, ledgers and other documents 
and records of the organization. 

He declared that should any of the 
papers that he considers necessary for 
him to conduct his inquiry be missing, 
he will ask a Justice of the Supreme Court 
to look into the matter. 

It is expected that the hearings will 
continue for about three months, as all 
of the directors of the White Rats will 
be called to testify, besides a score of other 
witnesses. 

The order for the examination, submit- 
ted by Sapinsky, according to J. J. Myers, 
attorney for the White Rats, covers only 
a period of twelve months piror to the 
time of Miss Pemberton's application, and 
for that reason he states that nothing 
can be gained regarding the affairs of 
the White Rat Realty Corp., which would 
in any way reflect upon the present of- 
ficers and directors of the Rats. 

Harry Mountford, when seen, said that 
as long as Attorney Sapinsky was will- 
ing to have the membership books and 
levy list sealed by the Court, he would 
welcome the inquiry and will assist in 
every way in the proceedings. 

The first of the hearings will be held 
at Referee Schuldenfrei's office on either 
Monday or Tuesday. The sessions, after 
the start, will probably be held daily. 

SPELLMAN IS IN TOLEDO 

Toledo, O., Sept. 24. — Frank Spellman, 
president of the United States Circus 
Corp., and promoter of the motorized cir- 
cus, is in this city. He says that his cor- 
poration has purchased 174 acres of land 
here where it will erect the Winter quar- 
ters of his circus. He states that all of 
the bnQdings will be fireproof and built 
ont of steel and concrete. The property is 
three miles from the city and Spellman 
states that the land cost over $100,000. 
He says that he has established his offices 
in the Gardner building where he will re- 
main all Winter. 

He farther states that as soon as war and 
labor conditions justify, he will take bis 
motorized circus on the road. 



ZIEGFELD SETTLES CASE 

Through the filing of an order of discon- 
tinuance in the County Clerk's office last 
week, in an action brought by W. C. 
Fields, the juggler, against the Ziegfeld 
Follies, Inc., it was learned that Fields 
Was seriously burned about the face and 
had his eyesight impaired through the 
explosion of a gasoline tank on a motor 
cycle at a rehearsal of the "Follies" last 
year. 

Fields was to have done a stunt with 
a trick motorcycle in the show that sea- 
son, and while rehearsing the scene went 
through the business of lighting a match 
and throwing it into the gas tank. The 
tank was supposed to have been cleansed 
for the rehearsal, but a quantity of oil had 
been left in it, bo that when Fields threw 
the match it lighted the gasoline, which 
caused an explosion that burned him about 
the face and eyes. 

A summons in an action for $5,000 dam- 
ages was served on the Follies manage- 
ment by David Steinhardt, attorney for 
Fields, shortly afterward. Several days 
biter a meeting of the interested parties 
was held and a settlement of $150 to cover 
the physician's fee was made. 'However, 
nothing was learned of the settlement in 
the action until the filing of the papers 
last week by Robert McCormick, attorney 
for the 'Tollies" Co. 



TWO SHOWS ARE RE-CAST 

Last week principals for special com- 
panies of "So Long Letty" and "Canary 
Cottage," productions which Oliver Mo- 
rosco will place on the road next week, 
were engaged. The cast of the "Letty" 
company includes Gladys Lockwood, Ho- 
bart Cavanagb, Jack Pollard, Arthur 
Hartley, Muriel Grier, Una Fleming, May 
Temple and the Gossman Twins. 

Those in the principal roles of "Canary 
Cottage" will be Frances J. Gillen, Mar- 
garet Leslie, Arthur Behrens, Anita Allen, 
Frankie Mann, Henry Ginkins, A. F. 
Frank, Margaret Hnrtz, Margaret An- 
drews, Cliff Hekengcr, Adrian Rosley, Les- 
lie Palmer and Regan Houston. O'Malley 
Jennings was engaged for Laurette Taylor 
in "Out There": A. J. Cusack by George 
M. Nicolai for "The Volunteer," and Rath 
Oswald as prima donna with Cohan and 
Harris' "Going Up." These engagements 
were made through Leslie Morosco and 
Jack Hnghes. 



TO TRY UNION CASE SOON 

The action of the Musicians' Theatrical 
Protective Union against Mayor J. P. 
Mitchel, to restrain the bands of the Fir* 
and Police Department from playing at 
public functions, will be brought to trial 
in the Supreme Court the early part of 
next month. The union contends that 
through the appearance of these bands at 
functions union men are deprived of em- 
ployment. T. C. Press appears as attor- 
ney for the union and Lamar Hardy, cor- 
poration counsel, appears on behalf of the 
Mayor. 



LEVY HAS LEASE ON LA FAYETTE 

Robert Levy, the present lessee of the 
La Fayette Theatre, at Seventh Avenue 
and One Hundred and Thirty-first Street, 
states that there can be no truth in any 
rumors to the effect that John Cort or 
anyone else is after the house, as he has a 
ten-year lease on the property that still 
has a number of years to run. Levy states 
that he is so satisfied with the proposition 
be has In hand, that he is negotiating to 
lean property adjoining the house on both 
sidea in order to extend his operations. 



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DAYTON UNIONS 

QUIT; OTHERS 

HOLDOUT 

DEADLOCK IN CLEVELAND 



Cleveland, O., Sept. 24. — No headway 
seems to be made toward the settling of 
the differences between the union mu- 
sicians here and the management of 
Keith's Hippodrome regarding an adjust- 
ment of the wage scale over which the 
men have been on strike for more than 
two weeks. Neither the management nor 
the men are willing to compromise except 
upon their own terms. 

The men claim that they need $40 a 
week salary on account of the high cost 
of living, while the management says 
that there is no reason why $5 more a 
week should be paid the men here than 
in New York, where the prevailing scale 
of wages is $36 a week. 

The theatre is operating with .non- 
union musicians and no difficulty is being 
encountered in the giving of the perform- 
ances. The leader of the orchestra is a 
man who was brought here from a New 
York theatre which employs men belong- 
ing to the Amalgamated Musicians' Union. 

in all of the other theatres here the 
men are being paid $40 a week, this fig- 
ure having been agreed upon at a meet- 
ing of the men and managers held laBt 
Friday. The scale of the stage hands 
was also adjusted at that time. 

GET STEADY WORK; LESS COIN 
Dayton, O., Sept. 24. — After making a 
concession of taking one dollar less a 
week in saury, the stage hands of Keith's 
Theatre went back to work last week. 

The management of the theatre was 
willing to grant the men $28 a week, for 
which they asked, but with the under- 
standing that in the Summer-time one of 
their number would have to be laid off. The 
men objected to this proposal, and J. J. 
Murdock, representing the Keith people, 
proposed that they accept $27 a week 
and be kept in employment all the year 
around. The matter was then taken up 
at a meeting of the union and voted 
upon favorably, after which the adjust- 
ment was made at a meeting with Mur- 
dock. 



CINCINNATI MANAGERS WINNING 

Cincinnati, OMo, September 21. — So 
far as appearances go, the Cincinnati the- 
atre managers have about won their fight 
against the musicians' union. Instead of 
the strike threatened at the opening of the 
season, all the houses are going along as 
usual and with the usual orchestras. 

B. F. Keith's, upon which the demands 
for extra men centered, is using its old 
orchestra under veteran Jake Bohrer and, 
so far, there is no sign of a walk-oat. J. J. 
Murdock has been making flying trips be- 
tween this city and Cleveland, and it ap- 
pears that his good offices here have borne 
fruit The other theatres are having no 
trouble, although they absolutely reject 
the musicians' thirty-week clause, and also 
withhold the right for the union to name 
the number of players to be employed. The 
salary demands have been compromised. 

It is said that the musicians' stand has 
lacked confidence. 



MARTY SEMON 

With Stone & PsUard. 



SHUBERTS GET PHILLY THEATRES 
. Philadelphia, Sept 24. — The Shnberts 

will cut a big swath in Philadelphia, the- 
atricals this season with four theatres un- 
der their control, and negotiations on for a 
new one to be built. Last week they ac- 
quired the leases of the Walnut Street 
Theatre, took over the Chestnut Street 
Opera House on a ten years' lease, and 
started negotiations for the leasing of the 
new theatre to be built on the site of Hor- 
ticultural Hall at Broad and Spruce 
Streets. These acquisitions, in addition to 
the Lyric and Adelphi, which they already 
control, will make the Shnberts a the- 
atrical power in this city. 



AARONS JUDGMENT VACATED 

Justice Tierney, in, the Supreme Court, 
last week, ordered a judgment for $1,757 
against Alf. E. Aarons, general manager 
of Klaw and Erlanger, vacated, on the 
ground that he had been adjudged a bank- 
rupt in the United States District Court. 
It was granted in favor of C. Elias, Jan. 
17, 1910, for services rendered. The notice 
of vacation was filed in the County Clerk's 
office by Ditenhoeffer, Fishel and Knox, 
who are the attorneys for Aarons. 



"THE YELLOW SIN" OPENS 

Abboba, Ind., Sept. 25. — "The Yellow 
Sin," a play on the type of "Within the 
Law," will have its premiere here tomor- 
row. Jack Forcum, the author, is play- 
ing the leading role. The other members 
of the company include Hayden O'Conner, 
Jeanne Alix, Bliss Taylor, Billy Curtiss, 
George Hornberger, Bert De Rue and 
Richard Fehr. 



ANN MURDOCK REJOINS FROHMAN 

Ann Murdock, who last season suddenly 
left the Charles Frohman, Inc., manage- 
ment and went into motion pictures, has 
returned to the Frohman fold and will be 
seen in the ' stellar role of "The Three 
Bears," a comedy by Edward Childs Car- 
penter. 

HALE HAMILTON SUED OVER AUTO 

The Travellers Insurance Co. obtained 
a judgment in the Municipal Court hist 
week against Hale Hamilton and Chas. E. 
Reiss & Co. for $61.41. It is alleged that 
Hamilton failed to pay insurance pre- 
miums on an automobile to the plaintiff. 

NEW THEATRE CO. FORMED 

Cincinnati, Ohio, September 21. — I. W. 
McMahon, L B. Davidson and Jerome 
Jackson have incorporated the Consoli- 
dated Theatre Company for $25,000. Mc- 
Mahon says he has not completed plans for 
the operation of the company. McMahon 
and Jackson Boon -will open their new 
downtown movie theatre at Sixth and Vine 
Streets. 



ARTHUR MACK LAID UP 

Union Hill, N. J., September 24. — Ar- 
thur Mack, for two years a favorite at 
the Hudson Theatre, has been on the sick 
list for -a few days as a result of an at- 
tack of rheumatism in the ankles. This 
complaint kept Mack from the stage for 
several weeks last season. 



DRAFT GETS JACK STERN 

Boston, September 22.— Jack Stern, 
minstrel singer and pianist with Eddie 
Leonard's Company, which closed at 
Keith's here tonight, has received word to 
report for the draft army. Stern wired 
bis exemption board, No. 4, Bronx, N. V., 
for a two weeks' furlough in which to fin- 
ish with Leonard. 



BERNHARDT FOOLS ADMIRERS 

Hartford, September 24. — After her 
matinee at Parsons' last week, a great 
throng of admirers assembled at the stage 
door to see the divine Sarah, but she 
cutely evaded them and was carried out 
another entrance in her sedan chair. 



WINCHELL SMITH IS SPENDTHRIFT 

Hartford, Conn., September 24. — Before 
leaving for his annual Southern sojourn, 
Wincbell Smith ran home here last week 
to get a few duds and dropped in at Stack- 
pole's, where he bought a Panama bat for 
$150. Out of town papers please copy. 



NICOLAI CHANGES PLAY NAME 

George H. Nicolai has changed the title 
of his new war play by Hal Reid from 
"Capt. Russell, U. S. A." to "The Volun- 
teer." The play is based on the life of 
Gen. Pershing and will open on the In- 
ternational Circuit early next month. 



CARNIVAL PEOPLE MARRY 

Decatur, B1, Sept. 22.— Guy W. White, 
of Chattanooga, Tenn., and Lillian Hais- 
lnp, of Columbia, Ind., members of a car- 
nival company, were married here this 
week. It was necessary to appoint a guar- 
dian for White prior to the ceremony, as 
he was under the legal marrying age, 



September 26, 1917 



THE NEW YORK CLIPPER 



EXPECT JAM AT 
WASHINGTON 
ON FILM TAX 

KLAW STATEMENT THE CAUSE 



Washington, D. O., Sept 24. — What 
will likely develop into a lively wrangle 
between the House and Senate Finance 
Committees is expected to take place this 
week when the House members will insist 
that the motion picture theatres which 
charge 25 cents or less admission and are 
free from taxation, according to the War 
Revenue measure, be taxed in the same 
proportion as other theatres which charge 
admission above that amount. The tax 
on these houses is ten per cent, of the 
price of admission and is collected from the 
patron. 

It has been learned that the House mem- 
bers are determined to force this issue, 
despite heavy pressure which has been 
brought to bear from the Senate to let 
the measure go through without any fur- 
ther changes. 

Many of the Congressmen have been 
discussing the recent statement of Marc 
Klaw which said that one Senator "is 
heavily interested in the motion picture 
end of the theatre business and that he 
wants to avoid taxation against these 
booses for this reason." 

The Senate members have waxed indig- 
nant over this statement, but the Repre- 
sentatives in the Lower House seem to be 
swayed by it and it is possible that they 
will not return the measure to the Senate 
for final action until they have amended 
that section of the bill calling for the 10 
per cent. tax. 

Sbould this tax be added to the bill an- 
other $2,000,000 will be added annually 
to the coffers of the government. 



MRS. DAVID WARFIELD SUED 
A judgment in favor of George Durie, 
for $1,570.76 against Rebecca Warfield, 
wife of David Warfield, was ordered va- 
cated last week when affidavits were sub- 
mitted to a Supreme Court Justice show- 
ing that the judgment was procured by de- 
fault and that, at the present time, Mrs. 
Warfield is alleged to be incompetent and 
confined in a sanitarium. The latter affi- 
davit was made by Warfield and a 
p